home » news » news archive » 2007 » fish news

Convict and Jack Dempsey placed in new genera

Convict and Jack Dempsey placed in new genera

The Convict has been split into four and placed in a new genus. (Image: Creative Commons, Dean Pemberton)

New cichlid genera have been erected for both the Convict cichlid and the Jack Dempsey.

This was done as part of a recent revision of the central American cichlid genus Archocentrus, with two new, closely-related genera (Amatitlania and Rocio) and six new species (three of Amatitlania, two of Rocio and one of Cryptoheros) described as a result.

The study by Juan Schmitter-Soto is published in a recent issue of the journal Zootaxa, and examines all the nominal species ever assigned to Archocentrus, and species considered closely related to the type species, Archocentrus centrarchus, in phylogenetic analyses.

Archocentrus

The following species of Archocentrus (with Heterotilapia considered its junior synonym) are recognized as valid:

Archocentrus centrarchus from the Pacific Central America from Honduras to Nicaragua and the Atlantic slope from Costa Rica to Nicaragua.

Archocentrus multispinosus from the Pacific Central America from Costa Rica to Nicaragua and the Atlantic slope from Costa Rica to Honduras.

Archocentrus spinosissimus from Guatemala.

Cryptoheros

Nine species of Cryptoheros are recognized as valid:

Cryptoheros panamensis from the Atlantic drainages of Panama. This species is the sole member of the subgenus Panamius (described in this study as new).

Cryptoheros spilurus from the Lake Izabal drainage in northern Panama. This species is a member of the subgenus Cryptoheros.

Cryptoheros chetumalensis, new species, from Belize north to the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico.

Red pointBlog: The importance of using detailed names for cichlidsMore»



This species is a member of the subgenus Cryptoheros, and can be distinguished from other members of the subgenus in having the secondary pored scales of the caudal fin not arranged in rows, a convex rostral end of the maxilla, the first neural spine slanting rostrard, three dorsal elements between the first two epineural spines, and the presence of a spinous anterodorsal process on the first dorsal-fin pterygiophore.

The species is named after the city of Chetumal, which is near its type locality.

Cryptoheros cutteri from Atlantic Honduras north to Guatemala. This species is a member of the subgenus Cryptoheros.

Cryptoheros septemfasciatus from Costa Rica. This species is a member of the subgenus Bussingius (described in this study as new).

Cryptoheros altoflavus from Panama. This species is a member of the subgenus Bussingius.

Cryptoheros myrnae from Atlantic Central America from Panama to Costa Rica. This species is a member of the subgenus Bussingius.

Cryptoheros nanoluteus from Panama. This species is a member of the subgenus Bussingius.

Cryptoheros sajica from Atlantic Costa Rica. This species is a member of the subgenus Bussingius.

Amatitlania

The genus Amatitlania is named after the type locality of the type species (Amatitlán), and differs from other heroine genera in having the first bar on the side of the body Y-shaped, well-marked and with the caudal arm discontinuous; the bars from the sides of the body extending fully to the edge of the dorsal and anal fins; and medial intensifications on the second and third (sometimes first) bars.

It consists of the following species:

Amatitlania nigrofasciata from the Pacific central America from El Salvador to Guatemala and the Atlantic central America, from Honduras to Guatemala.

The southern populations previously considered A. nigrofasciata (Convict cichlids) are described as three new species below.

Amatitlania coatepeque, new species, from Lake Coatepeque in El Salvador (after which the species is named).

Red pointIs the Honduran Red Point now called Amatitlania siquia? More»



This species is distinguished from other members of the genus in having a Y-shaped fourth bar on the side of the body; triple-spined posterior end of the dentigerous arm of the dentary, and a characteristic double medial loop in the gut.

Amatitlania kanna, new species, from Atlantic Panama.

This species differs from other members of the genus in lacking secondary caudal pores, a dorsally pigmented peritoneum, and a quadrate bone that is wider than long.

The species is named after the greek word meaning a reed, as the Río Cañaveral (=reedbed) was the first locality where it was found.

Amatitlania siquia, new species, from Costa Rica north to Atlantic Honduras.

This species is distinguished from other members of the genus in having a simple gut that is folded ventrororstrally with the anal and medial loops not touching and a rostrally-pigmented peritoneum.

It is named after the type locality (Río Siquia).

Rocio

The genus Rocio is named after the author's wife and the spots on the cheek and the sides of some species, an allusion from the Spanish word for “morning dew”.

Rocio is distinguished from other heroine genera in having the main gill rakers on the first gill arch with a mediad projection at the base, an indentation and posteriad spine on the posterior edge of the mesethmoid, and posterior edge of the supraoccipital undulating and with a deep concavity.

Rocio octofasciata

The Jack Dempsey is now called Rocio octofasciata. Picture by Zhyla, Creative Commons.

It consists of the following species:

Rocio octofasciata (the Jack Dempsey) from Honduras and southern Mexico.

Rocio ocotal, new species, from the Laguna Ocotal in Mexico. Rocio ocotal differs from other members of the genus in having a reddish abdomen in life, pelvic fins not reaching the anal-fin origin, lower symphyseal teeth without a lingual cusp, isoalted secondary pores on the caudal-fin scales, the absence of spots on scales on the sides of the body, and 4 or 5 dentary pores. The species is named after the type locality.

Rocio gemmata, new species, from the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico.

This species is named after the bright green and blue cheek and opercle spots (from the latin gemmata, meaning bejeweled), and can be distinguished from other members of the genus in having spots on the sides larger than scales and not clearly aligned, an interrupted stripe from the eye to the snout, and a spine on the quadrate bone.

Hypsophrys

Two species of Hypsophrys are recognized as valid:

Hypsophrys nicaraguensis from Costa Rica and Nicaragua.

Hypsophrys nematopus from Costa Rica and Nicaragua.

The revised taxonomy of Hypsophrys matches that of an earlier study by Chakrabarty and Sparks. (See Central American cichlids renamed).

For more information, see the paper: Schmitter-Soto, JJ (2007) A systematic revision of the genus Archocentrus (Perciformes: Cichlidae), with the description of two new genera and six new species. Zootaxa 1603, pp. 1–78.

See also: Chakrabarty, P and JS Sparks (2007) Relationships of the New World cichlid genus Hypsophrys Agassiz, 1859 (Teleostei: Cichlidae), with diagnoses for the genus and its species. Zootaxa 1523, pp. 59–64.

This article may not be reproduced without permission.

iconHeok Hee Ng: 1.10.2007
Views: Read 3,172 times

  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Reddit
  • NewsVine
  • blogmarks
  • Simpy
  • Furl
  • Spurl
  • TailRank
  • YahooMyWeb
  • LinkaGoGo
  • Ma.gnolia
  • Facebook
  • Stumbleupon

Print page |   Send page |   RSSComments feed

Please login to vote


Editorial comment

"Big news for the cichlid world!"

Posted by: Matt Clarke - 2 months, 4 weeks ago
Date: Monday October 1st, 2007, 8:21 amReport post
Reader comment

"More and more names to remember now. Fantastic article there. Now I'll have to go and jot all these down next to their old names in all the reference books. "

Posted by: Chris Green - 2 months, 4 weeks ago
Date: Monday October 1st, 2007, 8:48 amReport post
Reader comment

"Expected and useful news, at least some of the mess is being sorted. Not sure about the designation of 'Cichlasoma' Panamensis as Cryptoheros Panamensis but it is great to see the HRP get a home. i'd defintaley like to see the piece in full."

Posted by: Tom Williams - 2 months, 4 weeks ago
Date: Monday October 1st, 2007, 3:46 pmReport post
Reader comment

"I'd like to think that my partner would name a new fish species after me too!!!

I will have to let my Jack Dempseys know!"

Posted by: A Reid - 2 months, 3 weeks ago
Date: Tuesday October 2nd, 2007, 10:40 pmReport post
Reader comment

"Brilliant news - some resolution in a very confused group of fishes. I always found panamensis very different from a lot of relatives but it does have the classic female dorsal ocellus and dark mask when breeding (and high levels of aggression!)

Will we see the full article published in the magazine?"

Posted by: Paul Tapley - 2 months, 3 weeks ago
Date: Wednesday October 3rd, 2007, 2:28 pmReport post
Editorial comment

"The print magazine tends not to cover the more high-brow taxonomy news we do on the website, so you'll probably see only a summary of this in print. "

Posted by: Matt Clarke - 2 months, 3 weeks ago
Date: Wednesday October 3rd, 2007, 2:32 pmReport post
Reader comment

"Ah, I read your related article before finding this one.. I feel quite bad now as I've allowed HRPs and other variants to interbreed freely. Having said this I've never offered them for sale so no damage done..

Anyone know where the Rio Monga variant falls? amatitlania siquia or nigrofasciata?

The male is closer to nigrofasciata in colouration with a blue-green throat whilst the female resembles the HRP...

"

Posted by: Mark Beeston - 2 months, 2 weeks ago
Date: Tuesday October 9th, 2007, 9:44 amReport post
Reader comment

"So does the HRP fall under the species name Amatitlania siquia?"

Posted by: Kevin Crokin - 2 months, 2 weeks ago
Date: Monday October 15th, 2007, 3:33 amReport post
Editorial comment

"That seems most likely given the collection localities mentioned in the paper, but this has not been officially confirmed, hence the question mark in the photo caption above. The HRP may well be an undescribed species not mentioned in this paper, though."

Posted by: Matt Clarke - 2 months, 2 weeks ago
Date: Monday October 15th, 2007, 9:24 amReport post

Please login to leave a comment

Login

Please login using your current username and password. If you have forgotten your details you can get a reminder.
Username
Password
Forgotten your password?
Keep me signed in

About the author: Heok Hee Ng

Heok Hee Ng

Singapore-based ichthyologist Dr Heok Hee Ng is a leading expert on Asian catfishes and has described dozens of fish ranging from catfishes, to nandids and cyprinids.

More articles by Heok Hee Ng »


«Previous              Next»

Latest articles

A fishkeeper's guide to Badis and Dario
tropical fish
Antti Vuorela and Stef...
The new school
tropical fish
George Farmer explains...

Latest blog posts

Do Discus really need regular worming?
tropical fish
A lot of Discus keeper...
Are you a pond pooper?
tropical fish
A forgotten pond is an...

Featured retailers

Tropical Paradise Aquatics
fish video
Unit 4 Boyatt Wood Shopping Cent...
Heritage Aquatics
fish video
Heritage Farm Nurseries Little W...

Manufacturers & Wholesalers

D-D The Aquarium Solution Ltd
screenshot
D-D is a manufacturer and distri...

Treatment Finder

Are your fish sick?
sick fish
Our Treatment Finder can help...

Site of the month

FishBase
screenshot
Few fish sites on the web are as...

In the latest issue
Cover
Welcome to Practical Fishkeeping, the UK's best-selling aquarium magazine. More »

Register for FREE access

To access some of the content on this site you need to register for free access, or click here to login.

Competitions

Win a Rena aquarium
tropical fish
Win of the star aquariums from t...

Online shops

Marine and Aquarium Supplies
screenshot
Swell UK is an aw...
Hayes Aquatics
screenshot
HayesAquatics.co....

The People's poll

This month we're asking readers: What do you think of the Pets at Home Fish Tank Amnesty? Vote»

In Focus

In Focus
tropical fish
Tropicals, marines, ponds...

Aquatic plants

Plants Alive
screenshot
Plants Alive is a...

Stockist finder

Aquatic Design Centre Ltd
fish video
107-111 Great Portland Street L...