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Please read EMAIL FAQs first: Comments, suggestions, and questions to Joe Citarella, Skip MacWilliam, or Ed Stroligo

"Mouse Clicking Troubles? DIY Repair"
Douglas Holden - 5/3/05

page 1 of 2

After a month of non-use, I plugged my trusty Logitech iFeel Mouseman into my USB port and continued on as if we (my mouse and I) hadn't missed a beat. But as soon as I clicked the start menu button, I knew something wasn't quite right anymore.

I was single-clicking folders but for some reason they were opening as if I had double-clicked on them. Programs began popping open as I tried to move shortcuts around on the desktop. It was so bad that it was almost impossible to draw boxes around groups of icons I needed to move around. After searching for my trusty old PS2 mouse, which was nowhere to be found I might add, I decided to Google my trouble and realized that I alone was not the sole sufferer of this almost unbearable torment.

I located countless posts all over the web, from users of all different manufacturers, for whom the solution of reinstalling drivers didn't help and who were forced to go out and buy new mice. I wasn't about to plop down money for a new mouse when I liked the one I already had, so I decided the best course of action was to see if I couldn't fix it myself.

WARNING: DO THIS AT YOUR OWN RISK! UNPLUG YOUR MOUSE AND DO THIS SOMEWHERE YOU CAN FIND THE SMALL PIECES YOU ARE SURE TO DROP!

STEP 1:

Mouse

Unplug the mouse and get out a small screwdriver. Every mouse I've seen has small Phillips head screws holding the pieces together, so if you don't have one, get one, it'll come in handy on more projects than just this one.

STEP 2:

Screws

Time to remove the screws from the bottom of the mouse and put them CLOSE BY so that you don't lose them. I have marked the locations of the screws of my mouse in the picture.

On my particular mouse, care must be taken when removing the vibration motor from the upper assembly. Your mouse's internal hardware may be different, so please be careful removing the top from the base. Below is my mouse after separating the two.

Off

STEP 3:

Since your mouse is already open, take the time to remove any hair, dust, or other matter inside. Once cleaned, it's time to have a look at the micro-switches that register your clicks.

Sw

The switches will be small rectangular boxes with a small plastic piece that, when pushed, will emit a clicking sound. After you've found the switches, click both the right and left mouse buttons and notice how big of a difference in the sound they make. My left mouse button barely made an audible click before I fixed it.