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   The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition.  2000.
 

Appendix I

Indo-European Roots
 
ENTRY:sg-
DEFINITION:To seek out. Oldest form *se2g-, colored to *sa2g-, contracted to *sg-.
Derivatives include seek, ransack, and hegemony.
1. Suffixed form *sg-yo-. seek, from Old English scan, scan, to seek, from Germanic *skjan. 2. Suffixed form *sg-ni-. soke, from Old English scn, attack, inquiry, right of local jurisdiction, from Germanic *skniz. 3. Zero-grade form *sg-. a. sake1, from Old English sacu, lawsuit, case, from Germanic derivative noun *sak, a seeking, accusation, strife; b. (i) forsake, from Old English forsacan, to renounce, refuse (for-, prefix denoting exclusion or rejection; see per1); (ii) ramshackle, ransack, from Old Norse *saka, to seek. Both (i) and (ii) from Germanic *sakan, to seek, accuse, quarrel. Both a and b from Germanic *sak-. 4. Independent suffixed form *sg-yo-. presage, from Latin sgre, to perceive, seek to know. 5. Zero-grade form *sg-. sagacious, from Latin sagx, of keen perception. 6. Suffixed form *sg-eyo-. exegesis, hegemony, from Greek hgeisthai, to lead ( to track down). (Pokorny sg- 876.)
 
 
The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Copyright © 2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by the Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

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