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Georgetown University history
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Co-Ed

The end of the 1960’s saw the University become fully coeducational with the admission of women to the College of Arts and Sciences. This event had a number of consequences, including the designation of Copley as the first coeducational dorm - women were housed on the third and later the fifth floors - and the re-writing of student handbooks to eliminate references to the "weaker sex".

In 1789, the separate education of men and women, and indeed the idea that women needed few educational opportunities, had been taken so much for granted that John Carroll did not need to specify that his academy was intended for the education of young men only.

The first women to enroll were Jeannette Sumner and Annie Rice who took classes in the School of Medicine during the 1880-1881 school year. Women have studied at Georgetown continuously since the founding of the School of Nursing. During the 1930's, they were admitted to the hygienist program at the School of Dentistry, regular graduate programs were opened to them during the World War II, and by 1952, women had secured admission to all schools but the college, although on a limited basis.