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The Truth About Windows Vista

When I first saw XGL and AIGLX being demonstrated through YouTube videos, I was blown away. I assumed that it would take a monster video card, much like Vista does. However, I found that I could run a full 3D accelerated Linux desktop on Ponzi’s low powered laptop with an average Intel video chipset. Make no mistake: Windows has fierce competition in the marketplace, especially for the masses. Is Linux ready? No, but it’s definitely looking sexier than Windows Vista RC1 these days.

And if you don’t want your desktop to be sexy, you’re in a minority.

I’ve seen several geeks (and countless developers) dismiss the slick nature of the AIGLX demo. “I got seasick from the wavy windows” is tantamount to saying that “the way Windows works is good enough for me and everybody else.” It’s not like those XGL options are hard-coded into the operating system, folks - it’s fully customizable, fully tweakable, and fully usable. My original complaint stemmed from the way Microsoft has been actively touting Vista as a “breakthrough” experience - and until I saw that video, I couldn’t point to something to put the haphazard implementation of Aero (and the shim-ridden Windows shell) in its place.

Uh, Flip3D is borderline useless - not half as usable as OS X’s Expose (which a forthcoming Microsoft mouse will fully emulate, and I’ll report on that soon enough). I get more out of the free TaskSwitchXP than I do from Flip3D! Vista’s user experience has been further rendered generic when it’s demonstrated side-by-side with the full range of today’s AIGLX features. I’m not saying that the average user would want to use (or could use) half of the eye candy that’s shown in the new Linux desktop, but that doesn’t make AIGLX / XGL any less exciting to see. Linux with a 3D desktop, much like OS X, is fun to use - and Windows Vista is just. feh.

And if you’re not excited by desktop advancements, then you should just live on the command line and be done with it.

So, Robert McLaws wants me to take a deep breath. “[Chris’s] feedback on Vista would be far more valuable if he accepted the reality of the situation and focused on problems that actually stand a chance of getting fixed at this point in the game.” I agree and disagree.

Yes, I’d be happy to help Microsoft fix the fixable Vista oversights - but I’m not going to push my opinions to the sidelines, throw up my hands in defeat, and wait to see if they actually improved anything. It’s been in my experience that by the time I see a Microsoft product, it’s far too late to provide feedback for it. Instead, I’m told to hold off until the next version - but by the time I see that Microsoft product, it’s far too late to provide feedback for it. Instead, I’m told to hold off until the next version - but by the time I see that Microsoft product, it’s. starting to sound like a broken record.

It’s great that Microsoft has accepted so much feedback in the development of Vista, Office, etc. I’m never short of feedback - and I typically provide it freely. But I’m tired of feeling like I’m talking to a brick wall. Need an example? I told Microsoft to build RSS support into Windows Media Player 9 before it exited beta, years before podcasting, months before Scoble went to work for `em! Windows Media Player 11 will likely ship without it. There’s another Microsoft team that thinks they know more than users do - and what’s best for you.

And if you don’t think that users matter, you’re living in a bubble that’s about to burst.

“Brand loyalty” is a phrase that’s quickly disappearing. Users are looking for better, cheaper, faster, nicer, cleaner, smarter, etc. I used to swear by Dell - now I see that everybody’s swearing at them. I used to rely on MSN for my searches - and now I only look when I forget to change my defaults to Google. I used to use Internet Explorer - until I discovered Maxthon 1.x (and I’m still not liking the way 2.x is shaping up). If you’re blind to brand, you deserve everything you might get from it - both good and bad.

Henry Ford initially refused to innovate beyond the Model T, resolute in his belief that his automobile did everything a driver needed it to do (and nothing more). Because of this attitude, Ford had slipped to #3 in the nation by the time the World War was upon us. In a similar sense, I believe that Microsoft has gotten lazy in the desktop space - much like Apple has gotten lazy in the media space. What’s most interesting is that each company is only now beginning to challenge the other on more equal terms - Zune vs. iPod, Windows vs. OS X on Intel.

And if you don’t think that users provide feedback (and make decisions) on their own schedules, you’ve got another thing coming.

I’ve run into countless UI hiccups which prove (beyond a shadow of a doubt) that the usability quirks inside Windows Vista are by design. Need four prime examples that are completely replicable?

  1. In installing and running WinVNC server, I’m prompted to view a dialog that’s been forced into some kind of separate desktop (a backwards compatibility screen that runs in Classic mode, removes me from the Vista experience, and looks like total ass to boot). I’m sure this isn’t an isolated incident. My beef, again, is that Windows Vista handles incompatibilities with the largest amount of inelegance possible.
  2. Separately, the QuickTime Preferences Control Panel applet causes my entire Windows session into some kind of non-glass Aero fallback mode. Why? Why not just shove that process into some kind of space that protects it from the rest of Windows Vista? Then, why does the screen flash suddenly - as if I’m about to hit a BSOD? Screen flashes without fades are jarring.
  3. If you’re lucky enough to have a video card powerful enough to run the full Aero experience (Glass), you know that it’s certainly better than XP’s Luna. I’m not talking about the way that Microsoft’s own developers completely ignored the guidelines set forth by their own company here, mind you (that’s another rant entirely). My legitimate complaint is that the non-Glass experience doesn’t look like Glass at all. Seriously, even Stardock emulated Aero pretty well in WindowBlinds (with transparency!) - but Microsoft opted to give users this 50/50 experience. It’s not just about having a great video card - it’s about having applications that are 100% optimized for Windows Vista. For that, you’ll likely have to wait. forever.
  4. “Classic Mode” has always been pretty clean across the board. I’m not so sure that’s the case in Windows Vista - at least, in respect to Microsoft’s own applications (especially Windows Explorer). The shortcomings in UI cohesiveness and completeness are even more apparent when you’re not in Aero (or Aero Basic). With all the new Vista shell shims and hacks in place, “Classic Mode” has pretty much been shoved out of the picture - even though it rears its ugly head far too frequently, as witnessed by my first point in this truncated list.

And if you think I’m the only geek who believes Windows Vista RC1 is not compelling, then you need to start reading reviews outside the Microsoft echo chamber.

Vista’s user experience is just sloppy, folks - sloppy, sloppy, sloppy. I’m sure we’re going to get excuse after excuse, apology after apology, reason after reason - but nothing is going to undo what’s already been done in Vista betas to this point. I’m told that little to nothing is going to change in the UI between RC1 and Gold. We’ll see what happens in a few weeks, won’t we? I’m not holding my breath, but I remain hopeful that someone in the Quality Control department will wake up and smell the competition. Unless we see a radical system-wide improvement in the final (shipping) version of Windows Vista, my judgement on the OS will remain negative.

Without veneer, underlying code will never have a chance to shine.

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I would also recommend reading:

Do You Have any Thoughts?

Re: XGL UI: Larry answers Chris Pirillo - September 17, 2006 @ 11:14 pm

[…] The Truth About Windows Vista Page 2 of 2 [37 total records] Channel 9 Forums » The Coffeehouse » Re: XGL UI: Larry answers Chris Pirillo « 1 [2] […]

Andre Da Costa - September 17, 2006 @ 11:46 pm

How long are you gonna beat this horse man? The point is, it does not matter, you are gonna get bored with Glass or even Apples AQUA anyway. As a friend told me, you might not have a AERO style scrollbar in Command Prompt, but the scenario could be even worst where you do not have a scrollbar at all. The point is, you have one and it gets the job done.

Chris, you need to wake up and face the reality, you are a minority. Your obsession and little idiosyncrasies don’t matter. It’s about getting the job done at the end of the day. The user session icon under Task Manager window > users (tab) is not hi-res enough, but do I care? If you can’t take UAC freezing the user session, turn it off, I agree AERO Basic totally stinks. Like Robert recommends, focus on some things that needs fixing. Like IE 7 not writing cookies to disk, so that if I have a power cut, I can navigate back to a web page I was browsing by finding it in the Favorites Center. Or fixing the inability to close the MMC Customize View Dialog because the Close button or when you search for an Explorer folder from the Start menu such as Admin Tools or Fonts for example, it does not display gibberish text on the taskbar button representing it “search:crumb=location:G%3A%5CUsers%5CAndre%20….”

Hunt for real bugs and ui problems man.

Mauricio Diaz - September 18, 2006 @ 12:17 am

This guy built a Proof of Concept Exposé application for Windows Vista RC1:

http://blogs.labo-dotnet.com/s.....11116.aspx

It’s in French, it’s rough, it doesn’t handle errors (and it’s activated with F12).

Makes you wonder, if he can do it, why can’t such a useful feature come out-of-the-box with Vista?

Vista: Prevention of the Flashing Aero Theme -- See One, Do One, Teach One - September 18, 2006 @ 5:52 am

[…] Chris Pirillo is not the biggest fan of the new Vista windows UI.  I have always respected Chris as his lockergnome sites is one of the few tutorial sites more heavily populated than our tech-recipes.  […]

Davak - September 18, 2006 @ 5:58 am

I wasn’t sure if my trackback went through. I had a few thoughts regarding the aero flashing theme induced seizure effect that you described.

http://blogs.tech-recipes.com/.....ero-theme/

mattbg - September 18, 2006 @ 9:06 am

I agree with what you said about the Windows Media Player team. I’ve had some pretty offensive replies from them during the WMP11 beta when suggesting improvements that I think are very valid (such as, for example, not autoplaying a DVD when autoplay is turned off but WMP is running). Their reply? Autoplay isn’t their team’s responsibility.

Great work.

Andrew - September 18, 2006 @ 9:58 am

If you believe that Chris is in the minority, then you have a very skewed perception of reality. The devil is in the details and the details are extremely important. It’s not about getting the job, it’s about the getting the job done correctly. Why is the iPod such a huge success? It’s the details. The iPod does nothing more than many other digital music players, but the little details set it apart from the competition. Vista is nothing more than a dressing up of XP. Which is all fine and dandy but no matter how many layers of makeup you apply to a pig it’s still a pig.

Farhan - September 18, 2006 @ 10:39 am

“In installing and running WinVNC server, I’m prompted to view a dialog that’s been forced into some kind of separate desktop (a backwards compatibility screen that runs in Classic mode, removes me from the Vista experience, and looks like total *** to boot). I’m sure this isn’t an isolated incident. My beef, again, is that Windows Vista handles incompatibilities with the largest amount of inelegance possible.”

Is this the secure desktop you are talking about? The one which prompts you to enter administrator credentials or which asks you if it is okay to run the selected program if you are in the Administrators group?

If it is, then the reason for the switch is to counter spoofing attacks that could potentially make the choice for you when UAC asks whether you want to go ahead with an action. You can’t programmatically control objects on the secure desktop since it runs at an elevated level, and so spoofing attacks are rendered useless.

As for other quirks, yes, there is some fit and finish work left to do and some even might not make it. But you have to understand, that to move forward, you need to give up some things, and complete application compatibility might sometimes be the victim. Applications that weren’t designed for Vista are bound to experience some hiccups, and the application compatibility team works its tails off to make sure that the end customer experience is as pleasurable as possible - but not every little thing can be “fixed”. UI consistency, at least for 3rd party software, will become better when software vendors start rolling out versions specifically designed for the WPF/Aero experience.

Vista Earplugs « I, Blog - September 18, 2006 @ 11:42 am

[…] Chris is right. […]

RichardatDell - September 18, 2006 @ 1:49 pm

Hi Chris,
Thanks for the perspective. Perhaps “Brand loyaltyâ€�? is open to change as a result of users “looking for better, cheaper, faster, nicer, cleaner, smarter, etc.” Companies like you mention Apple and Ford may have overlooked those changing demands. Watch — you will see cheaper, faster, nicer cleaner and smarter from Dell….its what Dell 2.0 is all about.

Here at Dell, “with people swearing at us” as you point out, we paid attention because the 1:1 relationship with customers keeps us tethered to what really matters and what customers value. Its why we have announced $150 million investment in improving the customer experience; its why we have broadened our product line; its why we now offer AMD chips; and, most recently announced Dell 2.0. Already we are seeing a turnaround in customer satisfaction both through internal and external surveys. No doubt we have more work to do….and we will get it done.

I dont think any company experiences a perfectly linear and smooth growth path. We all experience speed bumps along the way. Each time, Dell has emerged stronger because of those challenges, and because we are fundamentally tied to the customer — no middleman, no third party for design, manufacturing, selling or supporting what we produce.

That single point of accountability leads to us hearing the swearing and taking corrective action at Dell. Thanks for the perspective and reminder.

The PC Doctor - September 18, 2006 @ 3:11 pm

More Windows Vista nonsense - You need a monster graphics card…

I think that there’s been more garbage talked about Windows Vista than any other software project in history.  Every day I come across dozens of ramblings made by people who either don’t know what they are talking about or who are deliberately t…

Andrew Denny - September 18, 2006 @ 4:02 pm

RichardatDell reads like a press release. Just about the only buzzword he missed out was ‘leverage’, and he doesn’t . SO I guess I shouldn’t be surprised that his return URL was direct2dell.com, and not his own blog.

Also, Chris’s post wasn’t about Dell, but something more generic. Yet RichardatDell seems to think was all about Dell, and gave a “I feel your pain” comment which feels halfwy to comment spam.

I’m writing this on an Inspiron WUXGA laptop - the best laptop screen I’ve ever seen. So why did RichardatDell’s comment not raise my respect for Dell and make me feel they weren’t listening?

Larry Osterman - September 18, 2006 @ 8:25 pm

Btw, others have commented on some of these.

The Quicktime (and older versions of Java) disabling glass is because those applications perform operations that are incompatible with glass. Microsoft had two choices: 1) have the app not work or 2) disable glass. Microsoft chose the path of greatest compatibility - it’s better to lose visual effects than not run an app.

The WinVNC problem appears to be a session 0 isolation problem. From your description, WinVNC is running as a service and attempting to pop up UI. It turns out that that NEVER worked on XP (especially on non domain joined machines or server machines) because the console session wasn’t always session 0. For Vista, all services run in session 0, and user apps run in session 1. This security fix completely mitigates a huge class of security holes known as “Shatter” attacks that plague 3rd party apps. So instead of allowing WinVNC to interact with the desktop (and concievably be used to launch an elevation-of-privilege attack (don’t scoff - 3rd party apps have been used for this)), vista simply prevents it and isolates the app.

I have a 2 year old ATI Radeon x800 video card in my machine at home, it runs about $120, and it runs glass brilliantly. You don’t need a video card with major horsepower to get full glass effects.

So I don’t see “architectural” problems as you described.

I do see that you’re not happy at many of the appcompat choices that MS made, chosing to allow applications to run instead of simply breaking them, but Microsoft has always chosen to allow applications to run instead of simply breaking them.

not give u my name - September 18, 2006 @ 11:10 pm

I got a SuSe box with xgl running on it, and i got Vista rc1. Hands down xgl runs cleaner and smoother then Aero Glass. Eye candy at it’s finest.

Diego Barros - September 19, 2006 @ 4:24 am

Looks like Vista is not ready for release.

http://www.hanselman.com/blog/.....rPain.aspx

Andre P Da Costa - September 19, 2006 @ 9:45 am

Andrew, I don’t have a skewed vision, its just reality, they are not gonna fix minor details and Chris could rant until eternity, its not gonna change one bit or pixel.

The all in the details business is a farce and no IT Manager cares. Usability and beauty are two different things. I personally believe there are too many dialogs in Vista and too many networking options. Collapsible and modal windows would have done a good job of consolidating the confusion that will be associated with this release of windows.

If you are having issues with apps disabling Glass, install the latest test release of JAVA 6. It prevented earlier release of iTunes and LimeWire from doing so.

Jason Bunting - September 19, 2006 @ 12:18 pm

“And if you don’t want your desktop to be ****, you’re in a minority.”

LOL

I never cared for the poor opinions of the masses anyway, idiots characterize the majority more than ever before. For me and many others, computers are a means to an end - they are not an end in themselves. I couldn’t care less about UI look and feel, except as it makes getting things done easier. After the novelty of the look and feel wear off, people still need to get work done. Who cares?

Andre P Da Costa - September 19, 2006 @ 4:10 pm

“I couldn’t care less about UI look and feel, except as it makes getting things done easier. After the novelty of the look and feel wear off, people still need to get work done. Who cares?”

Exactly, but people like Chris, don’t use computers for important things, just IM and post rants and looking for boring tiny flaws in the Windows UI everyday. YAWN!

M - September 20, 2006 @ 8:51 am

Andre P Da Costa - September 19, 2006 @ 4:10 pm

Exactly, but people like Chris, don’t use computers for important things, just IM and post rants and looking for boring tiny flaws in the Windows UI everyday. YAWN!

______________________________________________
Sir,

You cannot define” important” for the whole computer user group.
My Personal Computer is important to me for my own interests and
when it does not work right for whatever reason, it interrupts the seamless flow of creativity and usability that I expect from my PC.

I have been reading Chris since he appeared on the Internet and even though I don’t always agree with everything he has ever said, I do respect the man for his opinions and knowledge. Then I take what he says and go deeper into the subject to formulate my own opinion.

I have been running computers since 1995 and all the computers in my house are still in top running condition and usable. I owe that to men like Chris who have posted to the web to help us all when they could have been doing important stuff with their computers.

M

CC - September 20, 2006 @ 10:51 am

The grass is always greener…seems like OSX has its share of UI critiques:
Disecting ‘Gloomy’ Unified in iTunes 7
http://www.thinkmac.co.uk/blog.....nes-7.html
Or this:

Bad UI in OS X - Spotlight:
http://www.thinkmac.co.uk/blog.....light.html

Diego - September 20, 2006 @ 6:10 pm

“I couldn’t care less about UI look and feel, except as it makes getting things done easier.”

You woldn’t care less? The whole point isn’t just to have a pretty UI, but the “feel” part is extremely important. Have some sort of consistency across applications. Sure OS X is not perfect, but it doesn’t feel like Vista does, which is that the apps are all over the place when it comes to UI. It doesn’t look and feel like you’re running a unified operating system. You step from one world to a different one when ou run another application in Vista. It’s a dog’s breakfast.

wannabegeekblog - September 26, 2006 @ 8:57 am

He’s been unhappy

A verdade sobre o Windows Vista - Macsin - September 26, 2006 @ 9:48 am

[…] Pirillo Retirado de “http://www.macsin.com/wikimedia/index.php?title=A_verdade_sobre_o_Windows_Vista” Page categories: 19 Setembro2006 […]

NexTechNews - September 26, 2006 @ 1:04 pm

He’s been unhappy

Vista Horizons - September 27, 2006 @ 12:16 am

Chris Pirillo has been a long time advocate for a consistent UI. He can spot even the smallest inconstancy in fonts between windows menus and applications. Vista has been a thorn in his side for a while and MS hasn’t listened to him (so far). So he’s taken it upon himself to hack into the registry and build a reg file to run to fix all the font substitutions and make them consistent on Vista’s new ‘Segoe UI’ true type font.

wannabegeekblog - September 27, 2006 @ 6:01 am

DISCLAIMER: Proceed at your own risk. Chris finally put his money where his mouth is. He’s been unhappy with Vista’s inconsistency issues for ages. So he decided to do something about it. He created a registry patch that redirects system calls to legacy fonts (Tahoma, Arial, Times New Roman, etc) to Vista’s Segoe UI. It has a pretty nice effect on

Fix Windows Vista Font Consistency - AeroXperience - September 27, 2006 @ 7:12 pm

[…] QUOTEI've been labeled a nitipicker for seeing skipped details that few others seem to see on the surface of an application's user interface. Guilty as charged! Download this simple registry patch, but please read this entire post before applying it? I'm not happy that Microsoft has added yet another shell font to the mix with Windows Vista: Segoe UI. On its own, Segoe UI is an awesome font - but when it's slapped up against Tahoma, MS Sans Serif, Microsoft Sans Serif, and/or Arial - it's no longer a clean user experience. In fact, Vista is downright messy when it comes to shell fonts - with some aliased faces reaching back to the days of Windows 3.11! These blatant font oversights were shoved onto the backburner for the sake of (a) 100% backwards compatibility and ( time. However, that didn't stop me from diving into REGEDIT and setting things straight. The good news? I believe I've figured out how to make everything inside of Windows Vista stick to Segoe UI. It's a subtle, yet radical, transformation.Source: http://chris.pirillo.com/2006/...../Download: REG File (use caution!)Note: I have not tested this REG file. Use it at your own risk. I accept no responsibility if this hoses your system. ——————– …Many beta testers simply like their exclusive little clique to continue as long as possible. Only they, after all, are qualified to determine when Windows is ready. And then there are the online pundits, many of whom are barely old enough to legally buy alcohol. These guys are classic. Let's just say that a lack of experience and a strongly worded opinion don't result in the most coherent of arguments and leave it at that.-Paul Thurrott […]

kfarmer - September 28, 2006 @ 12:25 pm

“I have been running computers since 1995 and all the computers in my house are still in top running condition and usable. I owe that to men like Chris who have posted to the web to help us all when they could have been doing important stuff with their computers.”

Wow.. a newbie. :)

Atari 400 — 1982, later models to follow
Heathkit HERO — sometime around then

Even programmers want look and feel, but a few things to note:

* autoplay is not WMP’s realm, it’s true. Perhaps they should have forwarded you toward the shell folks.
* even long-time developers want something pretty to look at, sometimes. Sometimes it’s an easy-on-the-eyes font like Consolas. Sometimes it’s UI changes that make features more discoverable (I never knew Word had a translation feature until the 2007 beta). Sometimes it’s the search and the sidebar. Vista’s been great to me so far. I’ll be stocking up at release.
* nit-picking is valuable as a means to an end, but is not valuable as an end to itself. Better are suggestions for how to improve. Sure, you can tell programmers you don’t like their UI, but you need to be prepared to tell them what would make it better for you, and be prepared also to discover that 50 other people told them the exact opposite. You can tell them something’s 1 pixel off, but be prepared to have them ignore it in lieu of other, more important changes.

Microsoft has to serve countless people, only a few of which are vocal about anything, and it needs to balance their often-conflicting requests, as well as the need to just ship the bloody thing.

Robert McLaws: Windows Vista Edition - October 6, 2006 @ 4:47 am

[…] Take Vista’s Font Issues Into Your Own Hands Posted Tuesday, September 26, 2006 1:57 AM by Robert McLaws | 1 Comments Filed under: Fonts, User Interface, Community DISCLAIMER: Proceed at your own risk. Chris finally put his money where his mouth is. He’s been unhappy with Vista’s inconsistency issues for ages. So he decided to do something about it. He created a registry patch that redirects system calls to legacy fonts (Tahoma, Arial, Times New Roman, etc) to Vista’s Segoe UI. It has a pretty nice effect on all of your installed applications: they look consistent. Dialog boxes look cleaner, web pages are easier to read, etc. But consider yourself warned: it redirects ALL calls. That means websites, Word documents, and anything else that uses these fonts will now display Segoe UI instead… but only certain sizes. You are guaranteed to see unpredictable results outside of Windows apps. But IMO, it’s totally worth it. Download the Vista Fonts Fix now! Share this post […]

Wolfie - October 11, 2006 @ 7:30 am

Chris, I think you’re absolutely right. Firstly as a developer I’m spending hours a day looking at a screen so a pleasant LAF is important to my wellbeing. Secondly that LAF should be consistent and seamless otherwise you get the unpleasant feeling that you get in uncoordinated home decoration.

Windows is not cheap, MS is a wealthy company. Why should we accept sloppy workmanship from them? Only because of their market dominance.

Xgl : del.icio.us tag/xgl : The Truth About Windows Vista ~ Chris Pirillo - SWiK - October 25, 2006 @ 3:19 am

[…] The Truth About Windows Vista ~ Chris Pirillo 25 Oct 2006 read more… Posted by at 04:33 PM. Tagged: Xgl .   Comment on The Truth About Windows Vista ~ Chris Pirillo Post your own Comment: […]

Protricity - December 24, 2006 @ 7:37 pm

Aside from having the usual amount of bias and skewed perception as all other vista-haters, this article has a great number of facts wrong. During your ‘non-glass Aero fallback mode’ which is ’sloppy’, it is not possible to put the ‘process into some kind of space that protects it from the rest of Windows Vista’. We’re talking dx9 layers here. You use them or you don’t.

I’ve been running vista in its pre-release for 2 months straight with absolutely, absolutely, no problems, or ‘fallback mode’ or any of the other assumptive flaws claimed here. Why? because I know how to use windows.

The dx9 interface is beautiful, fast, and keeps my cpu at 0% at all times. I love it.

I recommend reading up on the basic features vista has to offer, using the os for more than 3 minutes, and hell even reading the minimum requirements for the os. Maybe also focusing on the myriad of new features vista provides outside of UI.

Here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Vista

Everything you said here was wrong.

blogbeebe - April 1, 2007 @ 5:04 pm

not built with “any compiler and linker not employing Microsoft’s proprietary Win32 API.” Nicely says it works just fine for him on every release of Windows up through Windows XP, but fails on this known limited version of Vista. There are already innumerable stories about incompatibilities with existing applications running perfectly fine on Windows XP, but failing to install or run on Windows Vista. We’ve been hearing about this for over a year. And now, Nicely pops up with his grand conspiracy.

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