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Title: Family Poetry

Grade: 3

Time: 1 day

Subject: Poetry, Reading

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify the family structure of African Americans.
2. The students will be able to create a poem about their family.

Materials: "Brown Angels" by Walter Dean Myers

Introduction:
The teacher will read the book "Brown Angels" to the students. The students will discuss how this book shows the importance of family in African American culture.

Lesson:
The teacher will share with the students more information about the African American Family structure. Since the story "Brown Angels" consisted of poems about families, the students will be asked to write a poem about their family.

Post-Lesson:
The students will read their poems to the class and discuss how their families are similar or different from the African American Culture. The students will write one interesting thing that they learned about African American Culture in their journals everyday during the unit on African American Culture.

Assessment:
Rubric to evaluate the students poems and the presentation of their poem and how it relates to the African American culture.

Strategies used: Class discussion, Individual work on poems.
Title: The Peculiar Animal

Grade: 3

Time: 2 days - One day to draw the picture and one day to research and classify their animal.

Subject: Reading, Art, Science

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify African American Folk Tales.
2. The students will be able to use their imagination to draw a picture of the Peculiar such thing.
3. The students will be able to relate the story to science by classifying their animal.

Materials Needed: "The People Could Fly" by Virginia Hamilton, colors, paper, and library resources.

Introduction:
The teacher will read the story "The Peculiar Such Thing" from the book "The People Could Fly".

Lesson:
The class will discuss the features of the animal that were given in the story. The students will use their imagination and use colors to draw a picture of what they think the peculiar such thing would look like. The next day the students will take their pictures and try to scientifically classify the animal that they drew. To do this the students can find an animal that is the closest to their animal and use that animal or two animals to classify their animal.

Post Lesson:
The students will present their animal to the class and show the students how they classified their animal. The students will write their sentence in their journals.

Assessment:
The students will be evaluated by a rubric on how they present their animal and their classification of that animal.

Strategies used: Class discussion, classification, class reports

Title: African American Food

Grade: 3

Time: 3 days The first day will consist of the guest speaker, the second day the students will take a field trip to the grocery store, and the third day they will prepare African American food.

Subject: Math

Materials Needed: Permission slips, recipes, groceries and cooking supplies.

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify some of the African American Foods.
2. The students will be able to determine the costs of the foods and where they are available.
3. The students will be able to prepare an African American meal.

Introduction:
The first day the teacher will have an African American from the community come in and speak to the children. The African American will bring samples of African American food for the students to try. The African American will discuss with the students African American food and where he or she finds food to prepare their African American dishes. The African American can also bring in some of their favorite recipes for the students to use.

Lesson:
The second day the students will go to the grocery story and find the ingredients for their recipes. The students will be divided into four groups, each group will be given a different recipe. In the store they can estimate the cost of their total bill and see how close they come to the actual amount. The students will bring their supplies back to the school and discuss the difficulties involved in finding the ingredients necessary for an African American meal. The students will add up the total cost of their ingredients and compare it to the cost of their normal meals. The next day the students will prepare their meals. The students will discuss the math skills needed in preparing a recipe, such as measuring ingredients and time to prepare.

Post-Lesson:
The students will share their dishes with the other groups and discuss how African American food is different from American food. The students will write their sentence about African American food in their journal.

Evaluation:
The students will be evaluated on their behavior during the guest speaker and at the grocery story. They will also be evaluated on how they work in groups to create their dishes and also on the final product of their African American dishes.

Strategies used: Guest speaker, field trip, estimation, comparison
Title: African American Instruments

Grade: 3

Time: 1 day

Subject: Music

Materials Needed: Claves, African American Music on tapes or records and African American sheet music.

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify claves that are used in African American music.
2. The students will be able to identify African American music.
3. The students will be able to use the claves to perform an African American children’s song.

Introduction:
The teacher will play some African American music and ask the students if they can identify the instruments that are used in the music. The teacher will introduce the claves to the students and tell them that they are a musical instrument used in African American music.

Lesson:
The students will be shown how to use the claves. The teacher will tell the students how the African Americans used the claves to emphasize the rhythm and beat in African American songs. The students will be given a sheet of music for an African American children’s song. The teacher will show the students how to read the music and play the claves.

Post-Lesson:
The students will perform their song using the claves. The teacher will play another African American song and see if the students can identify the claves used in that song. The students will write their sentence in their journals.

Assessment:
The students will be evaluated on their performance with the claves and also their identification of the claves used in the music played by the teacher.

Strategies Used: class discussion

Title: Story Summary Plates

Grade: 3

Time: 1 day

Subject: Reading, Art, bulletin board

Materials Needed: "The People Could Fly" by Virginia Hamilton, paper plates, markers, and crayons.

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify African American Folk Tales.
2. The students will be able to show their knowledge of African American culture through their summary plate.

Introduction: The teacher will discuss the author, Virginia Hamilton, and show some of her books. The teacher will have the students each pick their favorite folk tale out of the book "The People Could Fly." Each student will be asked to read their folk tale to themselves.

Lesson: The students will each be given a paper plate. The students will divide their plates into fourths. In the first section the students will write the title of the story. In the second section the students will write a two or three summary of the story. In the third section the students will write their opinion of the story. And in the fourth story they will draw an illustration of their favorite part of the story.

Post-Lesson: The students will show their plates to the rest of the class and share with them their folk tale. The students can take their plate and display it on the class bulletin board. The students will write their interesting idea in their journal.

Assessment: The students will be assessed by the appearance of their summary plates and by the report that they provide on their plates.

Strategies used: class discussion, Individual reports, Highlighting an author
Title: Strange Animals

Grade: 3

Time: 1 day

Subject: Reading, Social Studies, Science, Bulletin Board

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify African American’s early views of animals.
2. The students will be able to identify African American Folk Tales.
3. The students will be able to share their knowledge of African American Folk Tales with others.

Materials Needed: "The People Could Fly" by Virginia Hamilton, paper bags, scrap paper, markers and other art supplies.

Introduction:
The teacher will read "Bruh Alligator Meets Trouble" and any other animal Folk Tales in the book "The People Could Fly" to the students. The teacher will explain to the students how early slaves were unfamiliar with many of the animals that were native to America, so they made up tales to explain the animals appearance or habits. The story "Bruh Alligator Meets Trouble", explains why alligators have dark and horny hides.

Lesson:
The class will brainstorm why animals looked they way they did or acted the way they did, such as why a turtle has a shell or why a skunk has a stripe. The students will write their own folk tale to explain why an animals looks the way it does. Each of the students will tell their folk tale to the rest of the class. The students can take a paper bag and use scrap paper, markers and other art materials to decorate the front of their paper bag to resemble their animal. They will rewrite their story and put the story in the bag.

Post Lesson:
The students will post their bags on a bulletin board in the hallway so other students can read their stories to find out about African American culture. The contents of the display table would be the book "The People Could Fly" by Virginia Hamilton and other African American books about animals. The students will be able to pull the story out of the bag and read it. The students will write their sentence in their journals.

Assessment: The students will be evaluated by the appearance of their animals and their rewriting of their story. The students will also be evaluated on their participation in the activity.

Strategies Used: brainstorming, and rewriting a folk tale
Title: African American Music

Grade: 3

Time: 1 day

Subject: Music, Social Studies

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify a few songs related to African American culture.
2. The students will be able to identify the characteristics of African American music, after listening to several African American music pieces.

Materials Needed: Record Player or tape player. African American music pieces such as "Boll Weevil Blues", "Swing Low Sweet Chariot", Kee-Chee", Kye, Kye, Kule", "Ma Lo We", "Obwisana", "Tue, Tue", or "Twa-Ma-Sanga".

Pre-Lesson: The teacher will introduce African American music to the students. The teacher will discuss how many African American songs were originally written by slaves as they worked in the fields. Through the songs they could communicate with each other without the slave owners knowing. Many songs were call and response songs, where one persons sings and the other people responded.

Lesson: The students will listen to and sing some of the African American songs, such as "Boll Weevil Blues", "Swing Low Sweet Chariot", Kee-Chee", Kye, Kye, Kule", "Ma Lo We", "Obwisana", "Tue, Tue", or "Twa-Ma-Sanga". The students will discuss the different rhythms and instruments used in these songs. The students will discuss the short melodic phrases and the strong beat characteristic of the African American music.

Post-Lesson: The students will discuss the similarities and the differences of the African American Music to the music listened to in America. The students will be asked to use the K-W-L technique to summarize what they learned. The students will write their sentence about African American music in their journals.

Assessment: The students will be assessed by observations of the student’s discussion of African American music. They will also be evaluated on their written work for the K-W-L exercise.

Strategies used: class discussion, KWL

Title: Live From Our Classroom

Grade: 3

Subject: Reading, Social Studies, Art

Time: 2 days- One day to organize the readers theater and one day to present their readers theater.

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify an African American Folk tale after presenting "Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears".
2. The students will be able to organize and perform a readers theater.

Materials needed: Copy of "Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears" by Verna Aardema for each student, Props in costumes if necessary.

Pre-Lesson: The teacher will ask the students to identify what they think the story will be about. The teacher will also ask the student if they have every been annoyed by mosquitoes. The teacher will read the story "Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears" to the students.

Lesson: The teacher will tell the students that they are to make a readers theater out of the story. The students will brainstorm and make an affinity diagram of the plan they will make to create their readers theater. The students will have to include: if they are going to make props or costumes if so, what, how they will make them, and how they will divide the duties. They will also include how much time they will spend on each job and how they will perform their readers theater. The students will need to have the following people: Iguana, mosquito python, rabbit, crow, monkey, Mother own, owlets, Lion King, antelope, and a narrator. The students will use the rest of the time to prepare props and practice the readers theater. The next day the students will perform their readers theater for the other classes in the school and any other people they wish to perform for. The students will watch the movie "Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears" by Weston Woods Release and compare the movie to their reader’s theater.

Post-Lesson: The students will discuss the reader’s theater and how they learned about African American culture through the activity. The students will need to write a sentence about the folk tale in their journals.

Assessment: The students will be assessed on their plans in their affinity diagram and also on the final presentation of their reader’s theater.

Strategies used: brainstorming, affinity diagram, readers theater, class discussion

Title: Flying to freedom

Grade: 3

Time: 1 day

Subject: Reading

Materials Needed: "The People Could Fly" by Virginia Hamilton, "Tar Beach" by Faith Ringgold, examples of Venn diagrams.

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify the similarities and differences between African American Folk tales.
2. The students will be able to identify the characters, settings, and plots of the African American Stories.

Pre-Lesson: The teacher will read "The People Could Fly" by Virginia Hamilton and "Tar Beach" by Faith Ringgold. The teacher will ask the students to state the similarities in the stories.

Lesson: The teacher will tell the students that the ability to fly is a characteristic found in many black folk tales. The slaves wanted the ability to fly to escape slavery. The slaves thought that their wishes would be fulfilled by flying to freedom. Both of these stories are about the theme of flying. Have the students compare the two stories creating a Venn Diagram. The teacher can show the students sample Venn diagrams, if they have not used this concept before. They can use the Venn diagrams to map similarities and differences in the characters, settings, plots and ect. The students can imagine if they were a slave and write about their desire to fly away to freedom.

Post-Lesson: The students will share their Venn Diagrams with the rest of the class and also share their paragraphs. Then they will write their sentence in their journals about this lesson.

Assessment: The students will be evaluated on their Venn diagrams and their presentations to the class.

Strategies used: class discussion, Venn diagram
Title: Famous African Americans

Grade: 3

Time: 2 days. One day to research their person and one day to present the interview.

Subject: Reading, Social Studies, Research

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify famous African Americans and how they affected the African American culture.
2. The students will be able to identify important questions that you would ask in an interview.

Materials Needed: African American cards, and library resources

Pre-Lesson The teacher will present the African American cards, on Ed Bradley, Mae C. Jemison, Rosa Parks, George Washington Carver, Neal V. Loving, Oprah Winfrey, Thurgood Marshall, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Marian Anderson, Bill Cosby, Arthur Ashe, Jr. and May Angelou, to the students. The teacher will read the interesting facts about the famous African Americans. Each student will be asked to pick a famous African American. They can pick from the people already discussed or choose another famous African American. The students will be asked to research their person and find out how they affected the African American culture. The next day the students will choose a partner and think of interview questions that they can ask their partner about his or her famous person. The students will present their interviews in front of the class, so the whole class will learn about all of the famous African American.

Post-Lesson: The students will be asked to make a chart of all of the famous people. They will list the name of the famous person and then list the contributions they made to the African American culture. The students will fill out the worksheet about the famous African Americans. They will then write an interesting fact about one of the famous people in their journals.

Assessment: The students will be evaluated on their interviews and the information that they present to the class during the interview and they will also be evaluated on their charts. The worksheet will also be evaluated to see how much they learned about the famous African Americans.

Strategies used: class discussion, research, interviewing and charting

Worksheet
African Americans have excelled in all arenas of life. Below are some of the many accomplishments made by famous African-American heroes in sports, literature, science, the armed forces, and politics. For each description, circle the letter of the matching answer.

1. In 1964 I was given the Nobel Peace Prize for my work in civil rights. I believed in peaceful, nonviolent demonstrations. I am:
A. Martin Luther King, Jr. B. George Washington Carver C. Malcolm X

2. I traveled around the country before and after the Civil War speaking out for the rights of women and blacks. I am:
U. Coretta King V. Sojourner Truth W. Oprah Winfrey

3. I was the first black Supreme Court justice. I helped fight against racial segregation in the public schools. I am:
L. Clarence Thomas M. Thurgood Marshall N. Shirley Chrisholm

4. I wrote a book entitled Up From Slavery that described my experiences as a newly freed slave. I also headed a school for blacks called Tuskegee Institute. I am:
H. Martin Luther King, Jr I. Booker T. Washington J. Malcolm X

5. I helped more than 300 slaves escape to freedom by leading them through safe routes on the Underground Railroad. I was also a nurse and a spy for the Union Army in the Civil War. I am:
F. Maya Angelou G. Rosa Parks H. Harriet Tubman

6. I spent 47 years doing plant research and teaching throughout the South. I am best known for my pioneering work with peanuts. I am:
C. Colin Powell D. Bill Cosby E. George Washington Carver

7. In 1955 I refused to give up my bus seat to a white passenger. My refusal helped strike down this Jim Crow law. I am:
C. Jesse Jackson D. Benjamin Banneker E. Rosa Parks

8. I was the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. I helped make decisions regarding American troops during Operation Desert Storm. I am:
A. Colin Powell B. Jesse Jackson C. Nelson Mandela

9. In 1947 I became the first black major-league baseball player and the first black man to play in a World Series. I helped the Dodgers win the National League pennant. I am:
C. Michael Jordan D. Jackie Robinson E. Arthur Ashe

10. During World War II, I developed a method of storing blood for longer periods of time by separating the whole blood from the blood plasma. My process saved thousands of lives. I am:
R. Richard Drew S. Clarence Thomas T. Booker T. Washington

11. I was the heavyweight boxing champion of the world from 1937 to 1948. I was a symbol of hope for many blacks. I am:
A. Joe Louis B. Hank Aaron C. George Foreman

Now list all of the letters that you circled: __________________________
Can you make a simple, four-word sentence with those letters? Fill in each blank below with one letter. What is the significance of this sentence.

Title: Fight for Freedom

Grade: 3

Time: 1 day

Subject: Reading, Social Studies

Materials Needed: "The People Could Fly" by Virginia Hamilton, worksheet on the Fight for Freedom, library resources and computers.

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to understand the importance of freedom in the lives of African Americans.
2. The students will be able to make a time line of the events involved in the fight for freedom.

Pre-Lesson: The teacher will read the story "The Talking Cooter" to the students and have the students discuss Jim’s dream to be free and how many slaves wanted to be free.
The students will also brainstorm the events that took place to give slaves freedom.

Lesson: Each student will be given the worksheet "A fight for freedom", which has several events that took place during the African American’s fight for freedom and their fight to vote. The students will first predict the order of the events listed. Then the students will find a partner. With their partner they will compare their answers. Then they will go to the library and use the reference materials to find the actual year that the events occurred. The students will share their order with the rest of the class to see if they put all of the events in the correct order. The students can use the program Timeliner 4.0 on the computer to make a timeline of the events that took place during the African American’s fight for freedom. The students can add pictures to their timeline if they have time.

Post-Lesson: The students will share their timelines with the rest of the class and show how close their predictions were to the actual order of events. The students will write their statement in their journals.

Assessment: The students will be evaluated on the final product of their timelines. The criteria for the evaluation will be if the time line is correct, neat, and looks appealing.

Strategies used: class discussion, computerized timeline and predictions
A Fight For Freedom

Predict the events in order numbering them from 1 to 12. Then use reference materials to find the actual year in which each event occurred. Then write the actual order of events.

1. All women - Black and White - were granted the right to vote

2. The 14th Amendment, which protected the right of freed slaves after the Civil War was ratified

3. The Civil War began.

4. Rhode Island became the first state to abolish slavery

5. In Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were no longer legal.

6. The 13th Amendment was approved, making all slavery illegal

7. The U.S. Constitution was put into effect. It included a compromise on slavery which said the Congress would not stop the slave trade for 20 years.

8. The 24th Amendment banned the use of poll taxes in federal elections.

9. In the Emancipation Proclamation, Abraham Lincoln declared that all slaves in the Confederate states were free.

10. In Plessy v. Ferguson, the Supreme Court ruled that blacks and whites could be segregated as long as the facilities were equal.

11. The Voting Rights Act was passed, making it easier for blacks to register to vote.

12. The 15th Amendment was ratified, giving black male citizens the right to vote.

Title: Kwanzaa

Grade: 3

Time: 2 days - One day to research Kwanzaa and one day to present their research.

Subject: Reading, Social Studies

Materials Needed: "The Gifts of Kwanzaa" by Synthia Saint James and library resources.

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to identify some of the important parts of the African American celebration called Kwanzaa.
2. The students will be able to compare this African American celebration to celebrations that they celebrate.

Pre-Lesson: The teacher will read "The Gifts of Kwanzaa" to the students. The teacher will ask the students to use the K-W-L process to brainstorm about what they would like to learn about Kwanzaa.

Lesson: The students will brainstorm as a class what things they would like to know more about the tradition of Kwanzaa. The students will find a partner and choose a topic to research about Kwanzaa. The students will go to the library and research what they can find out about Kwanzaa. The next day the students will present to their classmates what they found out about Kwanzaa. As a class they will make an affinity diagram of the important aspects of the Kwanzaa tradition.

Post-Lesson: The students will take their sheets of paper that they started the K-W-L process on and complete the process by writing about what they learned. They will then write their sentence about Kwanzaa in their journals.

Assessment: The students will be evaluated on their presentation, affinity diagram, and on their responses to the K-W-L process.

Strategies used: class discussion, KWL, research and affinity diagram
Title: African American Culture Booklet

Grade: 3

Time: 1 day

Subject: Social Studies, Art

Materials Needed: Construction paper, string, needles, crayons, markers, glue and journal sentences.

Objectives:
1. The students will be able to organize all of their information about African American Culture.

Pre-Lesson: The teacher will ask each student to share their favorite activity that they did over the African American Month. The teacher will ask the students to draw a picture to represent their favorite part of African American Culture.

Lesson: The students will fold their pieces of paper in half, so they can write a statement on half of the paper and make it into a booklet. The students will take all of their sentences from their journals and rewrite them on a sheet of paper. For each statement, the students can draw a picture to illustrate their statement. They will combine all of their statements and use a piece of construction paper for a cover. The students can glue their pictures from the pre-lesson on the front of their booklet. The students will use the string and needles to sew together their booklets at the fold of their papers.

Post-Lesson: The students will share their booklets with the rest of the class. They can compare the similarities in their statements that each student thought was interesting.

Assessment: The students will be assessed on the completion of their booklet. They will be assessed if the booklet is aesthetically appealing, organized and complete.

Strategies used: summarization of unit

Resources
Teacher’s Helper- February/March 1996
The Mailbox - Intermediate Feb/Mar 1994
The Mailbox - Intermediate Feb/Mar 1995

African American Children Songs

Boll Weevil Blues
Swing Low Sweet Chariot
Kee-Chee
Kye, Kye, Kule
Ma Lo We
Obwisana
Tue, Tue
Twa-Ma-Sanga


African American Children’s Books

Why Mosquitoes Buzz in Peoples Ears by Verna Aardema
The People Could Fly by Virginia Hamilton
Tar Beach by Faith Ringgold
Underground to Canada by Barbara Smucker
The House of Dies Drear by Virginia Hamilton
The Story of the Underground Railroad by R. Conrad Stein
If You Traveled on the Underground Railroad by Ellen Levine
Harriet Tubman and Black History Month by Polly Carter
Kwanzaa: Origin, Concepts, Practice by Maulana Karenga
The African American Celebration of Kwanzaa by Maulana Karenga
Kwanzaa, An African American Celebration of Culture and Cooking by Eric Copage
Pink and Say by Patricia Polacco
Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor
Extraordinary Black Americans From Colonial to Contemporary by Susan Altman
Outward Dreams: Black Inventors and Their Inventions by Jim Haskins
The Dark - Thirty by Patricia C. McKissack
Brown Angels by Walter Dean Myers
The Well by Mildred D. Taylor
The Friendship by Mildred D. Taylor
Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman
The Gifts of Kwanzaa by Synthia Saint James
Seven Candles for Kwanzaa by Andrea Davis
Movie: Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People’s Ears by Weston Woods Release



African American Web Sites

http://wms.luminet.net/d...phics/afamer/Lesson.html
http://www.educ.indiana.edu/cas/tt/v2i2/african.html
http://www.atlhist.org/html/tradit.htm
http://lcweb.loc.gov/rr/mss/guide/african.html
http://www.webmasters-net.com/old96/african.htm
http://www.usinternet.com/users/bdbourn/maya.htm
http://www.multiculturalmedia.com/northamerica.html#africanam
http://www.melanet.com/melanet/kwanzaa/kwanzaa.html
http://www.flint.lib.mi.us/fpl/resources/holidays/kwanzaa.html
http://www.putnam.com/putnam/Its_Kwanzaa_Time/

African American Research Resources

Children’s books from above
Web Sites from above
Zapler, Michael. "The Force Behind Kwanzaa." The Chronicle of Higher Education. Dec 14, 1994 p. A7
Fulmer, Douglas. "String band traditions." American Visions. April-May 1995: 46