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Bangor

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city, seat (1816) of Penobscot county, east-central Maine, U.S. It is a port of entry at the head of navigation on the Penobscot River opposite Brewer. The site, visited in 1604 by Samuel de Champlain, was settled in 1769 by Jacob Buswell. First called Kenduskeag Plantation (1776) and later Sunbury (1787), it was incorporated as a town in 1791 and is thought to have been named Bangor by the Reverend Seth Noble…


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More from Britannica on "Bangor"...
49 Encyclopædia Britannica articles, from the full 32 volume encyclopedia
>Bangor
town, North Down district (established 1973), formerly in County Down, Northern Ireland. It lies on the southern shore of Belfast Lough (inlet of the sea). About 555, St. Comgall founded a monastery at Bangor, which became a celebrated seat of learning. Incursions by Danes in the 9th century destroyed Bangor, which was partially rebuilt by St. Malachy in the 12th century. ...
>Bangor
cathedral city, Gwynedd county, historic county of Caernarvonshire (Sir Gaernarfon), Wales. It commands the northern entrance to the Menai Strait, the narrow strip of water separating Anglesey from the mainland. Bangor Cathedral is dedicated to the Celtic St. Deiniol, who founded a church there in the 6th century; the community was a leading centre of Celtic Christianity. ...
>Bangor
city, seat (1816) of Penobscot county, east-central Maine, U.S. It is a port of entry at the head of navigation on the Penobscot River opposite Brewer. The site, visited in 1604 by Samuel de Champlain, was settled in 1769 by Jacob Buswell. First called Kenduskeag Plantation (1776) and later Sunbury (1787), it was incorporated as a town in 1791 and is thought to have been ...
>Baugh, Cecil Archibald
Jamaican potter (b. Nov. 22, 1908, Bangor Ridge, Jam.—d. June 28, 2005, Kingston, Jam.), was one of the most influential Caribbean potters of the 20th century and was renowned for works that showcased his artistry and technical creativity. In 1991 the National Gallery opened a ceramics gallery bearing his name, and in 2003 he received the Order of Jamaica.
>North Down
district, Northern Ireland. Formerly within County Down, North Down was established in 1973 and consists of gently undulating lowland on the southern shores of Belfast Lough (inlet of the sea). It is bordered by the city of Belfast to the west and by the districts of Castlereagh and Ards to the south. North Down's northern border is a 15-mile (25-kilometre) coastline on ...

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13 Student Encyclopedia Britannica articles, specially written for elementary and high school students
Bangor
The cathedral city of Bangor, Wales, is the site of one of the earliest Christian communities in Great Britain. The seat of Arfon district in Gwynedd County, it borders the northern entrance to the Menai Strait, the narrow strip of water separating the Isle of Anglesey from the mainland.
Cities
   from the Maine article
Maine's largest city and the chief railroad center is Portland. Located on a peninsula in Casco Bay, it has one of the finest harbors on the Atlantic coast. Portland's many densely shaded avenues have earned it the nickname Forest City. It has a variety of small industries. South Portland is a residential and industrial suburb on Casco Bay.
Cohen, William S.
(born 1940), United States political leader. After the 1996 election President Bill Clinton, a Democrat, wanted to start his second term with a Republican in his Cabinet to smooth relations with the Republican majority in Congress. On Dec. 5, 1996, he named William S. Cohen his next secretary of defense, and the Senate readily approved the appointment the following ...
Weston, Christine
(1904–89). U.S. author Christine Weston was celebrated for her novels featuring finely crafted portrayals of her native India. Indigo, her most acclaimed novel, was praised for its rich evocation of the sights, sounds, and smells of that country.
Transportation
   from the Maine article
Early transportation routes in the state were largely attempts to connect Maine settlements with those of colonies to the south and west. In 1787 the first stagecoach line began making the three-day journey from Portland to Portsmouth, N.H. By 1816 there was service to Boston and to New York City. Today these routes are covered by modern highways. The Maine Turnpike was ...

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