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Showbuzz

June 10, 1999
Web posted at: 2:29 p.m. EDT (1829 GMT)

Today's buzz stories:

Video store owners disagree over ID policy for R-rated movies

(CNN) -- Video store operators are at odds over whether to require teens to show photo ID to rent R-rated movies.

U.S. President Bill Clinton proposed the plan on Tuesday at the White House, with the blessing of the National Association of Theater Owners. A leading home-video organization has also endorsed it, but it has no authority to make its members follow the rules.

The Video Software Dealers Association says it will ask members to "actively check IDs" and will provide stores with posters explaining the rating system for both movies and video games.

"We're encouraging people to enforce it strongly," says Kelli Clayton, spokeswoman for the Los Angeles-based organization. She says most video stores already let parents restrict accounts, so children can't rent R-rated movies without permission.

But some video store owners doubt the move will be effective. "We're not going to be the arbiter of morals," said Court Attinger, owner of Videophile Inc. in Seattle. "Personally, I'm of the opinion that it's too late. The barn door has been open too long."

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Clooney

Rosemary Clooney to help rescue ailing theater

MAYSVILLE, Kentucky (CNN) -- Jazz singer Rosemary Clooney is planning a music festival to raise money for a theater close to her heart.

She's organized the event to help restore the 69-year-old Russell Theater, the site of the 1953 premiere of her first film, "The Stars are Singing." The repair is expected to cost $3.5 million.

Clooney will headline the outdoor festival, which is scheduled to take place on September 25, in Maysville, Kentucky, about 70 miles (112 kilometers) from Cincinnati, Ohio. During the festivities, she's to press her hands into cement, to be displayed in front of the theater.

Clooney is a Maysville native and five-time Grammy nominee. She now lives in Beverly Hills, California. She's also the aunt of former "ER" star George Clooney.

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Gill

Graduating with Vince Gill

CHARLESTON, West Virginia (CNN) -- The promotion was for just one high school class to "Graduate with Vince Gill." Instead, a local radio station overwhelmed with entries has arranged for about 400 high school seniors from three different schools to end their school year with the country music star.

Students from three graduating classes are expected to join Gill on June 12 for a picture-taking reception, just before he performs at the Charleston Civic Center. The contest for a party with Gill asked for high school classes to send postcards with the message: "I want to graduate with Vince Gill." Just how many entries came in? Some 124,000.

"I knew this could be a fun project for the kids, but it certainly exceeded anything I imagined," Gill says. "I'm really looking forward to meeting all the students."

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Former Rolling Stone to sell hotdogs outside concert

LONDON (CNN) --- Thirty-six years ago, drummer Carlo Little quit a struggling rock band. Perhaps he should have held out a bit longer.

That band, the Rolling Stones, will play this weekend in London before a packed Wembley stadium, while Little will sell burgers and hotdogs outside.

Little, now 60, tells the Express newspaper he played with the Rolling Stones before they hit it big in the '60s. "I couldn't carry on with them as they only had a few gigs lined up and could only offer me a couple of quid (pounds) for each gig," he recalls.

Little says he was thrilled to be invited for a get-together with the band at a concert in Paris last year.

"I was so nervous about meeting the boys, but they came up and threw their arms around me," he says. "I have no regrets, even though I could have become a millionaire -- but then I remember that I'm alive and happy."

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The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report.

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