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Full text of "Landmarks of Toronto; a collection of historical sketches of the old town of York from 1792 until 1837, and of Toronto from 1834 to 1904"

ROBERTSON S 



LBSDMURKS or TOROSTO. 





TORONTO PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Reference Department. 



THIS BOOK MUST NOT BETAKEN OUT OF THE ROOM. 



DEC 8 1933 



ROBERTSON S 



LANDMARKS 




A COLLECTION OF 

HISTORICAL SKETCHES 



OF THE OLD 



TOWN OF YORK 

From 1792 until 1837 

AND OF 

Toronto from 1834 to 1904 

ALSO 

Nearly Three Hundred Engravings of the Churches of Toronto 
Embracing the Picture of Every Church Obtainable 

from 1800-1904. 



FOURTH SERIES COMPLETE. 

REPUBLI-iHED FROM THE TORONTO "EVENING TELEGRAM," 



TORONTO: 

J. ROSS ROBERTSON. 



1904. 

.Entered according: to the Act of th Parliament of Canada in the year one thowiapoa nta* 
hundred and four, by J. Ross ROBERTSON, at the Department of Agrienltnre, Ottawa. 




Jgrn^ 
DEC 8 1933 



PREFACE. 

This ;s the fourth volume or series of "The Landmarks of Toronto" 
which I have issued. The sketches have all appeared, as with former 
volumes, in the columns of The Toronto Evening Telegram, and the inter 
est awakened by the reading of the history c an important feature in tfvic 
life that of the history of the churches, induces me to continue tie issue 
of the Landmarks in this form. 

The three preceding volumes are nearly out of print, the first volume 
absolutely. Th merit of the first volume is testified to by the fact taat 
although issued at $2 a volume it is now $6, and very difficult to obtain. 

No book of its kind in Canada has commanded more attention than the 
volumes which record the life and history of the capital c^ty of Ontario 
from 1792-1903, and the fact that at tiiis date it should oe impossible to get 
together the information and engravings -which embellish the first volume, 
makes the earlier volumes all the more interesting. 

The Landmarks are to be found in the great libraries of the world, at 
the British Museum, The Guildhall Library, and The United Service Institu 
tion in London, England, The National Libraries at Paris, at Berlin and 
Vienna, ani. in many of the smaller libraries, not only public, but private, in 
Great Britain and the United States. 

The Landmarks of Toronto are the only volumes ever published that 
give in detail the history of the old Town of York and of the City of 
Toronto, with historic pictures of men and places, maps and plans and 
other records that are of vital interest, not only to the pioneers, but to their 
children of the present generation. 

If the 3,000 pages contained in the four volumes, with 600 illustrations, 
had not been first published in the columns of The Toronto Evening Tele 
gram they could not be issued under a cost of $5 a volume. 

Their valus may be shown in the fact that two sets of the three volumes, 
extra illustrated, have been soi- by a bookseller, one to the Public Library 
in Toronto, and another set to a private collector for $150 for each set. 

Copies of this volume may be had by sending $2 to The Evening Tele 
gram Office, Toronto. Volumes II. and nL may also be obtained. Occasion 
ally a copy of Volume I. is offered for sale, but at the increased price of $6, 
and where collectors desire that volume it may be possible, scarce as it is, 
to obtain it. 

Of this, the fourth volume, only a limited number have been issued, and 
as it will not be reprinted, those who desire a copy should subscribe as soon 
after its issue as possible. 

The engravings in ail the volumes are copyright, and cannot be T9~ 
published in any other form except by permission. 

Every effort has been made to make the history of the churches com 
plete, and it is expected that every church and very member will sub 
scribe for at least one copy. 

Each volume has a complete iiv^, no* only of the subject matter but 
o f th 111"otT-aHr>Tv<3. fnrl the e^re volume furnishes to the people of To- 
Torsto a tmlqtre collection * local chtircTi history that must interest all who 
are interested in local ckurch history and its work in this city during the 
more than century of years that have rolled by since the old Town of 

York was founded. 

J. ROSS ROBERTSON. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



CO2STTE3STTS. 



CHAPTER I. PAGE 
Introductory Remarks Their Or 
igin and Growth Their Minls- 
isters. Officials and Leading 
Members, with Other Particu 
lars 1 

CHAPTER II. 
Trinity - An Historic Church 

Full of Years and Honours 2 

CHAPTER III. 

St, George s The First West End 
Anglican Parish Some Not 
able Parishioners g 

CHAPTER IV. 

St. Paul s The Olrl-time York- 
vine Place of Worship The 
Grammar School 10 

CHAPTER V. 

Holy Trinity The First Free and 
Open Church in Toronto A 

Gift from England 16 

CHAPTER VI. 

Ptephpn The First Church In 
the Citv West of Spadina Ave 
nue Its Founder 24 

CHAPTER VII. 
John s The Old Military 
Church Ita History and De 
velopment 29 

CHAPTER VIII. 

Cemetery Chapel The Predeces 
sor of the present St. Peter s, 
How the Work was Extended 

CHAPTER IX. 

Peter s The Origin of the 
Chnreb Who Originated the 
Building The First Members 

CHAPTER X. 

Church of the Redeemer The sec 
ond Yorkville Church Those 
Who Built it A Long Pastor 
ate 

CHAPTER XI. 

St Luke s The First Frame 
Church and its Successor A 
Prosperous Work 43 



. 






33 



36 



40 



CHAPTER XIL 

AH Saints An Offshoot from St 
Luke s and Holy Trinity A 
Large Congregation ........ 

CHAPTER XIII. 

St. Andrew s The summer ehnreh 
on the Island Its Ministers 

CHAPTER XIV. 

St. Bartholomew s An East End 
Rectory in a Qufet Neighbour 
hood ................... 

CHAPTER XV. 

Church of the Ascension A Down 
town Parish In Memory of 
Canon Baldwin ........... 

CHAPTER XVI 

at. Matthias A Typical High 
Church Service and Congrega 
tion ... . ............ 

CHAPTER XVTI. 

St. Thomas A Prosperous Congre 
gation Formed from Small -Be 
ginnings ........... 

CHAPTER XVTIT. 
Grace - A Church Formed from 
Holy Trinity Congregation.. 

CHAPTER XIX. 

St. Philip s A West End Parish 
with a Pleasing Remrd ..... 

CHAPTER XX. 

St Mary Magdalene A Hearty 
Service and Ritual A Well- 
worked Parish ............ 

CHAPTER XXI. 

St. Mary the Virgin A North-west 
Parish, Forty Years ago In the 
Forest .................. 

CHAPTER XXH. 

St. Alban s Cathedral The Cath 
edral Church of the Diocese of 
Toronto ................. 

CHAPTER XXIII. 

Trinity College The handsome 
University Chapel and Its His 
tory ......... 



45 



61 



55 



57 



75 

75 



gfl 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER XXIV. PAGK j 
St. Anne s and St. Olave s The 
First Brockton Place of Wor 
ship for Anglicans S8 

CHAPTER XXV. 

Church of the Messiah An Archi 
tectural Gem in the Northern 
Suburbs 

CHAPTER XXVI. 
St. Cyprian s A Small Church 
with an Excellent Record . 



CHAPTER XXXIX. PAOB 
Christ Church, Deer Park A 
Pretty Suburban Church with 

Many Earnest Workers 117 

CHAPTER XL. 

Tent Church - - The Summer 
Church Where Gathers a Con 
gregation of All Denomina 
tions . 



CHAPTER XXVH. 
St Mark s, Parkdale An Ener 
getic Rector and a Very Large 
Congregation ............. 

CHAPTER XXVIII. 
St Simon s An Edifice in the 
North-east Part of the City 
with a Pleasing History ..... 

CHAPTER XXIX. 
St. Barnabas The Anglican Place 
of Worship Built on the Old 
Givens Propertv ........... 

CHAPTER. XXX. 

Church of the Epiphany An Off 
shoot from St. Mark s with an 
Excellent Record .......... 

CHAPTER. XXXI. 
St. Matthew s An East End Par 
ish with a Very Handsome 
Edifice .................. 

CHAPTER XXXII. 
St. Martin s The Church Known 
as "St. Martin s-in-the-Fields" 

CHAPTER XXXIII. 
St. Margaret s A Hearty Service, 
with an Energetic Rector and 
United People ............ 

CHAPTER XXXIV. 
St. Clement s The Only Anglican 
Church in the Extreme East 
End of the City .......... 

CHAPTER XXXV. 
St. John s, Norway A Pretty 
Country Church, with its Off 
shoot at Chester ........... 

CHAPTER XXXVI. 
St. Mark s, Toronto Junction The 
First Anglican Church Built in 
That Part of York Township .. 

CHAPTER XXXVII. 
St. John s, Toronto Junction On 
the Old Humber Plains With 
in sight of the Lake ...... 

CHAPTER XXXVin. 
St. Clement s, Eglinton A Pretty 
North Toronto Church Con 
nected with York Mills ..... 



92 



94 



99 



101 



103 



105 



106 



107 



110 



113 



115 i 



116 



CHAPTER XLI. 

St. Augustine A Building Which 
was nearly lost to the mem 
bers of the Anglican body, 119, 608 

CHAPTER XLII. 

The Presbyterian Churches Pre 
fatory Remarks The First 
Toronto Presbyterians and 
Their Places of Worship - 
Growth of Presbyterianism . . 120 

CHAPTER XLIII. 
St. Andrew s, King Street West 
The First Toronto Presbyter 
ian Church Its Ministers 
from the Beginning Some In 
cidents of Striking Interest. . !? 

CHAPTER XLFV. 
Knox Church A Church with an 
Unprecedented Record in a 

Busy Part of the City 214 

CHAPTER XLV. 

Duchess Street Mission Useful 
Organization in a Poor and 

Populous District 223 

CHAPTER XLVI. 
Old St. Andrew s Church A Pres 
byterian Congregation with a 
Long and Progressive Record 225 

CHAPTER XLVII. 
Cooke s Church One of the Prin 
cipal Organizations in the 
Presbyterian Denomination . . 23S 

CHAPTER XL VIII. 
Leslieville Church The First 
Presbyterian Place of Worship 

East of the Don 23T 

CHAPTER XLIX. 
St. James Presbyterian Large 
and Influential Congregation 
Excellent Work Accomplished 239 

CHAPTER L. 

St. John s United and Large Con 
gregation with a Pleasing Re 
cord 24fl 

CHAPTER LI. 

Charles Street Presbyterian A 
Prosperous Place of Worship 
on Charles Street, now Re 
moved to Bloor Street East. . 241 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER LIT. PAOB 
Erskine Presbyterian Large and 
Handsome Church Where 
Many Useful Men Hare Minis 
tered 253 

CHAPTER LOT. 

Central Presbyterian Once a Su 
burban Church, now in the 
Midst of the City, has a Pleas 
ing History 258 

CHAPTER LIV. 

College Street Presbyterian A 
Prosperous and United Con 
gregation with a Record for 

Useful Work 263 

CHAPTER LV. 

Reformed Presbyterian Faithful 
to Old Traditions and Ideals 
Neither Organ or Hymn Book 266 

CHAPTER LVI. 

Parkdale Presbyterian A West 
End Church Its Inception, De 
velopment and Progress 268 

CHAPTER LVII. 

Independent Presbyterian Earn 
est Band of Workers Who Or 
ganized a Church Outside of 

General Body 272 

CHAPTER LVIII. 
Bloor Street Presbyterian Hand 
some Church and Large Con 
gregation in North-west Part 
of City 273 

CHAPTER LIX. 

St. Enoch s Presbyterian An East 
End Church with People and 

Pastor Always in Unison 276 

CHAPTER LX. 

Chalmers Presbyterian A Flour 
ishing West End Congrega 
tion in a Suburban Neighbour 
hood 278 

CHAPTER LXI. 

St. Mark s Presbyterian A 
Church Where in 1860 the 
"Wild Flowers O er the 
Plain" Grew and Flourished . . 280 

CHAPTER LXII. 

Pern Avenue Presbyterian "Slow 
but Sure" A Small Church, 
but a Congregation Filling 

Every Seat 283 

CHAPTER LXIII. 
Dovercourt Road Presbyterian A 
Small Congregation from 
Which ^-"eelient Results Are 
Obtained . . 284 



CHAPTER LXIV. PAO 
St. Paul s Presbyterian A Flour 
ishing Congregation which at 
First Worshipped in a Carpen 
ter s Shop ^ 

CHAPTER LXV. 

Booar Presbyterian A Band of 
Enthusiastic Workers Make 
Continued and Substantial 
Progress 

CHAPTER LXVI. 
West Presbyterian First Presby 
terian Church in West End 

Mission Work Progress 2SS 

CHAPTER LXVTI. 
Church of the Covenant A North 
End Congregation Which has 
Surmounted Many Difficulties 290 

CHAPTER LXVIII. 
Cowan Ave. Presbyterian Park- 
dale Presbyterians Who Hav 
Done Earnest and Excellent 
Work 291 

CHAPTER LXIX. 
Deer Park Presbyterian A Pretty 
Church Which was Long Ago 

a Mission Sunday School 293 

CHAPTER LXX. 

East Presbyterian Now Known 
as St. Giles Formerly a Mis 
sion Originating in the "Six 
ties" 294 

CHAPTER LXXI. 
South Side Presbyterian A Con 
gregation Originally Organ 
ized Under Very Great Diffi 
culties 340 

CHAPTER LXXn. 

St. Andrew s Institute A Social 
and Religious Influence Exer 
cised Wisely for Many Years 300 

CHAPTER LXXIII. 
York Presbyterian A Suburban 
Church which has Accomplish 
ed Much Useful Work 303 

CHAPTER LXXIV. 

St. Michael s Cathedral The Cath 
edral Church of Toronto Dio 
cese Its Hierarchy and its 

Clergy 3<M5 

CHAPTER LXXV. 

St. Paul s Roman Catholic The 
First Roman Catholic Church 
Erected in the City Some of 
its Notable Rectors 315 



V1U 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER LXXVI. PAGB 
St. Mary s, Roman Catholic The 
Earliest West End Place of 
Worship Erected by the Ro 
man Catholics 320 

CHAPTER LXXVII. 
St Basil s, Roman Catholic Fam 
ous for its Educational as well 

as Parochial Work 323 

CHAPTER LXXVIII, 
Our Lady of Lourdes The 
Church of the Archiepiscopal 
Palace in the North-east of 
the City 328 

CHAPTER LXXIX. 
St Helen s, Roman Catholic 
Once the Parish Church of 

the Suburb of Brockton 333 

CHAPTER LXXX. 

St Patrick s, Roman Catholic 
Flourishing West End Congre 
gation in Charge of Redemp-t- 

orist Fathers 335 

CHAPTER LXXXI. 
St. Peter s and St. Cecilia s Off 
shoots respectively from St. 
Mary s and St. Helen s Par 
ishes 338 

CHAPTER LXXXII. 
Church of the Sacred Heart The 
Only French Congregation in 
Toronto Formerly a Presby 
terian Church 339 

CHAPTER LXXXIII. 
St. Joseph s, Leslieville Where 
Earnest Work has Accom 
plished Splendid Results 340 

CHAPTER LXXXIV. 
The Methodist Body A brief re 
sume of the Rise and Progress 
of That Denomination in Tor 
onto , 342 

Richmond Street Methodist The 
"Cathedral of Methodism" in 
Ontario Its Earlier Pastors. 342 

CHAPTER LXXXV. 
The Metropolitan Church with 
an Eventful History of Nearly 

a Century 348 

CHAPTER LXXXVI. 
Central Methodist First Metho 
dist Church in Northern Por 
tion of Toronto 350 

CHAPTER LXXXVII. 
Elm Street Methodist Prosperous 
Church in One of the Poorer 
City Districts 353 



CHAPTER LXXXVIII. PAGM 
Carlton Street Methodist Large 
and Flourishing Congregation 

with a good record 357 

CHAPTER LXXXIX. 
Berkeley Street Methodist The 
Old Place of Worship for East 
End Methodists 361 

CHAPTER XC. 

Sherbourne Street Methodist 
The Handsomest Church in 

Central Toronto 363 

CHAPTER XCI. 

Bathurst Street Methodist Marks 
Expansion of Toronto s 

Methodist Churches 364 

CHAPTER XCII. 

Agnes Street Methodist Story of 
its Origin, its Founder and 

First Pastor 36< 

CHAPTER XCin. 
Queen Street Methodist A con 
gregation worshipping in the 
Vicinity since the "Thirties" 370 

CHAPTER XCIV. 
Yonge Street Methodist The 
Most Northerly Methodist 

Church in the City 373 

CHAPTER XCV. 

St Paul s Methodist A Handsome 
Structure, with a Large Con 
gregation 37f 

CHAPTER XCVI. 
Dunn Ave. Methodist The Hand 
somest Ecclesiastical Struc 
ture in the West End 37T 

CHAPTER XCVII. 
Parliament Street Methodist A 
Pioneer Church in the Relig 
ious Life of the East End ... 379 

CHAPTER XCVIII. 
Broadway Tabernacle An Impos 
ing Building Where Once 
Stood the Military "Block 
house" 384 

CHAPTER XCIX. 
Centennial Methodist A North 
End Church Doing Quiet but 

Effective Work 387 

CHAPTER C. 

Woodgreen Methodist Named 
After Two Well-known Metho 
dist Ministers 387 

CHAPTER CI. 

Perth Avenue Methodist A Small 
Church Which has had Many 
Difficulties 389 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER GIL FAUK 

Clinton Street Methodist A Con 
gregation Which has from the 
First been Progressive 390 

CHAPTER CIII. 

Wesley Church, Dundas Street Davisville Methodist Semi-rural 

Built on Land Which in 1860 Church in the Northern Sub- 
was used for an Orchard . 392 



CHAPTER CXVI. PAGE 

West Toronto Methodist A Hand 
some Church Where Once 
were Brickfields 411 

CHAPTER CXVII. 



urbs 



412 



CHAPTER CIV. 

St. Clarens Avenue Methodist 
The First Methodist Church 
in the Old Brockton Suburb.. 394 

CHAPTER CV. 

Euclid Avenue Methodist An Off 
shoot from Queen St. Wes" 
Congregation 395 

CHAPTER CVI. 

Epworth Methodist A Small Un 
pretentious Building An Off 
shoot from Bathurst Street.. 397 

CHAPTER CVII. 

Gerrard Street Methodist Situ 
ated in the Midst of a Work 
men s District 398 

CHAPTER CVIII. 
Queen Street Methodist An Old 
Suburban Church Around * 
Which are many Memories . . 400 

CHAPTER CIX. 

Westmoreland Methodist Result 
of Perseverance in Church 

Work and Extension 401 

CHAPTER CX. 

Simpson Avenue Methodist An 
Offshoot of Woodgreen and 
Queen East Congregations . . 402 

CHAPTER CXI. 

Trinity Methodist The Handsom 
est Ecclesiastical Building in 

That Portion of Toronto 403 

CHAPTER CXII. 

Crawford Street Methodist For 
merly was known as Berean 

Church 404 

CHAPTER CXIII. 
New Richmond Methodist The 
Successor of the Old Church, 
the "Cathedral of Methodism" 406 

CHAPTER CXIV. 
King St. East Methodist A Build 
ing Removed from Teraulay 
St., Formerly "The People s 

Church" 407 

CHAPTER CXV. 

Zion Methodist, Bracondale Ca 
pacious Church, Built Where 
it was Urgently Required . . . 408 



CHAPTER CXVIII. 
Hope Methodist, Little York 
Handsome Church in the Rail 
way Suburb 415 

CHAPTER CXIX. 
Eglinton Methodist Once a Coon- 
try, now a Suburban Congre 
gation 417 

CHAPTER CXX. 

St. Alban s, Methodist The Old 
Parkdale Mission Some Suc 
cessful Work 418 

CHAPTER CXXI. 
Davenport Mehodist A Suburban 
Place of Worship Founded in 

the "Forties" 420 

CHAPTER CXXII. 
Free Methodist Independent Con 
gregation Working on Metho 
dist Principles 420 

CHAPTER CXXIII. 
The Baptist Body History of the 
Rise and Progress of That De 
nomination of Christians in 

the City 422 

Jarvis St. Baptist A Most Feeble 
Congregation in 1829, Crown 
ed with Success in Later 

Years 422 

CHAPTER CXXIV. 
Bloor St. Baptist Church with a 
Phenomenally Successful Era 

Its Internal Growth 430 

CHAPTER CXXV. 
i Dovercourt Road Baptist Out 
come of an Energetic Mission 
Beautiful and Commodious 

Structure 434 

CHAPTER CXXVI. 
: Inunanuel Baptist Organization 
of Missions Spirit of Self-sac 
rifice from Inceptioa 457 

CHAPTER CXXVII. 
Bcverley St. Baptist i^arge and 
Useful Congregations Its 

History and its Pastors 440 

CHAPTER CXXVIII. 
| First Ave. Baptist First Baptist 
Place of Worship Erected east 
of the Don 444 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER CXXIX PAGE 

Parliament St. Baptist A Congre 
gation of Workers Theory of 
Church Giving 446 

CHAPTER CXXX. 
Tecumseh St. Baptist Memorial 
Church Erected by Private 
Munificence Liberal Contri 
butions 449 

CHAPTER CXXXI. 
College St. Baptist Hopeless Out 
look in its early History City 
Missions and Charity 460 

CHAPTER CXXXII. 
Ossington Ave. Baptist Hopeful 
Band of Workers Successfully 
Rewarded for Past Efforts . . . 455 

CHAPTER CXXXIII. 
Western Baptist An Offshoot 
from Parkdale, and a Thriv 
ing Church 456 

CHAPTER CXXXIV. 
W aimer Road Baptist Handsom 
est Baptist Church in Prov 
ince of Ontario 458 

CHAPTER CXXXV. 
Sheridan Ave. Baptist Small but 
Prosperous Church Its Rise 

and Progress 459 

CHAPTER CXXXVI. 
Kenilwortb Ave. Baptist Growth 
of a Miss on Sunday School 
Now a Prosperous East End 

Church 461 

CHAPTER CXXXVII. 
Eastern Ave. Baptist Mission 
Vigourous Workers Spiritual 

Methods and Results 463 

CHAPTER CXXXVIII. 
Christie St. Baptist Offshoot 
from Walmer Road Church 
In a Flourishing Condition . . 465 

CHAPTER CXXXIX. 
century Bapust Formerly a Mis 
sion of Bloor St. Church In- 
creasing Congregational 

Growth 465 

CHAPTER CXL. 

Zion Baptist, Eglinton Outcome 
of a Gathering of Children- 
Aftermath of the "Boom" . . 466 

CHAPTER CXLI. 
Annette St. Baptist Growth of a 
Suburban Church A Larger 
Edifice Necessary 467 



CHAPTER CXLII. PAQB 

Royce Ave. Baptist Started as a 
Mission from Dovercourt road 
Church Student Pastors . . . 468 

CHAPTER CXLIII. 
East Toronto Baptist Persistent 
Congregation Increased pros 
perity Financial Standing . . 469 

CHAPTER CXLIV. 
Baptist Church (Coloured) "The 
First," Organized in the 
"Twenties" Its Career 4T1 

CHAPTER CXLV. 
Congregational Body Brief His 
tory of That Denomination in 
Toronto for Over Half a Cen 
tury 473 

Zion Church The Mother of Tor 
onto Congregationalism Re 
cord of Sixty-nine Years .... 473 

CHAPTER CXLVI. 
Bond Street Marvellous Growth 
from Small Beginning Its Re 
cord and Pastors 4T7 

CHAPTER CXLVII. 
Northern Congregational Off- 
* shoot from Old Zion Had its 
Origin as a Sunday School 

Its Pastors 484 

CHAPTER CXL VIII. 
Olivet Congregational Growth of 
a Bond Street Mission in the 

North End of the City 48 

CHAPTER CXLIX. 
Western Congregational A Flour 
ishing Congregation Depres 
sing Period Overcome through 

Persistence 488 

CHAPTER CL. 

Broadview Ave. Church Band of 
Hope Develops into a Flour 
ishing East End Church 490 

CHAPTER CLI. 

Parkdale Congregational Organ 
ized by the aid of Sister 
Churches, now Dependent on 

Itself 492 

CHAPTER CLII. 

Bethel Congregational Realiza 
tion of the Desire of Friends 
for Church Extension Its 

Pastors 494 

CHAPTER CLIII. 
"Bethany" An Undenomina 
tional Church on Congrega 
tional Lines 495 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER CLIV. PAGE 

Friends Meeting House Where 
They First Gathered Promi 
nent Members of the Sect . . 497 

CHAPTER CLV. 

Church of Christ An Evangelical 
Association with numerous 

branches 499 

CHAPTER CLVI. 
Disciples of Christ A Small but 
Earnest Gathering in the 

"Junction" 500 

CHAPTER CLVII. 
Church of Christ Handsome 
Church on Cecil Street, with 

Large Congregation 501 

CHAPTER CLVIII. 
Christian Workers Earnest Band 
of Evangelists and home Visit 
ors 503 

CHAPTER CLIX. 
The Salvation Army Rise and 
Progress in City Aggres 
sive Missionary Spirit 507 

CHAPTER CLX. 

Reformed Episcopal - Church 
Formed as a Protest Against 

Anglican Ritualism 516 

CHAPTER CLXI. 
Christian Scientists A Small 
Body of Worshippers Holding 
Peculiar Tenets 520 

CHAPTER CLXII. 
The Church" Congregation of 
Independent Thinkers on 

Evangelical Basis 522 

CHAPTER CLXIII. 
The Plymouth Brethren Christ 
ian Workers who Reject an 

Ordained Ministry 523 

CHAPTER CLXIV. 
Disciples of Christ Congrega 
tions Formed on Evangelical 
Lines in the Year 1838 . 



CHAPTER CLXV. 
The Gospel Hall, Broadview Ave. 
Evangelical Congregation of 
Earnest Workers 

CHAPTER CLXVI. 
First Unitarian Church - - Only 
Congregation of the Denomin 
ation in or near Toronto .... 

CHAPTER CLXVII. 
The Theosophists - - Sometimes 
Spoken of as Christian Pan 
theists . 



526 



529 



530 



534 



CHAPTER CLXVIII. 
The Christadelphians Denomin 
ation Describe Themselves as 
Brethren in Christ 534 

CHAPTER CLXIX. 
Assembly of Saints An Assem 
blage of Christian Workers, 

now Scattered 536 

CHAPTER CLXX. 
Dundas St. Methodist An Old- 
time Country Place of Wor 
ship 536 

CHAPTER CLXXI. 
Swedenborgians Congregation 

of Followers of Immanuel 

Swedenborg 537 

CHAPTER CLXXII. 
Latter Day Saints Popularly 
Known as the Mormon Con 
gregation 542 

CHAPTER CLXXIII. 
Catholic Apostolic - - Handsome 
and Commodious Building, 

Unique in the City 544 

CHAPTER CLXXIV. 

German Lutheran Where the 
Followers of the Great Re 
former Meet 550 

CHAPTER CLXXV. 
Jewisn synagogues The Relig 
ious Home in Toronto of 

God s "Ancient People" 556 

CHAPTER CLXXVT. 

Toronto Y. M. C. A. A Non-sec 
tarian but Evangelical Insti 
tution 566 

CHAPTER CLXXVII. 

African Methodist Churches 
Many Strange Vicissitudes 
Among the Various Bodies . . 571 

B. M. Episcopal Church (Col 
oured) 574 

CHAPTER CLXXVIII. 

Christian Adventists A Small 
Church with Earnestly Am 
bitious Hopes 574 

CHAPTER CLXXIX. 

Free Methodists Evangelical 
Congregation Following John 

Wesley s Lines 575 

CHAPTER CLXXX. 

Greek Catholic Church The Only 
Congregation of the Kind in 
Western Ontario 576 



xii 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER CLXXXI. PAGE 
Collegiate and Conventual Chapels 
Attached to the Various Re 
ligious Denominations of the 
City . ... 577 

St. Joseph s Convent 577 

Lonetto Convent 578 

Wycliffe College 579 

McMaster University 579 

Victoria University 580 

House of Providence 581 

Knox College 583 

Bishop Strachan School 584 

CHAPTER CLXXXII. 

Deaf and Dumb Congregation 
Unique Religious Organiza 
tion of Great Interest 585 

CHAPTER CLXXXIII. 

St. James Church Brief History 
of First Anglican Church in 

Toronto 586 

CHAPTER CLXXXIV. 

St. Saviour s, East Toronto A 
Handsome and Prosperous 

Suburban Church 590 

CHAPTER CTLXXXV. 

St. Jude s Founded as a West 

End Mission During the Boom 591 

St. Paul s Church 592 

St. John s Church 592 

CHAPTER CLXXXVI. 

Church of the Holy Family - - The 
First Roman Catholic Church 
In Parhdale 593 



CHAPTER CLXXXVII. PAGB 
St. Francis Roman Catholic An 
Offshoot from the Adjacent 
Parish of St. Mary s 594 

CHAPTER CLXXXVIII. 

St. John s Roman Catholic, East 
Toronto, only Roman Catholic 
Church in That Part of East 
York 594 

CHAPTER CLXXXIX. 
Victoria Presbyterian Church - 
First Presbyterian Church in 
the "Junction" 595 

CHAPTER CXC. 

Chester Presbyterian - Pretty 
Church in a Country Neigh 
bourhood, for Many Years a , 

Mission 597 

Bonar Presbyterian 598 

CHAPTER CXCI. 
Kew Beach Presbyterian - - For 
Many Years a Mission 
Church, only Fully Organized 

in 1895 598 

CHAPTER CXCII. 
King St. East Methodist The new 
Church of 1903, Erected on 

the Old Site 599 

CHAPTER CXCIII. 
Churches of the Past - - Where 
Early Residents of the City 
Once Worshipped 600 



1 1., m, TJ STiR^T z o isr s. 



PAGK 

Trinity Church, King St. East . . . 

St. George s Churches, John St. . 8 

Interior of St. George s Church.. 9 

St. Paul s Church, Bloor St. East 13 

St. Paul s Ch., 1843, Bloor St. E. . 15 

Holy Trinity Church, Trinity Sq. 19 
Holy Trinity Church, east front 

view. Trinity Square 20 

Holy Trinity Church, west front , 

view, Trinity Square 22 

St. Stephen s Church, from Belle- 

vue Ave 26 

St. Stephen s Church, interior, 

Bellevu-e Ave 28 

St. John s Church, Portland St ... 31 

The Cemetery Chapel ......... 34 

St. Peter s Carlton St opp. 36 

Church of the Redeemer, Avenue 

Road and Bloor 41 

Church of the Redeemer, interior, 

Avenue Road and Bloor 42 

St. Luke s Church, St. Vincent 

and St. Joseph 44 

All Saints Church, Wilton Ave. 

and Sherbourne 48 

All Saintp Church, interior, from 

west front door 49 

St. Andrew s Episcopal Church. 

Toronto Island 52 

St. Andrew s Episcopal Church, 

chancel. Toronto Island 54 

St.. Bartholomew s Ch.. River St. 56 
Church of the Ascension, Rich 
mond St. West 58 

Church of the Ascension, Organ, 

Choir and Altar 61 

Church of St. Matthias, Bellwoods 

Ave 64 

Church of St. Matthias, interior 67 
Church of St. Thomas, Sussex Ave. 

and Huron 70 

Church of St. Thomas, interior . . 72 
Church of St. Thomas, Huron St., 

1898 74 

Grace Church, Elm St... 75 

Ft. Philip s Church. Spadina Ave. 78 

Ft. Philip s Church, interior ... 79 
Church of St. Mary Magdalene, 

Manning Ave 82 

Church of St. Mary the Virgin, 

Dovercourt 83 

St. Alban s Cathedral (unfinished), 

exterior of Chancel 85 

Interior of Trinity College Chapel 87 
St. Anne s Church, Dufferin St.. 

Brockton 89 

St. Olave s Church, Windermere 90 

Church of tl>o Messiah, Avenue rd. 91 

St. Cyprian s Church 93 



PAGE 

St. Mark s Church, Parkdale 95 

St. Simon s Church, Howard St. . 97 
St. Barnabas Church, Halton and 

Givens St 100 

St. Barnabas Church, interior . . . 101 
Church of the Epiphany, Beaty 

Ave., Parkdale 102 

St. Matthew s Church, First Ave. 104 
St. Martin s Church, Perth Ave.. 106 
St. Margaret s Ch., Spadina Ave. 107 
St. Clement s Church. Queen St. E. 108 
St. Clement s Church (new), 

Brooklyn Ave 109 

St. John s Church, Norway Ill 

St. John s Church (new), Norway 112 
St. Barnabas Church, Chester . . . 113 
St. Mark s Church, Toronto June. 114 
! St. John s Church, Toronto June. 115 
St. Clement s Church, Eglinton . . 116 

Christ Church, Deer Park 118 

St. Augustine s Church, Parlia 
ment and Spruce 119 

The Original Church of St. An 
drew, Church St 122 

The Present (1899) Church of St. 

Andrew, King St. West 125 

Knox Church, Queen St. West, 

near Yonge, before fire. 1895 216 
Knox Church, as it is now, 1900. 221 
Duchess St. Presbyterian Misson 224 
Old St. Andrew s Church, Carlton 

and Jarvis Sts 228 

Cooke s Church, 1858-1891, Mutual 

and Queen Sts 232 

Cooke s Ch., Mutual and Queen Sts 247 

1 Leslieville Church, Queen St. East 238 
St. James Square Presbyterian. 242 
St. John s Presbyterian Church, 
corner Bolton Ave. and Ger- 

rard Sts 247 

Charles St. Presbyterian Church. 249 
, Westminster Presbyterian Church, 

Bloor St. East 251 

! Erskine Presbyterian Church, 

Simcoe and Caer-Howell Sts. . 255 
i Central Presbyterian Church, 

Grosvenor and St. Vincent. . 261 
\ College St. Presbyterian, College 

and Bathurst 265 

Reformed Presbyterian Church, 

Carlton St., near Yonge 267 

Parkdale Presbyterian Church, 

Dunn Ave 270 

Independent Church, Presbyter 
ian, Sumach and St. David . . 272 
Bloor St. Presbyterian Church, 

1888. Huron and Bloor 274 

Bloor St. Presbyterian Church . . 275 



XIV 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PAGE 

St. Enoch s Presbyterian Church, 

Metcalfe and Winchester . . . 277 
Chalmers Presbyterian Church, 

Dundas and Dovercourt 279 

St. Mark s Presbyterian Church, 

Adelaide St 281 

St Mark s Presbyterian Church, 

King St. West 282 

Fern Ave. Presbyterian Church. . 284 
Dovercourt Road Presbyterian Ch. 285 
St. Paul s Presbyterian Church, 

Bathurst and Barton 286 

Bonar Presbyterian Church, Lans- 

downe and College 287 

West Presbyterian Church, Deni- 

son Ave 289 

Church of the Covenant, Avenue 

Road 291 

Cowan Ave. Presbyterian Church, 

Parkdate 292 

Deer Park Presbyterian Church . . 294 
Old East Presbyterian Church . . 296 
Oak St. Presbyterian Church ... 297 
South Side Presbyterian Church, 

Parliament St 299 

Emmanuel Presbyterian Church, 

old, East Toronto 304 

Emmanuel Presbyterian Church, 

new, East Toronto 305 

St Michael s Cathedral, as in 1870 312 
St Michael s Cathedral, January, 

1901 312 

St. Paul s Roman Catholic Church, 

Power St., 1887 316 

St. Paul s Roman Catholic Church, 

Queen and Power Sts.., 1901. 318 
St. Mary s Roman Catholic Church, 

Bathurst St., 1901 321 

St. Mary s Roman Catholic Church, 

as it will be when completed 322 
St Basil s Roman Catholic 

Church, St Joseph St 324 

Church of Our Lady of Lourdes, 

Roman Cath., Sherbourne St. 330 
St. Helen s Roman Catholic Ch., 

Dundas and Lansdowne 334 

St Patrick s Ch., Roman Cath 
olic, William St 336 

St Peter s Roman Catholic Ch., 

Bathurst and Bloor Sts 337 

St Cecilia"s Church, Roman 

Catholic, Toronto Junction . . 338 
Church of the Sacred Heart, 

French R, C., King St East. . 339 
St Joseph s Roman Catholic Ch., 

Leslieville 341 

Richmond St. Methodist Ch., 1888 345 
Metropolitan Methodist Ch 348 



Central Methodist Ch., Bloor East 

and Gwynne Sts 351 

Elm St. Methodist Ch 355 

Carlton St Methodist Ch 353 

Berkeley St. Methodist Ch., Queen 

East and Berkeley Sts 362 

Sherbourne St Methodist Ch., 

Carlton and Sherbourne Sts. 363 

Bathurst St Methodist Ch 365 

Agnes St. Methodist Ch., Teraulay 

and Agnes Sts 367 

Queen St. Methodist Ch., near 

Spadina Ave 372 

Yonge St. Methodist Ch., Marlbor- 

ough Ave. and Yonge St 374 

StPaul s Methodist Ch., Aventre rd 37ft 

Dunn Ave. Methodist Ch., King St 

West 378 

Parliament St. Methodist Ch,, cor 
ner Oak St 381 

Broadway Tabernacle, Methodist, 

College St. and Spadina Ave. 385 

Centennial Methodist Ch., Dover- 
court, near Bloor West 387 

Woodgreen Methodist Ch., Queen 

East, corner Strange Ave.... 388 

Perth Ave. Methodist Ch., Perth 

and Ernest Aves 390 

Clinton St. Methodist Ch., near 
College St 391 

Wesley Methodist Ch., Dundas 

and Ossington 393 

St. Clarens Ave. Methodist Ch., 
Dundas and St. Clarens 395 

Euclid Ave. Methodist Ch., Queen 

West, opposite Euclid 396 

; Epworth Methodist Ch., Yar 
mouth and Christie 397 

Gerrard St. Methodist Ch 398 

Queen St. East Methodist Ch., 

near Greenwood Ave., 1858.. 399 
j Queen St. East Methodist Ch., 

1901 400 

1 Westmoreland Ave. Methodist Ch. 402 
j Sussex Ave. Methodist Ch., corner 

Rowland Road 403 

I Trinity Methodist Ch., Bloor W., 

between Major and Robert. . 404 

Crawford St (Berean) Methodist 

Ch., near King St. West 405 

New Richmond Methodist Ch., Mo- 
Caul St 406 

King St East Methodist Ch., cor 
ner Bright St 407 

I Zion Methodist Ch., Bracondale. . 408 
j Annette St. Methodist Ch., Tor 
onto Junction 412 

Davisville Methodist Church 413 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



XT 



PAGB 

Hope Tabernacte, Methodist, East 

Toronto, 1895 414 

Hope Tabernacle, Methodist, East 

Toronto, 1901 416 

Eglinton Methodist Ch 417 

St. Alban s Methodist Ch., Galley 
Ave 418 

Davenport Methodist Ch., Toronto 

Junction 419 

Free Methodist Ch., Broadview ave 421 
March St. Baptist Ch., erected 

1832 424 

Jarvis St. Baptist Ch., north-east 

corner Gerrard St. Bast 425 

Bond St. Baptist, 1848 428 

Don Mills Baptist Ch 429 

Bloor St. Baptist Ch., corner 

North St 432 

Dovercourt Road Baptist Ch., cor 
ner Argyle St 435 

Alexander St. Baptist Ch.. 1887.. 438 
Immannel Baptist Ch., Jarvis and 

Wellesley, 1901 439 

Beverley St. Baptist Ch., corner 

Sullivan St. 442 

First Ave. Baptist Ch., corner Bol- 

ton Ave 445 

Parliament St. Baptist Ch., oppo 
site St. David St 447 

Teemnseh St. Baptist Ch. (old) . . 450 
Teenmseh St. Baptist Ch., 1897.. 451 
College St. Baptist Ch., corner 

Pahnerston Ave 453 

Ossington Ave. Baptist Ch 456 

Western Baptist Ch., Lansdowne 

Ave 457 

Wahner Road Baptist Ch., corner 

Lowther Ave 458 

Sheridan Ave. Baptist Ch 460 

Olivet Baptist Ch., Margueretta st. 461 
Kenflworth Ave. Baptist Ch., 

Queen St. East ... 462 

Eastern Ave. Baptist Mission . . . 464 

Christie St. Baptist Ch 465 

Century Baptist Ch., Birch Ave.. 466 

Zion Baptist Ch., Eglinton 467 

Annette St. Baptist Ch., Toronto 

Junction 468 

Eoyce Ave. Baptist Ch., Toronto 

Junction 469 

East Toronto Baptist Ch., En- 
derby Road 470 

Baptist Ch. (Coloured), Queen St. 

East and Victoria St 472 

The First (Zion) Congregational 

Church, Bay St 474 

Zion Congregational Ch., College 

and Elizabeth Sts . . . 475 



Bond St. Congregational Ch., WH- 

ton Ave. and Bond St 480 

Northern Congregational Ch,, 

Church St 485 

Olivet Congregational Ch,, Hazel- 
ton Ave 487 

Western Congregational Ch., Spa- 

dina Ave 489 

Broadview Ave. Congregational 

Church 490 

Broadview Ave. Congregational 

Ch., interior 491 

Parkdale Congregational Church, 

Brock and Maple Grove Aves. 493 

Bethel Congregational Ch., Clin 
ton St 494 

Bethany Church, north-east corner 
University Ave. and Christo 
pher St 496 

Friends Meeting House, Pem 
broke St 497 

Friends Church, Carlton St, be 
tween Vonsre and Church Sts. 498 

Church of Christ, Bathurst St., 

north of College St 499 

Discinles of Christ, Toronto Junc 
tion 500 

Church of Christ, Cecil St 502 

Christian Workers Ch., Denison 

Ave 504 

Sheridan Ave. Mission 505 

Christian Workers Ch., Daven 
port Road 50*5 

Christian Workers Ch.. Concord 

Ave 507 

Salvation Army Headquarters, Al 
bert St 509 

Children s Home, Salvation Army, 

Farley Ave 511 

Salvation Army, Broadview Ave. 513 

Salvation Army. York 514 

First Reformed Episcopal Ch., 
Simcoe St., now used by , 
Christian Scientists 518 

Emmanuel Ch.. Reformed Epis 
copal, Shaw St "... 518 

Christian Scientist Ch., south-east 
corner Simcoe and Caer- 
Howell Sts 521 

Gospel Hall. Brockton, 1904 524 

Gospel Hall. Fartey and Spadina 

Ave.. now disused, 1904 525 

Gospel Hall, Toronto Junction, 

1904 525 

Chapel on Shuter St. in 1841 . . . 528 

Building now used by the Dis 
ciples of Christ, Elm St., 1904 527 



XVI 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



Syrian Catholic Ch., Shuter St 
formerly used by the Disciples 
of ~" 



PAGE 



Building at Louisa and James Sts., 
formerly used by Disciples of 

" 



528 



528 



PAGK 



The Gospel Hall, Broadview Ave. 529 
First Unitarian Oh., Jarvis St. . 531 
Dundas St. Methodist Ch., I860.. 536 
Building formery occupied by 
Swedenborgians, Elm St ____ 538 



Interior of Hopse of Providence 
Chapel 

Interior of Knox College Chapel 583 

Interior of Bishop Strachan School 

Chapel 584 

Bible Training School, College St., 
where Deaf and Dumb Congre 
gation Meet 585 

St. James Church (first church 



also) 



St. James Church, erected 1831 





586 



burned 1839 ............. . 537 

St. James Cathedral, erected 1840, 

burned 1849 . rroo 



Meeting House of Swedenborg 
ians, Elm Grove and Mel 
bourne Aves 540 

Church of the Latter Day Saints , j The present Cathedral 58 9 

0*S?Z& Church, Giiii 543;SL To Y ;o l S . EPiSCOPal ^ ^ 590 

rv,n, a v d X 1Ct !^. St ~ 545 St Jude>s Episcopal Ch., Ronces- 

Cathohc Apostolic Ch., Bay St.. 550 valles Ave 591 

German Evangelical Ch. (Luther- St. Paul s Ch., Bloor St. East 592 

an), Bond St., old building.. 551 St. John s, Anglican Portland St 
German Evangelical Ch. (Luther- the old church 592 

an), Bond St., new building.. 553 j Church of the Holy Family Ro- " 

issom Synagogue, Bond st. 557 man Catholic King St and 

Church on Richmond St., formerly Close Ave. 593 

usefl as Synagogue 558 St. Francis Ch., R. C. , Arthur * 

Rlossom Synagogue (old), and Grace Sts. 594 

lichmond St. East 559 | St. John s Roman Catholic, East 

Jewis Assembly Rooms, Rich- Toronto . 595 

mond St. West 561 j Victoria Presbyterian Church in- " 

Jewish Synagogue. University ave 562 i nette and Medland Sts Tor- 
Jewish Meeting House, Edward St. 564 onto Junction 596 

Austrian Synagogue, Chestnut Bonar Presbyterian Ch ... . .. , 598 

. East Side 565 Kew Beach Presbyterian Ch. . 599 

. A., Yonge and McGill Sts. 567 King St. East Methodist Ch 600 

Church, corner Edward and First Methodist Church . . 601 

Teraulay 571 British Wesleyan Chapel ... 601 

African Tethodist Ch., Richmond Adelaide St. Methodist Ch 602 

St. West 571 Old P. M. Chapel, Bay St., 1832-52 603 

?an Methodist Ch.. Edward St. 572 N.C. Methodist Ch., Temperance st 603 
British Methodist Episcopal Ch., Dobson s Church, Yorkville Ave 603 

3tnut 3t 573 Methodist Church, south side of 

Adventists Church, Montrose King St. East, about 1855 ... 603 

Avenue 574 Primitive Methodist Ch., Alice St., 

Dovercourt Congregational Ch., 1852-75 604 

Salem Ave., used by Free Elm St. Methodist Ch., old church 605 
Methodists 575 Primitive Methodist Ch., Cumber- 
Syrian Catholic Ch., south-east land St 605 

corner Victoria and Shuter sts. 576 j Formerly Methodist Ch. School- 
Interior of St. Joseph s Convent 

Chapel 577 

Interior of Loretto Abbey Chapel 578 



Interior of Wycliffe College 



579 
Interior of McMaster University 

Chapel 580 

Interior of Victoria University 

Chapel .581 



house, Winchester St 605 

U. P. Church (Dr. Jennings), Bay 

Street 606 

First Knox Church 607 

Second Knox Church 6T07 

Church on site of Richmond Hall, 

Richmond St 608 

The Denison Church, Churchill 

Ave., 1857 . . 608 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO, 



THE CITY S CHURCHES. 



CHAPTER I. 
INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 



Their O iKlu -.ud rWlh Their Mlnl- 
tem, Oflcial* ami Leading Member* wllU 
Other rnrllalnr. 

Tihe history of the churches of To 
ronto during the century or more that 
th>6 city has been in existence has never 
heretofore been published in one 
volume or collectively. Sketches of 
various churches in the city, of their 
Castors and their chief officers hava 
from time to time appeared in the daily 
Capers and in magazine articles, but 
they have never been collected to 
gether except in a fragmentary man 
ner ; they lie bqiried in the newspaper 
files at the various public librnr es or 
in rampaiei". form and those \\ho want 
to avail themselves of the information 
contained in these descriptive ac 
counts, have often the very greatest 
difficulty in finding the accounts 
themselves. 

In the following pages the Anglican 
Roman Catholic, Presbyterian, Metho 
dist, Baptist and Congregation;) list 
churches are arranged in groups. The 
Salvation Army, though having sev 
eral .places of meeting, is dealt with 
in one chapter, in which each place of 
\vorship is separately noticed. Chapters 
are tlso devoted to the Young Men s, 
also to thr. Young Women s Christian 
Associations. Ever} place of worship 
whether it is Christian or Jewish, in or 
near Toronto is described in this book, 
every effort having been made to make 
it ILS co.njpilete . as possible. As far as 
practicable the churches in the vari 
ous groups ,have been arranged in 
chronological order, and "in no single 
case have the names of lay members 
*~-! helpers who have assisted either 
in the formation of the congregations 
or in erecting \h edifice, been omitted. 
That, of course, irS.-sn-s where it has 
been possible to obtain the names. 

It will be noticssd that among the 



I Anglican churches that of St. James" 
i (the old parish church) has been en- 
! tirely omitted; this is because a sepa- 
i rate account of that church has al- 
j ready been fully published in a for- 
: mer volume. 

Another thing to be mentioned is 
i this, that because, the first Presby 
terian church described, namely, St. 
Andrew s, was built in 1834, it must 
nnf, be pre suni^d there were no Pres 
byterians in York up to that tuna. 
I herd were many families and indi 
vidual members among the very small 
population of lss tbnn 1 ^. n OO r>~nle. 
But they were in a minority, and as* 
semblexl for worship in private houses 
or perhaps a hired room. Th great 
majority of the residents in York in 
1830 were- Anglicans, Roman Catholics 
and Methodists, though among them 
ah they did not provide church accom 
modation for more than thirty-three 
per cent, of the population, if they 
evn accomplished that. Now, on the 
other hand, in Toronto Township, Scar- 
boro*" and Vaughan, there were flour 
ishing Presbyterian churches and con 
gregations, but neither Anglican nor 
Methodist ministers or churches. These 
latter were in a s great a minority in 
the country districts as the Presby 
terians were in York. 

Illustrations are given not only of 
the churches as they are now (1898), 
but as they were some years ago. For 
instance, Knox church is shown with 
the steeple, though the latter was de 
stroyed by fire in 1895. The old church 
of St. John s, Norway, is given, as is 
also the modern one. The Richmond 
street Methodist church is given; so 
also is its successor, the McOaul street 
church, known as the New Richmond, 
These few introductory remarks are 
nl> that is necessary to enable the 
reader to see from the contents of i he 
volume that what has been attempted 
has been to give ;> clear hisiory of 
every church, wholly irrespective of 
denomination or of creed. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



CHAPTER H. 
TRINITY_CHURCH. 

AH Blstsrlc Church Full f Tear* 
nonpar*. 

Way down among the smoke and dirt 
and dtust of factories, in a section of 
the city notable more for its industrial 
than its fine arts, amid surroundings 
that are homely and uninteresting, 
stands Trinity church. MJore than half 



musty records in its archives are in 
scribed names that are honoured in 
civic history for probity and integrity, 
and fondly cherished in the affec 
tionate remembrance of this genera 
tion. But now the time-honoured walls, 
upon which the storms of nearly five 
decades have beaten, are worn with 
aa and dingy with the dust and dirt 
or many years, and Trin ty stands like 
some weath r-beaten mausoleum bury- 
"><? within itaeif the greatness and 




TBHTITY CHURCH, KING STRKKT EAST. 



a century has gone by since it arose, 
in 1843, a magnificent piece of archi 
tecture, that was the pride of faithful 
churchmen. Withi.n its walls were 
wont to meet the ancestors of those 
whose industry and enterprise in these 
latex days have given Toronto an 
enviable position amid the beautiful 
cities of the worlds Occident. Ppon the 



glory of the past. All over this city 
are scattered thousands of people 
whose feet have crossed its threshold 
and whoes. heads have bowed in adora 
tion before the God to whom its altar 
was dedicated so long ago. And in that 
other quiet city of the dead forever 
rest many who, in the time-honoured 
past, united their voices in the celebra- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



lion of its beautiful ritual, and doubt- 
leas found therein that comfort and 
guidance that smoothed their pathway 
to the grave. 

In one sense, therefore, Trinity is 
valuable more for its memories and the 
historic interest attaching to it than 
for what it is extrinsioally to-day. Just 
as this generation of people surrounds 
itself with greater magnificence and 
elegance of living, in evry way, BO 
this old historic church, once itself 
great, has been far outstripped by 
larger, more pretentious and more 
elegant edifices. Slowly but surely it 
ha seen the city growing away from 
its nurturing care and reaching out 
for greater beauty and glory towards 
the northern hiH-country and along 
(he western ^ h >rom*hfi r e c s until not 
much more of it is left than sacred 
associat oas anrl tender rnernor.ei. Biat 
even with all th s forsakeiaent the old 
church has a vitality that is remark 
able ; one paris i after another has 
been taken from its territory; one 
family after another has left its pews 
to find a new church -home more con 
venient ; a long procession has gone 
from its doars never to return, fcut 
even with ail th s draught upon its 
strength its energy, though impaired, 
is unabated, and it deserves special 
notice for its present worth and work 
as well as for the history attaching to 
it. In Toronto s Church of England 
hi story P,t. J;:mes Cathedral and 
Triiity church are. indissolubly united 
lx>c use they are the two oldest 
parishes in the city. 

The, church h;:s been called "Little 
Trinity" in ord^r to distinguish it from 
the larger Trinity church on Trinity 
square, off Yo^.ge street. The then 
unknown lady benefactress of that 
church made it a condition of her en 
dowment that the church should be 
called Trinity church. As therp already 
was a Trinity church in the city, some 
perplexity arose as to the matter, so 
the difficulty was solved by calling 
the Yonge street church Holy Trinity, 
and the church of this sketch is pro 
perly known as Trinity church. 

It is located on the south side of King 
street east, just beyond its bend to the 
north-east to join Queen street on the 
west of the Don. On the east it is 
bounded by Trinity street, so named 
after the church ; on the west by an 
other little street so-called, but really 
only a lane, dignified by the name 
of Erin street; while Derby street 
limits the property on the south. The 
grounds are spacious, and contain, on 
King street, the rectory, built in 1853, 



at a cost of 1,400, and, at the south 
ern side, a long, low-set rambling 
school house, part of which was built 
in 1848 by Enoch Turner, the western 
end having been added during the pres 
ent pastorate at a cost of $3,000. A 
six feet high picket fence separates 
the property from the streets. The 
church is immediately noticeable on 
account of its antiquated appearance 
and rather quaint architecture, being 
what is known as the undecorated. 
perpendicular Gothic, such as was 
popular in England at the close of 
the thirteenth century. The edifice is 
70x45 feet in dimension, with a square 
tower of 80 feet, surmounted with a 
pinnacle at each corner. The church 
was built in 1843, and at that time 
it was intended to run up a spire of 
30 feet, but the money was wanting, 
and it remains spireless to this day. 
It is of red brick with! white brick 
buttresses to relieve the monotony of 
its appearance. There are three en 
trances, the central one being through 
the tower, which slightly projects 
from the body of the building, and 
the others on either side. The mould 
ings above the doorways are of wood, 
and the whole external appearance 
of the building is evidence of its age. 

The following is a description of the 
church as it appeared in 1887. It will 
be interesting, so as to compare the 
church with what it is in 1898 

"The same evidence confronts the vis 
itor when he enters the church. The 
walls are plain and bare, the floors and 
stairways well worn, the furniture se 
verely simple, and somehow it all con 
veys the impression of the homely, un 
fashionable style of earlier days, 
though, with some modern improve 
ments, it is a pleasant and comfortable 
place. There are three spacious vesti 
bules, one for each entrance, the two 
on the sides containing stairways to 
the gallery, which is a roomy place 
running along the northern end of the 
church and extending into it over 
three pews space. Opposite the gallery 
is the chancel, a very narrow com 
partment containing a plain com 
munion altar amply covered with a 
heavy red cloth. On each side is a 
throne chair; in front is a hardwood 
rail and before it a cushion for the 
kneeling communicants. The reading 
desk, an octagonal boxlike affair, is 
on the right of the chancel, anti put- 
side of it, with a large stone baptism 
al font in front of it, while a similarly 
constructed pulpit is built to the left. 
The vestry is a plain, neat an d very 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



pleasant room to tho right, containing 
old-fashioned but useful furniture. 

"The aisles of the church hare strips 
of carpet running along their lengths, 
but otherwise the floor is bare. Some 
of the pews are cushioned and some 
are not, just as the fancy of the occu 
pant dictates. The building seats four 
hundred people and is heated from fur 
naces recently introduced. Before that 
stoves were used, and the old iron 
brackets upon which the long pipes 
rested are yet to be seen jutting from 
the walls. The room is amply lighted 
by eleven large stained glass windows, 
of the lancet seriate: form; they are 
very bright and pretty, not only ton 
ing the entering light, but beautify 
ing it with a variety of colours. The 
floor, when the church was built, was 
so arranged as to have two aisles and 
a centre, the latter place being devoted 
to free seating accommodation for 
strangers and casual visitors; at that 
time also two large vestries were con 
structed within the church. But 
these were removed later, and ten years 
ago more modern pews were intro 
duced and other improvements made 
upon the original appearance of things 
so that now it is not quite so ancierft 
in looks. A neat gasalier of twenty*- 
four burners depends from the centre 
of the ceiling; during the delivery ofl 
the sermon the light is turned low, for 
economy s sake, it is presumed, thus 
patting the congregation into the hazyi 
mystery of semi-darkness, a condition 
vry favourable for napping or little 
social amenities. In this case, however, 
no advantage is taken of the twilight. 
Underneath each window is a little tin 
trough to caJbch the water, forcing its 
way through the time-worn frames 
When the indriven snow is melting, 
iR^hich then runs down through a small 
pipe underneath the floor. 

"Above the vestry entrance a Little 
round-faced clock merrily ticks away 
the hours. Next to it is a magnificent 
mural memorial, with an ornamentally 
carwed base, on which rest columns 
supporting a heavy and an enriched 
entablature with a large urn in the 
centre. This is built in memory of 
William Gooderham, who was born at 
Socle, Norfolk, England, August 29th, 
1790, and died August 20th, 1881, "one 
of. the original founders, largest bene 
factors, and for thirty-five years 
churchwarden of this church." Directly 
opposite is an exactly similar tablet 
in memory of Harriet Gooderham, his 
wife, born at Sipton, Suffolk, England, 
November 1st, 1802, died March 5th, 
1885. 

"A tablet Ln the form oif a sQueld on 



the tttdcern wall commemorates ET^a- 
beth, wife of Rev. Alexander Sa^sou. 
and upon it are carved these words: 
"As a testimony of respect for her 
character and affection for her memory 
this tablet is erected by the ladies of 
this congregation." 

"Opposite this, on the western va l, 
is another to the memory of Rev. Win. 
Honeywood Ripley, B.A., 9f University 
College, Oxford, the first incumbent of 
Trinity church, who served it six 
years "freely, without money and with 
out price." He died October 22nd, 1849, 
aged 34 years. He was honorary secre 
tary of the church diocese of Toronto 
and second classical master of Upper 
Canada College. He challenged the 
heartfelt respect and affection of his 
parishioners, who have thus given ex 
pression to their feeling. 

"In the western part of the gallery 
are two memorials in honour of Mr. 
James Gooderham Worts and his wife 
Sarah. The children of this estimable 
couple have set apart a spacious me 
morial pew on the gallery formerly 
occupied by this family. The pew is 
linsd, cushioned and curtained in black, 
while five old-style chairs occupy its 
front portion. 

"Th" rise of Trinity church came about 
as follows: In the early "forties" that 
part of the city where the church now 
stands, was called the Park. Many of 
its residents were members of the 
United Church of England and Ire 
land, and they earnestly desired the 
establishment of a church of their 
own faith. No other Protestant de 
nomination had a church in that sec 
tion and this fact rendered the build 
ing of one more feasible. So on the 
12th day of July, 1842, a couple of gen 
tlemen met in the house of Mr. Rey 
nolds, on King street (in the park) 
and resolved to buy land and proceed 
with the erection of a church. A con 
tract was entered into for the build 
ing of the present edifice at a cost 
of 1,800. The English "Society for the 
Propagation of the Gospel" in the colo 
nies contributed 120. 

"Success came with the effort. The 
late Mr. Alexander Dixon secured the 
grant for the new church from the 
society named, and he was the moving 
spirit in securing subscriptions, being 
ably assisted by William Gooderham, 
J. G. Beard, Joseph Shuter, Enoch Tur 
ner and Samuel Mitchell. Bishop 
Strachan gave two lots, one on Parlia 
ment street and one on Power street; 
Chief Justice John Beverley Robinson 
gave a ten -acre lot on Kingston road 
for the rector s income. This lot was 
sold in 1886 for $35,000. In addition to 
building the school house Mr. Turner 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



left $5,000 for improvements and Jjj>2,- 
000 for the enlargement of the church, 
contracts for which are now under way. 
Mr. Gooderham also left 1,000 for re 
pairs. With all this, however, there 
was a debt of $4.000 for a long time; 
it was reduced during the pastorate 
of Dr. Mitchell, who was Mr. Ripley s 
successor, and served from January, 
1850, to July, 1852. At the latter date 
the Rev. Alexander Sanson became the 
incumbent, and has been the pastor 
since (1898.) 

The income of the rector, derived 
from the endowment, is $1,250. At first 
the income was but $600, and the rec 
tors were obliged to depend upon their 
own resources. The neighbourhood has 
always been a poor one, and the! 
labour of the minister is very largely 
one of love only; originally the con 
gregation was richer than it is now, 
and the territory covered by this par 
ish was much more extensive. The best 
part of the congregation has one time! 
after another withdrawn to form new 
parishes, until Trinity has given birth, 
more or less directly, to St. Peter s, 
All Saints , St. Bartholomew s and St. 
Matthew s. It now stands alone in its 
old age, the only church of its denomi 
nation in the eastern part of the city; 
its children have left the old home, 
bu it still carries on useful work. 

Rev. T. R. O Meara Ls superintendent 
of the Sunday school ; Mr. Lye, or- 
gjacist, and Rose Cameron, librarian, 
T!here are more than twenty teachers 
ill the school and 300 volumes in the 
library. Of those who have been teach- 
er. six are now clergymen, two of 
whom are canons, one in England, and 
three became judges, viz., Harrison, 
Moss and Vice-Chancellor Blake. 

The present territorial limits of the 
parish are Sierbourne on the west, 
Queen ofn uhe nortfh, the Don on the 
east, and the bay on the south. 

"The Rev. Alexander Sangon, who has 
so long- and faithfully served the his 
toric old church, was educated in Edin 
burgh. He was pastor of St. John s, 
York Mills, the second rectorate in this 
part of the country for ten years. He 
also served St. Paul s two years, gratui 
tously, in connection with St. John s, 
which was then a wealthy church 
diaries Mathews, first classical mas 
ter of Upper Canada College, was his 
.assistant. Mr. Sanson is a white- 
haired, be nevol vent -look ing gentleman 
of the old school type, dignified and 
courteous, but pleasant and agreeable 
in manner. Aside from giving hard, 
cold facts and figures to the reporter 
he was exceedingly averse to any per 
sonal mention. He has always been 



made cognizant of the difficulty of 
serving a parish with all outward cir 
cumstances against it, and yet he 
speaks very highly of his people, and 
very kindly of the nature of the work 
he has had to do. At personal expense 
to himself he has ministered to his 
congfregation, and exemplified in his 
own life a il labours that charity that, 

; unfortunately, is becoming rare in the 
pulpits of all cities where mercenary 

! considerations too often determine 

, what is denominated called of the 

j Lord to preach the Gospel. 

"During the present rectorate the 
church debt has been entirely paid; 
an excellent organ, built bby Edward 
Lye & Sons, has been introduced, new 
windows and pews put up, and furnaces 
ejected; then the school room has beeto 
enlarged and the parsonage repaired 
ana improved, and now, this fall, the 
church will be enlarged and still fur 
ther improved all of which adds to 
the glory already crowning the history 
of Trinity Church." 

Trinity Church celebrated its jubilee 
in 1893, and there were present at the 
anniversary services some two or three 
individuals who fifty years before as 
young people, had heard the first ser 
mon preached in the building by the 
Bishop of Toronto, Dr. Strachan. 

Since the preceding portion of this 
sketch first appeared Trinity Church 
has been enlarged and beautified 
throughout. 

_ When the church was first erected, 
like nearly all other Anglican churches, 
it had extensive galleries. These have 
all been removed and the arrangement 
of the pews altesnetd. These in the 
old days were the old-fashioned high- 
backed class; now the seats are low, 
and afford no chance for an attendant 
at the service to slumber unawares. 

Trinity Church has had since it was 
erected the following clergy: 

1843 until 1849 Rev. W. H. Ripley. 

1849 until 1852 Rev. Mr. Mitchell 



(resigned June, 1852.) 

1852 until 1898 Rev. Alexander 



San 



son. 



The last-named gentleman still con 
tinues in office. In Trinity s earlier 
days the Anglican Bishop of Toronto 
oftentimes officiated, as did Revs. H. 
Scadding, D.D., and Walter Stennett. 

The wardens have been: 
1852-1853 A. Joseph, Thomas Haworth. 
1853-1866 ,W. Gooderham, Enoch Tur 
ner. 

1866-1874 W. Gooderhem, J. H. Blake. 
1874-1882 iW. Gooderham, J. G. Worts. 
1882-1883 J. G. Worts, Lewis Reford. 
1883-1885 Lewis Reford, S. R. Heakes. 
1885-1886 John Gillespie, R. M. Cam 
eron. 
1886-1889 J. Gillespie, J. R. Wniteside. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



4889-1891 A. J. Boulton, J. J. Davis. 
1891-1893 A. E. O Meara,, J. J. Davis. 
1893-1894 John Sanson, C. R. Cooper. 
1894-1899 C. R. Cooper, C. HI. Beavis. 

The choir, a mixed one of hoth male 
and female voices, do nto wear sur 
plices, though they sit in the chancel. 

Of assistant ministers at Trinity not 
previously natoed, who have been re 
gularly attached there have bee]? 
but two, Rev. ML S. Baldwin, now 
Bishop of Huron, and the present 
(1898) curate, Rev. T, R. O Meara. The 
latter gentleman was educated at 
Port Hope and Wycliffe College, To 
ronto, and came to Trinity Church in 
1890. 



CHAPTER III, 
ST. GEORGE S. 

The First VT>t End Anglicaa Parl*k 
Some \otbl Parlfthl*nr. 

At John street and Stephanie place, i 
jost above Queen, stands St. George s 
Church, one of Toronto s oldest 
churches, occupying a very prominent 
place in its religious life and history. 
The church is built in the early Eng 
lish Gothic style, 96 feet long by 50 
wide, with a spire 150 feet high, of 
white brick, now dingy and weather- 
stained, and is a graceful structure, 
with aJ proportion so arranged as to 
give it a somewhat massive appearance 
as well. There are three entrances, 
from John street, with another into 
the vestry from the north and 0*1 > 
from the south. The Sunday scJu 
building is directly connected with tn<- 
church on the east, and a commodious 
and convenient rectory is built just 
north of the church. The, ground upon 
which the three buildings are erected 
was given to the parish in 1844 by the i 
late Mr. and Mrs. D Arcy Boulton, of i 
the Grange. The church was begun in j 
that year, and was opened for service i 
November 9th, 1845. The total cost was 
$24,000. The church was consecrated 
on St. Andrew s day, 1853, by the late 
Bishop Strachan. 

The first impression made upon the 
mind of a visitor when entering the 
building is that of its cathedral char 
acter. The tall columns and graceful 
arches dividing the nave from the 
aisles give the interior an appearance 
of great space. A number of the win 
dows are filled with stained glass of 
varied designs, and are memorial win- i 
dows. One such is that on the north, ; 
which commemorates the life of Clara 
Perkins and that of her brother, Fred 
erick Campbell Perkins. The church 



is very comfortable in arrangement 
and furnishing; it seats about 750 per 
sons, and a considerable part of it is 
free and u/nappropriated. A spacious 
gallery extends across the western end, 
which is the facade, and there are two 
small transept galleries. The organ is 
placed in the south-east corner of the 
building and is artistically decorated. 
The cjhancel measures 20 feet by 11 
feet in depth, and contains sittings for 
the choir. A magnificently decorated 
window occupies a large section of the 
eastern wall above the altar. The 
handsome lectern is located in the 
front centre of the chancel, while the 
pulpit is to be seen to the north of it. 
A marble baptismal font is placed in 
the north aisle near the front of the 
building. 

,When the writer inspected the build 
ing for tihe purpose of this article hei 
found it tastefu ly decorated with me 
mentoes of the happy Christmas time. 
"Wreaths of evergreen were grace 
fully twined about the columns, while 
illuminated shields hung upon the 
walls. A series of evergreen, lancet 
form, Gothic arches spanned the front 
ot the chancel with the star of the 
Nativity in the centre. Appropriate 
mottoes and emblems were deftly ar 
ranged within the chancel, giving it 
the semblance of a miniature bower. 
The four decades that have passed since 
the erection of the church give it an 
atmosphere of antiquity and, with 
that, the historic interest and attrac 
tion always attached to the old and 
venerable. 

The service and church of St. George 
was in 1888 described in the following 
account : 

"The style of service at St. George s 
is considered to be the most English 
in Toronto. It is not ritualistic, but 
conforms with the established usage of 
the Church of England. The morning 
service is a plain one, but the evening 
service is largely choral. The choir of 
men and boys is a surpliced one, and 
these are assisted by a number of ladies. 
The church has a widely established re 
putation for excellent music, and just 
ly so. The music is Anglican in char 
acter, and no operatic or sensational 
selections are used for the purpose of 
catching the curiosity of the, public. 
The sole end and aim of the service 
seems to be the effort to reach an 
ideal form of worship, stripped of bar 
ren negations on the one side and florid 
exercises on the other. The style of 
the English Church in the mother coun 
try is closely adhered to, much to the 
edification of the great mass of wor- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



shippers at this church. It is a popu 
lar church, so much so that it is often 
exceedingly difficult to secure sitting 
accommodation. Tne congregations are 
.very Larg>e and the work has so grown 
upon the hands of the rector that it 
was found necessary to employ two as 
sistant ministers. These have been 
secured in the persons of Revs. P. J. 
Moore and F. M. Webster. There are 
400 communicant members of the 
church and 350 of these have commu 
nicated on one day. The Christmas 
offertory in 1866 was over $300. 

"There are more than 400 children 
connected with the two Sunday schools, 
one of which is connected with the 
Phoebe street mission hall work. In 
this hall the Church Army began its 
work in Canada in 1885. The object 
of this Army is to evangelize the low 
classes of society ; its aim is precisely 
that of the Salvation Army, but its 
methods are dignified and orderly. 
Special attention is also given at this 
hall to temperance work, and so far 
with the most encouraging results. 

"A Home for the Aged has also been 
established in the parish, which is man 
aged by the Sisters of St. John the 
Divine. A property on Larch street 
was purchased lor the Home at a cost 
of $4,500. A paper called St. George s 
Parish Journal is published, contain 
ing historical information, notices of 
services and meetings, besides a well- 
selected quantity of reading matter. 

"The total value of the parish pro 
perty is about $30,000, all of which is 
fully insured. $1,020 was received In 
1885 for missionary purposes, with 
about $400 from the Sunday school, 
over $300 from the Phoebe street mis 
sion hall, $450 for the poor, about $3,- 
700 from the offertory, over $1,800 for 
pew rents, and over $600 from the 
Church Home. The congregation raises 
about $11,000 yearly for parochial and 
missionary work, and this statement 
affords the reader some idea of the 
great work being done by the church 

of St. George the Martyr. 

****** 

Briefly, the history of St. George s 
church and parish is as follows : The 
first mission district, an offshoot from 
St. James church, was organized in 
December, 1843. The original committee 
consisted, of Rev. Henry James Gra- 
sett, Vice-Chancellor Jameson, F. T. 
Billings, H. Boys and Henry Rowsell. 
It was proposed to erect the church 
on a plot of land contiguous to where 
the General Hospital stood, on the 
north-west corner of John and King 
streets. This site was subsequently 



abandoned and the committee dis 
solved. A second one was formed, the 
members being Right Rev. John 
Strachan, D. D., Bishop of TJoronto, 
Bon. William Cayley, William Heniy 
Boulton, J. G. Spragge, James G. Chew- 
ett and Clarke Gamble. 

The church was subsequently erected 
on the site where it now stands, which 
was the gift of D Arcy Boulton, of the 
Girange. When finally completed, the 
cost had reached nearly $28,000. The 
builder was John Ritchey and the 
architect Henry Bowyer Lane. 

The first organ in the church was 
built by Warren, of Montreal, in 1857, 
and was rebuilt by Warren & Son, of 
Toronto, in 1880. 

The church was freed from debt and 
consecrated to the service of God on 
November 30th, 1853, St. Andrew s day. 
The school house was erected in 1857, 
the corner stone being laid on August 
20th in that year. The parsonage was 
built in 1865. 

The clergy of St. George s since the 
foundation of the parish in 1847 have 
been : 

Rectors Rev. Charles Ruttan, 1844- 
1848; Rev. Stephen Lett, LL.D., 1848- 
1862; Rev. Thomas Brock Fuller, 1862- 
1875 ; Rev. John D Arcy Cayley, 1875. 

Mr. Ruttan until Easter, 1896, was 
rector of Sit. John s church, Norway, 
when he resigned that appointment in 
consequence of advancing years. Dr. 
Lett became rector of Guelph, and died 
there several years ago. Rev. T. B. Ful 
ler was in 1875 appointed Bishop of 
Niagara. He died in 1887. He was suc 
ceeded at St. George s by the present 
rector. 

The assistant clergy have been: 

1857 Rev. W. A, Adamson. 

1862 Rev. E. L. Wells. 

1865-66 Rev. Richard Harrison, 

1866-70 Rev. T. & Ellerby. 

1870-73 R*w. C. J. Machin. 

1870 Rev. A. G. L. Tffew. 

1874 Rev. E. H. Cole. 

1874-75 Rev. J. D. Oayley. 

1876-81 Rev. C. H Mbcfcridge. 

1880 Rev. J. F. Jowitt. 

1882-83 Rev. Joseph F, White. 

1883-85 Rev. W. Clark. 

1884 Rev. G,. M. Kingston. 

1885-89 Rev. R. J. Moore. 

1886-87 Rev. F. M. Webster. 

18SO-91 Rev. Allan A. Pitman, Rev. 
M. C. Dickenson. 

1893 Rev. Oswald Rigby, Rev. E. O. 
Cayley, Rev. C. Lutz, Rev. H . Siymonds, 
assistants either as locum tenens or 
in absence of rector. 

Rev. E. Bullock, May to October, 
1893. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 




ST. GEORGE S CHURCH, JOHN STRKET. 



Rev. Prebendary Bollock, of Eng 
land, February, 1893, special mission. 

Rsv. J. S. Bjroughall, October, 1893, 
to February, 1895. 

Rev. H. P. Lowe, February, 1895. 

Tiie wardens have been: 



1854ir48 Wm. H. Boulton, Wm. Wake- 
field. 

1848-49 J. H. Cameron, Thos. Barnes. 

1849-50 John Arnold, John Henry Le- 
froy, R, A. 

1850-51 J. H. Lefroy, R.A., J. G. Home. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



if $*iji 



I 










INTERIOR OF ST. GEORGl S t HVROM. 



10 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



1851-56 John Henry Lefroy, R. A., S. 

B. Harman. 

185S-55 T. P. Robarts, John Arnold. 
1855-56 John Arnold, KLvas Tally. 
1856-57 T, P. Robarts, S. B, Harman. 
1857-58 S. R Harman, R, B. Denison. 
1858-50 R, B. Denison, Kivas Tuily. 
1859-60 John Boulton. 
1860 Kivas Tully, John Boulton, re 
signed June 6th, 1860, when 
were elected Win. McCleary, 
John Hiillyard Cameron. 
1861-62 Wm. MoCleary, John Hill- 
yard Cameron. 
1862 66 John Boulton, Huson W. M. 

Murray. 
1866 68 Huson W. M. Murray, A. R. 

Boswell. 
1868 77 A. R. Boswell, Samuel William 

Farrell. 

1877 78 E. M. Chadwick, Wm. Gpeey. 
1878 80 Edward M. Chadwick, Elmes 

Henderson. 
1880 81 E. M. Chadwiok, Alexander 

James Burrowes. 
1881 83-E. M. Chadwick, Stephen Lett. 

M.D. 

1883 85 E. M. Chadwick, G. T. Harman. 
1885 86- E. M. Chadwiok, Harrj Hayes. 
1886 87 E. M. Chadwick, W. M. Mur 
ray. 

1887 90 S. Bruce Harman, R. B. Street. 
1890 96 S. Bo-uce Harman; George P. 

Reid. 

1896 99 R. B. Street, R. W. Barker, 
The Sunday school room is a large, 
lofty building with very little adorn 
ment. The floor and seats are bare, 
and theae Ls an appearance of rugged 
simplicity about it. Opening from it 
are the infant class room, Bible class 
rooms, robing room, kitchen, etc. 

The first incumbent of St. George s 
was Rev. Charles Ruttan. In 1848 Dr. 
Lett became the incumbent. The sam 
year Mr. William Caiger, who is 
well remembered by many citizens, was 
appointed sexton. In 1861 Dr. Lett re 
signed and Rev. T. B. Fuller became 
the rector. He resigned in May, 1875, 
when he was made Bishop of Niagara, 
and was succeeded by the present rec- j 
tor. Rev. J. D. Cayley, M.A. 

Mr. Cayley, who is well known 
throughout the city, was born in Lon 
don, England. He was educated at 
Upper Canada College and Trinity Col 
lege University. In 1860 he was or- f 
dained in England deacon, and the fol 
lowing 1 year priest, by the Bishop of 
London. After remaining in England 
three years he came back to Canada, 
and was incumbent at Whitby eleven 
years. In the autumn of 1874 he was 



appointed assistant minister at St. 
George s, and rector in May, 1875. 

When the parish completed its jubilee 
in 1893 the staff of the church was as 
follows : 

Clergy Reverends J. D. Cayley and 
J. S. Broughall. Churchwardens S. 
Bruce Harman, George P. Reid. Sides 
men F. Arnoldi, Q.C., E. D. Armour, 
Q. C., C. R. W. Biggar, Q. C., H. E. 
Blanchford, A. M. Browne, Frank Cay 
ley, A. J. Close, W. B. Close, Frank P. 
Cowan, M.D., S. J. Davies, J. C. Hari- 
son, G. F. Harman, C. D. Heath, C. E. 
Holmes, A. C. Bedford-Jones, H. H. 
Langton, F. Lightbourn, Inglis Lough, 
M.D., L. McMurray, H. W. M. Murray, 
Q.C., H. C. Parsons, H. S. Strathy, R. 
B. Street, W. B. Strickland, C. V. M. 
Temple, Harry Winsor, E. H. Keating. 

Organist and Choir Master E. W. 
Phillips. 



CHAPTER IV. 
ST. PAUL S. 

Th Old Time TorkTllle Place .f W*r*hlp 
The Urnmmnr School 

The following account, very slightly 
Altered, was given of St. Paul s in 1886. 
It is now re.publ ; shed. It reads thus : 
. "No more beautiful sunset bathed th* 
world in glory than that which en 
wrapped the dying day last Sabbath 
evening. Golden shafts of light linger 
ed about the tree tops as if crowning 
them with celestial radiance. The 
feathered songsters seemed to carol 
more musically as if in response to 
the day-king s farewell. The bright 
green leaves grew tremulous in the 
breeze passing among them never so 
softly, as if loth to disturb the quiet 
that rested like a benediction upon 
the day going down into the grave of 
the night. The hallowed quiet is broken 
by other sounds than those of nature. 
From out of an ivy-dad tower come 
the peajing notes cJ* the vesper bell; 
rising above all sounds and yet ming 
ling with the tones of all the cathedral 
chimes come now ponderously, now al 
most merrily, until from all over this 
beautiful city of churches one grand 
metallic chorus rises upon the even 
ing air calling men to song and 
prayer. 

"The streets of the city, so quiet dur 
ing the sunny hours of the beautiful 
day, are now crowded with people find 
ing their way to the favourite church. 
Among these was the writer of this 
sketch, and he was met with evidences 
on all sides that however the Sabbath 
may be observed on the surtee in 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



11 



pirit it is not so extensively kept as is 
sometimes imagined. There are many 
private arrangements in this city wthere- 
by illicit traffic of various kinds is go 
ing 1 forward regardless of the sacred 
character of the day. A walk through 
Rosedale glen, through, the cemeteries, 
over the Don and along its banks will 
reveal the fact that not only are there 
many non-churchi-goers, but there is 
freedom of enjoyment not obtainable on 
any other day. And this is not con 
fined to poor people ; the residences and , 
grounds of some of OUT- wea thier citi 
zens in the upper portion of the city j 
were seen to contain many persons that 
had discharged their religious duty by 
going to church, in the morning and 
leaving their pews vacant for the com 
mon people in the evening. But it 
wb6 a pleasant and refreshing sight to 
see little children merrily skipping over 
the beautiful lawns in innocent play. 
While the contented mother luxuriously 
enjoyed the picture from the open win 
dow of a richly furnished drawing-room. 
6ig!hts like this with the evening air 
perfumed with the fragrance of flowers r 
and made mellow with bird-songs ; with j 
beautiful residences that seemed ver- | 
itable palaces of art ; with avenues | 
whose long,, cool arches of Interlacing j 
tree-tops made invitingly pleasant, no I 
wonder one s steps became insensibly 
slower while drinking in the peace and 
beauty of the even-time. 

"With all this! loveliness of nature at 
tuning the spirit to worship the Power | 
that created it, nothing is lost by en- ! 
tering a beautiful church where the ! 
classic surroundings complement the j 
outside natural beauty. And St. Paul s j 
church is an attractive one ; it is most 
eligibly situated on the southern side 
of Bloor street, east of Jarvis. There Ls 
no fence or enclosure to mar the beauty 
of the surroundings, and in this re 
spect the church simply anticipates what 
good taste will generally demand in the 
future. The church stands well back 
from the street, and is reached by neat { 
wooden walks running in graceful lines 
over a closely 1 trimmed and very exten- ! 
eive lawn surrounding; it. A clamber- i 
ing 1 vine climbs profusely up by a beau>- | 
tiful window until it almost entirely 
conceals the little "bell swung in a ! 
quaint-looking tower. One is instinc 
tively reminded of the ivy-clad towers 
otf romance .and poetry, and somehow 
there seems to be peculiar fitness in 
the wreathing of the ivy about a church 
tower. 

"Th" building is a Gothic stone struc 
ture and conveys an impression of nias- 



sLveness and solidity, although it is not 
a large building ; its outline is well pro 
portioned and it is an ideal structure, 
such a one as is frequently met with 
in the land across the sea the real 
home of the Church of England. The 
building runs east and west, with an 
entrance into the vestry and thence into 
the transept, and another, with a fine 
porch, on the Bloor street side; another 
entrance on the wjeat has about it a 
temporary wooden porch. In each of 
ths northern and southern transepts 
there is a large stained glass window 
composed of a number of circular and 
foliated smaller divisions, that make 
them ornamental. The nave, a long, 
narrow one, has six cinque-foil win 
dows, with a very large one in the 
west end. The roof is composed of 
darkly stained, open timber work, sup 
ported by massive stone arches resting 
upon heavy stone columns. While these 
are not disproportionate in any way, 
fchey seriously interfere with both the 
feight and hearing of those seated di 
rectly between them and the chancel. 
The interior is prettily painted in 
light colours with ornamental bor 
ders; in every part of the church Scrip 
ture mottoes are 1 , painted in bright gilt 
letters, old English style, upon a dark 
red background, and this work pre 
sents a pleasing appearance. While 
there is much of the cathedral spirit 
about the church, these bright colours 
give it an air of freshness and life in 
pleasing contrast with the sombre 
heaviness that generally accompanies 
the cathedral style of architecture. 
Just within the northern entrance 
stands a large, heavy sandstone bap 
tismal font. The pews are very plain 
and only those are carpeted and cush 
ioned whose owners so desire; narrow 
strips of carpets are laid in the aisles. 

"Above the arch spanning the chan 
cel is a motto which reads: Whoso 
ever will, let Mm take of the water of 
life freely. Outside on the left is the 
pulpit, whose desk and panels are cov 
ered with red velvet; the lectern is 
also a plain desk, and is near the pul 
pit. The organist aits within the 
chancel; above him is a set of pipes, 
prettily ornamented; another set is 
visible in the southern transept, and 
the builder has avoided the mistake, 
so frequently made in churches, of en 
tirely burying the organ in an enclosed 
chamber, from out of which no full 
sound can be obtained; very much of 
an otherwise fine musical effect is lost 
by the organ being walled in. 

"Seats for tine choir are fixed at 



i: 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



right angles to the n ave within the 
chancal, which is entirely carpeted and 
is ample for all demands made upon 
it. Thr> altar is an exceedingly plain 
one, tut the reredos is a handsome 
piece of work, extending entirely across 
the eastern wall, and is made of stone 
Mosaic; immediately above it is the 
motto, cut in stone, which reads : 
Glory to God in the highest on earth 
peace, good-will toward men. The 
stained glass window is richly wrought 
in fresh, bright colours, and is orna 
mented with various emblems and 
symbols. On the arch above it is in 
scribed: Holiness becometh Thine 
house, Lord, forever. 

There are three memorials in St. 
Paul s church. The first one is engrav 
ed in brass upon a black marble tablet 
and reads: 

Erected by the cpmpaiiiotis of his household 
in affectionate remembrance of 

ROBERT HENDERSON, 

who was lost with six; others by the 

foundering- of the yacht 

Foam off Niagara, 
July llth, 1874, in the\ 21st 

year of his age. 

In the fourth watch of the night Jesus 
Went unto them walking on the sea. 

"Within the chancel, on the north 
wall, is a very handsome white mar 
ble memorial erected to the memory 
of Rev. Saltern Givins, who was rector 
of the church twenty -four years. He 
was missionary at Tyendenaga on the 
Bay of Quinte, nineteen years, and fill 
ed every position to which he was call 
ed with fidelity and zeal, for which 
he was much beloved. He was born 
in this city April 8th, 1809, and died 
at Colborne, October 30th, 1880. Such 
is the statement inscribed upon the me 
morial. 

"A plainer memorial is seen imme 
diately opposite, honouring Rev. W. 
F. Checkley, M.A., who died Jan. 3rd, 
1879, and it reads This tablet is erect 
ed by a few friends who desire to re 
cord his faithful ministry in this 
parish. 

"It was into this church that the 
writer found his way last Sunday even 
ing. He was immediately confronted by 
a gentlemanly usher and shown to a 
seat, and was handed a prayer book 
and hymn book. It is a custom in 
this church to provide all strangers 
with these books; a collection of them ; 
is kept on hand for this special pur 
pose. The attention shown all visitors 
is one of the most considerate and i 
courteous nature; as soon as a person 
tenters he is met by the usher, who 
provides him with an eligible seat, and 
extra efforts are used to accommodate 
individual circumstances; if a person 



is partially deaf he is taken well for 
ward. <3ut no other distinction is 
made; a plainly, poorly-dressad visitor 
is served just as politely as one more 
TOi y t a .yured in these matters; even 
i children were kindly shown to 
seats, and everything was done to make 

: ail incomers welcome and comfortable. 
Ihe audience was what may be termed 
miscellaneous, that is, it was composed 
ol all classes of people; a few were 
Jiere bearing evidences of wealth about 
i*L em but the large majority of the 
^5 present were of the middle class 

; of people. It was not a large congrega 
tionthe church will seat 600 but it 

; was a very decorous one, and its dis 
tinctive feature was the heartiness 
and universality of participation in the 
service. The latter was an exceedingly 

: plain service ; for a Church of Eng 
land service it was j ust within the 

i regulations and no more. The choir, 

j composed of ladies and gentlemen to 
the number of about twenty, with Mr. 
Geddes as organist, was not distin 
guishable from the congregation in 
the musical service, so familiar did 
every one seem with the chants and 
responses. There is no choral in the 
responses save on the part of one 
strong voice that was particularly 
noticeable for its musical intonation 
when brought into comparison with 
the ordinary responses. The service, 
like the congregation, is a conserva 
tive one, almost painfully so. But 
everybody was interested, enjoyed and 
was benefited by it. 

" It began with the singing of a 
hymn and then followed the rubric of 
the prayer-book. The rector, Rev. T. 
C. Des Barres, conducted the service, 

; and in some respects he is a novel 
reader. There is nothing artificial 
about his reading ; in fact it is in 
tensely natural ; he does not intone 
but reads rapidly, with an emphatic 
utterance that runs along in a sort 
of staccato style that seems almost 
business-like. But the reading is re 
freshing and attractive, because it is 
not stilted or assumed ; there is no 
whine about it ; it is taken easily, 
naturally, and is properly interpreted. 
The singing is excellent, not finely 
shaded, because it is too general, but 
tuneful, well measured and harmoni 
ously expressed. The Magnificat, or 
Song of the Blessed Virgin, and the 
1 Nunc Dimittis, or Song of St. 
Simeon, were especially well sung. 
Four hymns were sung the l*st of 
which, Lead, kindly Light, was an 

.exquisite selection and seemed so ap 
propriate in its sentiment, for 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



13 



darkness of night was then rapidly en 
folding the earth, insensibly remind 
ing one of the need of some guiding 
light amid the gloom of the coming 
night when all earth s toilers shall 
gather the drapery of everlasting sleep 
about their spent lives. 

" Mr. Des Barres sermon was a short 
one, based upon the text: Who his 
own self bare our sins in his own body 
on the tree, and was a plea for the 
grand old doctrine of the Atonement 
as a substitutional affair. 

" The land and the church cost about 
$29,000. The rectory, just east of the 
church, and the extensive double 
school house south-west of it cost 



ers the floor adda to this feeling of 
warmth and comfort. Prettily paint 
ed mottoes adorn the walls; neat little 
settees and a convenient desk for each 
teacher, with a large organ, constitute 
the furniture, and it is a most de 
lightful room for Sunday school pur 
poses. Opening from it and running 
into the extension eastward is a long 
narrow library furnished with 980 
volumes. The Sunday school numbers 
350, with Mr. John G. Greey as super 
intendent. Next tc the main room are 
two large well-furnished Bible class 
rooms, and them comes the Infant 
class room, by far the finest in this 
| city. It is carpeted with a beautiful 




ST. PAUL S CHURCH, BT,OOR STRKET EAST. 



000 additional. This school house is a 
model of elegance and comfort that 
amounts almost to luxury. It is in 
the shape of an L, that part of it run 
ning north and south being devoted 
to the main school. The facade is stone, 
but the remaining portion is built of 
white brick with red brick ornamen 
tation. The main room is wainscptted 
and has a white kalsomined ceiling. 
The white bricks of the wall are point 
ed with black paint, while the red brick 
adornments have white pointing ; al 
though the walls are not plastered the 
room does not convey that idea of cold 
ness that is generally associated with 
a-u unplastered room. Doubtless the 
rich Brussels carpet that entirely COT- 



Brussels, and has a tier of graded seats 
made of brightly-coloured wood. The 
walls are of the clearest white, and a 
beautiful circular window with an ele 
gant combination of parti-coloured, 
variously shaped panes of glass is in 
serted in the eastern wall. Above it 
is a handsome scroll artistically paint 
ed upon the white wall containing the 
sentence Suffer little children to 
come unto Me and forbid them not. 
A little organ, a blackboard, maps, 
etc., are at hand for the entertainment 
and instruction of the little ones for 
whom no more delightful room can be 
imagined. No wonder that one of the 
boys remarked : If any fellow comes 
in here with muddy boots we ll bounce 



14 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



him. The infant class increased fifty 
per cent, within the last year. 

" So far as ascertained St. Paul s is 
the second offshoot from St. James 
cathedral, and is about fifty years old. 
The first building was a wooden one, 
erected upon the ground where the 
rectory now stands. The land was 
deeded to the church by Hon. G. W. 
Allan, who gave his portion without 
remuneration, and the late James Hen 
derson. The congregation became too 
large for the pew accommodation, and 
a section petitioned for removal to 
Bloor street west ; the petition was 
granted and the building was also 
taken and placed upon what was call 
ed Potter s Field, and later developed 
into the Church of the Redeemer. It 
was to remain a chapel of St. Paul s 
until the latter was free of debt, and 
this condition existed until Rev. Sep 
timus Jones was appointed rector of 
the former church. 

" Steps were then taken to build a 
new church, and this was done about 
25 years ago. The late Mrs. Proudfoot 
managed a bazaar that netted $4,000, 
and this was the nucleus for the new 
building; and the late W. A. Baldwin 
mortgaged his farm for $8,000 to com 
plete the church, and when this debt 
was discharged the church was conse 
crated. The rectors, as far as could be 
learned, were Rev. S. Givins, who had 
as his curates Revs. Dr. A damson, 
Government Chaplain; A. Williams, 
John Langtry, Septimus Jones, W. F. 
Checkley and T. C. Des Barres. Mr. 
Des Barres has no curate because the 
egress of several parishes from St. 
Paul s has obviated the necessity of 
supporting two ministers. His salary 
is $1,500 with the use of the rectory ; 
he has been rector eight years. 

Within the last thirty-five years 
.St. Paul s has been the mother of five 
parishes, viz.: Church of the Redeemer, 
St. Luke s. St. Peter s, a portion of 
Christ cjjurch, Deer Park, and the 
new St. Simon s. But its old-time vig 
our is unabated notwithstanding this 
draft ui)on its strength. It has about 
150 communicating members and a 
yearly income of about $3,600. In fact 
last year was more prosperous than 
any year before; $3,000 was spent for 
permanent improvement and $2,000 
will be spent this year. The church 
wardens who so successfully care for 
the interests of St. Paul s are Messrs. 

Wm. B. Evans and J. R. Roaf." 


The foregoing portion of the history 
of St. Paul s church and congregation 



years that have since elapsed there 
has been no change in the incumbency 
of the church. But to make the story 
complete something remains to be told 
about old St. Paul s. In volume I. of 
the landmarks a cut of the old build 
ing has aJ ready appeared, and some 
few particulars given about the church 
and its erection. 

In a paper Bated June 18th, 1842, 
now in the writer s possession, ap 
pears the following account of the 
opening service. 

"The new church near the toll gate 
on Yonge street, was opened for the 
performance of divine service on the 
mprning of Sunday last, the 12th inst." 
It may be remarked that when the 
I first St. Paul s was built Church street 
! only extended as far as Carlton 
I street. Jarvis street from the corner 
of Queen street east was only a sandy 
lane, as was also Sherbourne street, 
then known north of Queen street as 
Allan s Lane. West of St. Paul s on 
the south side of Bloor street there 
was scarcely a house between the 

I church and Yonge street, and on the 
northern side there were only some 

i three or four houses between the end 

i of Jarvis street and the Red Lion 
Hotel, on the north-east corner of 

! Yonge and Bloor streets, close to 
which was the toll gate referred to 
The newspaper account continues : 
"The Rev. Charles Matthews officia 
ted upon the occasion, and we had the 
gratification of hearing him deliver an 
appropriate and animated sermon from 
II. King IV., 8, 9. [The building of a 
little chamber for Elisha by the Shun- 

i amite was very skilfully and eloquent 
ly applied to the spiritual wants of 
the neighbourhood in which the new 
church stands, and furnished the 
preacher with many powerful argu- 

I ments for recommending the people to 

! use every effort towards securing the 
services of a resident minister. A re- 

1 spectable congregation of one hundred 
persons had assembled and a collec- 
tion^of about 3 14s ($14.80) was made 

j in aid of the building fund. It was a 

I matter of sincere rejoicing to all pre- 

; sent to take part in the simple and 
well conducted services of this new 

; little sanctuary." 

The same paper contains this adver- 

| tisement : 

TEE NEW CHURCH. 

NEAR THE TOLL GATB ON YONGE STREET. 
On Thursday next, 23rd inst., a 



was written in 1886, and in the twelve meeting at which the Lord Bishop will 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



15 



preside will be held in this church. 
The object of the meeting is to organ 
ize a congregation in conformity with 
the Church Temporalities Act. All 
persons who are disposed to rent or 
purchase pews or seats will then have ] 
an opportunity of doing so, and are 
particularly requested to attend. The 
church will hold two hundred. 

"On Sunday morning the 26th inst., 
a sermon will be preached in this 
church by the Rev. Dr. McCaul, Prin 
cipal of Upper Canada College, in aid 
of the building fund." 

Toronto, 17th June, 1842. 

The first incumbent of St. Paul s 



Owing to ill-health Mr. McKenzie re- 
tired from the incumbency in 1855, and 
was followed by the Rev. W. A. John 
son. Turing th?i term of office of the 
latter clergyman a controversy and di 
vision aros>, in ,the congregation re 
spiting the theological leanings and 
teaching of Mr. Johnson. His sermons 
by a portion of his flock were declared 
to savour more of Rome than of the 
Reformed Church of England, while 
on the other hand an almost equally 
large number of his parishioners gave 
him their warm and hearty support. 
There was on both sides no desire to 
cast the sl ; ghtest imputation oil Mr. 




ST. PAUL S CHURCH, BLOOR STREET, 1843 



was the Reverend John George Dal- 
hoste McKenzie, who continued in 
charge until 1855. In addition to un 
dertaking the cure of softls at St. 
Paul s, Mr. McKenzie conducted a 
school, known as "St. Paul s Church 
Grammar School," in his residence, 
the second house to the east of the 
c&urch on th. same side of Bloor street. 
Among his pupils were members of the 
Jarvis, Henderson, Blake, Baldwin, 
Murray and Creese families. 



Johnson s character; all admitted his 
perfect and absolute sincerity, but the 
very fact of his earnestness render vd 
his opponents all the more desirous 
that he should leave St. Paul s, as he 
was, to their way of thinking, preach 
ing erroneous doctrines, though fully 
believing himself In the truth of what 
he taught. 

After long, painful and heated con- 
trov r;->y, Mr. Johnson resigned his 
charge and we,nt to Weston, where as 



16 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



rector of St. Philip s he remained for 
many long years after the troubles at 
St. Paul s had been buried in oblivion 
so far as he was concerned. 

Following Mr. Johnson came Mr. 
Givins, who was in turn succeeded by 
the present rector. 

The clergy of St. Paul s since its 
foundation have been these : 

Rectors Rev. J. G-. D. McKenzie, 
about 1843 to 1855; Rev. W. A. John 
son, 1855; Rev. Saltern Givins, 1856- 
1879; Rev. T. C. Desbarres, 1879-98. 

Assistant Clergy Rev. Mr. Schrie- 
ber, occasional, 1855; Rev. Dr. Adam- 
son, 1855-56 (deceased); Rev. A. Wil 
liams (now of St. John s); Rev. John 
Langtry, 1868-69 (now of St. Luke s); 
Rev. Septimus Jones (now of Redeem 
er); Rev. W. F. Checkley (deceased); 
Rev. T. C. Desbarres (now rector of St. 
Paul s). 

Professor Rev. H. J. Cody, of Wyck- 
College, has been acting as assist 
ant minister since the summer of 1895, 
but h is not responsible for parochial 
work (1898). 

The following have been the ward 
ens: 

From 1843 until 1849 there are un 
fortunately no records showing who 
were wardens. Probably the affairs of 
fch^ district were manage/d by the Bisr- 
hop and the minister, aided by a com 
mittee, but this is little more than cpn- 
j-.-cture, as no documents of any kind 
are to be found relating to vestry 
meetings prior to 1849. 

The register of births, marriages and 
deaths dates from 1846, but these give 
no clue as to whom filled the office of 
churchwarden. 

OH I RCH WARDENS 

18-19 1852 George William Allan, 
James Henderson. 

185; 1853 A ! ex. Murray, Captain Pat 
terson. 

1853 1854 William V. Bacon, William 
Telfer. 

185-1 1855 J. W. G. Whitney, W. Mac 
kenzie. 

1855 1856 J. T. Brondigeest, T. J. Pres 
ton. 

1856 1857 Robert Beard, T. J. Pres 
ton. 

1857 1859 A. M. L. Howard, T. H. 
Ince. 

1859 1861 Robert Sewell, Jas. Young. 

1861 1862 Thomas Haworth. T. J. Pres 
ton. 

1862 1864 Thomas Haworth, Charles 
R- DLckson. 

1864 1868 W. G. Schreiber, George 
Bostwick . 

1868 1870 Alex. Marling, J. B. Sorley. 



1870 1871 T. B. Blackwood, G. M. 



1871 1872 G. M. Rae, E. J. JarvLs. 

1872 1873 J. T. SmLth. John Symons. 

1873 1874 Frank Draper, Captain 

Stupart. 

1874 1877 Captain Stupart, William 

Sea cl ding. 

1877 1878 Henry Skynner. J. R. Roaf. 

1878 1880 W. H. Draper, W. B. Evans. 

1880 1881 Major R. J .Evans, W. B. 

Evans. 

1881 1883- W. B. Evans, R. H. Gray. 

1883 1884 W. B. Evans, C. B. Jackes. 

1884 1886 W. B. Evans, D. Mitchell 

Macdonald. 
1886 1888 W. B. Evans, J. R. Roaf. 

1888 1889 Major R, J. Evans, Charles 

Langley. 

1889 1892 J. G. Greey, Charles Lang- 

ley. 
18921898 W. R. Smallpiece, J. G. 

Greey. 
1893 1895 W. R. Smallpiece, R. Milli- 

champ. 
1895 1898 W. G. Eakins, Charles Mar 

riott. 
Organist 1896 Mr. McKim. 



CHAPTER V. 
HOLY TRINITY. 

Che Ftrt* Free and Open Church In T- 
ront* A Gift Frew Englniid. 

Running westward from Yonge 
street, about 200 yards to the north 
of Queen street, is a narrow thorough 
fare leading to a court wherein is 
built the Church of the Holy Trinity, 
belonging to the Church of England. 
The court is now known as Trinity 
square. In 1835 it was known as " the 
fields," and constituted the garden 
aoid cleared space around the residence 
of Dr. James Macaulay, formerly an 
army surgeon in the Queen s Rangers. 
His residence, called Teraulay cottage, 
was removed in 1848, when Trinity 
square was laid out. Macaulay lane, 
now Louisa street, was described as 
" fronting the fields," and from this 
cleared space a line of unbroken forest 
extended as far north as the eye could 
reach. This clearing on the north side 
of Macaulay lane was almost inaccess 
ible half a century since, and could 
be approached only by passing around 
treacherous swamps and through tang 
led forests. It is related by Dr. Scad- 
ding that a magistrate declined an 
attempt to find Dr. Macaulay s house 
on account of the dangers by the way, 
when he reached the eastern part of 
York one afternoon , and it required 



OF TORONTO. 



17 



half of the next day to finish the 
journey. The residence was destroyed 
by fire after its removal to what is 
now the southern entrance to Trinity 
square. 

Twenty-five years witnessed a radical 
change in the appearance of this court, 
or " fields," which was transformed, 
into an active, populous district, so 
that the lines of the historian truth 
fully represent the change when they 
say: 

Macaulay s fields are fields no more ; 
The trowel supersedes the plough ; 
Huge inundated swamps of yore 
Are changed to ci^ic villas now. 

Within a few rods of Tonge street, 
one of the main arteries of Toronto s 
commercial life, enclosed on all sides 
with buildings, so that it enjoys a quasi 
seclusion, even while it is readily reach 
ed, stands this church, which in some 
respects has an unique character and 
history. It is reached by a very narrow 
passage way from Alice street on the 
north, another from Louisa street on 
the south, and the short avenue from 
Yonge street on the east ; it seems like 
some great giant entombed amid the 
lesser buildings on every side and 
whose greatness only becomes appreci 
able when we stand within the narrow 
court and look up to the battlemented 
turrets of the twin spirelets above the 
front corners. 

It is a large brick structure, cruci 
form in shape, with two narrow tran 
septs adjoining the chancel. There is 
no attempt whatever at architectural 
effects, the entire building being an 
unpretending reflex of English cath 
edral churches. It runs east and west, 
the altar being at the east end, the 
main entrance at the west end, with 
an approach from the north and one 
from the south into the transepts. At 
the south-east corner and entered 
through a small porch is a two- 
storeyed annex, used for lecture and 
Sunday school purposes. 

The origin of this church is ground 
ed in the church revival in England 
in the early " forties," a revival that 
stimulated church architecture so that 
many new and ornate churches were 
built and old ones renovated, enlarged 
and generally improved, more attention 
being given to artistic results in con 
tradistinction to the rather rigid ar 
chitecture heretofore existing. Accom 
panying this revival in England her 
growing colonies were more assidious- 
ly cared for by the National Church, 
and a systematic supervision and 
organization of its scattered adherents 
was maintained. Out of this new-born 



energy grew Holy Trinity. The diocese 
of Toronto was established in 1839, 
the Venerable Archdeacon John Stra- 
chan being appointed the first Bishop. 
His fine personal qualities, his energy 
of administration, executive ability 
and wonderful success gained him very 
favourable notice in Great Britain and 
Ireland. In this way it occurred to the 
mind of a benevolent lady whose name 
was not known, that a church should 
be established in Bishop Strachan s dio 
cese in Canada. This was in 1845. 
When he returned to Toronto from a 
missionary tour west he found a let 
ter from Bishop Longley, of Ripon, 
afterwards Archbishop of Canterbury, 
saying that a lady, unknown to him, 
had deposited in his hands 5,000 ster 
ling to build a church in tha Diocese 
of Toronto, stipulating that it lie. called 
ths "Church of the Holy Trinity," "the 
saats of which were to be free and un 
appropriated forever." 3,050 of this 
were devoted to the building and 2,000 
invested as an endowment fund for the 
incumbent. 

Toronto having been chosen as the 
most suitable and most advantageous 
locality for the church, its present site 
was given by Col. John Simcoa Macau- 
lay, son of fcho original owner of the 
land. Whila the building was in pro 
cess of erection the unknown donor 
presented silver sacramental plate for 
puMio use, and smaller service for 
private ministration; she also sent a 
largo supply of fair linen and a cover 
ing of Genoa velvet for the altar, be 
sides surplices for the clergy. The 
church was consecrated Octo ser 27th, 
1847, in the presence of a large con/- 
gregation. On that day, at the com 
munion service, 50 in gold were pre 
sented, and 50 for a font, besides 50 
more for clothing to be distributed 
among the poor. 

Rev. Henry Scadding was the rector 
from 1847 to 1875, although Bishop 
Strachan frequently preached there. 
The finances were so judiciously hand 
led that a reserve fund was created, 
and the parish is now in a most flour 
ishing condition, notwithstanding the 
free seat system, owning a parsonage 
in Trinilty square, and a new school 
building directly opposite. Rev. John 
Pearson, formerly of Fredericton, N.B., 
is rector. He is a genial, scholarly 
gentleman, interested in his work. 

The church has len honoured by the 
official service of Rev. Dr. Scoresby, 
the celebrated English Arctic navi 
gator and explorer, and of Bishop Sel- 
wyn, an eminent missionary of New 
Zealand, both of whom preached here 



18 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



on more than one occasion. Lord El 
gin, whose subsequent services in Chi 
na and India gave him distinction, was, 
when Governor-General, often a wor- 
shippsr within its walls. These facts, 
connected with its novel origin, serve 
to add to its historical interest and 
value. 

On October 27th, 1884, a special com 
memorative service was held, at which 
time a memorial brass tablet affixed 
to the north wall was uncovered in 
honour of its then unknown founder. 
The address on that occasion was de 
livered by Dr. Scadding, accompanied 
by appropriate religious services. The 
following is the inscription: 

THIS CHURCH 

DEDICATED TO 

THE HOLY TRINITY. 

WAS ERBCTED THROUGH THE MUNIFICENCE OF 
A LADY RESIDENT IN ENGLAND, WHO, A.D. 1845, 
THROUGH THE BlSITOP OF RlPON. PLACID IN 
THE HANDS OK TI .K BISHOP OF TORONTO FlVK 
THOUSAND POUNDS STERLING, WHHREWITH TO 
ERECT A CHURCH IN HIS DlOCESE UPON THE 
EXPRESS CONDITION THAT THE SITTINGS THERE 
IN SHOULD BE FREE AND UNAPPROPRIATED FOR 
BVER. WITH THAT SUM THE FABRIC WAS 
ERBCTED UPON A SITE GIVEN FOR THE PURPOSE 
BY THE LATJC LIEUTENANT COLONEL JoHK SlM- 

COE MACAULEY AND AN ENDOWMENT PROVIDED. 

THE FOUNDATION STONE WAS LAID ON THE 
FIRST DAY OF JULY. A. D. 1846, AND THE 
CHURCH WAS OPENED AND CONSECRATED BY 
THE RIGHT REVEREND JOHN STRACHAN, BISH 
OP OF TORONTO, ON THE EVK OF THK FEAST OF 
SS. SIMON AND JUDE, A.D. 1847. 

THIS TABLET WAS PLACED HERE BY THE CON 
GREGATION. A.D. 1884, AS A MARK OF GRATI 
TUDE TO THOSE THROUGH WHOSE LIBERALITY 
THEY ENJOY THE PRIVILEGES WHICH THIS 
PLACE AFFORDS. 

No account of the history and ser 
vices of the church of tha Holy Trinity 
is complete without reference to the 
ejninent work of Rev. W. Stewart Dar 
ling, who for nearly thirty years was 
ilntimately associated with all its in 
terests. In 1855 he was appointed as 
sistant minister, which position he held 
until 1875. when he became the rector. 
As some one said: "_T_hese years spent 
in this thickly populated and poor 
parish were years of the most unre 
mitting and earnest labour, whose 
fruits were evidenced in a large, unit 
ed and devoted congregation, con 
spicuous for heartiness of worship and 
forwardness in all good works." Mr. 
Darling was endowed with such quali 
ties of zeal, sympathy and geniality 
that he attracted to him tha love and 
confidence of the young, and " few 
pastors have endeared themselves more 
universally to their flocks." To his 
untiring efforts and conscientious de 
votion are largely due the present 
strength and influence of this parish. 
The revival of church life and work 
in Toronto, as manifested by the in 



troduction of daily public prayer, week 
ly communion, choral services, sur- 
pliced choirs, and other accessories of 
divine worship, which tend to make it 
a thing of glory and of beauty, and 
by the many organizations and me 
thods which exist for bringing the in 
fluence of the church to bear upon the 
masses, would, but for Mr. Darling s 
earnestness and zeal, courage and per 
severance, have been of much later 
.beginning than it was; for few, and 
feeble, if any, were the steps taken in 
these directions till he had led the 
way and rallied with voice and ex 
ample, as a leader of men, the forces 
of the party with which he was iden 
tified.. 

In these rapidly moving times an 
edifice built in 1847 begins to bear 
about itself an air of antiquity. If 
the building is associated, as in this 
case, with a service that is venerable 
on account of an unbroken historical 
enrichment, the feeling of veneration 
is enhanced, so that a visit to Holy 
Trinity gives one this impression. Like 
cathedral churches, the vastness of it 
establishes no sympathy between the 
worshipper and ths building. Catha/- 
(Irals seem to be built more for ele 
gance of artistic results and grandeur 
of architecture than for the comfort 
or convenience of devotees. The ser 
vice is to supply everything, and in 
this respect cathedral service is the 
acme of all service, in that it furnishes 
attractions and interest beyond the 
mere luxury of the building. 

The chancel seems far away from the 
main entrance; the intervening space- 
is occupied with narrow seats, divided 
into individual compartments by small 
strips of wood, each seat having a 
single rail at the back with a book- 
rest in front and a kneeling board be 
low. The floor, save the three aisles 
covered with matting, is uncarpeted, 
and there is not a vestige of upholstery 
about the building except tbat of the 
chancel and sanctuary. Within the four 
entrances are four huge stoves, two in 
which wood is burned and two for coal; 
the building is well lighted with "stain 
ed glass windows and by neat gasa- 
liers. The ceiling is buttressed directly 
from the walls, so that no pillars ob 
struct the view, and is harmoniously 
painted and decorated, the walls being 
wainscoted several feet from the floor. 
A very small gallery, enclosed by the 
turrets, rests above the western ves 
tibule, and is reached by two narrow 
winding stairways, one on each side. 
Two visitors books are kept, with a re- 
quesit attaJched that all persons -wpr- 
shipping there inscribe their namea 
and addresses. Just within the south- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



19 



era trans- tpft is the stone 1 aptismal 
font, upon a stone elevation, reached 
by three stone steps circumscribing it. 
iA.t the north-west corner of the 
chancel is the organ, a magnificent 
instrument, the pipes with their gilt 
fcnd blue ornamentation making a. 
bright and pleasing contrast with 



The surpliced organist sits within the 
chancel with two long lines of seats 
behind him and two similar lines cm 
the opposite side for the choristers. 
Back beyond all this two steps rise to 
! a cTaia, upon which are placed the 
bishop s and clergy s stalls; two steps 
lurther and the altar is reached; it is 




HOLT TRTNTTY CHURCH. TRTKITT ROTTARK. 



darkly-colourad case. The instrument, 
bail* by Ixve & Son, of this city, is of 
great power and resonance, capable of 
instant reduction to tie most melodi 
ous combinations and tones. Project 
ing beyond the chancel rail is the pul- 
ftfc, and to its left the reading desk. 



covered with red velvet, fringed with 
white silk, and the monogram I. H. S., 
with a cross above it all worked ID 
white silk; on one corner of the altar 
is a large service book sustained by 
1 a highly polished brass stand, while cm 
a ledge above it are two vases filled 



20 



OF TORONTO. 



with fresh, sweetr-smelling flowers and 
a cross in the centre all made of fine 
brass. The eastern wall of the sanc 
tuary is panelled in the third-pointed 
French Gothic of the Luilding, while 
above fhe window is the inscription : 
"Holy, holy, holy, Lord God Almighty," 
the Beatitudes from the Sermon on 
the Mount being inscribed above the 
window ot the nave. The chancel has 
a blue canopy, olentifully sprinkled 
with gilt stars. 



ness of delineation and delicacy of col 
ouring. The four evangelists are rep 
resented above, and the four major 
prophets below. Tihe "window, made in 
Edinburgh, cost, 150. But the entire 
arrangement of the chancel is in keep 
ing with the churchly idea which is 
truly unfolded only in cathedral arch 
itecture as well as in cathedral ser 
vice. 

"The school portion of the structure, 
at the south-east corner, is in perfect 




HOLT TRINITY KA8T FRONT VIEW. 



The greater portion of the preceding 
portion of this history, very slightly 
altered, has already appeared, but the 
following account of the service at 
Holy Trinity in 1884, is quoted just 
as it was written then ; 

"The large, varigated. stained-glass 
window above the altar presents a 
rich and beautiful appearance at a 
distance, but is not sufficiently well 
executed to bear cloae and critical in- 
gpection, on account o! a want of clear- 



accord with the antique character of 
the edifice. On the lower floor is a 
large room uncarpeted and unadorned, 
with a small vestry adjoining, in which 
the weekly meetings are held. Above 
it is the Sunday school room, also un 
furnished, unless plain settees and 
chairs can be called furniture. The un- 
plastered walls are painted white and 
the rafters and other woodwork of the 
roof painted dark; a huge wood stove 
stands on one side and a small recess 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



21 



rector and curate, were counted, slow 
ly wound its way to the front of the 
chancel, and entering it divided at the 
sanctuary, the congregation mean 
while standing. 

Too much cannot be said in praise of 
the musical rendition of this service. 
Mr. A. R. Blackburn, who is organist 
and choirmaster, has developed a musi 
cal abil.ty that makes evensong at 
this church not only a pleasure but 
a luxury, and that, too, at no sacri 
fice of a devotional spirit; indeed, the 
mo.it casual listener must be inspired 
and uplifted by the sweetness and har 
mony of it. It was what is known as 
the choral service. The prayers, the 
creed and the responses are all intoned 
by the choir, composed entirely of male- 
voices, the full choir in this church 
numbering 51 members; 24 of these are 
men and 27 toys. The former are divid 
ed into nine tenors and 15 bass, the 
latter into 22 trebles and five altos. 
The mingling of the fresh, clear, young 
voices of the boys with the pure tenor 
and full round bass voices of the men 
produces an effect that is delightful. 
The intonation of the prayers, which 
to an ordinary Protestant of uncult< - 
yated musical taste seems novel, if not 
irreligious, is, when conducted with 
feeling and expression, very impressive 
and restful. 

"On this occasion Rev. John Pearson 
intoned the prayers in excellent style 
with a full, rich voice, accompanied by 
the choir the organ playing a soft and 
low refrain, as the petition was humble 
and penitent or rising and swelling 
with triumphant gladness when voic 
ing the greatness and honour and glory 
of the Almighty God. The congrega 
tion was worshipful, nearly every in 
dividual having the use of a prayer- 
book, and every one intensely follow 
ing the ancient service enriched with 
historical value and beautiful with the 
melody and harmony of reverent 
music. Rev. George Nattress read the 
evening lessons and preached a short 
Sermon. He is a minister of fine ad 
dress, good voice and evidently of great 
sincerity. Two hymns were sung, one, 
Singing to welcome the pilgrims of 
the night," being especially well sung. 
The choral service before the sermon 
lasted an hour, the sermon twenty 
miuntes. the concluding service and 
recessional occupying ten minutes. 

"Attentive officials are at hand; all 
seats at all services are free; the rector 
is curtained wherein is stationed an 
altar from which the service is con 
ducted. While all this is true to that 
specific form of church life In which 
the Holy Trinity is embosomed, yet 
the aspect is so devoid of finish and 
colour that it seems almost rude in 



its stern primeval nature. A number 
of Scripture scenes illustrated in pic 
tures of the most ancient and inartis 
tic style are hung on the low white 
walls about the room. 

"The Sunday school is a flourishing 
one, numbering about 350, with an av 
erage attendance of over 200, includ 
ing a Bible class of 50 and 36 officers 
and teachers. .More commodious and 
convenient rooms will be had when 
the new building is completed, and to 
this the school is anxiously looking. 
Of the $350 received by the treasurer 
in 1884, 60 was sent to the Indian 
Homes at Sault Ste. Marie, and 200 
volumes were added to the Sunday 
school library. 

"Although the general character of 
the building is of that simplicity com 
bined with massiveness, growing out 
of the middle-^aged Christian architec 
ture that symbolizes the trua cathe 
dral .habit, yet the worship is rich and 
cultivated in its ceremony. The ser 
vice of ^ this church in not ritualistic; 
it is liturgical and in entire agree 
ment with the Church of England ser 
vices as celebrated in the old country 
for the last three hundred years. Com 
munion is celebrated every Sunday at 
8 and 11 a.m., and on All Saints and 
Holy days, the Litany every Sunday 
at 4.80 p.m., and choral evensong at 7. 
Ordinarily in the morning the service 
is a plain one, but on the first and 
third Sundays of each month and on 
festival days the communion service 
is choral ; there is evensong every day 
at 5.30. At the usual morning service 
about 400 people are present, but the 
evening service finds the church fill 
ed ; it seats about 800. There are 400 
communicants and 3,714 communion 
services were held during the last 
year. 

" I should like very much to have 
the privilege of sitting in the gallery 
in order to get a goo:l view oT the 
choristers, said the writer to the 
black-robed beadle of the Holy Trin 
ity. 

Just wait a minute, said that 
busy functionary, as he turned away 
to look after a stove. Now, step this 
way, he resumed, opening a narrow 
door at the front of one of the tur 
rets ; just keep right on till you come 
to a green door and pusih it open, was 
the parting instruction as the little 
door was closed behind him, and the 
writer found himself in total darkness. 
With one hand groping along the damp 
circular wall and the other outstretch 
ed to ward off any unseen dancer, the 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



narrow winding stairway was followed, 
by faith, not by sight, until the green 
door was reached; after an alinosc 
idespairing effort to find the latch, an 
effort not conducive to the cultivation 
of a reverential temper, the door at 
last flew open with a bang and threat 
ened to bring the eyes of the whole 
congregation galLery-wiards. After- 
enough of the accumulated dust of 
months had been cleared away from 
the unused seat a fine view of the 
nave and chancel, brilliantly lighted, 
was deemed a reward for the perilous 
ascent. 



in their work and anxious to accommo 
date all enquirers with their offi 
cial services. 

-The year s report for 1885-86 shows 
an income of $1,120.83 through the 
envelope system, $2,416.69 through the 
general offertory, and $586.75 through 
the clergy fund, while the total receipts 
from all sources amounted to $9,514.23. 
The membership is divided into minor 
organizations for the prosecution of 
the work the Holy Trinity feels called 
upon to do, and the work is conscien 
tiously done, reflecting credit upon its 
congregation, and in that way honour- 




HOLY TKINITY WEST FRONT VIEW. 



Far away the processional chant was 
faintly heard, like the distant mur 
mur of some hidden waterfall; its soft, 
gentle music grew stronger and louder 
until the vestry door was opened and 
the surpliced choristers slowly and re 
verently entered, while the inspiring 
music rose and fell in liquid melody, 
growing louder and stronger as the 
clear tenor wove sweet sounds above 
the splendid harmony of the deep bass. 
The double line processional, led by two 
very small boys, and graduated by two 
larger ones, and so on along until the 
24 boys and 18 men, followed by the 
and his curate are intensely interested 



ing its generous founder. 



The foregoing sketch brings the his 
tory of Holy Trinity in great measure 
down to Easter, 1886. The following 
particulars are now added, to make the 
story complete : 

The sum of $9,514.23 mentioned as 
having been received from Easter, 1885, 
until Easter, 1886, included the special 
funds for the new school buildings and 
repairs to chapel and parsonage, re 
spectively, 2,919.63 and $115.50, mak- 
i ing in the aggregate $3,035.13, so that 
the net amount for parochial purposes 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



23 



was $6,479.10. Since that date the con 
tributions have been as follows: 



1886-87 - 


810,1*5.73. of this $1,668.27 was special 


1887-88. 


18.297.06, 


8,982.20 




1888 89 


8.278.40, 


2,148.34 




1889-90. 


8,600.26, 


1,715.00 




1890-91 . 


8,244.82, 


1,537.95 




1891-92. 


14.S82.52, 


4,780.65 




1892-93. 


12.403.34, 


4,688.38 




1893-9i. 


6,560.37. 


4 771.83 




1994-95. 


4,779.95, 


* No special funds 


1895-90. 


3.873.18, 


t * 


1896-97 . 


7,547.18, 


3,599.40 was special 


1897-98. 


4,665.97, 


924.92 



The special funds were for the new 
school buildings and include loans on 
mortgage. 

The rectors of Holy Trinity have since 
its foundation been as follows: 

1847-1875, Rev. H. Scadding, D. D.; 
1675-1886, Rev. W. S. Darling; 1886, 
Rev. John Pearson, who ia the present 
incumbent (1890.) 

From 1868 until 1875 Rev. W. S. Dar 
ling was rector s assistant, and Rev. 
John Pearson filled the same office 
from 1875 until 1886. 

The curates since 1847 have been: 
Reverends Walter Stennett, 1847-1854; 
W. S. Darling, 1851-1868; Dr. Duck 
et t, 1857-1858; W. E. Cooper. 1858-1859; 
R. Sandars, 18.i2-1865; G. T. Carruth-rs, 
186?/-1865; H. W. Davies, D. D., 1866- 
1881; Edwin Day, 1870-1875; C. T. Den- 
roche, 1870-1871; 0. P. Ford, 1873-1875; 
O. B. Darling, 1880-1881; W. Farncomb, 
1883-1883; George Nattress, 1883-1889; 
O. H. Mockridge, D.D., 1890-1893; Rev. 
Frank DuMoulin from 1894 until Janu 
ary 1st, 1896, when he went to Chicago 
to one of the Epi.scopal churches in 
that city. Rev. Wl L. Baynes-Reed, 
for three months in the summer of 
1895, and Rev. B. C. H. Andrews, from 
January 1st, 18SJS, until the. present, 
(January 1899.) 

The churchwardens have been, from 
1847 to 1853, J. W. Brent and Thomas 
Champion; from 1853 to 1856, J. W. 
Brent and D. Crawford, 1854; C. Berczy, 
1855; E. \Hobson, 1856; from 185G tp 
1858, F. W. Obate and William Ince; 
1858-59, F. W. Ooate and C. J. Campbell; 
from 1859 to 1861, C. J. Campbell and 
Jl. W. Brent were; since then the list 
is as follows: 

1861-62 Robert Spratt, J. E. Ellis. 
1862-63 Robert Spratt, A. W. Otter. 
1863-64 A. W. Otter, J. W. Young. 
1864-65 C. J. Campbell, S. G. Wood. 
1865-1866 William Ince, S. G. Wood. 
1866-67 William Ince, John Catto. 
18S7-68 John Catto, A. Blachford. 
1868-69 A. Blachford, W. T. Rielly. 
1869-71 W. T. O Rielly, G. W. Buck- 
land. 
1871-72 G. W. Euckland, John Catto. 



1872-73-John Oatto, John W. Young. 
1873-75 A. Blachford, G. S. Holme- 

sted. 

1875-76 A. Blachford, H. J. Browne. 
1876-77 H. J. Browne, W. H. Gates. 
1877-78 W. H. Gates, R. H. Be,thune. 
1878-79 R. H. Bethune, E. F. Dates. 
1879-80 E. F. Dates, William Ince. 
1880-81 G. S. Holmested, W. S. Taylor. 
1881-82 W. S. Taylor, H. J. Browne. 
1882-81 H. P. Blachford, William Hill. 
1884-87 H. P. Blachford, W. Kerste- 

man, jun. 
1887-88 W. Kersteman, jun., I. J. Cbo- 

per. 

1888-901. J. Cooper, C. H. Thompson. 
1890-92 William Hill, W. P. Byrch. 
1892-93 William Hill, F. A. Hall. 
1893-95 H. P. Blachford, Edmund 

Vragge. 
1895-98 H. P. Blachford, Aubrey 

White. 
1898-99 O. J. Agar, W. H. Tippet. 

For nearly fifty years the secret of 
who it was that built Holy Trinity 
Church was well kept, but about 1894 
the name became known, and in 1897 
| the churchwardens thus alluded to the 
matter in their report: 

"By the terms of her gift, her name 
was expressly directed not to be dis- 
j closed; I ut during the last few years, 
| by some means or other, the name of 
I our benefactress has been made pub- 
; lie, and it is therefore committing no 
I breach of confidence now, in this jubi- 
j lee year of the church s history, but on 
. the contrary, rather an appropriate oc 
casion, to make the fact known in these 
pages, and more especially as the merit 
of founding this church has been 
ascribed to other persons. Mrs. Swale 
! departed this life, in the year 1844, and 
the gift, though made by her in her 
1 lifetime, was not actually paid over 
until after hei; decease. 

"When the memorial tablet record 
ing the foundation of the church was 
placed in the church, a rubbing of it 
was sent to the Rev. H. J. Swale, and 
met with his approval. Rev. H. J. 
Swale died in the year 1893." 

The church of the Holy Trinity com 
pleted its jubilee on Oct. 27th, 1897, and 
| it was celebrated by special sermons 
and services and cqngregati9nal gath- 
erings. These jubilee services com- 
tinenced on Sunday, October 24th, and 
j concluded a week later, on October 
! 31st. At morning prayer on Octobe* 
the 24th, there \vas an unusually larg 
congregation, the sermon being preach 
ed by the Right Reverend the Bishop 
: of Algoma, the lessons being read by 
! the Ven. Archdeacon Bogert. 
i At night the Bishop of Toronto occu 
pied the pulpit. His discourse consisted 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



of a carefully prepared sketch of the 
history of the church, its inception, 
consecration and subsequent growth. 
During his sermon ha paid a touching 
tribute to the work done by the Iws. 
H. Scadding, D.D., and W. Stewart 
Darling, besides eulogizing the la 
bours of the rector the Rev. John 
Pearson. 

On Tuesday, October 26th, a special 
service was neld for the school chil 
dren, when a clear and forcible ad 
dress was given by the Rev. C. J. Good 
man, curate of St. Luke s. After the 
service a handsome brass baptismal 
ewer was presented to the church by 
the children of the Sunday school, to 
whom an entertainment was given the 
same evening in the school room. 

Wednesday being the anniversary of 
the consecration there was an early 
celebration of the Holy Communion at 
seven a.m., when there were atout fifty 
communicants, the rector and the Rev. 
B. C. H. Andrews officiating. The 
jubilee service proper was at 8 p.m., 
and rarely has such a vast congrega 
tion gathered within the church s walls 
as on the occasion. 

At seven o clock there were at least 
two hundred people seated in the 
church, a-nd at 7.30 it was well filled. 
When the service began every seat in 
the building was crowded, and num 
bers were accommodated with .chairs 
who otherwise would have had to 
stand. 

The chair, with the clergy and bishop 
entered the church by the west door 
at ten minutes past eight, the pro 
cessional hymn being 393 A. & M., 
"Rejoice Ye Pure in Heart." Besides 
the Bishop amd his chaplains, Rev. A. J. 
Brougha.ll and Rev. H. Scadding, D. D., 
there were present the clergy of the 
parish, and the Revs. Arthur Baldwin, 
preacher for the evening, C. B. Dar 
ling, who read the lessons, and about 
forty of the clergy from Toronto and 
its immediate neighbourhood. 

The Rev. Arthur Baldwin s sermon 
was a clear and masterly one. He 
confessed unreservedly that through 
Holy Trinity church and the lessons 
taught from its pulpit by "those faith 
ful teachers Scadding. Darling and 
Pearson," a higher tone had been 
given Canadian churchmanship, that 
Holy Trinity had proven a blessing, 
not only to its own people, but to the 
Canadian church at large. The preach 
er acknowledged his own indebtedness 
to the kindness of former rectors of 
the church, and his admiration for the 
life and work of the then rector. 

The benediction at the close of the 
service was pronounced by the vener 



able Dr. Scadding, who as a young 
man of thirty-five years of age, had 
half a century previously read a por 
tion of the prayers at the consecration 
of the church. The doctor s voice was 
heard distinctly all over the church, 
while the occasion was a most impres 
sive one. 

The tall figure of the doctor, in sur 
plice and hood, with his snow-white 
hair and uplifted hand, the white-robed 
clergy and choristers grouped kneel 
ing about him, and the vast congrega 
tion, all constituted a scene as beau 
tiful as it was solemn. Tor a brief 
moment after the doctor s words had 
ceased there was absolute silence, "a 
silence that could be felt," and then 
rising from their knees, led by the 
choir, the whole congregation joined 
in singing the Te Deum. 

On Thursday, October 28th, there was 
a re-union of the past and present 
members of the congregation in the 
school room, when addresses were de 
livered by the rector, by Dr. Scadding, 
and by Messrs. William Ince and S. G. 
Wood. 

The Jubilee services at Holy Trinity 
were brought to a close on Sunday, 
October flst, the preacher at the morn 
ing service being the Right Rev. the 
Lord Bishop of Huron, who was most 
attentively listened to by a large con 
gregation. 



CHAPTER VI. 
ST. STEPHEN S. 

The First Church in th CUT : Wet of 

Spudlna Avenue Il Fonmlrr. 

The following account of this church 
and its services was first published in 
1887. It reads: 

" It was an ideal Sunday ; a gentle 
breeze tempered the sunshine that en 
wrapped the city with its golden glory 
and made the day enjoyable to the 
thousands threading the streets and 
i avenues, on their way to church. The 
ringing 1 of the little bell from the open 
belfry of St. Stephen s warned the ob 
server that his notebook must be other 
wise occupied than with street scenes, 
and be entered the pretty church and 
found a comfortable seat in a retired 
1 corner of the north transept. 

" The Church of England people may 
well rejoice in the possession of so 
pretty and so) ornate a building as that 
of St. Stephen s. It is constructed of 
red brick with stone facings, and is 
almost perfect as an illustration of 
true ecclesiastical architecture, the 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



25 



style being early English Gothic. A 
mere glance at the exterior at once re 
veals the gracefulness of outline and 
the originality of conception, and yet 
a conception that is in harmony with 
true art. It is the testimony of Eng 
lish people who live in Toronto that 
this little church, almost more than 
any other in the city, at once pictures 
to their minds the vine-embowered 
chapels and historic shrines of their 
dear native land. The mam entrance 
is on Bellevue avenue, although there 
is a porch on College street and an 
entrance from the rectory grounds on 
the south. The building facing the ave 
nue is 103x34 feet, with two shallow 
transepts measuring 12 feet; the chan 
cel has a depth of 30 feet and is 20 
feet wide. Above the altar are three 
large stained glass, lancet shaped win 
dows; the left has inscribed upon it: 
"The Layspring from on High Hath 
Visited Us," while pn the right can 
be seen, "I am the Resurrection and 
the Life." The central one of the 
three has an image of a dove hover 
ing above the monogram I. H. S., while 
a chalice is pictured below. The altar 
is a plain one, covered with gilt- 
fringed red cloth, and has the word 
"Jesus" embroidered in black letters 
upon a white background, while above 
this was arranged a collection of 
white flowers. On the panelling of the 
altar the letters A and O ara en 
graved, signifying the first and the 
last, Alpha and Omega being the first 
and last letters of the Greek alpha 
bet, the languig; which Xsus spcke. 
Within the chancel there are six sm;< , ! 
lancet windows, and the ceiling is 
painted a dark blue, dotted with gilt 
stars. The organ is a small, but fine- 
toned instrument. Its pipes, as well 
as the general painting of the church, 
are more of a fanciful character, in 
the way of decoration, than of an 
ornamental one. The organ chamber 
and robing room are one and the same, 
on the south side of the chancel. 

The church seats 600 people, and it 
is not luxurious, but it is thoroughly 
ecclesiastical in design and arrange 
ment. The seats are plain, darkly 
stained and uncushioned ; the floor is 
uncarpeted, save the aisles, which are 
covered with matting. A stone bap 
tismal font stands within the north 
ern transept, just to the right of the 
pulpit, and has inscribed upon its base, 
"Suffer Jittle children to come unto 
Me and forbid them not." 

Scriptural mottoes are painted above 
the transepts in fanciful colours, while 1 
suitable selections indite the windows. 



of which there are eight in the walls 
and eight in the roof. Above the arch 
way of the chancel is inscribed: "I will 
wash mine hands: in innocency; so will 
I compass thine altar, O Lord." 

The impression of the building is one 
of comfort, notwithstanding its lack 
of those furnishings and adornments 
that one naturally expects in connec 
tion with the idea of comfort. Some 
how the architecture with its grace 
and harmony gives a restful feeling 
to thj worshippers; there is nothing 
in the structure to disturb a refined 
sensa ot proportion. 

Rented seats are unknown in St. 
Stephen s Church. Whatever exclusive- 
ness may be charged against the Church 
of England, it must l>e admitted that, 
with few exceptions, its management 
in this city is conducted upon the prin 
ciple of a free Gospel. And St. 
Stephen s is one of its parishes that 
exemplifies the charity it theoretically 
holds, viz., freedom to worship God 
without being assessed for the privi 
lege. Every sitting in this church is 
absolutely free to any one. Y"ou may 
choose your own place and you will be 
heartily welcome to occupy it; no rents 
arc taken, no assessments laid; every 
thing in its- financial income goes upon 
the voluntary system, and, as a con 
sequence, the entire property of the 
parish, worth about 830,000, is free of 
debt, and the offertory last year was 
increased over $5 a Funday. The 
free seat system, together with an ad 
vantageous location in a growing part 
of the city, and a most genial and 
friendly minister has made this em 
phatically a "people s church." The 
congregation on the Sunday morning 
referred to was evidence of the fact; 
it was not made up of wealthy or aris 
tocratic people, but of people in the 
middle walks of life, and people who 
heard the Gospel gladly, if their par 
ticipation and interest in the service 
are a criterion of judgment. 

Almost every congregation in the 
city has an individuality of its own; 
it may partak largely of the neigh 
bourhood in which it is located, or it 
may so imbib \ the spirit of the pastor 
in charge as to receive its distinctive 
St. Stephen s three things specially im- 
sort of personal entity. In the case of 
presses the writer, viz., the heartiness 
with which the congregation joined in 
the service, the excellence of the sing 
ing, and the large majority of young 
people and children in attendance So 
far as the reporter could see, only nine 
grey-headed persons were noticeable; 
the. remainder, and the congregation. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



as is usual, was a very large one, was 
mainly composed of young persons. 
Very many children were there, and 
they were reverent children, too; all 
followed the service slosely, and with 
apparent interest; the decorum 
throughout was devout and proper; the 
people seemed to be there to worship 
and for no other purpose. 

"The only thing that seemed anoma 
lous in the whole proceeding was the 
entrance into the chancel of the choir 
boys and men without surplices; and 
they entered irregularly, some from the 
nave and some from the vestry, there 
being no processional or recessional 
hymn. But they sang well; the chant 
ing was in exact time with concerted 



"Rev. C. B. Kenrick, M.A., became the 
curate in October, 1886, ana is also su 
perintendent of the Sunday school.^ He 
took the opening service and recited 
the creed, the prayers and litany. The 
rector, Rev. A. J. Broughall, read the 
lessons and preached the sermon. He 
is a gentleman in middle life with hair 
and beard plentifully sprinkled with 
gray. In personal intercourse and in 
the conduct of church service he is 
perfectly natural and unrestrained ; 
he is of easy manner, not oratorical in 
delivery, but has a clear, distinct, 
pleasant voice which holds the interest 
of his hearers to the end. His sermon 
was a short utterance of useful truth 
plainly but forcibly put; it was no iter- 







ST. STEPHEN S CHCBCH, FROM BELLKVUE AVENUE 



action and fine expression. A notice 
able feature was the evident familiar 
ity of the people in the pews with the 
music that was used. And it was no 
flimsy, trashy, sentimental dish-water 
music; the chorals, the Te Deum and 
Benedictus, and the hymns were all 
dignified, sublime and had soul in them. 
The entire service is choral, the ming 
ling of the clear young voices of the 
ftoyfc with the deeper and heavier tones i 
of the men, and these with the volu 
minous tones of the vast audience pro 
duced a most pleasant and artistic ef 
fect; indeed, the congregation seemed 
almost proficient as the choir, and 
it was really an inspiring service. 



ation and reiteration of trite sayings 
that have no interest in them save the 
interest that belongs to age; it was a 
practical outline and appeal whereby 
the Christian grace of alms-giving was 
shown to be a beneficial factor in pro 
ducing happiness not only to the recipi 
ent but to the donor. The text was 
taken froea the Acts; "It is more 
blessed to give than to receive." After 
explaining the circumstances that gave 
rise to these \,ords and the significance 
of Che fact that they are the only re 
corded words of Ohirst outside the 
Gospels, he said : 

"These words have a s^fftage but true 
ring about frhem. The world and many 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



27 



Christians admit their justice, but do 
not act according to them. To re 
ceive anything is a blessing, but it is 
a greater blessing to confer a benefit. 

"In Christian benevolence there is an 
element of the divine; it is divine to 
give; it is human to receive. God is 
the Good because He is ever dispensing 
blessings on all. Ohirst was always 
giving, either strength or health or 
life or love or tenderness; He looked 
upon men as members of one great 
fraternity, and in so far as we give do 
we resemble Him. 

Christianity is founded upon forget- 
fulness of self. There is a kind of re 
ligion that is selfish; it sings hymns 
a.bout heaven; it prays for its own 
needs, and sheds a few delicious tears 
of repentance in its closet; it gives 
money to its own church, and for its 
own pew accommodation. This is not 
Christ s religion. To be good and hon 
est in every day s action and transac 
tion, to do as one would be done by, is 
Christianity. 

"fcy giving we giorify God. The prac 
tice of love and good-will, and to be 
benevolent and iisjid, distinguish the 
servants of God. Giving does good to 
ourselves, and has a wholesome and 
beneficial effect, because the exercise 
of moral virtues tends to their growth 
and stability. The philanthropist is 
always a happy man. Modern agnosti 
cism teaches that each man realizes 
happiness by sacrificing himself to the 
good of others, and yet Christ taught 
that truth eighteen hundred years ago. 

"The sermon was only twenty-two 
minutes in length, but it was brimful 
of such sentences. They were illus 
trated by short quotations from the 
poets and by references to Bishop Bur 
nett and the philanthropist Howard. 
It was a valuable sermon, and all the 
ujore so because terselv expressed. It 
closely held the attention of the iarge 
congregation, and doubtless produced 
a practical response among the people 

"In 1858, November 28th. the first 
service was held in the church, which 
was built, entirely at his own expense, 
by Robert B. Denison, the third son 
of the late Colonel G. .T. Denison, who 
died in 1853. _ Anglicans west of Spa- 
dina avenue in those days were few 
in number; but the provision made for 
the outreaching population by the 
building of this church was a wise 
one, as is shown in its large member 
ship, there being 350 communicants 
now connected with his parish. The 
corner occupied by the church, rertory 
and school housa has very much in 



creased in value. At first it was a 
field among many surrounning fields, 
with tangled thickets and forest trees 
on the north; now beautiful lawns, 
commodious residences and a fine 
, avenue take their place. The congre- 
1 gatiou was very small at first, com- 
: posed of only a few earnest workers; 
i but the spirit of consecration to the 
| work kept it alive, and slowly grow- 
j ing, until, with the coming population, 
a large parish and a most successful 
one has been established. Nothing of 
historical moment occurred in the life 
j of the congregation until the year 
I IfGo, save a change of rectors, the 
first incumbent, Rev. J. H. McCollum. 
being succeeded in April, 1861, by Rev. 
A. J Broughall. On October 26th, 18(i5, 
the church, which cost $10,000, wan de 
stroyed by a fire that consumed every 
thing save the walls. The flames were 
seen first issuing from the vestry win 
dow, and it is supposed an attempt 
was being made to rob the safe in 
that room, when by some accident the 
building was fired by the burglars. 

"The congregation then met in the 
laite Col. Cumberland s house, and its 
irrepressible spirit immediately rebuilt 
the church, so that in March of the 
following year it was re-opened for 
service. In 1878 the building was en 
larged by the addition of the transepts, 
but it is again too small, and further 
enlargements and improvements are in 
contemplation. It is noteworthy that 
every addition and improvement was 
paid for as soon as finished. Land was 
bought to the south for a rectory, and 
later on an additional plot, upon which 
was built aschoolhouse capable of ac 
commodating 400. But the Sunday 
school, which numbers 650, is too large 
for the building, and the overflow is 
accommodated in the churoh. The 
school building and the rectory will 
also be" enlarged and improved. No 
thing seems to be wanting to mark 
St. Stephen s as one of the most flour 
ishing churches of the city. Its con 
stituency is not a wealthy one, but 
the work it is doing is better work, 
perhaps, on that account, because it 
brings the blessings of the Gospel to 
the poor. Both the rector and assist 
ant clergy labour self-sacrif icingly and 
lovingly with a spirit of humility and 
consecration that is very commendable. 
Indeed, voluntary work is character 
istic of the parish, and its aim is to 
directly interest its membership not 
only in acts of worship, but in prac 
tical service. 

" The choir, under the direction of 



28 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Mr. C. E. Burch, the organist, does its 
work as an act of voluntary service. It 
is composed of twenty boys and eight 
men. There is a flourishing C. E. T. S. 
connected with the church, and also a 
Band of Hope, together with a Ladies 
Aid and Benevolent Society. The in 
come is about $3,500 a year, and $270 
from the Sunday school, a most liberal 
showing, when the circumstances of 

the people of the parish are considered." 


Since June, of 1886, the year in which 
the preceding portion of this account 
of St. Stephen s was written, there 
have been various changes in the con- 



the Rev. J. H. McCollum. He was in 
office from November, 1858, until April, 
1861, when he resigned and the Rev. 
A. J. Broughall was appointed by Dr. 
Strachan, the then Bishop of Toronto, 
to the vacant rectory. The following 
is a complete list of the whole of the 
clergy who have been connected with 
St. Stephen s since its foundation : 

Rectors Rev. J. H. McCollum, 1858- 
1861; Rev. A. J. Broughall, 1861-1898. 

Locum tenena, January to June. 1882 
(owing to illness of the rector) Rev. 
C. H. Shortt. 

Assistant clergy Rev. C. B Kenrick, 
1886-1888; Rev. Professor Clark, spe- 



y 

/ 




INTEKIOR OF ST. STEPHEN S CHURCH. 



gregation and buildings, but none in 
the rector. 

In 1890 considerable enlargements 
were made in the church, the chancel 
as described in the earlier portion of 
this article, being taken down and a 
more spacious one erected in its stead, 
together with an organ chamber and 
clergyman s vestry to the south, also 
a northern chamber of considerable 
seating capacity. The nave was also 
extended eastward; the new portion in 
tended to be part of a much larger 
church than the present one, yet to 
be erected. 

The first rector of St. Stephen s was 



cial preacher from October, 1888, until 
August, 1891; Rev. J. S. Broughall, 
1890-1892; Rev. E. Vicars Stevenson, 
1892-1895 ; Rev. E. H. Capp, who began 
his work in the district in September, 
1895. 

The list of wardens includes some 
well-known names. Unfortunately, ow 
ing to the first church having been 
destroyed by fire, the minutes of the 
vestry up to 1865 cannot be referred 
to, but the first wardens, from 18*8 un 
til 1862, were these : 

Lieut, -C6L R. B. Denison, Lieut.-Col. 
F. W. Cumberland. 

Succeeding them have been the fol- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



29 



lowing gentlemen, some of whose names 
are well known. 

1865-67, F. W. Coates and F. Arm 
strong; 1867-71, F. W. Coates and H. L. 
Hlme ; 1871-72, F. D. Bostwiek and Jonas 
Ap Jones; 1872-73, F. D. Bostwiek and 
Mr. Williamson; 1873-74, J. Pepler and 
Mr. Walker; 1875-76, J. Pepler and F. 
D. Bostwiek ; 1876-78, F. D. Bostwiek and 
J. D. Oliver; 1878-79, J. D. Oliver and 
J. Pepler; 1879-81, Edward Brown and 
Dr. Machell; 1881-82, N. Weatherstone 
and Dr. Machell; 1882-83, John Carter 
and R. T. Fuller ; 1883-84, J. D. Oliver , 
and Dr. Macho U; 1884-85, E. B. Brown 
and R. T. Fuller ; 1885-86, J. Pepler and 
W. A. Brown; 1886-87, W. A. Brown 
and G. Mercer Adams; 1887-88. W. A. 
Brown and F. W. Ball; 1888-90, J. H. 
Patterson and Dr. Machell; 1890-92, J. 
H. Patterson and W. A. Brown and W. 
Cook; 1893-91, W. J. Mitchell and W. 
Cook; 1894-93, W. J. Mitchell and E. 
B. Temple; 1896-99, John Alley and 
Walter Nation. 

About 1890 the choir of St. Stephen s 
were vested in oassacks and surplices, a 
bhangte looked upon by the great bulk 
of the congregation as being one very 
much for the better. Mr. M. de G. I 
Wedd is the present organist (1896), | 
having taken the place so well filled 
by Mr. Burch. 

CHAPTER VII. 
ST. JOHN S. 

ffce Old Military t liurrh-Itu History nnd 
Development. 

On the west side of Portland street, 
at the corner of Stewart, just below 
King, is an historic piece of ground 
owned by the Ontario Government, but 
cared for by the city. It is called Vic 
toria Square, .and is the site of the 
old military burial ground. It was at 
one time the intention to build Gov 
ernment House on St. Clarence Square 
and then open Wellington street 
through this old burial ground. A 
subsequent change of design was made [ 
and the ground was not broken. Until j 
recently it was in a very dilapidated I 
condition; nearly all marks of the old ! 
graves were obliterated, and it was an 
ordinary common. But the. city re 
claimed it from this condition, put it 
into respectable shape, and erected 
about it a neat fence. In the north- j 
west corner may be seen a few of the i 
old _ tombstones, the only relics of the 
military heroes whose graves are now 
entirely lost. 

Many years ago the Government 



made a grant- of two acres to the 
Church of England, so that a church 
might be erected wherein the soldiery 
could worship without being obliged 
to march down from the Fort to St. 
James Cathedral. The church was to 
be erected on Portland street; but, on 
account of the contemplated opening 
up of a street through the ground, 
the northern sect ion was given, and the 
church was built on Stewart street, 
back of Portland, where it now stands. 
At the corner, protected by two posts, 
may yet be seen: the stone, with a 
broad arrow engraved upon it, to show 
that that is Government land. This is 
the Church of St. John the Evangel 
ist. It was the military church until 
1870. The soldiers worshipped there, 
and now ssats are assigned to the offi 
cers and soldiers of No. 2 Co., R.R.C.I. 
There are about 40 J graves in Victoria 
Square, some of them the resting place 
of men very prominent in the early 
history of Canada. The father-in-law 
of thb late Chief Justice Harrison, the 
grandfather of the late Lieutenant- 
Governor Robinson, children of Sir 
John Colborne, and other officers are 
buried there. And so sacred are these 
graves in the memory of some that 
the descendants of thess long-buried 
Ko diers bring their children to St. 
John s church for baptism, and many 
a marriage is consecrated there be 
cause of the veneration felt for the 

dead heroes lying outside. 



In the history of Toronto s church ^s 
already frequently quoted is tb^ fol 
lowing description, not of St. John s 
as it is to-day, but as it was in, J887, 
It is well worth quoting, as it describes 
a building now fast becoming a faint 
memory ; 

"The original church is still to be 
seen. It is a low-built, quaint-looking 
structure, bearing about it an air of 
antiquity which gives an old building 
that veneration challenging our re- 
spacfy. There is a small porch on the 
north, with an odd-looking little belfry 
beside it. The chancel is built in ap- 
sidal form on the east. The original 
building was enlarged by the addition 
of a transept on the south. It is now 
rough-coated, though in the early days 
it was simply a clap-board building. 
It cost less than 400, and seated 500 
persons, special sittings being set apart 
for the military. The transept affords 
room for 100 additional sittings. The 
church was built about 1860. At the 
west end is a very uncouth-looking 
old gallery, projecting its cumbersome 
body well out into the aisle. It was 



30 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



intended to receive an organ, but never 
realized the intention. The interior is 
very suggestive of an English chapel, 
and with all its unique characteristics 
is a comfortable, if not a pretty, church. 
The chancel is neat and pretty, and 
contains seats for the choir, with a 
handsome 18-stop "Warren organ in the 
north-east corner. The roof is upheld 
by light open timber-work, and neatly 
stained glass Avindows set in the low 
walls add to the picturesque appear 
ance of the edifice. It is a very plain 
building, but, for all that, it is inter 
esting. Perhaps it is the memory of 
the dead outsidej that invests it with 
so muah historic value. Just west of 
it is a rough-cast schooi-house, 60x40 
feet, and on Portland street, at the 
southern line of the grant, is a com 
fortable rectory. 

"At first open-air meetings were held 
in th 3 West End, with the design of 
finally organizing a parish that should 
take in What is known as "the com 
mons." Church of England people then 
l>egan holding service in St. Andrew s 
Market, where a Sunday school was 
also established. The congregations en 
larged, until the outlook for the build 
ing of a church became very hopeful. 
At this inception period of St. John s, 
Revs. Dr. Lett and T. Smith. Kennedy 
were especially active in the mission 
ary effort. The- new congregation wor 
shipped in St. Andrew s Market until 
it was destroyed? by fire, and then the 
church was built. It was a free church 
and the fashionable one of that day. 
The military gavrt it a social prestige; 
people well known in Toronto society 
and wealthy then lived in that section 
of the city, and gave their patronage 
and support to the little church. But 
the transfer of the residential centre, 
to the north-east sadly crippled the 
church, so that, in that respect, it has 
very largely lost its ancient prestige 
and influence. The/ people now attend- ; 
ing it, as comports with the neigh 
bourhood, ara mostly of the working ! 
classes. Not that the church is not so 
valuable and important, perhaps it is 
more so now; but, as the world and 
society go, it has lost its ancient re 
nown. Like the sleepers in the un 
known graves 1>>) its side, so its former 
greatness and glor.y have departed for 
ever. The fault is not in the church, 
but in the. natural causes that move 
the residential centre and induce peo 
ple to seek more modern and more 
luxurious places of worship. But even 
as it is, some of its parishioners come 
a long distance to worship in the old 



church, passing by more pretentious 
edifices on their way; 

"Among its founders mav be men 
tioned Messrs. D. R Read, Lewis Mof- 
fatt, George Monro, Stephen Oliver, 
William Armstrong, Archibald Cam 
eron, F. Gapreol, F. Widder and Chan 
cellor Spragge. The first rector was 
Rev. T. S. Kennedy, deceased, in whose 
honour a memorial tablet is placed in 
the southern wail of the chancel. H^ 
was assisted by Revs. A. J. Broughali, 
now of St. Stephen s, arid. G. T. Car- 
ruthers successively as curates. Rev. 
J. H 1 lowman was the second rector, 
and he was succeeded by the present 
rector, the Rev. Alex. Williams. M. A., 
who began his rectorate in 1865. Mr. 
Williams is a native Canadian and a 
graduate of Trinity College. At the 
time he graduated he was too young 
| to be ordained, so for one year he act- 
i ed us tutor, after which he was or 
dained, in 185">, by B shop Strachan. 
In company with two other mission 
aries he then had charge of the mis 
sion work along the St. Clair, covering 
. territory GO miles long by 12 miles 
wide. After four years hard labour he 
was compelled to desist on account of 
| sickness. H 1 ? almost lost the use of his 
voice, and for six years engaged ^n 
; the work of teaching. He was remark- 
! ably successful and had under hia 
tutelage a number of pupils who have 
become prominent men. He >s most 
affectionately and kindly sio cen of 1i|y 
these, who trace much of their ability 
and ^success to his teaching. The same 
admirable personal qualities that 
| bound him to h : s pupils have endeared! 
! his present parishioners to him and 
; the most cordial relations exist be 
tween him and them. 

"When his voice was sufficiently re 
stored he returned to the active minis 
try and was an assistant with Rev. 
Saltern Givins, at St. Paul s, Tork- 
ville, from which position he came to 

i St. John s. Incidentally the writer as 
certained that his salary for twelve 

i years as a clergyman did not exceed 

I $300 yearly, a notable example of de 
votion and self-sacrifice. 
"The boundaries of the parish of St. 

! John the Evangelist are Queen and 
I>e>foe on the north, Spadina on the 
east, the Bay on the south, Tecumseth 
and Garrison Creek on the west. This 
church gave St. Anne s a part of its 
parish, St. Mathias another part, and 
is the origin of the whole of St. 
Philip s. St. Mlathias church began 
from a Sunday school and miss : on held 
on what is now Claremont street, and 
which were handed over by St. John s 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



31 



to the professors and students of Trin 
ity College, and finally organized into 
a successful and flourishing parish. 
The attendance at St. John s is very 
good, especially at the evening service. 
There are boys and girls guilds and 
the ladies of the parish are energetic 
workers. A parish monthly is pub 
lished under the rector s editorial 
supervision and has a circulation of 
409. There are about 175 communi 
cants, and the income is $1,503 yearly. 
Strangers are most cordially treated 
and are made welcome to the best 
seats. The service is in the old English 
style, the organ accompanying the 
monotone. The people respond heartily 
and sing well, congregat onal singing 
being especially encouraged. The. music 



The matter will be delayed only until 
sufficient amount of money is 



a 



I pledged towards the new building. 



From 1880, the date treated of in the 
i preceding portion of this sketch of St. 
j John s, until 1892, is not a great space 
| of time, and yet it sufficed for grea.t 
! changes to take place in St. John s. 

The church, which had been erected 

j thirty years previously, was only a 

1 frame building, though of churchly de- 

sign, and naturally began to show signs 

of deterioration and decay. Some spoke 

of it as a discredit to the city and a 

disgrace to the congregation, while to 

i others it had become dear. There were 

; associations connected with it which 

could never be forgotten, and they 




ST. JOHN 8 CHURCH, PORTLAND STREET. 



selected is of simple character so as 
not to be beyond the reach of the peo 
ple. The Sunday school has an average 
attendance of iioO ; the rector is gen 
eral superintendent, and is assisted 
(1887-88) by A. J. Williams and D. M. 
Birman ; two schools are held, one in 
the church and one in the school house. 
A. special feature is a Children s ser 
vice and catechetical instruction by 
th irecftor after the school hour. 

"It is felt that the old church has 
largely outlived its attractiveness, and 
it is no*,v in contemplation to erect a 
more modern and more convenient edi 
fice at the corner of Portland street. 



felt unable to leave their church home 
?o long as its timbers would hold to 
gether or its roof afford a shelter. 
But the time had come for a change to 
eomething better, and at the vestry 
i meeting of Easter, 1892, a move was 
; made towards the erection of a new 
1 church, with the result that a build 
ing was erected at a cost of $16,000, 
i cwcprding to the plans of Mr. Eden 
j Smith, of Toronto, and those who are 
! competent to judge have expressed the 
I opinion that it is a remarkably good 
example of a church built at a com 
paratively small cost, and yet contain- 
; ing all the .comforts and conveniences 



32 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



of a modern building. It will accom 
modate about COO, in addition to a 
choir of sixty voices. Adjoining the 
sanctuary is a commodious clergy 
vestry, while in the lofty basement 
there is a large, light and airy room 
for Sunday school a chapel for daily 
or weekly services, when the congrega 
tion is less than a hundred, two choir 
vestries, a lavatory and a well-arrang 
ed room for a library. The building 
is heated by two furnaces, one for hot 
air., the other a combination of hot 
air and hot water; and both heating 
and ventilation are most satisfactory. 

The removal from the old church to 
the new was marked by special ser 
vices, the closing services in the old 
being held on the 30th day of April, 
and conducted by tha present rector 
and the first curate. On this occasion 
the building was crowded by an inter 
ested congregation, many of whom had 
been old worshippers in St. John s, who 
desired to avail themselves of the last 
opportunity of worship in the old de 
caying church, where many well- 
known men had worshipped. The min 
ute book of the vestry gives us brief 
notice of some of these, such as Vice- 
Chancellor Spragge, John Duggan, 
Stephen Oliver, E. M. Carruthers, 
Archibald Cameron, George Monro, 
Lewis Moffatt, Win. Gamble, and 
others, who in their lifetime helped on 
this parish in its earlier days. 

There are three memorial tablets in 
St. John s church, one on the southern 
wall of the chancel, removed from the 
old building in memory of Rev. Thos. 
Smith Kennedy. This is of marble, 
a,nd is surrounded by the armourial 
bearings of the deceased. The second 
is a brass about 20x15 inches, erect 
ed by the officers, non-commissioned 
officers and men of the Infantry School 
Cbrps, in memory of Arthur J. Wat 
son, a private in "C" Company, who 
t/as killed in action at Fish Greek, 
April 24th, 1885, during the North-west 
rebellion, and Herbert Foulkes, a bug 
ler of the same company, who fell at 
Cut Knife May 2nd, 1885. This brass 
is on the eastern wall of the southern 
transept. In the northern transept is 
a marble tablet in memory of William 
Postlethwaite, who was drowned at sea, 
July llth, 1891. The flagon and chalice 
of sterling silver, used in the Holy 
Communion, are mementoes of Colonel 
and Mrs. Mountain, who presented 
them to the church when the Colonel s 
duties recalled him to England. 

The chancel contains several fine 
stained glass windows, one in memory 
of the late Samuel Bickerton Harman, 
erected by his four sons ; another to 
the late Captain Prince ; two more in 
remembrance of members of the Risley 



family; and a fifth placed there by 
Mr. E. T. Lightbourne. They represent 
the Saviour with St. John and St. 
Mary on either side, the apostle and 
evangelist St. Matthew, and Christ 
blessing little children. 

On May 4th, 1893, the new church 
was opened for divine service, the band 
of the R. R. C. I. (since .abolished) 
assisting in the service. The choir, male 
and female, all arrayed in surplices 
for the first time, was largely aug 
mented by outside help, the service be 
ing fully choral. The Bishop of Toronto 
was the preacher. 

The following have been the officiat 
ing clergy at St. John s since its foun 
dation : 

Rev. Thomas Smith Kennedy, from 
the formation of the congregation in 
old St. Andrew s Hall to the time of 
his death in 1862: Rev. John Herbert 
Plowman, 1863 to 1865 ; Rev. Alexander 
Williams, appointed in 1865. is still in 
cumbent. 

During the incumbency of Mr. Ken 
nedy he was assisted by Rev. A. J. 
Broughall, who was promoted to the 
incumbency of St. Stephen s, Toronto. 
The vacancy thus created was filled 
by Rev. G T. Carruthers, who remained 
in connection with the church till the 
death of Mr. Kennedy. He was after 
wards a chaplain in the East India 
service, from which he retired after 
25 years service, and is now living in 
England, but taking only occasional 
duty (1898). 

The churchwardens list is a long 
one, and includes some well known 
names. It is as follows: 
1858-1859 G. W. Houghton, G. H. Lane. 
1859-1868 Archibald Cameron, David B. 

Read. 
1860-1861 Archibald Cameron, Stephen 

Oliver. 

1861-1862 Geo. Mours, Stephen Oliver. 
1862-1864 J. Thorpe, Stephen Radcliffe. 
1865-1866 E. M. Carruthers, Col. Moun 
tain. 
1866-1869 E. M. Carruthers, William 

Gamble. 

1869-1870 James H. Morris, John Maug 
ham. 

1870-1871 John Maughan, Wm. Hope. 
1871-1874 Thomas W. Shortiss, Colin 

W. Postlethwaite. 
1874-1875 George B. Kirkpatrick, Colin 

W. Postlethwaite. 
1875-1876 Thomas G. Bright, George L. 

Garden. 
1876-1879 C. W. Postlethwaite, Samuel 

Shaw. 

1879-1880 Georgre D Arcy Boulton, 
Noah Barnhart. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



33 



1880-1883 Dr. E. W. Spragge, Thomas 

G. Bright 
1883-1885 Dr. E. W. Spragge, Peter 

Clarke. 
1885-1887 Dr. E. W. Spragge, E. T. 

Lightbourne. 

1887 D. M. Harman, R- L. Barwick. 
1888 James Wilson, D. M. Harman. 

1889-1891 . Weir, W. IX D. Tighe. 

1891-1899 C. W. Postlethwaite, James 

Wilson. 



CHAPTER VIIL 
CEMETERY CHAPEL- 

Tk* rreilecpunor ! the Present St. Peters 
How the Work w Extended. 



On land hallowed by the memory of 
the just dead, and not desecrated by 
that of the unjust, if thi remains of 
any such be buried within the pre 
cincts of the cemetery of St. James, 
stands the Cemetery Chapel, other 
wise known by its dedicatory name of 
the Chapel of St. James the Less. The 
handsome little sanctuary, enshrined 
in a grove of low-growing oaks and 
maples and flowering shrubs, stands 
in a space made by thd branching into 
two avenues of the road from the large 
gates of the cemetery. From these 
gates the chapel is distant only 100 
yards or so. 

Its doors face the west. From the 
outside its appearance is most pic 
turesque. Its architectural style is 
Elizabethan. The building is of grey 
stoae, in places ornamented by most 
choice carving. A tower strongly 
broad at the base and tapering grace 
fully to a thin spire stands at the 
south-west angle. To the south ex 
tends a small transept. A large grat 
ed door in the heavy stone foundation 
of the rear and eastern end of the 
chapel opens into the ante-chamber of 
tke dead house. Past the heavy oak 
doors is a gloomy crypt who.se roof is 
supported by heavy masonry columns. 
Here on shelves ranged along the 
walls, while the frosts of winter hold 
the ground, lie the coffins and bodies 
of departed men, women and children. 
When the warmth of spring breaks 
the icy chains of the soil tha willing 
grave without receives the ghostly 
freight of the vault. The north side 
of the chapel is the plainest in ap 
pearance, though herein massive cor 
nices and other ornamentations of the 
stonecutter s art are to be seen at 
their perfection. Over all the build 
ing spring twining Virginia creepers. 
From the base of the tower the parent 
vine, a very tree in girth, shoots leaf- 
covered branches to where I he spire 
begins its slanting climb. To the 



southern walla, where the sun beats 
warmest and longest during the day, 
like verdure cLngs lovingly. The 
transept end is screened, as it were, 
artistically. And o/er the entrance to 
the temporary resting place, the vine 
branches droop. On the north wall is 
no vine. All about the chapel, except 
to the south, are graves and tombs, 
amd, as might be supposed, as being 
nearest the gates, these are the graves 
of bodies longest buried. 

A broad gravel walk at the head of 
a few steps terminates in a broad 
stone flag. This in turn leads to sev 
eral stone stairs flanked by heavy 
stone balustrades with iron guards. 
The gloomy wooden porch bears the 
brown rust but not the decay of many 
years, and has been pictured often by 
artists, whose pencils have for theme 
the portrayal of soma English coun 
tryside chapel house. It is barred at 
its entrance by heavy wooden gates, 
breast high. Two pairs of stout oaken 
doors close the way to the chanel. 

And why all these bars ? Within, 
the comely austerity of the house is 
isoftened only by the quiet light play 
ing from without through the small, 
coloured trefoil windows to right and 
left and painting shifting pictures on 
the matted floor. The massiveness of 
the masonry and doors is thus ex- 
plaiined:r-In the old days the bodies 
of the dead were carried through the 
chapel and let down to the vaults 
through a trap door in the floor of 
the chancel. This trap got out of or 
der. Other reasons there were why 
the place of worship should not be 
connected directly with the dead 
house. The trap was closed and the 
outer entrance, already described, con 
structed. o the heavy doors and so 
lid walls were set up to bar out ghouls, 
not worshippers. 

Within, the chapel is a cathedral 
jnoiel. Its low vaulted roof is arched 
with heavy brown -black rafters. On 
either side run rows of stiff-backed 
benches, capable of seating from 250 
to 300 people. The walls are of smooth, 
though unornamental, brick, and are 
pierced on each side with three or 
four spade-shaped orifices tapering 
funnel wise to the little trefoil win 
dows before pointed out. The transept 
is lighted by three larger coloured win 
dows. So, too, is the chancel an art 
ist s study in soft browns and greys, 
and where the light of the large orna- 
tnental windows in the east end plays 
on the crimson upholstery of the 
altar, in reds, changing to all 
the colours in heaven s arc. 
Here stand on each side a single 
row of seats for the choristers and 
a small organ. On the handsome 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 




THE CEMETERY CHAPEL. 



wainscotting to right and left hang 
framed translations of the Latin in 
scription, borne by a black-lettered 
brazen tablet under the large win 
dows. This is what the translation 
pays: 

THE DEDICATORY DESCRIPTION 

This chapel, built over a temporary 
resting place for the dead, dedicated 
under the name of St. James the Less 



to the Honour of Almighty God and 

His Son Jesus Christ, the Author of 
j Eternal Life, for the perpetual use of 

the faithful in the performance of the 
j burial service and the other public 
i rites of the Church of England, was 
j happily completed in the Year of Grace 

1861. 

John Strachan, Doctor of Divinity, 
I being Bishop. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Henry James Grasetti Bachelor of 
Divinity, being Rector. 

Thomas Dennie Harris and Joseph 
Davis Ridout, Cathedral Wardens. 

Frederic William Cumberland and 
William George Storm, Architects. 

But to be appreciated the paradoxi 
cal passing beauty of this plain inter 
ior must be clouded over by nothing 
more than the shade of the great walls. 
The outside world must smile. The 
sun must shine. Else the spirit of the 
worshipper or visitor already from the 
nature of his surroundings predisposed 
to gloom will sink within him. Such 
was the experience of the writer. After 
a lengthy walk through drizzling rain 
he found himself in the chaipel, dimly 
lighted at organ, reading desk and pul 
pit with three brightly burnished 
lamps. There was no longer the play 
of soft colour seen before ait dawn, noon 
and dusk of many a perfect day. All 
was now a dull brown except where 
the unchanging light through the win 
dows and from behind the thick clouds 
cast fixed images on the floor. Atout 
on the benches were scattered a few 
people, men, women and children. The 
church goer seated himself far back 
and prepared to resign himself to wor 
ship under the most cheerless condi 
tions. Jn front of bain was one of your, 
six-year-old men of the world who 
looked cheery as one who would say, 
"To-morrow will shine. Why should 
I not enjoy to-day s rain ?" Fre 
quently he dropped his copper on the 
floor and climbed down after it and 
1,-ack again with a famous clatter of 
heavy soled loots. JNO one minded him. 
Bless his great heart ! (His content 
had in it more worship than the de 
vout downhen rtedness of the older 
men about him. A drenched sparrow 
out in the vines a.round the tower s 
base chirp? d dolefully and the rain 
pattered softly on the roof. 

The door leading to the single little 
vestry to the south of the chajicel 
opened and the minister appeared and 
knelt in pratyer. At sight of his fine 
cheery old countenance when he turn 
ed and faced his flock, gloom vanished. 
The small boy again dropped his coin 
wad hardly suppressing a whoop went 
down under the seat after it. The 
Small congregation responded with 
fervor in the grand old service. Its 
voice rose, indeed a grateful incense, 
with that of the sweet toned 
Organ. The Service was finish- 
ted and the minister charged 
bis people. He spoke on Romans xv. 4i 
*For whatsoever things were written 



aforetime were written for our learn 
ing, that we through patience und 
comfort of the Scriptures might Lave 
hope." And stoutly did he defend and 
earnestly did he plead for his Mus 
ter s Book. His was the sermon of a. 
thoughtful, scholarly man, with a 
mind tempered by the experience of 
many years of devotion to his cause. 
He spoke in the choicest language to 
the hearts of his hearers. His fatherly 
benediction at the close was one of 
those tangible blessings which, alas! 
: one i oo seldom carries away from wor 
ship. The small boy dropped his cpp- 
per just before the plate reached him, 
and captured it on the roll while the 
steward waited. While the people ex- 
i changed greetings in the porch the 
j clouds lifted a little and the sun shot 
: a cheery beam on tha lad as he 
| whistled to the .sparrow chirping in 
| the road, and scurried off for home. 

The chapel is strictly extra parochial; 
I the cemetery in which it stands being 
I in charge of the rectors and ehurch- 
j wardens of St. James. It was origin- 
! ally intended for use as a mortuary 
j chapel only. But in 1863 Rev. Samuel 
J. Boddy, then and for 17 years there- 
! after the chaplain, of the cemetery, 
i and now Toronto s Archdeacon, enter- 
j ed on the conduct of public service. 
His congregation soon increased large 
ly in size, and a removal from the 
little chapel over the dead house be 
came necessary. Then was established 
the parish and was built the church 
of St. Peter. Rev. Mr. Boddy, as soon 
as his new church building was com 
pleted, discontinued the services in the 
chapel among the tombs. Then for up 
wards of twenty long years the voice of 
the worshipper was not heard in the 
chapel except at services over the 
bodies of the dead. Then, some four 
or five years back, the people at St. 
James found it expedient to send up 
their curates to minister to the 
spiritual wants of the growing Epis 
copalian population of the district. 
Rev. Dyson Hague and Rev. R. W. E. 
Greene, the latter of whom is now 
living in Orillia, conducted regular 
Sabbath morning and evening services. 
Tba students of Wycliffe College as 
sisted. In March, 1886. the incumbent, 
Rev. William Grant, M.A., B.D., was 
appointed. A few months later the par 
ish of St. Simon was established, and 
arrangements for the erection of a 
new church were completed. Thus Jt 
is that from the extra parochial chapel 
of St. James the Less has gone forth 
the nucleus of two full grown parishes. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



one of which is, and the other prom 
ises to be, as flourishing ; ia any in 
Toronto. When St. Simon s church was 
opened the chapel was closed for regu 
lar public worship. 

The last minister, Rev. William 
Grant, M.A., B.D., was ordained by the 
Biyhop of Lichfield in 1848, and has 
been engaged since 1839 in minis 
terial work in the Eiocese of Toronto. 
For years he tended the flock at the 
little church in Tullamore. Canon Du 
Moulin appointed him to his position 
in March, 1886. 

He was a perfect type of the old 
school English church preacher, cheery, 
ruddy-faced and bright-eyed. His ser 
mons were careful, scholarly, thought 
ful and earnest expositions of the 
Word. 



) ; , CHAPTER IX. i i ; I 
ST. PETER S. 

The Origin flheCbiireb- Who Orlg Baled 
the Hulldlns The Firm Member*. 

This well known church is on the 
north side of Carlton street, east of 
Sherbourne, at the corner of Bleeker 
street. It is a modern English Gothic 
church with" such proportions and off 
sets that it is rather picturesque in 
appearance. It partakes of the clean 
liness and neatness of that section of 
the city in which it is located. There 
is an assimilation of property and peo 
ple, always observable, that deter 
mines the architectural condition of 
living. Neat, cleanly and cultured 
people will have homes and surround 
ings correspondingly superior. The 
same rule applies to churches, so 
that even the outside appearance of 
a church edifice is, to a very large 
extent, indicative of the kind of people 
who attend it or support it. There is 
an organic fitness of things that pre 
vents too rudu a transition from one 
extreme to another in this respect. St. 
Peter s church illustrates this prin 
ciple. It is built upon a gentle rise 
and surrounded on all sides with _a 
beautiful green sward. Neatly-laid 
walks lead from the two streets to 
all parts of the buildings and a low 
iron fence surrounds the property. 
The buildings by which is meant the 
church proper and the school house 
at first sight present an almost strag 
gling appearance on account of their 
low walls, transepts, annexes and 
porches. But this impression is dissi 
pated by a longer study of their ap 
pearance ; then the harmony and pro 



portion are seen to relieve the expan 
sive and outreaching characteristics 
They are red brick buildings with 
white brick relieving lines and orna 
mentation. The church stands east 
and west on Carlton street, with a 
handsome porch on Bleeker street and 
a turret above it in which is hung 
a bell. Entrances afford admission into 
the porch from both streets, and the 
vestry is approached from the south 
east corner. 

Within the porch are bulletin boards 
containing such announcements as ap 
pertain to the service and work of the 
church, while collection boxes are con 
veniently at hand to receive money 
for the poor. Should there be any dis 
appointment in the appearance of the 
church externally, it will be entirely 
: removed when the interior is seen. 
j There is enough of the cathedral stylo 
I about it, with an amount of decor - 
j alion and ornamentation that gives 
; the auditorium a very handsome ap 
pearance. Variegated scriptural mot- 
; toes adorn the wails. The chancel, 
especially, is highly decorated, the work 
of Joseph Topling, but with such an 
agreement of colour and finish that none 
ol! the decoration is florid or profuse. 
The interior walls are white brick with 
red brick interlaid to vary the mon 
otony of colour. A beautiful rose win 
dow is inserted in the facade, above 
the porch, and dormerlets pierce the 
roof on each side. The northern and 
southern transspts are cosy, comfort 
able looking places, decorated in har 
mony with the nave, and lighted 
from brackets. Two immense gasaliers 
amply illuminate the church at night. 
The two aisles are covered with car 
pets, but the pews are furnished in 
red. Consequently, while all of (hem 
are cushioned und carpeted, there is a 
diversity of colour. 

The ceiling of the chancel is pan 
elled in dark Hue with gilt stars, ;md 
wainscotted with carved wood. Choir 
seats are arranged on either side ut 
right angles to the communion table, 
and the baptismal font stands 
in front of the desk where 
the service is read. The organ 
chamber is on the northern side, 
; and the pipes of the instrument 
are delicately painted in light and 
pretty colours. An open arch in the 
northern transept is filled with pipes 
coiinected with the side of the organ, 
an arrangement greatly conducive to 
the tone and expression of the instru 
ment. The sound, instead of being 
smothered and buried in the chamber, 
ia thus Allowed vent, and the orgap 




ST. PKTER S ANGLICAN CHURCH, CARLTON STREET. 



(opp. 30) 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



has opportunity to reveal its power 
and swee;nsss. The tendency to cover 
the walls with mottoes reaches all 
parts of the chancel. On the middle 
panel of the reredos is one, " Till I 
come," and immediately below it an 
other, " This do in remembrance of 
Me." There is a brilliantly painted 
triple lancet east window above the 
holy table, and it is a bright 
and beautiful piece of work 
manship. Above the arch is a 
motto which reads, "Behold He cometh 
with clouds, and every eye shall see 
Him." On a banner at one side of 
the altar is inscribed, "Glory to God 
in the Highest," and on another op 
posite, "On Earth Peace, Good-will to 
Men." 

The congregation of St. James cem 
etery chapel met in vestry, at the resi 
dence of Mr. Frank Richardson, on 
Carlton street, on March 28th, 1864, 
Rev. S. J. Boddy presiding, when it 
was decided to purchase a lot of land 
on Carlton street, or elsewhere, for 
the purpose of erecting thereon a new 
church. At the adjourned meeting, 
held on April llth, 186i, the plans sub 
mitted by Messrs. Gundry & Langley 
were approved, the church to seat 
about 100 people, at a cost of 5,700. 

The land upon which the church is 
built was bought in 1864 for $700; 
from Mr. A. McLean Howard, later 
an additional section on Bleeker street 
was purchased for $320. Subsequently, 
at a vestry meeting, held Nov. ]0th, 
1864, It was resolved to erect a plain 
church building, capable of seating 400 
persons, at a cost of $3,700, $2 ; 000 less 
than the original estimate. By the 
liberality o a few friends and the 
procurement of a loan on a mort 
gage, the officers were enabled to 
erect the church. It was named 
"St. Peter s Church" by the incumbent, ; 
Rev. S. J. Boddy. The corner stone 
was laid in the summer of IFe i, and the 
church was opened for survice June 
10, 1866, by Bishop Strachan. The after- ; 
noon service of that day was conducted 
by Rev. S. F. Ramsey, of Newmarket, j 
and the evening service by Rev. H. 
J. Grasstt, then rector of St. James ; 
Cathedral. The rapid growth of that : 
section of the city enlarged the con 
gregation, and so much increased the : 
attendance that it was found neces- \ 
eary to increase the capacity of the I 
church. The transepts were then : 
added, in 1872, and eight years later j 
further alterations were made, so that ] 
now there is a seating capacity of 600. { 

In 1868 a small school-house was j 
erected east of the church on Carlton ! 



street, at a cost of about $2,000, 
half of which was provided by the late 
Samuel Platt, ex-M.P. But it wa 
found to be too small for the incoming 
numbers, and then the present school- 
j houso, north of the church, oa Bieeker 
j street, was built in 188 ), at >. cost 
{ of $6/JOO. It is entirely ssparate from 
: the church, and is an admirable build- 
| ing for its purposes. In 1883 it was 
additionally impro/ed by the erection 
I of an annex for the infant school and 
by an enlargement of the ladies par 
lour. The main room is cut off from 
the latter, which is on the north, by 
folding glass doors, and similarly from 
a largo Bible cl 133 room oa the south. 
A quaintly constructed gallery runs 
along the western end of the room, 
and its front is made of wood carved in 
various designs. This gallery is reached 
by stairways from the vestibule. 
A long hail separate.3 the room from 
ante-rooms on the eatst ; at the end of 
this hall is the parlour or ladies work 
room, as It is sometimes called. It is 
a very capacious room and affords the 
benevolent ladles of St. Peter s needed 
scope for their charitable work. The 
organization of the large number of 
successful and efficient church and 
charitable a.=Bo~iations re^u ted f *-om the 
erection of the school house in the first 
place. The large amount of work done 
by the ladies made the recent addition 
absolutely necessarr. 

At the east end/ of tiu buUding may 
be found the ia . ^ toi-i.es and xttcJiens, 
furnaces, storage rooms and all other 
appurtenances recessary for the con 
duct of extensive church work. The 
improvements cost about $3,000. 

There were in 1886 two Sunday schools 
connected with the church, containing 
about 40 officers and teachers and 432 
scholars. Tfoe morning school has 128 
scholars enrolled, and the afternoon 
school 304; a large Bible class is held 
Immediately after the afternoon session; 
of the teachers some do not belong to 
St. Peter s church. The income last 
year was nearly $200. Besides this, the 
children raised more than $200 for char 
itable objects. 

The parish was constituted as the 
Cemetery Church Parish in the early 
part of January, 1863, and comprised a 
part of the north-eastern portion of the 
city ~a.st of Sherbourne street and north 
of Carlton street. Subsequently the 
western boundary waa extended to Jar- 
vis street, and the northern boundary 
was brought down to Wel. esley street. 

Rev. Samuel Johnson Boddy, M.A., of 
St. John s Colleee, Cambridge, was the 



38 LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



first incumbent. He was ordained by j ed with this organization, and proves 
the Bishop of London in 1830, and after . taken with large faith. The results, 
filling positions in Bethnal Green, in I a great blessing to its members. There 
the east, and Islington, in the north of are 70 names enrolled, and some of 
London, England, became one of the as- the members live two and three miles 



sistant ministers of St. James Cathed 
ral Ln 1858, of which he was curate five 



from the church. The Parochial Mis 
sionary organization raised in 1895 



years. In lSSO he was appointed Rural ! f 150 fo . r the support of foreign and 

Lean of Toronto, and in 188? he succeed- | ^^^T^co^let^lL ^rkin^" 

ed the Ve nerable Archdeacon Whittak- g?$Sta 5K& cSlch TbSS 

er, M.A., Provost of Trinity College, as are many score Q f members of st . 

Archdeacon of York. Peter s C.E.T.S, and many more mem- 

The Cemetery OhapeL was allowed to i bers of the Band of Hope. 

be used as the church of the parish, ; In addition to giving efficient and 

end the first service was held therein liberal support to the services of the 

by the present incumbent on Sunday, church and Sunday schools these chari- 

January 26th, 1863. The first vestry table organizations have from- time to . 

the following evening in Mr. Frank time sustained and paid for the fol- 

Richardsoa s house, when churchwao:- Lowing : A female medinal missionary 

%lens were elected and other business to the Zenanas o" Iniia; an evangelist 

was transacted. The Cemetery Chapel ^ Cirivada in India; two a^ed women 

having been foun dinadequate and in- j n the A^ed Woman s Home, Toronto; 

convenient the members of the con- a port ion o c the stipend of a mission- 

gregation at the Easter vestry ^ t th gi x^i^s, f n the North- 

ed eet iht c^urch^rdeni t pu^cha^ w7st Territories ; the support and edu- 
land for the site of a new church, cation of an Indian boy at the -bhmg- 
and the history then went forward as wauk Home; one-half of the^ expense 
already detailed. The territorial of educating the son of a missionary 
limits of the parish are not large, but belonging to the diosese o Algomla,; 
they embrace a densely iopulated sec- one-half of the expense of the Faath 
tion of the city, and one for which St. Cot" in the Hospital for Sick Children; 
Peter s seems admirably adapted. At grants of clothing to various charities 
all events it has been a most successful and poor families in the city of To- 
church in every way, and it enjoys a ronto besides sending to various poor 
just and widely extended reputation parishes in Algoma and the North- 
for charitable work. wes t Territories boxes of clothing and 
There is a church Women s Asso- gifts and other articles for Christmas 
ciation that works for the poor, trees. 

wherever found, and the various jjjg pew s in this church are rented, 
charitable institutions in the city, and brought in, in 1897, $2,768; the 
the settlers in Alfioraa and church o ff er tory was $2,000. Besides this, 
missions generally. The Dorcas So- 9 600 was received from other sources, 
ciety, the most flourishing one in To- fjjgge sums , token with the contribu- 
ronto, meets every Tuesday afternoon t - f mi - ss { ons , ma ke the yearly 
during the winter. It is careful never . j $8000 
to neglect a deserving case of char- n ^ average Sunday offertory last 
ity; in six months over 600 articles I cfi W ^.;IA thp pnvplonp offer- 
of clothing were made by this society fear was $2 , whale the envelope ol 
and distributed among the various tory was more than , L8 pe: owWi 
charitable institutions of the city; and This na-turally suggests the matter . 
then many poor have been assisted, free pews or otherwise, but i 
both in the parish and out of it. In not lie within the scop- o % this article 
1885 14 large boxes of warm clothing to debate the matter. It is mamtain- 
and Christmas tree articles were sent e ,d by advocates of both systems that 
to the families of destitute settlers in ea cli is the better for the financial 
Algoma. The Girls Sewing Class is a SUC cess of a church. An impartial ac- 
large one; it is designed to teach girls C(>un tant, taking the average of all 
from eight to fourteen how to sew. 4iKi Toronto Church o" England par- 
The Mothers Meetings is an institu- is|he _ s ffnds no difference in final re- 
tion to enable its members to buy ltg ^^ OQe S3emg ^ successful as 
[material at cost price and pay for i ^. ^ It t ^ g&1 ^_ however, 
same by small weekly instalments, so *, f - sys te m is much more 
that with comparative ease, they can *, Mi mnr^ nrnf it- 
get clothing for their families, and acceptable to and Bflb nmproat 
this, too, at a time when the cost of able, among poor p ople than the r 
fuel and want of work are apt to press ed p nv system I<; reso.ves iti 
heavily. A lending library is connect- ly into an affair of social considera- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



39 



tlons. The free pew system, where all 
church financial receipts depend upon 
the offertory, is one that must be 
iu tiie case of several lan/e and flour 
ishing parishes, abundantly justify 
the faith. Another remarkable feature 
about the case is that the ritualistic 
churches of the city, where a superior 
and more cultured service is rendered, 
are free churches. And in those is 
heard the sweetest music, the most re 
fined and artistic celebration of the 
beautiful and always impressive Church 
of England service. 

iijut St. Peter s has a happy medium; 
while tha pews are rented, yet at the 
evening sarvice they are ^Jl free, and 
a bulletin placed outside the Carlton 
street entrance so declares, with a 
welcome to strangers attached. Even 
at the morning services courteous 
sidesmen will cheerfully show visitors 
and non-subscribers to eligible seats. 
Perhaps, after all, the rental system 
is only nominally such; practically it 
makes no difference, except in the 
case of some exclusive people who de 
sire to have special privileges. 

While this parish is avowedly and 
unquestionably loyal to the Church of 
England, it is yet rigidly evangelical 
in the use of the Prayer Book. The 
morning congregations are larger than 
those in the even ; ng, while in free pew 
churches the reverse is the case gen 
erally, and yet this reversal does not 
effect the income one way or the other. 

The venerable Archdeacon Boddy has 
been St. Peter s only rector, and to 
his personal devotion and interest in 
all its movements is its success due. 

A call upon the rector in the cosy 
and semi-secluded rectory on Win 
chester street and a Lrief chat about 
the interests of his parish left a good 
impress on of the cordial and gentle 
manly spirit of the minister. The halls 
and rooms of the vestry resounded 
with the hum and buzz of conversation 
carried on by several ladies. It hap 
pened to be the day for the meeting 
of the Dorcas Socisty and the gentle 
and yet enthusiastic talk ran over 
bales oT goods, the cut of aprons, the 
fashion of garments, the style of sew 
ing, and all the intricacies of hem 
ming, stitching and plaiting in a way 
perfectly bewildering to the mascu 
line mind. 

One of the institutions" connected 
with St. Peter s is the Sunday after 
noon Bible class for teachers an 1 oth 
ers conducted by Mr. Samuel H. Blake. 
It is a very large class and is well at 
tended. Mr. Blake introduces his 
subject and the<n the matter is fully 



discussed, everyone present being at 
liberty to express their views one way 
or the other. 

In addition to the sum mentioned 
as contributed to missions, both foreign 
and domestic, large sums are also 
raised among the ladies of the con 
gregation for charitable purposes, the 
amount of which does not appear in 
the published accounts. 

As has been stated, the archdeacon 
has been the only rector of St. Peter s, 
and until within the last few years 
has done his own work in a great de 
gree, without extraneous aid, except 
ing from the lay element of his congre 
gation. Latterly, though, a curats has 
assisted Mr. Boddy. 

The churchwardens of St. Peter s 

have been: 

1863-67 F. Richardson, J. E. Ellis. 

1867-68 F. Richardson, Henry Pellatt. 

1868-69 Henry Peliatt, F. Richardson. 

1869 72 B. Homer Dixon, Henry Pel 
latt. 

1872-73-heriff Jarvis, Henry Pel- 
\ latt. 

1873-74-Sheriff Jarvis, C. E. Blach- 
ford. 

5.874-75 G, B. Holland, C. E. Blach- 
ford. 

1875-77 G. B. Holland, Richard Thome. 

,1877-78 .W. J. Coates, Richard Thorne. 

1878-80 Capt. J. T. Douglas, J. Her 
bert Mason. 

1880-81 Francis Marriott, J. Her 
bert Mason. 

1881-83 Francis Marriott, John Massey. 
, 1883-86 C. C. Dalton, R. H. Tomlinson. 
; 1886-88 Thomas Hodgins, J. R. Mc- 
Caffery. 

1888-89 E. P. Pearson, J. R. McCaffery. 

J889-90 E. P. Pearson, E. T. Carter. 

1890-91 E. P. Pearson, F. J. Stewart. 

1891-92 F. J. Stewart, E. T. Carter. 

1892-93 E. T. Carter, W. A. Geddes. / 

1893-94 W. A. Geddes, E. T. Malone. 

1894-95 E. T. Malone. R. 0. Montgom 
ery. 

1895-96 A. E. Gooderham, R. 0. Mont 
gomery. 

1896-97 Thomas Marshall, E. T. Car 
ter. 

1897-98 Thomas Marshall, R. O. Mont 
gomery. 

1898-99 Alexander Dixon, R. 0. Mont 
gomery. 
The assistant blergV of St. Peter s 

have been Reverends Cecil C. Owen, 

now of Winnipeg: L. E. Skeiy, now of 

Men iion; R. Eobinson, now of Fergus; 

and the present assistant, T. Beverley 

Smith. 
The organist and choirmaster C1898) 

is Mr. R. G. Stapells. 
On Easter day, 1898, the sum of 

$1,200 was collected by the ladies of 



40 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



St. Peter s towards the liquidation of 
the church debt. This left the parish 
practically free from pecuniary incum- 
brance, there being leas than $1,000 
owing on the whole of the buildings. 

In 1897 the lighting of St. Peter * 
church was by the kindness of Mr. 
Henry Pellatt, changed from gas tot 
electricity, which has added greatly to 
the comfort of those who worship there. 



CHAPTER X. 
CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER. 

Tbc Second TorkrUlo Chnrch Thoe who 
Built It A l,oiisr r.-ixfnratr. 

The parish of the Church of the Re- 
Cietemer was described in 1887, in the 
following terms. WLh very few altera 
tions, it is now republished:^ 

"In 1861 the present St. Paul s church 
already described, was built on Bloor 
street east. Before that a long, low, 
barn-like wooden building was used 
and then was n oved to what was known 
as Potter s Field, or "The York Gen 
eral or Strangers Burying Ground," 
at Bloor and North streets. There it 
served as a Sunday school and chapel 
of ease to St. Paul s, and it was de 
signed to call it St. Sepulchre. Prac 
tically this name was never adopted, 
but it was known as Old St. Paul s. 
The congregation gradually enlarged 
itself, so that the necessity for es 
tablishing a new parish ?oon manifest 
ed itself. Ths first formal vestry meat- 
ing of OKI St. Paul s was held April 
6th, 1833, and the first printed record 
was presented the following year. From 
this record it appeared that there 
were about 30 pewholders and the 
total income was $1,230.83. April 23rd, 
1867, it was resolved to divide the 
parish of St. Paul s and make Yonga 
street the divisional line. The next 
step was the purchase of a new site fur 
ther west, and that most desirable 
piece of property on Bloor street, at 
the corner of Avenue road, was 
bought for less than $10,030. from Mr. 
Alcorn. The lot measures 157 x 280 
feet, and formerly contained a beau 
tiful garden. 

"The Church of the Redeemer" was 
the name chosen for the new parish, 
steps were at once taken to build a 
handsome and commodious edifice. 
The corner stone was laid in 1878 and 
the new church opened for service 
June 15th, 1879. It is a pure Gothic 
structure, in the early English style, 
built of Georgetown stone and Ohio 
atone facings the interior is of white 
brick with hands of red brick bv way 
of ornamentation. At the southern 
eod is a gallery seating 800 persons, 



a,n(d in the east feransept a gallery 
seating 80, while the main floDr will 
accommodate 800. There are three 
(ntrances from the faca le on Bloor 
street, apid a turret there contains a 
bell. The chancel, on the north, is 
very large, amd contains room for a 
choir of fifty voices, with tha organ 
Ln the north-west corner, pipes of 
of which are visible from th? audit 
orium through avn open archway, thus 
enlarging the instrument s fi arabil- 
ities. The ceiling of the church is up 
held by ornamented Drac&ets. Sup 
porting the transept on either side is 
a hamdaome pillar with a shaft of Bay 
of Fundy granite. 

Back of the church and at a right 
angle to it is a large school room, 
one of the most ca/pacious rooms in the 
city. It hap a gallery and a number 
of communicating rooms comfortably 
furnished with all things necessary 
for the improvement and ease of the 
ohiHiren. The church is also thoro- 
ouglhly complete in all its appoint- 
feoients,_ and is an architectural orna- 
ttnent in its beautiful surroundings, 
presenting a. happy combination of 
massiveness and grace in its propor 
tions. On Bloor street, east of the 
church, is a large rectory, the finest 
in the city. The sits of these buildings 
is one of the prettiest and most valu 
able locations in Toronto, &n r \ the 
rapid enlargement and improvement of 
the city in that direction contantly 
augment the value of the property. 
The land alone is now worth about $18,- 
000, the church $25,000, the school house 
$10,000, and the rectory $2,000. There 
yet remains upon it aU a debt of $26,- 
000. 

The slight opposition at first exist 
ing to the division of the old parish 
soon gave wa.y Ln the face of the re 
markable growth of the new parish. 
Rev. Septimus Jones, M.A., was the 
curate of St. Paul s, on Bloor street 
east, and he became minister of the 
new parish, and has been its only reo- 
tor. July 1st, 1886, Rev. Arthur K 
Griffin became the assistant minister. 
It us owing, therefore, to the devotion 
and zeal of its rector that the Church 
of the Redeemer has attained its pre 
sent position among the most prominent 
churches of the city. The parish lim 
its were Cottingham street on the 
north, Yonge on the east, St. Joseph 
on the south, and St. George on the 
west. Sir Adam Wilson, Hon. S. C. 
wood, JL G. Dalton and many other 
prominent citizens have been attend 
ants at the church. There are about 
175 pewholders, and all the services are 
largely attended. The service is th 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



41 



plain Church of England service, with 
an anthem by the excellent choir in 
the evening and, on special occasions, 
Ln the morning 1 . The choir is composed 
of 40 members, and was led by Mr. E. 
W. Schuch; Mr. J. C. Arlidge is the 



1886 there were 230 participants and 28 
candidates were confirmed. 

The total income for 1885-86 was over 
$9,000. Of this sum the offertory yield 
ed $2,781.36, and the pew rents were 
$3,563.31, and the Sunday-school receipts 




CHPBCH OF THE REDEEMER, AVEN DE ROAD AXD BI OOR STRKET. 



organist. These gentlemen and the 
three leading singers are paid for their 
services, while the others volunteer 
their singing. Tb church wardens are 
Messrs. Alfred Wilson and F. C. Hod- 
fins. At the Easter communion in 



over $300. From this statement it will 
be seen that the Church of the Redeem 
er is arrayed on the pew-renting side 
of the income question and with the 
most marked success. The class of peo 
ple to which it ministers is such that 



42 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



the free pew system would doubtless 
projve a failure there. 

Their Sunday school in 1886 was sup 
erintended by Mr. E. C. Acheson, and 
is also in a very flourishing condition, 
numbering about 400, with an average 
attendance of 270. There are seven of 
ficers and 34 teachers. A Mission Asso 
ciation is connected with it, and the 
average attendance at its services was 
450 last year. 

A mission room is kept open on Dav 
enport road, and week-day service is 
held there with encouraging results. It 
is hoped that a plain and commodious 
church will soon be built there to ac 
commodate a demand for the Church of 



expenses were provided for, thus show 
ing a healthy financial condition. 

The rector, Rev. Septimus Jones, M. 
A., is a gentleman widely known 
througjhout the city, especially in con 
nection with its educational interests. 
His learning, his practical knowledge, 
his experience, and his independence of 
of that, conservatism in education which 
retards progress and true development 
in the unfolding of the human mind, 
eminently qualify him for a close and 
vital relation with the educational wel 
fare of the children and youth. 

Mr. Jones was born in Portsmouth, 
England, and was educated in London 
and Lennoxville University, Quebec. 







VIEW OF INTERIOR OF THE CHURCH OF THE REDKEMER. 



England service in that section of the 
city. Among the auxiliary associations 
within the church there are the Wo 
men s Mission Aid Society, Mothers 
Meetings and the Girls Sewing Class. 
TIhe latter Ls established to teach girls to 
make their own clothing, and is open 
every Saturday afternoon from Octob 
er to April of each year; there is an 
average attendance of 30. 

This collection of facts and figures 
shows a remarkabli flourishing parish 
with a beautiful church, a united peo 
ple and a hopeful outlook. From 1879 { 
to 1886 the collections and pew rents 
very nearly doubled, and over $2,000 
was paid on the debt after all current 



He was ordained deacon by Bishop Ful- 
ford in Montreal, priest by Bishop 
Mountain, in 1855. His first rectorate 
\vas in Caps Cove and Percy, Gaspe ; 
then he was the incumbent of St. 
Peter s, Quebec, and subsequapitly be 
came rector of the Church of the Re 
deemer, Philadelphia, Pa. He was then 
called to Christ church, Bslleville, 
which church was built for him, and 
since 1&71 has been rector of his pres 
ent parish. For many years he has 
been a successful teacher in Wycliff* 
College, and is yet connected with its 
staff. 

Mr. Jones has attained marked prom 
inence as a member of the Anglican 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Synod, lias served on its principal 
committees, been a member of the 
Mission Board and a delegate to the 
Provincial Synod. In the Synod he in 
troduced a measure, which was passed, 
relative to the superannuation of the 
clergy, and was complimented with a 
vote expressive of appreciation for the 
labour he bestowed upon the subject, 
and the courtesy with which he con 
ducted the matter. The church of 
which he is now the rector is a monu 
ment to his ability and usefulness. 
** 

Though ten years have elapsed since 

the preceding portion of this account 

of the Church of the Redeemer was 

written, there have been" few changes 

in the time. The following is a com 
plete list of the assistant ministers: 

Rev. Arthur K. Griffin, 1889-1890 ; Rev. 

Heber J. Hamilton, 1890-1891; Rev. 

Gua Adolf Kuhring, 1890-1895; Rev. 

Louis G. Wood, 1895-1896. 

The churchwardens of the Church 

of the Redeemer have been these: 

1871-1872 G. D. James, Wm. B. Evaoas. 

1872-1873 W. B. Evans, S ual Thomp 
son. 

1873-1874 Edward Burch, W. H. Tacka- 
bury, George Scovell. 

1874-1877 Edward Burch, Geo. Scovell. 

1877-1880 Edwd. Burch, James Harris. 

1880-1881 Edward Burch, Geo. Musson. 

1881-1883 Geo. Musson, James Harris. 

1683-1885 Geo. Musson, W. J. Battin. 

1885-1887 Geo. Musson, H. W. Evans. 

1887-1888 Alfred Wilson, Frank J. 
Hodgins. 

1888-1889 Alfred Wilson, Joseph Har 
ris. 

1889-1891 Henry J. Wickham, Joseph 
Harris. 

1891-1892 Robt. Parker, Joseph Harris. 

1892-1893 Robert Parker, William 
Monkhouse. 

1893-1895 D. T. "Symons, Dr. Thomas 
Millman. 

1895-189G Dr. Thomas Millman, W. P. 
Torrance. 

1896-1897 W. P. Torrance. 

1897-189SJ F. J. Campbell, D. T. Symons. 



CHAPTER XL 
ST. LUKE S. 

The Flrt Frume Chareb and Iti n censor 
--* l*roperons Work. 

3Cbe church of St. Luke, situated on 
the south-east corner of St. Joseph 
and St. Vincent streets, is one of the 
very few ecclesiastical edifices in the 
city, whether the property of the 
AnglLcan or any other religious de 



nomination, which is entirely free from 
debt or pecuniary encumbrances 

The church is not remarkable for its 
external beauty, as it has somewhat 
the appearance, especially when viewed 
from St. Vincent street, of being but 
a portion of an incomplete building, 
which change apparently, it is de 
signed to complete at some future 
period. The interior of the church, 
though, is far more pleasing to the 
eye than the exterior. The style of 
architecture is Gothic, with open tim 
bered roof. The materials used are red 
brick with sind stoue dressings, the 
total dimensions of the building being 
115 x 64 feet. The chance] is a re 
markably fine one for such a com 
paratively small church (its utmost 
seating capacity not Taeing for more 
than 600 people, andi has on the northern 
side the oragn, a very good instru 
ment, by Messsrs. Lye & Son. On the 
stone steps of the chancel stands the 
lectern, a remarkably handsome piece 
of work, and on the northern side, fac 
ing the west is the pulpit about which 
there, is nothing very remarkable. A 
handsome brass rail separates the 
compartment in tha east end of the 
chancel sometimes known as the sanc 
tuary where stands the communion 
table, from the ssats on the north and 
south sides of the chancel, where sits 
the choir. Thi holy table is covered 
with a handsome doth, whereon is 
embroidered the monogram I. H. S., 
while it is over-mounted by a brass 
cross, and afc thai back is a heavy dossal 
or curtain. The clergy vestry is in th 
south-neast corner of the church, and 
the robing rooms for the choir imme 
diately beneath them in the base 
ment. In this last named portion of 
the church there is also a small chapel 
where occas jonal services are often 
held. 

The original church of St. Luke was 
the frame roughcast building now 
used as a school room, to the south 
east of the church, oa St. Vincent 
street, and it was opened for divine 
service on December 4th, 1870, the in 
cumbency of the then .embryo and 
somewhat chaotic parish being vested 
iu_ the Rev. John Langtry, who in 1898 
still remains in charge. 

Dr. Langtry is a native Canadian, 
having been born near Oakville, in the 
year 1832. He was educated privately 
and at Trinity University, and Jie was 
the first graduate of Trinity admitted 
to holy orders. On his ordination, two 
days after he had attained the can 
onical age of 23, he was appointed tra 
velling missionary in West Simcoe and 
East Grey, itinerating in the country 



44 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



lying between Cookstown and Mea- 
ford. After three years of mission 
work, amid a very pioneer condition 
of things, he settled in Collingwood, 
where he remained till his removal to 
Toronto. For several years he assisted 
the Rev. Saltern Givins in St. Paul s, 
until, with his rector s consent, he 
undertook the organization of St. 
Luke s parish. 

Among others who have been asso 
ciated with Dr. Langtry as assistant 
clergy at St. Luke s have been Revs. 
A. 1 Ford, Charles Whitcombe, James 
Mead, J. A. Read, Henry W. Davies, 



church was opened for divine service 
on the first Sunday after Easter in 
the following year. It was consecrated 
and free from debt on October 18th, 
1890, when the following statement 
was issued: 

"The foundation stone of this church 
was laid on Ascension Day, 1881. It 
was opened for service the Sunday 
after Easter, 1882. The church and lo{ 
on which it stands are to-day fre> 
from debt. 

"The entire cost of the land, church, 
moving of the school house and fit- 
tings has been about 27.100. The hal- 







ST. LDKK 8 CHURCH, CORNER ST VINCENT AND ST. JOSKPI1 STKKETS. 



H. A. Manning, J. H. C. Mockridge, 
and the present assistant minister, the 
Rev. C. S. Goodman. (1898.) 

For nearly ten years after 1870 no 
effort was made by the congregation 
of St. Luke s to erect a better build 
ing, but in the latter days of 1880 
the rector, ably seconded by the late 
Mr. William riummer and Mr. Alfred 
Patton, persuaded the people to move 
in the direction of building a better 
church, and the present edifice was 
the result. The foundation stone was 
laid on Ascension Day, 1881, and the 



ance due on this expenditure, about 
10,000, was all subscribed during the 
past year. 

"Owing, however, to death, failure, 
refusal to pay, or inability to pay yet, 
and to the diminution qf income while 
this was being collected, there re 
mains a mortgage on the school house 
and lot of $2,500. 

"The average annual income for the 
nine years has been about $6.200, or 
for the whole nine years, $55,800. The 
average annual contribution for th 
extinction of the debt has been about 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



$2,6G6, or $23,994 for the nine years, 
making the average annual contribu 
tions ~b St. Luke s congregation lor 
ail church objects about $8,886, and 
for the whole period of nine years, 
$79.794. 

"The congregation has not exceeded 
500 regular attendants at any time. 
It has never had but one member (and 
that only for a short time) who has 
not had to earn an income. It has 
never had more than five members at 
any time who have not, had to practice 
economy to live, and yet these results 
have bee i. . attained. Shall we not thank 
God for His grace given, and i ake 
courage f" 



At the consecration services the 
preachers were the Bishop at the ser 
vice itself Archdeacon Boddy and 
Oanon DuMoulin at morning and even 
ing prayer respectively. 

It may be mentioned incidentally 
that St. Luke s was the second Angli 
can parish church in Toronto where a 
surplice-d choir was introduced. Dr. 
Langtry must have made comparisons 
in his own mind between the services 
as conducted at St. Luke s, his first 
rectorial charge, and those he had 
known as a boy and youth in Oakville 
some thirty years earlier. 

Unlike so many other churches in 
the city, St. Luke s, in the twenty- 
eight years it has been opened, toas 
had great and constant changes in the 
office of churchwardens, no less than 
thirty-one gentlemen having filled the 
position. In some of the Anglican 
congregations the wardens hold office 
or many consecutive years. The fol 
lowing is a complete list of the war 
dens : 

First vestry meeting held December 
27th, 1870, then were elected these: 
Hector s Warden, Clarkson Jones; 
People s Warden, Captain Stupart. 
1871-72 Clarkson Jones, Captain Stu 
part. 

1872-74 J. Fletcher, Rickerstaff. 
1874-70 James Henderson, Tizard. 
1876-77 ( apt. Hooper, Frank Wootton. 
1877-78 W. H. Howland, h rank Woot 
ton. 

1878-79 J. Broom, Clarkson Jones. 
1879-80 Win. Plummer, John Hague. 
1880-83 Alfred Patton, Edmund 

VVragge. 

1883-84 A. Jf. Patton, Walter Tavlor. 
1884-85 Walter Taylor. A. M. Patton. 
1885-8G Walter Taylor, H. J. Brown. 
1886-87 Walter Taylor. Dr. Burritt. 
1887-88 C. T. Whitney. G-eo. Chi lias. 
1888-89 C. T. Whitney, F. W. Holme- 
ted. 



1889-90-F. W. Holmested, L- H. Bald 
win. 

1890-91 F. W. Holmested, F. W. Har- 
court. 

1891-93 F. W. Harcourt, R. Russell 
Baldwin. 

1893-94 R. "Russell Baldwin, H. E. 
Caston. 

1894-95 H. E. Caston, H. J. Caulfield. 

1895-96 J. H. Burns, J. T. Symons. 

189fi-97 John Macoun, J. T. Symons. 

1897-98 C. S. Pettit, G. De W. Gre^n. 

1898-99 Llewellyn Robertson, G. De W. 
tireen. 



CHAPTER XII. 

ALL SAINTS. 

An OITilioot Freui Ml. Luke * nnd Holy 



Trinity A Large C 
It seemed as if the natural world 
were in harmony with the great spirit^ 
ual world that had decorated its altars 
and shrines for the celebration of 
Easter Sunday. The sun never shone 
more brilliantly, the returning war 
blers never caroled spring s advent 
more l;lithesomely and the whole life 
of nature never seemed more exuber 
ant and more promising than on that 
beautiful day when Toronto s thou 
sands of church-goers crowded its 
streets and avenues on the way to the 
churches garlanded with emblems of 
Easter gladness and joy. Just as the 
natural world seemed to re-act from. 
the long sleep of winter and* to set its 
pulseless life into bounding activity, 
so the long and saddening Lenten sea 
son was gladly closed and the joyous- 
ness of the resurrection season hap 
pily welcomed. Even the faces of the 
people seemed to reflect this universal 
jay; the merry sunshine brought 
brightness to the eye, elasticity to the 
Sitep and smiles to the faces of the 
great crowds thronging the city thor 
oughfares. Not a little of the buoy 
ancy and happiness was aroused by the 
consciousness on the part of many that 
the milliner and tailor had artistically 
added to personal adornment. Fair 
young maidens were sparkling and 
bright with the beauty of spring at 
tire, while many a "Prince Albert" 
was decorated with the white rose em 
blematic of Easter. To see the 
brightly dressed people on the streets 
last Sunday one might almost imagine 
fhat there are no very poor people in 
this city; but the,y are not 1 to be found 
where there is brightness and joy; 
they gathered about the. hovels and low 
tenements of the alleys and side streets 
in a quiet way, .sensible of the beauty 



46 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



of the day but not keenly alive ta its 
spiritual joy; but, for that matter, how 
many of the rich were? 

For the purposes of this article its 
writer mingled with the crowd finding 
its way to All Saints church, a t the 
south-east corner of Sherbourne street 
and Wilton avenue, Easter Sunday 
morning, 1886. It was not yet time for 
the service, but every seat was found 
occupied, and the obliging sidesmen 
were bisuly engaged carrying chairs 
along the aisles and making use of 
every available foot of space to accom 
modate the incoming people. The ves 
try doors were thrown open, the rear 
spaces were full and the crowd over 
flowed out into the porches, and there 
patiently stood during the entire ser 
vice. While the decorations were not 
very elaborate, they were chosen and 
arranged with excellent taste: the al 
tar was covered with lilies, while pot 
ted plants surrounded the reading desk 
and two beautiful calla lilies with 
graceful vines decorated the pulpit 
front. The baptismal font, a large stone 
structure in the northern transept, 
was entirely covered with a bank of 
variegated flowers, and surmounted 
with a double arch out of which sprang 
a floral cross. This piece of work was 
especially admired, and it was not only 
beautiful in appearance, but it was 
very fragrant, sending great waves of 
perfume on every side. The choir of 
15 men and 18 boys was augmented on 
this occasion by an orchestra of: fifteen 
string and wind instruments. After 
a short prelude on the organ, the sing 
ers and players entered from the choir 
vestry, followed by Rev. A. H. Baldwin, 
the rector; Rev. Street Macklem, the 
curate, and Rev. Dr. Scadding, who as 
sisted in tho communion office. The 
choir was not surpliced and occupied 
the usual place in the chancel, with the 
organist in the centre, Mr. Percy V. 
Greenwood, organist of the church, pre 
siding at the instrument and leading 
the music, while Mr. Vale conducted 
the orchestra. 

The unsurplLced clioii seems an an 
omaly in a true Church of England 
service. The vestry has been petition 
ed ta grant surplices, but from a con 
servative spirit has declined granting: 
the request so far. 1>.e choir is a fine 
one and contains some very excellent 
boys voices; the orchestra Ls composed 
of gentlemen who are connected with 
All Saints cKurch. Considerable atten 
tion is given to music in this church 
and Sunday school, and most. enjo\;i>.!e 
concerts have been given during the 
winter to immense audiences, the pro 



ceeds of which went to the building 
fund. 

Rev. A. H. Baldwin conducted the 
service, and he evidently caught the 
full inspiration of the occasion. He is 
a gentleman of fine presence and ad 
dress, with considerable nervous en 
ergy that infused all his utterances 
and gave them a sort of magnetic in 
terest. He intones the service in a 
musical voice with a sonorous vibra 
tion that is pleasant to the ear. The 
chanting of the "Yorkshire service" in 
this church is done in the key of G, 
and is done without any monotonous 
drawl or unmusical intonation. The 
harmony of the organ, the orchestra 
and the choir was well sustained and 
generally true. But everybody seemed 
so glad and so heartily entered into 
the festal joy of the day that no room 
seemed to exist for close criticism. The 
service began; with an Easter hymn, in 
the singing; of which the immense con 
gregation joined, and the responses by 
the people were hearty and universal. 
And all kinds of people were there, 
rich and poor, high and low, gaily 
dresser*, and otherwise. The seats of 
All Saints are free to every one ; no 
pew can be sold or rented, and the 
principle of "first come first served" 
holds good in this respect. No distinc 
tion was observable on account of dress, 
as has been noticed bv the reporter 
in certain other churches, but every 
one was cordially welcomed to a seat 
until no more seats were available. 
Evidently the purposes of. the origina 
tors of the free pew system have been 
well carried out here, because a con 
gregation of various classes of people 
fills the church at every service, so 
that extra.] chairs are constantly in de 
mand ; in this respect the name of the 
church is well taken. 

In this connection an incident occur 
red that, to those who saw it, was 
novel and interesting. Two little girls, 
one about five and the other three, 
strayed up the centre aisle and found 
seats on the steps of the chancel, where 
thev presented a picture that was very 
touching in its simplicity. They were 
evidently sisters, and of very affection 
ate natures, c ingintr to one another 
during the entire service; they were 
commonly dresued and wcn-e old win 
ter skufl-caps. but they had re 
fined features, beautiful blue eyes 
and sweet faces. During prayer they 
buried their faces in their hands, 
and during singing th aider stood 
with her arm aT^out the shoulders of 
hr little suiter, while the contrast of 



OF TORONTO. 



47 



their humble appearance with the 
beauty of the decorations and the rich 
dresses of other children near them 
mad them more conspicuous. One 
could not help but think of that gentle 
Saviour who once looked down into 
the sweet faces of little children 
whom doubtless He pressed to His 
loving heart, and who was the central 
object of devotion on this dz-j and how 
kindly He left a loving message for 
every little child the broad vvorici over : 
"Suffer them to come unto Me." The 
naivete of childhood was well illustra 
ted when the elder sister, not know- 
fng what to dp with a book she held in 
her hand, deliberately went up to Mr. 
Baldwin and told him all about it. 
Fortunately at that moment the choir 
was singing, so he very kindly leaned 
down to her, listened to what she had 
to say, smiled pleasantly into her face 
and told her what to do. Many a 
minister would have had his clerical 
dignity terribly shocked by this un 
usual break upon the solemnity of a 
service, but Mr. Baldwin had t.b.3 grace 
and coolness to grasp the situation at 
once and dispose of it at once. The 
little sisters were very devout, and 
when they I?a-ned their faces together 
and held their hands clasped, the old 
caps and plain dresses and ^veil-worn 
winter coats were entirely forgotten 
in the sweetness of the picture they 
unconsciously mode. When the offi 
cers passed by with the silver plates 
ladened with Easter offerings these 
two little children stood up and each 
dropped a penny upon the plate than 
which no gift was more acceptable to 
the Giver of every gift. 

After the first lesson, the combined 
choir and orchestra sang and played 
the Te Deum in F, by Dykes, and it 
was excellently executed. The com 
mingling of the pure, fresh voices of 
the little boys with the clear tenor 
and musical bass of the men, and this 
tnterwoven with the mellow flow of 
the instruments that twine-d a\>out it, 
the web and woof of inspiriting mel 
ody made the eye sparkle and the 
cheek flush and the heart throb with 
1he exultation of the resurrection joy. 
Ant! the sams spirit of tremulous glad 
ness characterized the entire service 
which from beginning to end was con 
ducted with that dignity and rever 
ence paculi&r to the Anglican as well 
as to the Roman Catholic church. The 
sermon was preached by the curate, 
aund was a brief outline of the central 
fact of the observance fittingly ex 
pressed. At the offertory the anthem 



"Why seek ye the living among the 
dead ?" by Hopkins, was sung, follow 
ed by another hymn, making the 
fourth hyinn that was sung during the 
service. 

To one whose aesthetic taste is cul 
tivated it was a delightful service and 
an uplifting one. The sunshine bath 
ing the world in gladness and casting 
fiftful gleams athwart the Easter gar 
lands as its beams found their way 
through the brightly coloured win 
dows, the rich melody filling chancel 
and nave with sweet sounds, the beau 
tiful chant of a beautiful service ris 
ing and falling in musical cadence- 
all this made it an ideal service and a 
most becoming tribute to the world s 
great Easter celebration. 

It was felt some time before this 
church was originated that the Church 
of England should have a parish in 
that particular part of the city as the 
cathedral, St. Peter s and St. Paul s 
were the only rhurchss in the eastern 
section. But the contention of High 
and Low church which at that time 
so seriously troubled Anglicanism was 
found to operate more or less de 
cidedly against any new movement. A 
meeting was appointed to inaugurate 
it, but Messrs. Geo. Allen, A. McLean 
Howard and Rev. Saltern Givins were 
the only ones present, and the matter 
then fell through. Subsequently it 
was in contemplation to buy a small 
Methodist frame building on Parlia 
ment street and begin in that way, 
but this also failed. A petition to the 
bishop, signed by 150 residents of the 
tieip{ht:ourhood, praying for the es 
tablishment of a new parish, and the 
agreement of a few gentlemen to see 
that the offertory for the year should 
reach $800 at least led to the forma t ion 
of a new parish. Its geographical 
boundary extended from the south side 
of Carlton to the north side of Queen, 
and from the east side of Sherbourne 
to the Don. The appointment of Rev. 
Arthur H. Baldwin was requested and 
a committee named to select a site 
for the church. The lot on which All 
Saints now stands was bought by Mr. 
Allan McLean Howard, who laid f SCO- 
cash down for it; ten minutes after 
ward a gentleman came and offered 
the owner inducements for it, but he 
was too late. This was in 1871; a small 
frame school house was built facing 
IWilton avenue, and when first used 
was unplastered. Mr. Baldwin s ser 
vices having been secured the parish 
at once began a remarkably success 
ful career, which has steadily improv 
ed every year since. The little build 
ing was soon found to be too small and 
was enlarged towards the south; but 
the congregation was actually crowded 



48 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



out of this, and then the present build 
ing at the corner was erected. 

From the start it was the intention, 
and an "intention faithfully followed 
ever since, to make it open and free 
for all alike, rich and poor; no distinc 
tions were to be made in any way, 
and this cosmopolitan spirit even 
pervades the service, which is always 
designed to be in medias res, the mode 
rate course, and to do no violence to 
any sentiment. Doubtless this accom 
modating spirit Is one of the factors 
In its universal success. And, then, a 
population of about 20,000 has settled 
In that sectioaa of the city within the 
last 15 years, and that fact has also 



The building is constructed of white 
brick, with red brick decorations, after 
the early English pointed Gothic ctyle, 
according to plans prepared by Win- 
deyer & Falloon. The walls, 18 feet 
high, are surmounted with a hammer- 
beam roof, giving a height of 46 feet 
to the ridge. An unfinished tower, 
wiht the middle age octagon staircase 
and to be crowned with three pinnacles, 
rises from the north-east corner. The 
nave is 96x36 feet : the transepts on 
the north and south sides are 10x48, 
each one resting underneath four 
heavy arches. The organ chamber is on 
the south side of the chancel, the choir 
and clergy s vestries are on the north 




ALI, SAINTS CHURCH, WILTON AVENUE AND SHERBOCRNE STRKET. 



accounted for the immense congrega 
tions. St. Bartholomew s has since 
been set off from it as a separate par 
ish, and was given the territory all 
east of Parliament street ; for several 
years it also received $400 annually 
from All Saints . It is now designed to 
have two more new churches, one at 
Spru?.e and Parliament and one at 
Sherb< urne and Howard. 

An interesting historical incident is 
connected with the land on which All 
Saints is built. Before the year 1800 
it was owned by Solicitor-General 
White, who, on the eye before his 
duel in which he was killed, made his 
will in which this parcel of land, as 
part of his estate, was disposed of. 



side. The open timber work of the 
roof is stained a dark yellow, and 
eight beautifully illuminated dormer 
windows axe cut in the latter. The 
walls are unplastered arid may per 
haps give the interior a rather cold 
appearance, but for all that, it is a 
beautiful building, prettily ornament 
ed with red brick, trimmings and 
painted mottoes running around the 
enitre room, while inscriptions and 
j monograms decorate the corbels. It is 
a comfortable room, of good acoustic 
property, capable of seating 800 peo 
ple, and that capacity is not now suffi 
cient to satisfy the demand. 

The audience chamber conveys pretty 
accurately the eathedrai idea, espeoi- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



49 




INTERIOR OF ALL SAIHTS CHUROH FROM WEST FRONT DOOR. 



ally the chancel, which has a dimen 
sion of 23x32 feet. The bishop s throne 
is to the left of the altar; a beautiful 
reredoe is hung above the altar and 
above this is a<n artistically wrought 



window, costing $700 and containing 
an illuminated centre-piece represent 
ing Jesus and His twelve disciples. It 
is an unique building internally, but 
the apparently inharmonious combin- 



50 



OF TORONTO. 



ations of colour and decoration after 
all unite to make it symmetrical and 
aesthetic. Externally the structure 
has no attractive features save that its 
proportions and angles are well kept. 

The school room, on Wilton avenue, 
is a detached building, modelled after 
the same plan as the church, and is 
a very handsome structure, most ex- | 
cellently adapted to its purposes. It ; 
seats f>00 persons, and is probably the 
largest and finest of its kind in the j 
city. Attached to it are class rooms, 1 
finely furnished, a large infant class ! 
room, and a good library. Pretty win 
dows admit an abundance of light; in 
scribed on those above the platform , 
at the eastern end is: "Auscultate Deo 
et Parentibus," which means "Hearken 
to God and your parents." A scrupu 
lously clean kitchen, amply supplied 
with culinary articles, gives opportun- 
its for social tea preparations and 
other festivals where refreshment is 
served. The caretaker of these build 
ings is evidently one who abhors dirt 
and dust and practises cleanliness and 
order. 

The first service in the little frame 
school house was held June 16th. 1872, 
and the present school house was open- 1 
ed Nov. 29th, 1874. Rev. Arthur G. ; 
Baldwin, M.A., the popular and genial 
rector of All Saints is the key to its 
phenomenal success. He is a native of 
Toronto, and pursued a course of study 
at Upper Canada College, but is a 
graduate of Oxford, England. After 
graduating he became curate of Luton, ; 
Bedfordshire, and then came to Canada, 
settling at Belleville. Being called to ; 
organize this Toronto mission he ac- 
cepted the appointment. Five hun- \ 
dred and eighty -six members have been 
confirmed since his incumbency, and he 
has now a class of more than 50 to be 
ronfirmed on the fifth Sunday after 
[Raster. He is a gentleman entirely 
devoid of clerical pomposity, is ob 
liging, genial and pleasant in man- ; 
ner, and is popular, not only among 
his own parishioners, but throughout 
the city wherever he is known, 
whole-hearted consecration to his 
work, his intense sincerity and modify 
ing spirit, a spirit that well conserves 
the unity and interest of All Saints , 
deserve this merited public recognition. 

Mr. Baldwin is ably seconded in his 
ministry by his curate, Rev. Street 
Macklem, a youing man who is very ; 
kindly spoken o by the congregation 
and who is doing his work acceptably 
He is the afternoon superintendent of 
the Sunday school, Mr. Willoughby 
Cul;nmings presiding at the morning 
session. The school numbers about 
400 scholars and 30 teacher, and meets 
twice every Sunday, and raises about 



|450 a year. The financial condi 
tion of the parish is of the 
most encouraging charcter. It is 
true there is a debt of $14,000 resting 
upon the church, but it is being re 
duced at the rate of |1,500 a year. 
The free pew system in some respects 
militates against the income of any 
church, but in this caee such disad 
vantage is largely overcome by the 
liberality of the offertory, about $102 
Iwdng contributed every .Sunday. The 
income, aside from tha debt fund, from 
ail sources is about $7,000 yearly. The 
assets t> c th. parish are $40,0^0 for the 
lamd and buildings, and $1,500 for the 
organ; it IB now contemplated to re 
place th latter with a larger and 
more improved instrument. 

In every respect this review of All 
Saints entitles it to prominent men 
tion among the city churches, and its 
future is full of possibilities that shall 
lend additional credit to its history 
when other pens shall hereafter por 
tray its good work. 

** 

Since Easter fn 1886, Wihsn the pre 
ceding portion o? this article was writ 
ten, there have been some interesting 
changes made in the services at All 
Saints church. The choir has been 
habited in surplices, and the old organ 
has been replaced by a new one. T le 
black Genevan gown used in the pul 
pit has disappeared and if th teach- 
mg remains tit 3 same in 1896 as it was 
ten years earlier, the services have 
been brought up to whaft Ls now all 
but universally considered the trn 
moiel for the Anglo-Catholio church 
goer. 

Reverend A. H. Baldwin has all but 
completed his quarter century s work 
at All Saints, and there are still 
some surrounding him in his work who 
were there when "he put his hand to 
the plough." 

The assistant clergy at All Saints* 
have been 

1882, from Juna to December Rev. 
J. B. C. Beaubien. 

1885-1887 Rev. T. C. Street Macklem. 

1887 1/883 Rev. E. C. Acheson 

1880-1691 Rev. Ernest C. Saunders- 

1892-1895 Rev. J. R. Shields Boyd. 

It may also be mentioned that since 
All Saints was built Rev. Henry Scad- 
ding, D.D., now (1898) the oldest Angli 
can clergyman in the Province of On 
tario, has constantly assisted in the 
services, he and the rector being 
brothers-in-law. 

Of the rest of the assistant clergy. 
the Revs. J. B. C. Beaubiefl, E, G 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



51 



Acheson and Ernes!; C. Saunders went 
to the United States for the work of 
the Episcopal church there. The Rev. 
J. R. Shields Boyd, who married _ a 
daughter of the late Robert Baldwin, 
left Canada in the closing days of 188.) 
to undertake missionary work in 
China. The Rev.- Street Macklem be- 
cam rector of St. Simon s, on Howard 
street. 

The churchwardens of All 
have been the following 
1872- 1875 Allan McLean Howard. Alex- : 

ander Marling. 
187o-i8"7 Hon. G. W. Allan, Columbus 

H. Greene. 

1378 C. H Greene, Robert Edminson. 
1878 C. H. Greene, Charles Unwin. 
1879-1881 C. H. Greene, Robert Good- 

erham. 
1881 H^nry Allen to June 6th, CharleB 

Unwin, Robert Gooderham. 
1882-1888 Gp.orre Go ilding, E. H. Kert- 

land, M.D. 

1888 Geo. bou.diu^, Thos. J- Jermyn. | 
1889-1892 G 30. Goulding, F. A. Thayer. 
1892 Geo. Goulding, E. Ferryman. 
1893 George Goulding, F. A. Thayer. 
(F. A. Jermyn was appointed to fill 
Mr. Goulding s place on October 16th, 
owing to the death of Mr. Goulding.) , 
1891 T. J. Jermyn, F. A. Thayer. 
1895 R. C. Le Vesconte, Win. Logan. 
1896-189& Wm. Logan, Samuel Trees. 



GHABTjEB 

ST. ANDREWS- 

Fhe Rammer rhnreh *n lire Inland It* 
Minuter*. 

It seems strangte tihat a person 
should go away from Toronto in order 
to go to dhnirch, and yet that wa-i the 
writer s duity in order to place before 
his readers an authentic description^ of 
& church that, while not in the city 
proper, still has a place among the 
city cihiurches. On the southern side 
of the Isiand, between Mead s and 
Hanlan s Point is St. Andrew s Angli 
can church. Tb visit this church the 
reporter embarked on tihe Little ferry 
boat Arlington, from Ghurch street 
wharf, one Sunday afternoon at three 
o clock. fHbe streets of the city were 
comparatively deserted, but the boats 
leaving for tube Island were crowded 
as they always are on Sunday. 

ffbe people aboard were, so far as 
ne could tell by tBwtir appearance, 
conrersatJon and manner, of the work- 
Ing classes. After some interchange 
of passengers tin.". Little steamer puff- 
d her wy to Mead s, where she ar 



rived ten minu/fces later. Here several 
Roman Catholic girls got aboard in 1 
order to attend vespers in the city, 
and the writer deliberately strolled 
along the narrow wooden walk to the 
beach, passing numbers of persons who 
had come over with 1 aby coach and 
luncheon to spsnd a day inhaling the 
pure, freslh lake breezes. They were 
spread ault on tfoe grass i,n reckless con- 
fua on, regardless of app arances, and 
yet not a single harmful word or a 
single wrong action was observed. Offi 
cer No. 46 was patrolling that part of 
the Island, but bsyond caution as to 
crowding and hurrying on the boat 
had nothing to do. 

The campers, in tent and cottage, 
were fully enjoying the beauty of the 
day, and abandoned themselves to that 
enjoyment with an enviable freedom. 
Very many were rowing about the la 
goons, or allowing the boat to glide 
whither it would, while the rower list 
lessly watched the rippling waters. 
Along the beach, upon which a magni 
ficent surt was beating, little bare-foot 
children, and some not so little, were 
gaily wading and merrily running 
from the white horses that seeme 1 al 
most lifelike in their play. Across the 
waters and rising above the boom of 
the surf, came the monotonous and 
doleful ring of the bell from the sway 
ing buoy, just beyond which a little 
steam launch was pertly bowling 
along. White winge glistened clearly 
against the dark blue of the water* 
far out on the horizon, and take it alto 
gether it was an ideal day along the 
shore. 

The little church was reached at 4 
o clock and a seat in thel last pewi af 
forded the writer good vantage ground 
from which to mafce observations. The 
first thing noticeable was the uncon 
ventional style of dress characterizing 
many persons there: the latest lash- 
ions were not seen. One lady had on a 
magnificent black silk dress, tastilj 
and richly decorated; she came late. 
The others were plainly, but very neat 
ly, and, under the circumstances, pro 
perly dressed. The young ladies fore 
swore those villainous high hats, that 
disturb a man s sight and temper in 
church as well as at the theatre, and 
generally wore pretty plain, straw, 
low-crowned hats tastily trimmed. The 
white dresses brought out the brown- 
ness of the complexion very clearly; 
low sh<*s were the rule. Young men. 
both in th choir and among the con 
gregation, wore yachting costumes. 
It was a new and strangei 
sort of surplice, but since "it 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



is the thing to dol" let it be done- 
no matter about the taste. Several 
gentlemen were there without coats, 
and they were envied by the writer. 
Perhaps the most picturesque of the 
congregl tion were the little fellows 
jauntily dressed in sailor s costume. 
This variety of dress, taken with the 
plainly furnished chapel, the open win 
dows, through which the breezes came 
laden with vigour and health, tho 
sound of the surf on the shore and the 
gay laughter of little children play- 
Ing on the sand made the room pleas 
ant, cool, airy and bright. 

The church was well filled; Lt will 
seat 210, and 180 were present, count- 
Ing the children, and there were very 



taken from Philippians: Let this mind. 
in you whioii was also in Christ 
Jesus." 

Prof. Boys, who preached, was a 
man of scholarship and culture, but of 
no very great physical power an 1 con 
sequently more intellectual than ora 
torical. But the sermon was excel- 
! leoit, and when the speaker became 
thoroughly enwrapt with his thought 
his delivery was impressive. The lan- 
; guage was well chosen and the ideas 
j made attractive on that account, as 
i well as more impressive. Referring to 
the alarming amount of unbelief in 
the world the sermon asserted that 
another more alarming thing was the 
cold, practical unbelief of the Chris 
tian church. The majority of mem- 




ST. ANDRUW S KPISCOPAL CHURCH, TORONTO ISLAND. 



many little children nice, well-be 
haved children. 

The choir consisted of a lady or 
ganist, four young larly singers and 
three young men. The service was 
the usual Church of England Evening 
Prayer, which for dignity and beauty 
and the revival of pure, feelings and 
elevating sentiments is only surpassed 
by the same Catholic service enlarged 
and additionally beautified. The peo 
ple all took part, and the singing and , 
responses were hearty, enjoyable and i 
helpful. Three hymns were sung in ! 
Connection with the service, and a 
twenty-five minutes sermon was 
preached by the Rev. Prof. Boys, of ! 
Trinity College, who also had read 
prayers and lessons. The text was 



bers adhere to the Kingdom of God 
as taught in the formularies of the 
church; but the Bible has certain com 
mands, and the large majority of Chris 
tians live as if they hal never been 
delivered. 

There are grades of commandments^ 
of more or less importance, and some 
may be neglected at an incalculable 
loss, but yet one may be a true be 
liever. Some commandments bear on 
the formation of life in the soul, and 
if they are not fulfilled the soul is 
not developed and cannot obtain hea 
ven. The text is one such command,, 
and asks that the believer shall have 
the same opinions as Jesus, and en 
tertain the views he held about every- 
thinir. 



LAM DM ARKS OF TORONTO. 



The Christian missionary is the Chris 
tian man. A winning tone and splen 
did character is the force that carries 
on the Kingdom of God, because it is 
the mitod of Christ in us. And the j 
reason of the slow progress against : 
the world is the want of this disposi 
tion. 

The mind of Christ is necessary to ; 
salvation. The idea that it does not 
fcnatter much how we live so that just < 
before we die we have our sins for- ; 
given and go to heaven is an abomin 
able idea. Of course forgiveness of 
sins is necessary; but going to heaven 
taieans to live with Jesus, and if we j 
are to live with Jesus it is necessary ] 
that we here learn to conform our j 
views to His; the unimportance of the ; 
present life is a wrong idea. If any | 
man gets to heaven by living any other i 
way than in conformity with the mind 
of Christ he will soon be turned out. 

In every earthly society there is a 
tone, an esprit de corps that pervades 
i/t, a/ad if a man is not in harmony with 
it he is uncomfortable and his peaae I 
Li disturbed. Heaven is not a state j 
of promotion but of blessing. The j 
misery of this world is the mixing i 
of evil with good; but the misery thus 
oscasion/e. i here will not go on there, 
jifoil there will be a rigid exclusion 
from heaven of those who have not its 
tone. 

The text is a mark of salvation. It j 
in important to know who an ) what | 
\ou are. There is much diletteante i 
Christianity in this day, because ^eo- 
jile do not grapple with the question 
of who they are. By what test shall 
we disco /er on which side of the line 
you are ? There is none better than 
those expressed by the words "mind] 
of Christ." You cannot have the- mind 
of Christ and not be a believer. If 
}ou recognize your deficiencies then 
you may know you are a believer and 
can rise up an I walk as a Christian 
.should. Now, in this life we can have 
this mind, and it will deliver mankind 
from the sins that oppress it. Annoy 
ance, that shortens physical life, will 
be saved, and anxiety as to results 
will not be favoured. He who has the 
mind that was in Christ will be an 
honest man in his business regard K-ss 
of the profit side of his ledger. ,\s 
we obey the words of the text we find 
the worries of life melting away -an I 
only a residuum left that does not i 
affect happiness. Christian life may 
seem irksome or its duties may be un 
performed because the yoke is heavy, 
but the mind that was in Christ fa es 
the yoke and then the burden becomes 
lighter every day. 

The above extracts will show the 
teaching of the sermon. It was de 



livered extemporaneously, the speaker 
standing at one side of the lectern in 
the centre of the chancel. It was evi 
dently appreciated by the attentive 
congregation. 

Service is held in the church everj 
Sunday afternoon at four o clock. The 
CouMnunion is administered the first 
Sunday of the month at 11 o clock. 
Services are held from the last Sun 
day in June to the last Sunday in 
September. Bishop Sweatman, who 
lives in. the rectory, which adjoins the 
church on the west, is in charge, 
though other ministers frequently offi 
ciate. All these services are given 
gratuitously. The current expenses 
are paid for by the offertory, about 
$150 per season, and the $150 rent paid 
by the Bishop for the use of the rec 
tory. But the Communion offertory is 
donated to The Lakeside Home for Sick 
Children. The building is a rouigh- 
coated frame one, built upon piles, in 
early English Gothic style, and is a 
neat and attractive structure, though 
making no pretension to any orna 
mentation of an elaborate character. 
The gable faces the lake on the south, 
and a littla vestry forms an L on the 
west. A belfry rises from the front, 
but contains no bell. It is topped with 
a finial of St. Andrew s cross. The 
roof is painted red, and the outside is 
stuccoed in block squares. A little 
porch, containing two seats, admits 
through the only doors; above it is 
a small Maltese cross. There are five 
buttresses, painted chocolate colour. 
Upon, the whole it is a rather pic 
turesque building, taken with its sur 
roundings. It is located on Cherokee 
avenue, and was built in 1884, at a 
cost of $2,<000. Mr. A. R. Denison was 
the architect. 

The building is 25x45 feet, with a 
chancel of 16 ^x 15 feet. Th windows 
are of ground glass with coloured bor 
ders and a pretty littla rose window 
is inserted above the porch. The walls 
are stuccoed. The ceili-ig, pierced oy 
Cour dormers, is verlical jointed sheet 
ing, relieved by purlin.s and timbers, 
the whole neatly stained, ns also are 
the pews, which are made of pine. The 
aisle is carpeted with matting, and a 
dark red Brussels covers the chancel. 
Brilliant and beautiful windows, in 
triplet form, made of brightly illumin 
ated painted glass, adorn the , pretty 
little chancel, r-fA are very artistic in 
appearance ana rich in design. The 
central des gns are Christ in the atti 
tude of talking, with the words "I am 
(he vine, y ar the branches," below. 
Above is the design of a pelican pierc- 



54 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Ing her breast in order to feed her 
young with her own blood, thus re 
presenting the quality of self-sacrifice. 
The design is well intentioned, but it : 
Is not true to nature, becausa the be- j 
lief that a pelican feeds her young I 
with her blood is only a legend. The 
pelican has a pouch hanging from the 
lower bill, in which are deposited the 
fish it catches. The young are fed from 
this pouch; and the legend arose from 
the fact that the bird presses her. bill 
against her breast to extract the 



of fishes, and above this a chalice. 

A small but neat oaken communion 
table, two chairs, an organ, a font. 
seats for the choir, lectern and ser 
vice desk complete the furniture of the 
chancel. The choir is volunteer, and 
Mrs. Sweatman is organist. 

The church has no vestry or dis 
tinctive organization as a parish; but 
it is ecclesiastically connected with St. 
James Cathedral. The seats are, T en 
tirely free, and this most Qommendahlt! 
institution of the Island is patronised 




VIK rff OF CHANCEL, ST. ANDREW S CHOKCH, TORONTO ISLAND. 



fishes, the red tip of the bill appear 
ing like a blood spot 0:1 the white 
feathers. 

Above this design ia another, the 
suspended dove, representing the bless 
ing of the Holy Spirit. The window 
on the left has a monogram composed 
of the Greek letters Alpha and Omega, 
arid below this a picture of Christ 
stilling the tempest and the design of 
fe font. On the right window is the 
monogram I. H. S., "Jesus th<- Saviour 
of Men," with a picture of the draught 



by people of all faiths, and everybody 
is heartily welcomed, no matter what 
his special religious predilections. The 
property is vested in the name of the 
Bishop, a most. enthusiastic Islander, 
who holds it for the Building Commit 
tee, of which Mr. John Massey waa 
secretary. 

In 1882 services were held in Mr. 
G. Gooderham s cottage, and the in 
terest grew and magnified itself in so 
many directions that steps were soon 
taken to build a church. The Bishop 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



55 



and Jr. George Gooderham were the 
moat, energetic workers in the move 
ment and the largest contributors. Of 
course, the land is leasehold land. The 
rectory and church together cost | 
about Sn,T>rO, and enough was raised 
by subscriptions and socials to go for 
ward with the work. There is a j 
mortgage on the rectory, but the ! 
church is paid for. The expenses are i 
about $-10j yearly. The chancel fur- j 
niture, communiou service, hymn Looks , 
and the stained glass windows were j 
the gifts of friends and supporters | 
of St. Andrew s. 

Even in the Island church many 
changes have occurred since the pre 
ceding portion of this sketch was | 
written. 

The church was enlarged !n the 
sprang of 18*5 to doable its seating 
capasity by lengthening both the nave 
and the chancel and the services have 
been increasid from the original after 
noon service, to both morning and 
evening S2rvice, wihh midday celebra 
tions of tJhe Holy Communion on the j 
first Sunday in the month, and early | 
celebration on the thurd Sunday, and 
afternoon Sunday school. The usual 
Sunday mlorndng attendance during the 
bes! part of the season of 1895 ranged 
from 250 to 809, and t ha evening at 
tendance from 100 to 150. Ttht^ offer 
tories when Holy Communion is cele 
brated are given to The Lakeside Home 
for Sick Children, and amounted in the 
summer of 1895 to $62. The balance 
of the collection in the Sunday school 
was given to th>3 same object, amount 
ing to ^S.^B. Tihe ordinary o fertories, 
which amounted in 181>5 to $330.62, 
were devoted to the maintenance of 
the services, and the reduction of the 
mortga-ge debt. The enlargement of 
the church was pra-tirally provided for 
by subscription and by special collec 
tion. Mr. Richardson, lately choir 
master of St. Thomas , was the organ 
ist during the season of 1895. 

Professor Eoys, referred to in the 
first part of this article, died in 1887. 
He was one of th j staff of professors 
belonging to Trinity College. The 
duty at St. Andrew s during the sum 
mer months is shared "by the Bishop 
and clergy of the city. 

CHAPTER XIV. 
ST. BARTHOLOMEW S. 

A , Knit Bud Heeler., In Onlet KHgli 
botirhood. 

St. Bartholomew s Church, situated 
em the eaai side of River slre^t, ex 



actly opposite the southern extremity 
of Wilton avenue, is a rough-cast 
frame building of no great architec- 
tual beauty or of imposing appearance, 
externally or internally. It is in the 
midst of an etejntmlly poor neighbour 
hood, there being no wealthy residents, 
few even comparatively well to do reo- 
pLe, in its locality. The interior of the 
church, though, is pleasing to the eye; 
there is no ornate ornamentation cer 
tainly but everything is neat and in 
good taste. 

There is one aisle and from this long, 
pine seats run to the walls, giving a 
seating capacity of 400. Tine walls are 
tinted and fanciful mottoes curve them 
selves above the windows. The chancel 
has seats for the choir and a pretty 
little pipe organ stands in its north 
east corner. Tihe altar is a very fine 
piece of handiwork and, contrasted 
with the surroundings, is particularly 
distinguishable. Above it are three 
beautiful lancet-shaped, stained glass 
windows, very rich in colour and ornate 
in decoration containing church sym 
bols. This was the gift of Mr. Allan 
McLean Howard, who was one of the 
chief instruments in the building of 
this church. Tihe school room back of it 
will easily seat an audience of 200 peo 
ple and is plainly but comfortably fur 
nished. 

St. Bartholomew s church was built 
in 1874-5 by Anglican citizens living 
in the eastern end. Xhe property is 
worth about $3,000. Connected with the 
church have been some well known 
citizens, among whom may be men 
tioned Mr. Ftrank Smith. R*v. J. Mo- 
Lean Ballard, now of St. Anne s, was 
the first rector, and ha was succeeded 
by the present rector, Rev. George 
Irwin Tjaylor, who assumed charge in 
1878. 

Mr. Taylor is a native Canadian, and 
a graduate of Trinity Collage. He was 
rector at Perrytown, in Brock town 
ship, where he built two churches, and 
then came to St. Bartholomew s. His 
ministry here has been quiet but effec 
tive, and the most harmonious and 
pleasant relation exists between him 
and his people. In that section of the 
city .a congregation will naturally be 
composed of mainly poor people, but 
those of this church are liberal and 
much interested in the parish inter 
ests. The service used is monotone in 
character and the congregations par 
ticipate with great heartiness and 
sympathy and appreciate its beauty and 
benefit. * There are about twenty-five 
members of the choir. 

The services are largely attended. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



specially Sunday evenings. There are 
nearly 100 communicants, and the Sun 
day school, of which Mr. Grant Helli- 
well was for many years the superin 
tendent, numbers about 200 children. 
In the twenty years that Mr. Tay 
lor has been rector of St. Bartholo 
mew s he has, with the exception of 
the services rendered by Rev. R. C. 
Caswell, practically worked single- 
handed, but seldom having had cleri 
cal assistance except during sickness 
or absence from home. He possesses 



mew s parish is barely $1,000, for th 
support of the church, choir, clergy, 
and all other purposes. It should be 
added, though, that the rector derives 
a portion of his income from extrane 
ous sources, namely, the St. James 
Rectory fund and what is known as 
the Commutation fund. 

There is an active branch of the 
Woman s Auxiliary to Missions in the 
parish: they in 1897 raising, in a mem 
bership of 23, the sum of $102.90. 

The wardens of St. Bartholomew s 




ST. BARTHOLOMEW S CHURCH, RIVER STREET. 



a unique record, too, in one other re 
spect, he being the only rector of all 
the Anglican churches in Toronto, who 
has seen active service in the militia. 
As a private in the Trinity College 
Company, Queen s Own Rifles, he was 
present in June, 1866, at the fight at 
Ridgeway, being next to Ensign Mc- 
Eachren when he fell mortally 
wounded. 
The annual revenue of St. Bartholo- 



since 1874 have been as follows: 
1874-76 Henry Alley, Tbomas Allen. 
1876-78 H. A. Harvey, John Patterson. 
1878-7& Robt. Davies, Tbomas Allen. 
1879-80 W. R. Over, C. K. Unwin. 
1880-83 James Stewart, C. K. UnwLn. 
1883-84 W. E. Hart, C. E; UnwLn. 
1684-85 W. McGrear, W. Dowding. 
1&85-E6 C. K. Unwin, J. Haliburlon. 
1886-91 W. Hawthorne, C. Martin. 
1891-5)3 F. Chesman, E. L. Barston. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



57 



1893-94 E. L. Birston. T. L. Bucklee. 
1894-96 T. L Bucklee. R. H. Stewart- 
1806-97 R. H. Stewart, J. Metcalfe. 
1897-98 R. H. Stewart, W. J. Moore. 
1898-99 R. Postans, W. J. Moore. 

During the rectorate of Mr. Taylor 
the church of St. Augustine, on the 
northeast corner of Parliament and 
Spruce streets, was built, but un 
happily that building has now (189S) 
censed to belong to the Anglican body, 
owing to fin-incinl reasons. It was dur 
ing the period that services were held 
in St. Augustine s that the Rev. R. 
C. Caswell was associated with Mr. 
Taylor in the parochial work of St. 
Bartholomew s. 



CHAPTER XV. 
CHURCH OF THE ASCENSION. 

A Down-town I nrlsh In Memory of 
Cann Baldwin. 

The Church of England has divided 
the city of Toronto into a number 
of parishes, in order the more effec 
tively to prosecute its mission work. 
The territory of these parishes is well 
defined and agreed upon, so that no 
congregation can encroach upon an 
other s district. It is not meant that 
the Church of England people living 
within the boundary of a certain par 
ish have no right to attend a church 
outside of that boundary; but the 
division is made for the purpose of 
covering the entire city, and of pre 
venting unnecessary encroachment. 
The parish of the Church of the Ascen 
sion, situated on the south side of Rich 
mond street, west of York, extends 
from the south side of Queen street 
to the lake, and from the west side 
of York street to the east side of John 
street, including thes^, sides. Perhaps 
there is no more unfortunate section 
of the city for the purpose of church 
missionary work than this. Com 
paratively there are few permanent 
residents in this section. The water 
front and public buildings and fac 
tories, together with other churches 
located there, and the large number 
of tenement houses, with their tran 
sient population, all militate against 
it as a fertile fisld. The location of 
this church is unfortunate, not only 
so far as its territory is concerned, 
but also on account of its immediate 
surroundings. The street is an un 
pleasant one. There are factories in 
the rear, with the prospect of another 
being built there; it is too near York 
street, with its ursavorv reputation, 
and too near the notorious Adelaide 



street ; in fact, a more undesirable 
locality for a church of its kind is 
hardly conceivable. And yet, notwith 
standing these outward disadvantages, 
the Church of the Ascension is one 
of the most flourishing and important 
of the city churches, both as to ma 
terial and spiritual interests, a fact 
which the data here collated will fully 
establish. 

Externally the building of of no 
special architectural value ; it is a 

j modified Gothic structure of white 

; brick with stone dressing, having a 

i lower at the north-east corner. Above 
the main entrance is inscribed 
"Church of the Ascension, Canon Bald 
win Memorial Church,." A fine toned 
belt is in the tower, and it was peal 
ing its sonorous music out over the 
house-tops and mingling its jangling 
notes with other metal tones that 
made the air vocal on the Sunday 
evening in the early spring of 1886 
when the writer took his seat in the 
last pew for the purposs of taking 
notes of the service. A congregation 

i of 45 J people was assembled. It was a 
"mixed" congregation; that is, there 

j were a few rich, many of moderate 
means, and a number of poor people. 
This criticism is drawn not only from 
the dress, but from the general habit 
and style a mode of estimate that sel 
dom fails to accurately locate people 

i in this respect. The ushers were very 
attentive. A genial smile and a grace 
ful little bow greeted the entering 
young lady as she was deftly piloted 
to the safe haven of her pe .v ; the 

j older ladies were supposed to have suf 
ficient experience to pilot their own 
way. while the young men, of course, 
could tack down the aisle alone until 
the desired pew was reached. While 
standing, as the first hymn was being 
sung, the writer felt some trivial com 
motion at his heels, and he looked 
down to see a manly little fellow, 
about seven years old, creeping into 
the pew, above which his head was 
barely visible. He deserves mention 
here because he was alone, and was 
a worshipful little fellow, and suffi 
ciently intelligent to find the lessons 
and responses, and to reverently follow 
them, his lips moving through every 
part of the service. There was nothing 

; trivial about him. In vain did his 
neighbour try to win his acquaintance 
with many smiles; he was serious 
too serious for one so young. 

Possibly there is no other congre 
gation in Toronto where the responses 
on the part of the people are so full, 
so general, and so free; everybody 



58 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



seemed to take part in the service, 
And the mingling of so many voices 
of different tones in one universal ut 
terance made a beautiful harmony. 
No one was allowed to ba without a 
book; that spirit of religious hospi 
tality ao characteristic of our city 



sponsible. While a sidesman was pas 
sing the plate for the collection it was 
turned over, aud the silver, the pennies 
and the envelopes showered them 
selves over the floor; of course every 
body was amused and many laughed ; 
just why It Is hard to understand, but 




CHOKCH OK THE ASCENSION, RICHMOND STREKT, WEST. 



churches prevails in this church very 
largely, and makes a stranger feel at 
home, not ELS if he wished he were 
there. There was one other disturb 
ing incident, but it was an accident, 
for which no one seeded directly re- 



the laugh went around all the same. 
I he other sidesmen seemed to be the 
mr>-v- -mused of all, whether from any 
sp .<!! i feeling towards their unfor 
tunate co-tax-gatherer, or from mo- 
tivs of self-congratulation Is not 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



59 



known. They clustered behind the 
writer and had a hasty, laughing con 
sultation, then two of them pulled 
themselves together, smoothed out the 
lines of laughter, and put on a digni 
fied and so.ema asp ci as they marched 
down the aisle to carry the offerings 
to the chancel, where they were re 
ceived by iha minister and placed upon 
the altar. 

the service in this church is em 
phatically of the "low church" or 
modernized Anglican form. The Eook 
of Common Prayer is closely followed, 
but beyond that there is nothing of the 
ritualistic, except the- bowing of the 
people s heads when the name of Jesus 
is pronounced in the Creed. There is 
no processional hymn ; a short volun 
tary on the organ, and the two minis 
ters entered ; a hymn was sung and 
tihen the ordinary service, followed. The 
hymn was announced, the organist 
played the tune, then, while the minis 
ter read the first stanza, the choir 
arose, the congregation rising when the 
last stanza was rra r l. The sermon, half 
an hour in length was delivered by 
the Rev. R. A. Bilkey, the assistant 
minister of the church. Mr. Bilkey 
wus formerly the pastor of Christ (Re 
formed Episcopal) church on Simcoe 
street. He is a gentleman of wide ex 
perience and scolarship, and has the 
unusual but happy faculty of giving 
to the people sermons distinguished for 
thought, beauty of expression, and 
attractiveness of delivery. He com 
bines just enough of the dramatic with 
the sacred to make his delivery very 
impressive; his sermon last Sunday 
evening was a gem in this respect. It 
was a lesson on the power of cons 
cience, drawn from the story of Joseph 
sund his brethren, based upon Genesis 
42, 21 and 22. Words can scarcely de 
scribe the thrilling expression made 
by Mr. Bilkey s oratorical portrayal of 
" the whip of conscience " as it lashed 
Joseph s brethren. In well-chosen lan 
guage, with gesture and intonation 
that became almost tragic, he painted 
a word-picture that was masterly in 
its production and in most excellent 
keeping with the practical lesson he 
drew from the old Scripture story. His 
description of the shameful barter and 
Ms delineation of the sordid motives of 
fche betraying brethren all through 
their different phases were so start- 
Kngly reaj as to prove fascinating to 
a sympathetic listener. 

Some of the expressions used are 
these : 

"Substantially conscience is the in 



born sense ol the right or wrong of 
moral conduct. What it says must be 
in accordance with the admitted lawa 
of life. It is not always an infallible* 
guide, but needs education according 
to the rule of right. 

"Is there a conscience in all men? 
Few seem to show it. Originally all 
were gifted with it, though it has been 
neglected and abused, i ( it is true, 
as scientific men teach, that some are 
born with no moral sense and no capa 
city for anfy, that is to be classed with 
insanity, and left to God s compassion 
and mercy. Two general considera 
tions show that all men had con 
sciences originally; first, the Word of 
God appeals to all indiscriminaf ely, 
and if all men are not in a position 
to receive these blessings it is a mock 
ery to offer them at all; second, the 
best and \\ h est pagans saw from ob 
servation and experience a conscience 
in each man. 

"The conviction of deserved punish 
ment wtoen we have done wrong $s 
within us ; injured self-respect, tears 
of remorse, the blush of shame, these 
are the immediate internal accusation 
of \vrong-doing. 

My younger hearers will never be 
worse for the blush of shame till it 
mingles with the wrinkles of old age. 

The tormenting claims of conscience 
are all the hell we need believe in, 
and that already logins here in part. 

"Cicero truly said: A man s own 
crime takes asvay man s soundness of 
mind. 

There is no perdition deeper and 
darker than the loss of honour, of 
self-respect, of innocence and purity. 

"So long as conscience and memory 
last in the coming world sins unre- 
pented of will still be our avenging 
companions. 

"Life is full of chances, and we never 
know when we shall strike up against 
one and find what it can do for us. 
Conscience is too great a power to be 
subdued; there are surprising con 
junctions which awaken it ; sins of 
years ago will come back. The time is 
coming when there will be no more 
chances and we shall stand before One 
whom we have wronged." 

The sermon was amplified with illus 
trations taktm from the Bible story 
out of winch it sprang, and. was a 
most excellent production in every 
way. 

The organ is a two-manual, sweetly*- 
toned instrument, capable of great pow 
er*. Its case is of oak and walnut, the 
pipes being gracefully arranged and 
beautifully ornamented, giving the in- 



60 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



strument a rich appearance. It is 
walled up In a chamber to the right 
of the chancel, and Its tones seem to 
be smothered Ln there ; they lack re 
sonance and fullness and distinctness 
on account of the enclosure. 

The Church of the Ascension in an 
outcome of the tumultuous history of 
the Anglican church Ln Toronto when 
the two factions, High and Low, vig 
orously contended for the establish 
ment of their respective views, and 
when the Church Association was a 
strong power in evangelical circles. A 
number of people whose sympathies im 
pelled them to a simpler ritual and a 
more evangelical system of Anglicanism 
met, in the year 1875 in Bice s large 
upper room on King street opposite the 
Rossin House. The first meeting was 
held on the 4th of July, the late Can 
on E. Baldwin officiating, although the 
general movement towards the estab 
lishment of a new congregation was 
under the fostering care of the late 
Dean Grasett. On account of the fail 
ing health of the first incumbent, Rev. 
George W. Moxon, of the cathedral 
staff, had charge until his appointment 
as rector of St. Philip s church. In 1876 
the Rev. J. G. BaylLs, of Montreal, 
became the rector. His eloquence 
and the excellent singing attracted 
such a large congregation that the 
room had to l)e enlarged to accommo 
date it. Mr. Baylis was compelled to 
withdraw, on account of ill health, and 
Rev. S. W. Young became the next pas 
tor, and continued such until the time 
of his resignation in 1879. The) present 
rector, Rev. H. Grasett Baldwin, was 
ordained by Bishop Sweatman, Decem 
ber 21st of that year, and then be 
came the incumbent. He is a son of 
Canon Edmund Baldwin, and a native 
of this city, although he was educated 
at St. John s, Cambridge, England. Mr. 
Bilkey became his assistant in July, 
1884. To the rector s pastoral over 
sight, the assistant s eloquent and 
scholarly .sermons and the choir s 
splendid singing is due the present ef 
ficient and prosperous condition of the 
church. These three elements combined 
have entirely overcome the terrible 
disadvantages of location and sur 
roundings. 

The land on which the church is built 
cost $ 9,500, and measures 131 feet on 
Richmond street and 208 feet south to 
the dividing line between Richmond 
and Adelaide streets, together with 
the right tc u.se a lane 20 feet wide 
on the easit. The Buildings cost about 
$27,000, and the improvements recent 



ly made will swell the amount to near 
ly $30,000. Building operations were 
begun in the spring of 1877, and the 
church was entered upo,n on Advent 
Sunday, December 2nd. 1877. The land 
was occupied by tenement houses pre 
vious to the erection of the church. The 
late Samuel B. Smith discounted the 
subscription list for the new buil<t- 
ings, and was a most generous donor 
himself. But for his generosity the 
church would be hopelessly encumbered 
with debt. When he died the entire 
debt of $30,000 was cancelled, accord 
ing to the provisions of his will. A 
plate on the organ states that the 
instrument was presented by him 
in May, 1881. To the left of the 
chancel is a memorial tablet erected 
aa a token of grateful remembrance on 
the part of the congregation for this 
"faithful member and munificent bene 
factor." 

Back of the church, alt a rig&t angle 
to and directly connected with it, is 
a capacious and well-proportioned 
schools-house, with a gajlery for the in- 

j fant class and a, communicating, well- 
furnished Bible class room ; at the east 
ern end is a large stage with a con 
venient ante 1 - room on one side and a 
kitchen fully stocked with culinary ap 
purtenances of every description on the 
other. Besides the large organ in the 
church there are two upright pianos and 

j two fine cabinet orguns in the building. 

The conveniences, rooms and all attach 
ments for religious and social church 
work are ample and commodious. 

The congregation includes within it 
self a number of Toronto s prominent 
citizens, who are closely identified with 
its activities, Prof. Goldwin Smith be 
ing among the number. Messrs. J. E. 
B. Smith and R. H. Temple are the 
churchwardens. The property is vest 
ed in the trustees, for the congregation, 
and is so held independently of the 
general church synod. There are no 
less than ten subsidiary organizations, 
properly officered and conducted, that 
carry on the general church work. 
Most excellent monthly concerts were 
gilven during the winter by the Tem 
perance Society ; they were largely at 
tended, much enjoyed and very profit 
able. 

The Sunday school has had a phe- 
nomertal growth. At the first meet 
ing, July 4th, 1875, there were ten 

"children present; now, in 1886, the 
school numbers about 700, with! a Bible 
claiss whose average attendance is 200, 
and that of the infant class 125. The 
school raises about $450 a year, while 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



61 



the income from all sources in the gen 
eral church work is about $10,000. 

The unattractive exterior of the 
Church of the Ascension gives no in 
dication of the magnificent interior. 
It will seat about 900 people, and is I 
most comfortably furnished through- I 
<jat ; there are three heavy archways | 
on either side opening into modified I 
transepts. The chancel is a very ex- 1 
tensive one, and accommodates about i 



sion of an ordinary observer is one of 
bewilderment as to the particular 
style according to which this church 
is decorated. Mr. Frank Darling in 
1884 designed the decorations, which 
were executed by Mr. Hovenden, the 
painter, the whole costing $1,000. Mr. 
Darling has preserved the true princi 
ple of artistic work in every depart 
ment, the principle that establishes a 
general rule or law of decoration, and 




ORGAS, CHOIR AND ALTAR, CHURCH OK THE ASCENSION. 



e hundred. T2ie furniture is plainly or 
namented, but very neat and attrac 
tive. A large stained glass window 
above the communion table is decorated 
with monograms and various devices, 
while the table itself is of the simplest 
construction. The central aisie and the 
entire chancel are covered with heavy 
Brussels carpet ; appropriate mot 
toes are inscribed at the front 
and rear, and the whole room 5s neat, 
clean and artistic. The impres- 



benda the details of the work to that 
rule. Some of the details may be defi 
cient, but so loug as the general har 
mony Is preserved, artistic taste is not 
violated. Tlhe walls, arches and ceil 
ing are all painted according to a de 
sign that may best be expressed by 
(he word unique. Ifc is a style of deco 
rative art, partaking of the Moresqtta, 
freer than the antique, with sugges 
tions of more modern Orientalism; per 
haps ft falls in with the Renaissance 



62 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



proper ; at all evenlts it is exceptional, 
and very impressive and rich. How 
ever fanciful any details may be they 
are not so violent as to mar the beauty 
and symmetery of the general style. 
Perhaps it impinges too much upon 
tine sombre, and yet the introduction 
of more brilliant colouring would ren 
der the general idea grotesque. It is 
an artistic piece of work, and as such 
merits examination and approval. 

With this beautiful building, prac 
tically free of all debt, with a Sunday 
school second <o none in the city, with 
its sermons and music and well organ 
ized work and free service and general 
culture the Church of the Ascension 
dessrves a prominent place among the 

churches of the city. 

* 

pn January 1st, 1896, Rev. H. G. 
Baldwin, who had been in very bad 
health, and unable to fulfil his duties 
for many months previously, resigned 
the incumbency of the Church of the 
Ascension, to the great regret of the 
members of the congregation, though 
it had been ssen for some time previ 
ously that this step was only a ques 
tion of time. 

The clergy of the Church of the As 
cension since its commencement have 
been : 

July, 1875, to February, 1876, vari 
ous. 

February, 1876, to September, 1876, 
Rev. J. G. Baylis. 

October, 1876, to January, 1877, Rev. 
Jas. Williams. 

January- 1877, to July, 1879, Rev. G. 
W. Young. 

August, 1879, to January, 1880, Rev 
Saltern Givens. 

January, 1880, to March, 1896, Rev. 
H. G. Baldwin. 

(Succeeded by Rev. G. A. Kuhring, 
who was appointed in April, 1896. 

The wardens have been these : 

JFrom 1887 to 1892, R, H. Temple, J. 
E Berkeley Smith. 

From 1892 to 1894, Thos. Lamgton, Q. 
C., J. B. Fitzsimons. 

[From 1891 to 1896, O. J3. Ryerson, 
J. B. Fltzsfmons. 

From 1896 to 1899 T. D. Delamere, 
J. B. Fltzaimone. 



CHAKTEB XVI. 
ST. MATTHIAS. 

A Typical Blfta Church Serrlee aad Cn 
grrgntlon. 

On tha east plde of BMLwwxl* ayenue, 
ne*r Queen street, etaada a low et, 



narrow brick building, known as 
th;> Church of St. Matthias " A quaint 
and even rude little belfry, whose finial 
J* a crois, rises from, the ridge of the 
sharply-pitched roof and a mere shed 
roof covers the oruly entrance from the 
street towards which the gable of the 
church stands. Running out into a 
large vacant lot on this north side is 
a frame extension used as a Sunday- 
school and weekly service room. There 
is nothing whatever architecturally 
attractive about thtis Btrange looking 
Church of England building and yet 
in a respect to ba noticed further on, 
it is the most remarkable church in the 
city of Toronto. It is located in a 
poor section of this city and its ex 
ternal appearance is in keeping with* 
the general character of ths section- 
There are wo finie residences out in 
that west end, no nicely laid lawns and 
flower beds, such as are seen in the 
north-eastern part of the city, no im 
posing buildings. On the contrary, It 
is evidently thi3 section of the poor 
man s home, and the houses correspond 
with the circumstantess oif their in 
mates. In B/uc h a section as this is 
St. Matthias located, and there it Is 
doing excellent work in a systematic 
and sympathetic way. 

Nor fs there very much to be said 
about the inside of the church, al>- 
though it is much more attractive than 
the outside. The purlins and timbers 
supporting the steep roof are darkLy 
outlined against the white-coated cell- 
fug. The low sides of the church are 
built of red brick, with white brick 
InterminjgLed to relieve the monoton 
ous appearance, as the walla are not 
plastered. Half way down the church 
an Immense gothic arch of timber-work 
spans the nave and is cut into a small 
er" arch on either side. The floor fa 
bare save for a &trip of matting down 
the centre aisle, and the seats are of 
plain unpainted pine, reversible, while 
common wooden chairs are ranged 
along the side aisles. Ten small win 
dows admit lighlt by day and simple, 
unadorned gas pipes furnish light by 
night. Above the main entrance on 
Bellwoods avenue i a rose window 
with a cathedral glass window on each 
side. A little vestibule atoout three 
feet wide forms a sort of porch; In- 
ejde of this is a box. on one side for 
the "Altar Fund," and one on the other 
side of the door, for the "Poor Fund." 
In the north-west corner a stone mem 
orial tablet is sunk into the wall comr- 
memorating Thomas Kearto-n Morgan. 
one of the first churchwardens, and 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



63 



Thos. Dent Groves, a Sunday school 
teacher. These young men died by the 
terrible disaster which befel the yacht 
Sphinx on Lake Ontario Sept. 14th, 
1873. In that year a very handsome 
and complete solid silver communion 
service was presented to the church as a 
memorial of these prominent members. 

Bulletin boards are hung at conven 
ient places announcing the services for 
the day. while printed placards may 
be seen which read ; "The seats in this 
church are entirely free and unappro 
priated. Strangers are invited to take 
a seat near the chancel and take part 
in the service. All expanses are de 
frayed so dy by the offertory," closing 
with a request that every on* will 
"assist in maintaining a proper spirit 
of devotion, an l reverent demeanour " 

About one-third of the building, at 
its eastern end, is s rt apart as a chan 
cel and i^ divided tro;n. the nave by a 
panalled partition of ch:rcy wood. Just 
outside of this is the pulpit desk 
covered with a beautiful silk frontlet 
with a cross and I. ,H. S. worked thera- 
an in silk flom Three steps admit ono 
to the chancel; on eithsr side of the en 
trance are ranged at right angles to ths 
nave, long pews for the choir, while 
a small organ, with gilt pipes and 
oaken case ii set on the northern 
side. This organ has only 12 
stops, and yet it is an ex 
cellent Instrument, combining great 
power with considerable sweetness of 
tone. This floor is also uncarpeted ex 
cept along the centre and up to the 
altar, which part is entirely covered. 
Two long low windows are screened 
by red curtains hung upon brass rings, 
while there is one pretty stained glass 
window on the south. Two steps fur 
ther rise to the sanctuary proper, and 
i.hree more to the altar- On one side 
is the Bishop s chair, an ornamentally 
carved oaken chair, and on the othei 
are three stalls. In the south-east cor 
ner is a neatly-covered table contain 
ing two silver salvers for offertory 
use, bearing the motto: "God Loveth 
a Cheerful Giver," and a highly polish 
ed brass book rest with the altar ser 
vice book, enclosed in a rich velvet 
case, resting upon it. Let into an 
arched recess in the wall is the corner 
stone containing the inscription : Anno 
Domini MDCCLXXIIL Here was seen 
the altar offertory plate with the in 
scription " Freely ye have received, 
freely give " on it. The wall of the 
sanctuary is covered with a darkly- 
figured paper relieved by gilt beading 
and a series of pine mouldings. The 



ceiling is pure white, and the eastern- 
wall is simply red brick. A magnifi 
cently illuminated window, in triple 
form, rises from back of the altar and 
adds immeasurably to the beauty of 
the chancel. On one side is a silken 
banneret with a cross and I. H. S. 
wrought upon it, while one opposite 
has the Greek letters Alpha and Omega 
intertwined \vith the cross. 

A magnificent altar is that of St. 
Matthias churcn. On the -lower step 
are two tall wooden candlesticks to 
hold the wax candles or "Gospel 
Lights." The altar itself is an orna 
mental one made of dark wood, and 
was carved and built by the divinity 
students of Cobourg for th parish. 
There the church in which it was 
placed was feloniously entered by 
some Protestant persons, the orna^- 
ments were all swept from the altar 
while it was cut and hewed, and gen 
erally defaced by axes in the hands 
of zealous Protestants who thought 
it tha vehicle of Popery. The marks 
of this defacement are yet distinctly 
visible in its beautiful carvings. It was 
stored away in a barn, for a while and, 
after being restored, served its sacred 
purpose in the church at Weston. Before 
the rector there, Rev. W. A. Johnson, 
died, he presented the altar to Rev. 
Chas. B. Darling, cunate of St. Mat 
thias , and he in time gave it to this 
parish. 

In the centre, below, is carved I.H.S., 
with ladder and spikes on the left and 
hammer and pincers on the right, 
while below is the motto : " My flesh is 
meat indeed and my blood is drink 
indeed." Its various parts are covered 
with rich and elegant cloths brilliant 
ly wrought in gold bullion and a beau 
tiful variety of bright colours, while 
a velvet frontal has the inscription 
" I am the true vine." In the centre 
is a dark velvet, gold lined square, 
with the letters 1. H. S. inscribed, 
while large and small vases, all highly 
ornamented, with bright and fragrant 
flowers, add to the general splendour 
of it all. There are two candelabra of 
five sconces each for the " vesper 
lights," and two large brass candle 
sticks for the "^ucharistic lights." In 
the middle, with a dark blue velvet 
curtain in the background, is a mag 
nificent brazen cross inlaid with bril 
liants, while pretty burnished cups are 
at the sides. 

The reredoa Is in perfect keeping 
with this splendid piece of furniture; 
it consists of panelled gothic wood 
work, extended at each side by heavy 



64 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



blue, silken curtains most elaborately 
and elegantly wrought and hanging 
from burnished rods in the usual style 
of portiere adornment. These curtains 
serve to enclose the altar and to en 
hance its magnificence. 

A large and beautiful stone baptis 
mal font, the handiwork and gift of 
Mr. Mollington, concludes a descrip 
tion of the furniture of the church. 
The school room is very simple in its 



land, excited considerable curiosity In 
the mind of the writer, and he was 
very anxious to see and understand 
it all. As he left Queen street and 
turned up Bellwoods avenue th im 
pression was not favourable so far as 
the locality is concerned, and when the 
humble and unadorned church itself 
was first ssen the impression already 
received was strengthened. The homely 
and almost rude interior was regarded 




9j*ir 



>r.\n - 



CHURCH OF ST. MATTHIAS, BKLLWOODS AVENUE. 



furniture, though a magnificent little 
altar recess is to be seen there, with 
an altar whose decorations are rich 
and beautiful. Communication is had 
with the church proper by large doors, 
and a cosy and neat little vestry opens 
from it back of the or.gan. 

The reputation of this church for a 
service that on its introduction was 
unique in the Church of England, at 
least in Canada, though not so in Eng- 



with astonishment, considering the 
fine reputation enjoyed by St. Mat 
thias for ritual ; naturally one expects 
to find a building corresponding with 
the elevated character of the service. 
But it was cool and pleasant in the 
church, and a seat was taken well for 
ward where the first sight of the mag- 
nific ent altar at once chained the at 
tention. It was not much after ten 
o clock, and oniy a few people were 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



present, and these were devoutly 
studying their prayer-books. By and 
by a few moire entered, and 
just before going into the pew 
some bent the knee towards the altar 
or made a slight courtesy in that 
direction. A little boy entered from 
the school-room, took down the end 
of a rope and rang the little bell, about 
forty persons being now present. A 
surpliced organist entered and play 
ed a brief voluntary while the priest, 
Mr. Harrison, entered from the vestry, 
stood momentarily when opposite the 
altar and bowed towards it, then pass 
ing- across the chancel began the usual 
morning prayers. The entire service 
was intoned; there wa,s no choir, as this, 
was only a preliminary service, but the 
people all intoned the responses, led 
by the very pleasant arid resonant 
voice of the minister. Whenever the 
Gloria was said many of the congrega 
tion either bent the knee or bowed 
the heal, and at the end of tb.3 Creed 
many signed the cross on their fore 
heads and breasts. And in the hymns 
that were sung whenever the name of 
Jesus was mentioned there was a low 
bending of the body. The chanting 
and singing were very fine, and it was 
at once evident that the musical cul 
ture of this congregation was of a su 
perior nature to that usually known 
in Protestant churches. The usual 
Church of England morning prayer was 
followed rigidly; in fact, the entire ser 
vice was exclusively within the rubric 
and was more faithfully followed, ac 
cording to that rubric, than is done 
elsewhere in churches of that denomin 
ation. At the conclusion of the ser 
vice, which lasted forty minutes, the 
priest remained in silent prayer a min 
ute or so before the altar, and then 
withdrew, the people still being upon 
their knees. 

At 11.15, a large congregation being 
present, a surpliced boy came out and 
rang the bell a few minutes, while an 
other went to the altar with a taper 
andl lighted the gas jets above the cur 
tains and the wax candles on the steps 
and on the altar. After the little bell 
ceased its ringing the sound of chant 
ing was heard in the distance, the large 
doors of *he school-room were thrown 
back, the sound of the musical sym 
phony grew nearer nnd directly the 
choir entered singing the processional 
hymn. It was led by two little boys 
whose faces just reached above the tops 
of the seats and then graded until it 
was ended by several men. the bass 
and tenor singers. There were eigh 
teen boys and men, each one clad in 
white surplice and black cassock. 
the whole followed by Revs. C. B. 



Barling, the curate, and R Harrison, 
the rector, and officiating priest on this 
occasion. The hymn "was beautifully 
sung, and the reporter was thereby as 
sure*! of a fine musical treat, nor was 
he disappointed in the least. Slowly, 
reverently and with dignity the pro 
cession wended its way to the altar, 
two by two, where they bowed and then 
separated so that half of the choir was 
on either side of the chance J. Immedi 
ately preceding the choir was a cross- 
bearer ; after entering the chancel the 
large, brazen cross was stationed to 
the left, where it remained. The offi 
ciating priest stood at the steps of the 
altar until the last stanza of the hymn 
was being sung, the congregation mean 
while standing, and then he ascended 
to the aJtar standing face towards it 
until the hymn was concluded. It 
was an impressive beginning of what 
proved to be an elaborate and very 
beautiful service. 

The service was the Communion or 
eucharislic office, and was begun with 
the Ten Commandments, all recited in 
monotone, the effect of the boys and 
men s voices joined with those of the 
people, who seemed to understand the 
music and intelligently sang ; t, was 
most delightful and pleasing. The 
epistle, a very short lesson, was read, 
and then, preceded by a short choral, 
tbe gospel for the da.y, the congre 
gation rising and the choir facing tha 
altar. These lessons were read by the 
priest, standing at one side of the 
altar. At no lime, save in administer 
ing the communion, did he leave that 
place. And his vestments were more 
than are usually seen in a Church of 
England service ; in addition to the 
usual surplice there was a richly 
wrought chTSublf, an ornamented stole 
and a handsome maniple. Thare was 
no impropriety in this rich vestiture 
compared with the brilliantly lighted 
r-llai and the splendour of its adorn 
ments ; indeed, an ordinary vestment 
would have destroyed the aesthetic 
effect of the service as well as its 
moral force. 

Perhaps the most impressive part of 
the service occurred during the repeti- 
Uou of the creed. It was intoned by 
the entire congregation while the 
organist played a .running accompani 
ment that wove the sweetest melody 
in and about the solemn declarations 
of the li f e, passio-i, death and triumph 
of the Incarnate Lord. When His 
humility and sufferings and death 
were spoken o r every one spoke slowly, 
in a low and tender way ; even the 
organ, with its subdued tones, seemed 



66 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



to catch the holy meaning of the words 
and added to the impressiveness of 
their delivery. At the end of the creed 
the people and choir signed the cross 
on their breasts. It was the most culti- 
valed service it has been the writer s 
privilege to witness outside of a Roman 
Catholic church, where, of course, 
special stress is laid upon the artistic 
execution of an elaborate and ornate 
ritual. 

And a most remarkable fact in con 
nection with the service was the silent 
adoration on the part of the people. 
In fact, the order was so goo 1 and 
the attention so intense y concen 
trated that the moments of silence 
vvero, almos painful in their nature. 
And if, is always so in this church. The 
average attendance is five hundred, 
and yet there is never the slightest 
infraction of good order o;- of that 
devout spiri that should characterize 
Christian worship. And this is more 
remarkable, when the losality and rhe 
roiissquent character of its audiences 
are considere.l. 

Rev. li. Harrison intoned the ser 
vice with naturalness, grace and a 
voice remarkable fo:~ resonance and 
purity He was absolutely free f-om an 
indication of that artificiality charac 
terizing so many ministers o r this 
order, and it is a musical pleasure 
to hear his easy and natural delivery 
of the service. He made a short ad 
dress from the words "God meant it 
for good " and in it he gave helpful 
and practical s iggcstions as to a 
Christian s daily life and conduct. 

After the sermon the offe to--y was 
received by two officers carriel to the 
curate, who deposited it upon the Jarge 
plate, which he than carrier! to the 
officiating minister, and he, after ele 
vating it above the altar, placed it 
thereon, all the others, including a 
choir boy, meanwhile standing in a 
pictures me position. And this little 
incident "was characteristic of every 
thing dono ; the artistic and aesthetic 
efi e-ts were always strictly regarded. 
During the prayer of consecration, the 
bread and wine having been presented 
to the priest by his attendant, the 
elements were elevated by him, and 
he then knelt before the altar while 
administering to himself, the choir 
singing a beautiful selection in a 
minor key. The people then came for 
ward and knelt before the altar. 

There were forty communicants at 
this service, the greater part of the 
congregation having communicated at 
the eight: o clock service. After all 
bad communicated, the usual prayer- 



book service followed; the chalice and 
bread were covered, the book removed 
from the altar, and the choir organ 
ized for withdrawal. A recessional 
hymn was sung, and the two priests 
and cross-bearer took their station, 
one behind the other, while the choir 
slowly passed by the altar, bowing to 
wards it in the passage and sweetly 
singing the Nunc Dimittis. Too much 
praise cannot be given the excellent 
singing of this choir. The music is 
all of: classical selactioi, and the hymns 
sung are of the mo -.t dignified and 
worthy nature. The who "e ,ser\ i e, f rom 
the beginning of matins, was two 
hours in length but even that time 
Seemed short, considering the novelty 
and beauty of ic. 

The reason of the observance of these 
peculiarities is given so that reade-s 
ma 5 have an unprejudiced and honest 
representation of this unique service. 
On the matter of the priest turning 
the same way in prayer as the congre 
gation, it nyty be said that the duty 
of the minister in church during 
prayer time is to lead the congrega 
tion in prayer, and thus to act as be- 
i.ng a member of the congregation 
himself. So he do3S exactly 1 ke the 
mayor o r a ro.vn who goes UT with 
the corporation and the citizens ta 
present an address to the Queen. He 
stands facing the Queen, with his 
companions ramred bc hind him, and 
reads the address in that position. He 
never thinks of turning round and 
reading the address to them. The 
prayers in the Prayer book are ad- 
dreasei to Gol, and not to the congre 
gation ; and so the minister who reads 
them must do so in a way to prevent 
the congregation from forgetting wh it 
they are really engaged in doing, and 
fancying, as they often do, that they 
have come to .listen to the nrayers, 
Instead of jo ning in them. When the 
minister "turns his back" on the peo 
ple, he is behaving as their equal; 
; when he turns his face to them, as he 
! does in preaching, it is as their su- 
1 perior, to whom they are bound to 
listen. The former is, therefore, the 
humbler and less self-confident posi 
tion. 

The principle of a special dress for 

1 the minister is found in the 

Testament and is granted everywhere 

In the Church of England by the use 

! of the surplice. As the Holy Com- 

munion is the chief service more so 

than morning and evening prayer, it 

is well to have some way of marking 

the difference of rank and dignity. A. 

general does not wear the same unl- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



67 



form as a private, nor- does the ju Ige 
in court dress like a. barrister. On 
great occasions, such as a state re 
view or the public entry of judges into 
an assize town, handsomer dresses are 
worn by officers and ju Iges than their 
usual professional clothes. And when 
the Queen gives a public reception 
every one must go in court dress, 
which is quite unlike any other dress 
worn by ladles and gentlemen. It is 



dom, and has < ome down from the 
days o e Christ and the A ostles for it 
is, in fact, their old ei stern dress, en 
riched and ornamented, md used in 
memory of a religion having come 
from the Holy Land ne irly two thou 
sand years !*<> and no having been 
invented in England in modern timea. 
Lights are used on the altar, be 
cause of their brightness and beauty, 
m the same spirit that prompts people 




IKTKRIOR OF CHCRCH OF ST. MATTHIAS. 



right and proper, then, that the chief 
act of Christian worship, the only one 
ordained by Christ himself, should h ive 
equal respect shown to it. The reason 
why the particular dress called the 
""vestments," is worn, rather than an 
other, is, first, because it is the dress 
commanded by the Prayer-Epok, which 
la the law, to be worn. This dress is 
worn, with very slight lo^ril difference, 
in all the ancient churches of Christen- 



to illuminate their houses or their city. 
They are to remind the church that 
Christ is the true light of tha world; 
by using them in daytime, contrary to 
the natural order, significance is given 
to the supernatural character of the 
sacrament. And they illustrate the 
ritual of Heaven, where seven lamp* 
of fire are re-iresented ^s burning be 
fore the Golden Altar. 
On the opposite page of the prayer 



68 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



book, at morning prayer, is the Orna 
ments Rubric," which decrees that 
such ornaments as were In use in the 
Church of England, by the authority 
of parliament, Tn the second year of 
the reign of King Edward the Sixth 
shall be retained and used. This year 
was 1549, and the prayer book of that 
year specifies the precise ritual now 
used at St. Mhtthlas church, Toronto. 
Upon the altar ol many parish 
churches In England lights are used 
constantly; at Sit. Paul s Cathedral 
they are used dally and the custom 
prevails at Trinity church. Jsevv York 
Cl y, tne largest and we; i hiest Episco 
pal church in America. It. appears, 
therefore, that St. Matthias is thus 
thoroughly loyal to the Prayer-Book; 
that it is doing an exceptional amount 
of good cannot be doubted, whatever 
may be said of its ritual. 

In 1873 a number of prominent 
Church of England people, whose 
names are given below, found that to 
keep up with the needs of the people 
living round Trinity University a 
place of worship was necess-iry, and R. 
A. Harrison. Q. p-, afterward Ch ef 
Justice of Ontario, D. B. and J. B. 
Reed, brothers, and both eminent law- 

Sers, John Carter, organist of St. 
ames Cathedral (and a member of 
the famous musical family of that 
name), T, K. Morgan, J. F, Cross, F. 
D. Graves and others, while the staff 
of Trinity University gave every help 
and encouragement, met on the 24th 
February, 187:3 (St. Matthias day) when 
the plan took shape. The first services 
were Jield in a room on Tecumseh 
street. Afterwards a site was procur 
ed on "Strachan avenue and a school 
house built on it, the Rev. C. B. Dar 
ling, son of the well-known clergyman 
of that name, was appointed to the 
charge, on January 4, 1874, and th n^at 
building opened. The previous Christ 
mas a day, or parocbia,, school had 
been started in connection with the 
mission, and was carried on for a time 
very successfully. In April, 174, a sur- 
pliced choir was instituted, and from 
tbe first found favour and proved a 
great help in the services. In 1875 the 
Rev. T. B. Ford was chosen locum ten- 
ens owing to the illness of the incum 
bent, as his name was a guarantee 
that the catholic spirit and duties of 
the parish would be faithfully car 
ried on. In 1882 the Rev. Charles Dar 
ling became, assistant, and from this 
time prosperity settled on the parish; 
1885 Rev. R. Symons was assistant, 
being replaced in 1890 by Rev. G. H. 
Webb, and Rev. W. Norgatt, 1889. Hav 



ing moved to present location. Bell- 
wood s avenue, opposite Trinity Col 
lege, the Rev. R. Harrison being 
rector since 1875. The parish 
suffered greatly in numbers and in 
come by the erection of the parishes 
of St. Thomas, St. Margaret s, St. Bar 
nabas and St. Mary Magdalene, the as 
sistant at St. Matthias, Rev. C. R Dar 
ling becoming rector of the latter par 
ish. 

In 1895 Rev. F. G. Plummer was as 
sistant, and later the Rev. J. McKee 
McLennan and Rev. William Carter 
were the assistants. 

In his inquiry into the history of St. 
!\ratthias the writer found closely con 
nected with it the hospital conducted 
by the Sisters of St. Joihai the Divine. 
It is not a parochial institution, but is 
located at Robinson street and Euclid 
avenue, within the parish limits and is, 
therefore closely associated with the 
church. The Reverend Mother Super 
ior most kindly greeted the writer, 
though she was compelled to receive 
him in the hall of the hospital, her of 
fice being converted into a sick room. 
This is an institution organized for cor 
poral and spiritual works of mercy 
among the poor. A dispensary is con 
nected with the hospital where, for one 
hour on Saturdays and Wednesdays, 
free treatment is given to poor women 
and girls. The hospital is exclusively 
for the treatment of \\omen. There is 
a, free ward for those who are too poor 
to pay anything. While those who can 
afford to pay a little may do so. at 
the rate of $3 per week. Working 
girls who are too poor to pay much are 
frequent patients; and recently several 
serious surgical operations have been 
successfully performed. There are 
rooms for private patients, and the en 
tire establishment has a cosmopolitan 
character on this account. The sisters 
themselves, none of whom are paid, 
are members of the higher classes of 
society who have sacrificed the world 
in this sublime devotion to duty and 
mercy. Their house is quiet, cool ^and 
pleasant. aTld a mere visit to it is a 
benediction- There is a gentle patience 
and consideration in all the movements 
and words of these noble women that 
alone conduces to rest. 

The hospital has not been opened two 
years, and has had 140 patients, about 
two-thirds free. Tlhere are ten beds, 
and these are generally full; frequently 
temporary beds are put up for extra 
numbers. The institution is partly self- 
siipporting. but there are good friends 
at hand to support it, and no anxiety is 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



69 



felt as to its continued success. Four 
physicians are upon active duty at the 
institution. The present quarters are 
found to be inadequate for the bene 
ficent work of the sisters, and a new 
sita for larger buildings is now about 
being 1 selected. 

The sisters also support and minister 
to the Home for fche Aged People on 
Larch street, in St. George s parish, 
where there are two building? and 11 
inmaters. And another excellent work 
being done by these heroic women is 
ihe reclamation of straying, but peni 
tent girls who are taken in and helped 
back to virtue and usefulness. They 
contemplate the erection of a Shelter 
of Mercy for such homeless and outcast 
girls. The residents in the parish speak 
highly of the visitation and ministra 
tion of these gentle sisters among the 
poorest classes, where they nurse wo 
men and children, by nighjt and day, at 
the sacrifice of every personal consid 
eration. 

After a long illness the Rev. Richard 
Harrison, the rector of St. Matthias 
church, died in 1896, and was succeed 
ed in the duties of his office ny the 
Rev. N. B. Norrie, who had for some 
time before the death of Mr. Harrison 
been assisting in the parish. 

It/ Tnoist be borne in mind by the 
reader that this sketch of St. Matthias 
church and its services was written 
partly in 1888 and the latter portion 
in 1898. There has not- h^en nnv ehangp 
m the services up to the latter year. 
The wardens of the church have been 
the following: 

1673-1871-T. K. Morgan, t>. B. Reed. 
1874-1875-0. C. Foster, TX B. Reed. 
.875-187H W. A. Fowler, John Way. 
876-1877 R. H. Brown, H. Moodie. 
1877-1878 Dr. Dean, W. A. Fowler. 
187S-1879 Thos. Bailey, W. Peacock. 
1879-1R80 P. Beverley, G. Y. Tims. 

B80-ia<<3 G. T. Tims, L. Tomlinson. 
1883-1885 W. Smith, T. McCleary. 
1885-1886 W. Smith, W. Thompson. 

3K-18S7 G. W. Verral. W. Thompson. 
1887-1888-G. W. Verral, A. H. Light- 
bourne. 

1888-1889 G. W. Gander, W. J. Thomp 
son. 

1889-1890-P. Dykes, F. J. Prior. 
890 191 P. Dykes, G. Gowanlock. 
91-1893 Dr. Pepler, E. Sampson. 
93-1894 V. E. F. Morgan, E. Simpson. 
I8V4-1897 John Carter, John R. Davis 



CHAPTER X 
ST. THOMAS. 

A Prosperous Cngrrgntion Formed F r m 
Small Br<:lnnlni. 

This church forms one of a cordon 
of six English churches, ranged at 
proper distances from each other, in 
the line of Bloor street, [t is situated 
on the south-west corner of Sussex 
avenue and Huron street. Mir. Frank 
Darling, architect of this city, with 
his thorough skill in church architec 
ture, was the designer of it. It is per 
fectly ecclesiastical in all its details, 
and tinted and kalsomined, is internal 
ly surpassed by no church in the city. 

Tihe present parish of St. Thomas is 
smaller than formerly the services in 
St. A-lban s cathedral supplying the 
spiritual needs of the north-west part 
of the parish. The church was former 
ly on Bat hurst street, but the trustees 
thought it prudent to move it to its 
present site. Tihis was a wise step, as 
the cathedral of St. Albans is built 
within a stone s throw of where the 
church formerly stood. 

The church passed through the vari 
ous troubles of a missionary church, 
it was erected by the subscriptions of 
churchmen, principal among whom 
was the late Wm. Russell Bartlett, of 
Davenport rend, who contributed large 
ly to the building fund. It was built 
about 1874, and was moved to its pre 
sent site in 1882. Tlhe seats in it have 
always been free, and will always con 
tinue so. It has nothing to support it 
but the free-will offerings of those 
who worship in it. There is a debt of 
$2,450 on it. A. site for a sctioolhouse 
is excavated at the west end, and it is 
hoped next year to complete this 
necessary adjunct to it, without which 
the right arm is wanting. 

The services are hearty, warm and 
cheerful in character the congrega 
tion is asjced to join as the Church of 
England requires, and it does respond 
as a congregation should ; the choir 
simply leads the worship, and in no 
way attempts to supercede the audible 
devotions of the people. The choir is 
surpliced and the services in the 
morning are partially choral; in the 
evening they are full choral. The tunes 
used are Gregorian, these being con 
sidered most conducive in the public 
worship of God. The hymn book is 
Ancient and Modern, and the singing 
is well sustained by the surnliced choir 
of men and boys. The services are at 
11 a. m. and 7 p. m.; Sunday school 
at 3 p. m.; week day service, Wednes- 



70 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



day at 8 p. m.; practice of choir each j 
Friday at 7.30 p. m. 

The rector of the parish is the Rev. 
J. H. McCollum, A. M., a graduate of 
"Trinity College, Dublin, and A. ML of 
Trinity College, Toronto. Mr. McCol 
lum in 1871 commenced holding services 
ion the corner of Dloor and Bat hurst 
streets in an old house belonging to 
Mr. Howland. From this weak begin 
ning the ctourch started, and St. 
Thomas church and St. Alban s Cathe 
dral now occupy the ground. 

JEhe nave f>t the church is 60 feet 



Mr. John Payne, with his sidesmen, 
manages the financial affairs of the 
church ; zealous and care. r ul in all 
pecuniary matters connected with the 
office of warden, yet spirited enough 
to sanction and engage in any outlay 
which might- improve the church and 
make it more attractive. 

Tie building is an old, frame, rough 
cast structure, rather quaint in ap- 
pearame with a suggestion of the 
picturesque. Tihe gable faces Huron 
street, and there is one entrance from 
this street into a transept on the 




CHURCH OF ST. THOMAS, SUSSEX AVENUK AND HCRON STRHKT, AS IT * AS. 



long by 34 feet wide, the chancel 33 x 
26, and the seating capacity is about 
320. The rector s moi ty for the last 
year of the Toronto rectory surplus 
was 415. St. Thomas has had more 
than its share of difficulties, but i 
has emerged out of all, and with its 
attractive services, solely and pu rel y 
Church of England in all the compre 
hensiveness of that noble Chr:stian 
office, it has a bright future before 
it. Mr. George Fmrnival has been the 
organist for many years, a faithful, 
punctual and conscientious musician, 
raining or shining ever at his post. 



north, that is, it is a transept ex 
ternally, but not internally. The other 
entrance is in the rear, on Soissex 
avenue. The chancel is built in the 
eas em gable, and is a beautiful 
model, uilh a handsome reredos and 
substantial furniture. The building 
externally shows its age; the shingles 
are well worn under the hent of many 
i summers and the storms of many win 
ters and, in fact, the building bears 
all over itself this evidence of age. 
From the middle of the sharply-point- 
; ed roof rises an odd-looking tower or 
i projection, called a Heche, that in- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



71 



tensifies the peculiarity of ihe struc 
ture. An enclosed porch contains the 
entrance from the north. 

But this antique external appearance 
is nort balanced by an equally ancient- 
looking initeror; for this is very neat 
and pretty. The floor is bare save for 
a strip of matting along the central 
and only aisle; the chancel is entirely 
carpeted. Long seats extend from each 
side of this aisle to the wall opposite 
and each one contains a book rest and 
a- foot rest. Four polished gasaliers 
are pendant from the ceiling, and 
these abundantly illuminate the room 
at night. In the eastern gable are lan 
cet form, gothic windows and a small 
wheel window, while the other win 
dows, on the north and routh sides, are 
swung upon hinges. There arc ventil 
ating registers in the roof manipulated 
by long cords. A little bell whose 
tones seem diminutive and of not the 
most muf-ical character, swings aloft 
and is rung by the caretaker standing 
directly at the entrance to the chan 
cel. The organ is placed in the vestry 
to the eouth of the chancel. 

A very pretty picture was made that 
Sunday evening in this organ recess; 
there is a narrow opening between it 
and the main room, so that the organ 
ist is plainly visible to the congrega- , 
tion. This officer is an old gentleman 
with silvery white hair and a full 
whte beard; a light suspended above 
him, but not visible, threw its radiance 
down over his snow-white hair and 
tell fn shimmering beauty upon the 
folds of his white surplice, enwrapping 
him as with a halo and presenting 
tfce whole as a framed picture that 
seamed artistically appropriate to the 
sublimity of the service. 

To hear this service, the writer found 
his way tj St. Thomas church one 
Sunday evening, passing thitherward, 
the usual crowds of people that throng i 
the avenues and streets of the city 
every Sunday evening. As the less 
densely populated portion of that sec 
tion is approached the crowd is lens 
dense and partakes more of a strag 
gling character, moving through 
Queen .-> Park and over the commons of 
th.- north-west in divergent lines. But j 
no! all of the crowd is going to church; : 
the leas clearly lighted portions of the 
park attract many who had better be 
at church. Although the cool damp 
ness of these September evenings set 
tled about the trees and made the 
avenues chilly and uncomfortable, this 
si ;ite of things did not deter certain 



loiterers from occupying the peats until 
a very late hour. 

A tiamp through the little ravine 
to the north, a stumble up over a 
hill terraced with the roots of trees 
laid bare by the tread of many feet, 
an unceremonious introduction to the 
sharpest rail of the fence in an en 
deavour to find some egress, and un 
looked-for plunges among the hillocks 
and holes of a common at last brought 
the iittle church within sight. After 
the devious detour amid the trees and 
fences, for the sake of a "short cut," 
the light so brightly streaming from 
the various windows was a welcome 
sight. 

Immediately upon entering, an atten 
tive usher met the writer and accom 
modated him with a seat and a book. 
It was early then, and but few people 
had entered. Away up the aisle, direct 
ly in front of the chancel, was placed 
au. invalid chair, containing a wor 
shipper who doubtless found great 
strength in her weakness from the in 
spiration quickened by a service so 
pure and beautiful. 

The little bell rang out its invita 
tion, the lights were turned up, and 
far in the distance was heard the voice 
of prayer with the "Amen," chanted 
in response. Then the organ sounded 
the key-note of the processional hymn, 
and the singers entered, led by two 
very small boys, followed by two a 
little larger, and so on until the en 
tire choir of ten boys and . two men. 
followed by the rector, marched into 
the chancel, the congregation mean 
while standing, and took the places 
assigned. 

Tho membership and the Sunday 
school of this church are small now, 
since St. Alban a has been organized, 
and tho congregations are, consequent 
ly, not so large as formerly. Only 
forty persons were present Sunday 
evening, and they were nearly all 
young people ; only one or two old per 
sons were there. As every church de- 
ponds for its perpetuity upon the chil- 
rlruu and young people, St. Thomas 
gives promiss, in this way, of becoming 
much stronger than it is at present. 
But every one seemed deeply interest 
ed In the service; even the talkative 
girls became quiet, and gave serious 
at tention to the ritual. Indeed, it 
could not well be otherwise, for the 
beauty of the service and the dignity 
with which it was executed will at 
tract any one. One great advantage 
of a liturgical service is this, that 
every person having a book to follow 
tho ritual for himself is given a direct 



LANDMARKS OP TORONTO. 



personal interest in it, and so has his 
attention enchained. 

The service was full choral, the choir 
being surplioed, and it was most ex- 
press ; vely sung, the pure, clear young 
voices of the hoys mingling delicately 
with the men s heavier tones in a 



while playing a subdued refrain that 
was a fitting adjunct, and made the 
utterances much more impressive and 
heartful. The chanting of the Lord s 
Prayer after the absolution was an 
other beautiful gem in the setting of 
the whole service. So also was the 







VIEW OF INTKRIOR OF ST. THOMAS* CHURCH. 



most musical manner. The Confession 
was first intoned, sentence ^ by sent 
ence, by the officiating minister, and 
then chorally repeated by the choir 
and congregation, the organ mean- 



repet \tion of the Apostle s Creed, when 
the low, sweet tones of the organ wove 
melody in and about the solemn declar 
ation of faithl as Lt fell In choral 
numbers from the lips of the reverent 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



worshippers. What made this part still 
more effective was the turning of the 
choir towards the altar, and the in 
clination of the heads of the people 
when the name of Jesus Chrisu was 
uttered. 

Five hymns were sung during the 
evening, including the processional and 
recessional hymns, and the tunes 
selected were those befitting the 
artistic nature of the entire service. 
Indeed, there seemed to be a sort of 
contradiction between the exalted art 
of the celebration and the humble ap 
pearance of the building, at least ex 
ternally. We generally associate a 
building of unattractive appearance 
with a service corresponding. It is a 
most agreeable surprise, therefore, to 
go into a homely-looking, time-worn 
church and there find a pure and cul 
tivated ritual observed, s ich as gen 
erally goes with magnificent church 
architecture and all the embellish 
ments of ecclesiastical art. The latter 
is more than compensated for by the 
beauty and harmony of a choral s^r- 
vice : indeed, interest in such a service 
loses sight of externals altogether and 
carries an appreciative soul on the 
pinions of sweet music up to the very 
gates of heaven. 

Mr, McCollum, the rector, is a gentle 
man of well developed physical power, 
and possesses a resonant voice, that 
Is well adapted to the choral celebra 
tion. He is a man in middle life, full- 
beared, wearing glnssss, and is of good 
presence in the pulpit. The building 
is rather small to accommodate the 
volume of his voice. He is an earnest 
speaker, pleas mt and cordial socially, 
and is not puffed up with any vain 
conceit of his office. 

He preached an interesting sermon, 
of half an hour s length, from 
Ephesians, 6th chapter, 13th verse 
"Take unto you the whole armour of 
God, that ye may be able to stand 
in the evil day and having done all 
to stand." These are extracts from the 
sermon--- 

Christian life is a struggle, the 
Christian is a warrior; from cradle 
to grave is the "evil day." 

We must not form a too gloomy 
view of life, peath is not the gift of 
God, but life is. It is great with en 
joyment and blessings, and full of 
grief and anxiety. 

Our sorrows are lighter than our 
sins. 

Temptation is the sweetener of life 
and perfect character. 
_ We cannot select the weapons for 
life s warfare ourselves, lest they be 



I carnal weapons. We must have the 
panoply of God; the girdle is truth, the 
breastplate is righteousness, the hel 
met is salvation, the shoes are the Gos 
pel of peace, the sword of the Spirit 
is the Word of God, the circumambient 
.shield is faith to ward off tha darts of 
the devil. 

The offertory was received while a 
hymn was being sung. Then the rector 
stood facing the altar and delivered a 
short prayer; at its close he turned 
and facing the congregation pronounc 
ed the benediction with uplifted hands, 
kneeling, thereafter, in silent prayer 
before the altar, while tb.3 congrega 
tion also knelt, and there was a D.w 
moments absolute silence. Then as 
the organ began the recessi-nnal 
hymn, the people rose, the choir slo-.v- 

: ly and reverently march l oui while 
singing the last stanza, until th^ ves 
try was reached, when a few words of 
audible prayer by the minister, a 
choral Amen by the choir, an 1 than 
a minute s wait on th part of the 
people, concluded a most interesting- 
and enjoyable service. 



The foregoing account, re-published 
| with but very few alterations from 
! when it first appeared, describes a 
thing of the past, tha St. Thomas church 
therein described having been super- 
1 seded by a new and more commodious 
building. It is considered th>3 most 
i advanced ritualistic church amon^ all 
| the Anglican churches of the city, and 
is at the same time oae of the best 
; attended at evening service when 
worship begins rarely can a seat be ob 
tained. 

The Rev. J. H. McCollum is still nom 
inally the rector, but in 1890 ha re 
tired to a great extent from parochial 
responsibility, the Rev. J. C. Roper be 
ing appointed by the Bishop of the Dio 
cese, Dr. Sweatman, as his co-adjufor, 
and he became de facto, though not de 
jure, the rector. 

Mr. Koper was a churchman of the 
scho)l of Pusey, Keble, Liddon, Low- 
der und Machonachie, and it may here 
be remarked as an interesting fact in 
the history of the Anglican church in 
Toronto, that the appointment of a man 
of his stamp to any Anglican church 
would, forty years since, have been 
practically impossible, so deter 
mined were the great majority 
of the clergy and laity of those times 
to oppose anything and everything that 
savoured of what was then termed 
"Puseyism." The term has now be 
come obsolete, few of the present gen 
eration know what it meant or what 
it signified, and the services at St. 
Thomas are heartily accepted and en- 



74 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



joyed by all those who worship within 
its walls. 

The present church stands on the 
eastern side of Huron street, about 100 
yards north of Sussex avenue, and was 
opened for divine service on January 
17th. 1893. Tfoe architect was Mr. Eden 
Smith. 

The land upon which the church 
stands cost $10,000, the building $10,- 
000, and the organ by Warren, $3,000, 
making a total of $23,000. 

The musical portion of the services 
at St. Thomas are somewhat ornate, 
In addition to the organ and choir of 
sixty voices ia an orchestra varying 
from eight to ten performers, who oc- 



versiity. As a parish visitor Mr. Roper 
was indefatigable, and every detail of 
his work was attentively studied and 
performed. As a preacher he had little 
pretence to eloquence, but his sermons 
were clear and practical. He set forth 
what hie believed to be he teaching 
of the Master in language that could 
not be misunderstood ; he had no con 
ception of watering down any of the 
old doctrines, and he viewed with horror 
any attempt to tamper with the book 
of Common Prayer, as it has been ac 
cepted by the Anglican body since the 
Reformation. 

Mr. Thos. A. Reed is organist of St. 
Thomas , and the Rev. F. G. Plum- 




CHURCH OF ST. THOMAS, HURON STRIBT, 1898. 



cupy places assigned to them in the 
chancel clo.. % , to the organ. There is 
each Sunday, an early, as well as a mid 
day celebration of the Holy Communi 
on, and there is also a celebration on 
All Saints days and church festivals. 
Daily prayer* are said throughout the 
year, and the church is at all times 
open for p:ivate devotion. 

Reverend J. C. Roper, the minister 
In charge until 1896, was an Oxford 
man, when foe graduated RA. in 1880, 
and M.A. in 1883. He was ordained 
deacon in 1832 by the Bishop of Chicbe- 
ter, and priest in the following year. 
He came to Canada in 1886 and was 
until his appointment to St. Tlhomas 
one of th" professors at Trinity Uni- 



mer, one of the clergy attached to the 
church, is choir master. 

In 1897 the Rev. J. C. Roper was 
appointed to a scholastic post in the 
United States, and was followed in his 
work at St. Thomas by the Rev. C. H. 
Shortt, M.A., formerly rector of St 
Cyprian s, Toronto. Under Mr. Shortt 
the services and work of the parish 
have been maintained in the highest 
efficiency, and the congregation re 
mains one of the largest In the city. 

The wardens since 1889 hare been 
as follows: 

1889-1890- W . D. Gwynne, J. T. Swal 
low. 

1890-1892 W. D. Gwyna*. B. Green 
wood. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



75 



1892-1893 W. H. Terrain, R. Green 

wood. 
1893-1894 R. Greenwood, W. A. Med- 

land. 
1894-1898 W. D. Gwynne, W. A. Med- 

land. 
1898-1899 W. D. Gwynne, Thomas Mer- 

ritt. 

CHAPTER XVIIl. 

GRACE CHURCH. 

A fbnrch Formed From llolr Trinity 



On the southern side of Elm street, 
about midway Ix-t-.v^n Teraulay and 
Elizabeth strwts, stan Is the church 
building known as Grace Church, the 



church r ses from east to west, while 
at the eastern end is a narrow daia 
whereon arc pulpit, lea tern and prayer 
desk. The organ, which, by the way, 
is an excellent instrument, is in the 
smith-east corner of the church, the 

1 ohoir seats being arranged at right 
angles in front of it. The church fa 
well lighted, but owing to the large 
amount of cubic space in the interior 
of the building, it is a somewhat 
difficult matter to heat it in winter. 
The basement, about half of which 
is underground, 5s a large room, and 
shows by its appearance that it haa 

1 been well used. The immense furnace 
and it* flues radiating in many differ 
ent directions, can not be said to add 
to i he room s attractions. In the 
basement are two infant class as well 




GRACK CHURCH, ELM 8TRBKT. 



present rector of which is the Rev. J. 
Pitt Lewis, M.A., (1898.) 

The church is built of red brick, in 
gothic style, and has little to recom 
mend it in an aesthetic sense, though 
it has much from a utilitarian point 
oC view. Both entrances to the build 
ing are from Elm street, and the east 
ern end presents a most unattractive 
Appearance. The nave of the church is 
80 feet from eaat to west, with a width 
of 55 feet. There are north and south 
transepts; lighting the former is a 
handsome Catherine wheel window, 
while in the latter are a pretty group 
<rf lancet windows. The floor of the 



as Bible class rooms, both separatee! 
from the principal room by a glass par 
tition. This latter apartment is used 
for the Sunday school, which numbers 
about 570, or possibly, even 600 pupils. 

The services in, the church on Sunday 
are at 8 a.m., 11 a.m., 3 p.m., an<| 
7 pan. There are also numerous week 
day services. Of parish organizations 
there are the rector s Sunday afternoon 
Bible class, the Guild of the Good 
Shepherd, the Women s Auxiliary, the 
Brotherhood of St. Andrew, the Young 
People s Association an dthe Coal Club. 

The rector of the church, the Rev. J. 
Pitt Lewis, was then described by a 



76 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



writer in the columns of a Toronto 
paper in 18 C 8. The description being a 
most faithful one, it is only right here 
to reproduce it. It reads thus: 

" The principle of self-sacrifice which 
underlies all true politeness is emi 
nently characteristic of Mr. Lewis, and 
it is this devotion of self to his work 
and the many claims it makes upon 
him that has not only signally blessed 
his ministry in "the building up of a 
fine parish, but it has endeared him 
to his people. On all sides he is kindly 
spoken of, and in terms of affection. 
He impresses a stranger as a man 
whose naturally strong feelings are 
kept under control by the domination 
of the higher, inner, spiritual life that, 
after all, really determines what a 
man is. He speaks in a mild tone of 
voice, but it is not hard to imagine 
that back of the kindly and gracious 
manner there is a reserve fund of 
power that, should occasion arise, 
would be found to be very positive 
and decided if not totally immovable. 

" Mr. Lewis is a native of Ontario, 
and received his preparatory training 
in the Newmarket Grammar School and 
from private tutors. After attending 
Victoria College he entered the min 
istry ; before this, however, he devoted 
three years to the study of medicine, 
intending, at that time, to become a 
practising physician. His inclinations 
led him to theology, and his first 
Church of England settlement was in 
Chatham, where he was most happily 
situated and strongly entrenched in 
the esteem and affection of his people. 
The peculiar exigencies of Grace church 
seemed to demand his services in To 
ronto. The field was larger, more ma 
terial was available and greater op 
portunities of doing good were neces 
sarily at hand. He assumed the re 
sponsibilities of this parish in October, 
1878, and certainly should feel grati 
fied with the wonderful success that 
has attended his ministry, notwith 
standing the circumstances that sore 
ly tried the church and almost perilled 
its very existence." 

Grape church was projected in the 
first* place as a protest against the ul 
tra ritualistic tendencies supposed to 
be dominant at the neighbouring church 
of the Holy Trinity, but this spirit soon 
subsided ; there was good work to be 
done without encroaching on the work 
at Holy Trinity, and to this work the 
clergy of Grace church set their minds. 

The corner stone of the present 
dhiurch was laid in 1875, but some time 
before this the congregation had wor 



shipped in a small frame building in 
the neighbourhood, formerly used by 
the Presbyterian body. The first rector 
of the parish was the Rev. W. H. Jones, 
M._A., who worked there from 1874 until 
1876. He was succeeded by the Rev. 
0. R. Matfhetw. For a short time the 
Rev. J. P. Sheraton had clerical charge 
of the parish until Mr. Lewis assumed 
rectorial charge in 1878. 

Among others who have from time to 
time assisted at Grace dhurch, have been 
the Revs. C. C. Kemp, now of Cleveland, 
Ohio ; J. G. Lewis, now of New York ; 
John McCarroll, at Detroit; C. H. 
Rich, at Weston, and the present as 
sistant clergy, R. J. P. Roberts and 
A. Newham. 

The churchwardens for 1897-98 were 
Messrs. J. S. Barber and H. A. Taylor. 
Among past and present active lay 
workers occur the names of Messrs. 
H. C. Fortier, T. R. Clougher, W. C. 
Hall, J. H. Mumford, F. W. Elliott, 
John Shields and E. T. Campbell. 



CHAPTER XIX. 

ST. PHILLIP S. 

A Wt End Farlsh with a Fleming 



The following description of this well 
known west end church and parish was 
first published about 188$. It is now 

reprinted with several additions. 

* * . * * * 

The religious life of Toronto is char 
acterized by a multiplicity of churches 
which for magnificence of architecture 
and luxury of appointments challenge 
the admiration of all visitors. These 
splendid monuments of distinctively 
denominational character, as well as 
of the generic religious life of the city, 
have risen according to that principle 
of evolution which underlies and en 
ergizes every realm of nature and of 
human activity. There has been a 
germ from which these churches have 
developed until they reached the fru 
ition of that development in some glori 
ous cathedral or some graceful and 
beautiful structure not less pleasing 
nor less an object of pride. And the 
growth has been, as all true growth 
is, from centre to circumference, from 
the heart of the city through all the 
arteries of its life out to its extrem 
ities. The upspringing of churches has 
been commensurate with the expan 
sion of the city. As the; residential 
centre gradually moves itself away 
from the mercantile and commercial 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



centres, ao the churches are gradually 
growing away from down town." In 
deed, the marvellous expansion of the 
city already begins U> imperil the 
value and significance of down town 
churches, so far as their maintaining 
large congregations is concerned. And 
this loss will continue to augment 
itself so long as people are denied the 
privilege of riding to church. The 
demand is for churches nearer home; 
whether the demand springs from in 
dolence or from a lack of attractive 
force in the church itself is a matter 
not to be discussed here. The fact ex 
ists that every year people become less 
inclined to walk far to church. Thou 
sands will walk out to Mount Pleas 
ant cemetery to attend a military 
funeral ; hundreds will stroll over the 
Don and out to the parks; scores will 
promenade the streets mile after mile; 
hut they are too tired to go to church. 
The churches of the city recognize this 
tendency, and are now going to the 
people. 

The missionary spirit of all the de 
nominations of Toronto is commensur 
ate with the growth and expansion of 
the population. If the demand for a 
new church does not exist, this spirit 
creates it, and, consequently, chapels 
may be seen everywhere upon the out 
skirts, while more pretentious struc 
tures are constantly being built as the 
vicinity becomes more densely popu 
lated. 

The Church of England in this coun 
try is fully possessed of this mission 
ary spirit. The protest of the sixteenth 
century Reformation necessitates this 
practical working spirit. No church 
now can afford to rest upon its tra 
ditions for success. It may deprecate 
the secular spirit, but the secular 
spirit demands an accommodation of 
the church to the people, and upon 
this principle rests the necessity of 
work, and hard work, if any church 
is to be successful. Then ihe spirit 
of emulation, if it may not be termed 
rivalry, that exists between the dif 
ferent sects and between all these 
united and the historic church of Chris 
tianity compels the latter to heroic 
effort in order to enlarge its borders. 
Hence we find Romanism and the 
Church of England fully alive to the 
importance of appropriating new ter 
ritory, and very zealous in its acquis 
ition. 

St. Philip s church is a notable ex^- 
ample of this activity on the part of 
the Church of England. The outgoing 
of the city towards the west, and north 
created the necessity of a church 



north of St. John s, and including part 
of its territory. An organization was 
effected in 1875, and the present site, 
at the south-west corner of Spadina 
avenue and St. Patrick street, was pur 
chased. A little cottage stood on that 
corner, called the Tolfree cottage. At 
first it was occupied by the new organ 
ization, unlil the pres3nt school-house 
was built. The congregation then wor 
shipped in the new schooJ-housj; and 
so Jittle was the cottage valued that 
it was sold, and brought only S45. The 
school-house was occupied in 1876; but 
so remarkably rapid was the growth 
of the parish that before long the 
room was fouad to be entirely too 
small for the congregations that as 
sembled. It seated 350, and frequent 
ly a hundred people were turned away 
for want of accommodation. The neces 
sity of a larger building thus becom 
ing absolute, steps were taken to 
build a church, although $5,000 was 
then due for the land and the school- 
house. 

J^fforts were a|t once put forth to col 
lect money in order to relieve the great 
pressure and $7,009 was raised. The 
present structure was then erected, 
at a cost of $17000. The entire pro 
perty, 140 x 6 S feet, is valued at $30,- 
000. The situation is not only a de 
lightful and commanding one but is 
one constantly increasing in value. 
The church is o-f the plain French 
Gothic style, built of red brick trim 
ming and Ohio stone dressing. It 
measures 101 x 6* feet, and stands with 
the length runn njc along St. Patrick 
street. At th/e north-east corner is a 
tower, extending a short distance 
above the roof, with four pinnacles 
whose appearance is somewhat nega 
tived by beams extending from one to 
the other in order -to give them sup 
port. ^When the spire, hereafter to 
be erected, is added the total height 
will lie 130 feet. The red brick gives 
the church a bright, fresh, clean ap 
pearance in marked contrast with the 
dingy, dirty, white brick churches so 
o> c ten seen in this city. And the mono 
tony of the walls is broken by stone- 
ca-pped buttresses while arched panels 
are built in th^ facade. In the central 
one is a blue shield oontaining in 
formation as to tbe hours of regular 
service. 

The school house Is directly attach 
ed tt> the church on the west, a.t a 
right angle to it, with two entrances 
through the ga.ble on St. Patrick 
street. Th>> church may be entered 
that way; then there is a main en- 



78 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



trance through tha tower in the front 
on Spudina av.nue. A ga .eway on the 
soutn gives entry to the little vestry, 
and from the latter thare is a doorway 
opening into the chancel. 

The seats face Spaiina avenuo; the 
ohancel therefore is at the east end 
o? the church, which is the proper and 
the most significant location in the 
Christian cult. It is v<^<" raraoi~"- 
measuring 33 x 16 feet, and opens into 
the nave through a magnificent fluted 



on a line with the southern wall of 
; the chancel; three long pews are placed 
here for the choir. The floor of the 
j chancel is well elevated and extending 
j out over the steps; beyond the arch is 
I the pulp t. 

The church presents a massive ap 
pearance growing out o f the cathedral 
.style according to which it is built 
and an ingenious arrangement of its 
proportions. Six Gothic arches, spring 
ing from nekt irpn columns twelve feet 



I m jyfr L 

: A:-:M. ..db&Skiftll . \ t. 




ST. PHILLIP S CHURCH, SPADTNA AVENUE. 



urchway 24 feet wide and extending 
40 feet to th.; crown. In the facade of 
the church above the altar is a triple 
lancet-formed window with the cen 
tral one 21 feet high. .The glass is 
of beautifully ornamented lozenge 
artistically wrought, very pretty and 
bright. The reredos is a carved and 
joinlel pioca o oaken wo k the alrar 
iis l is of plain pan-Is an 1 the orpan, 
a new and costly instrument, fronts 



high, support the clerestory walls; 
| within the latter are six equilateral 
; windows of brightly coloured glass. 
1 The roof of the nave is supported by 
! five timber principals bolted and fill- 
1 ei in with cusps and other ornamenta 
tions. The rafters are carried 
upon moulded purlins bolted to the 
principals, and all this open timter 
work gives the nave not only a lofty 
i but a graceful and beautiful appear- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



79 



ance. The dark wood is relieved by the 
pale blue, pink and brown panels of the 
ceiling, each one of which is prettily 
decorated with stencil flowers in the 
centre and at the corners. The walls 
of the entire auditorium are stuccoed 
in blocks divided by black lines. This 
dark grey colour is relieved by the 
white jambs and the plaster of Paris 
label mouldings terminating in orna- 



The furniture of the nave is plain 
and simplj. The seats are long, pine 
pews; their racks are well furnished 
with prayer and hymn books. Notices 
are posted stating that "The seats in 
(his church are all free and unappro 
priated," a most gratifying announce 
ment to strangers and regular attend- 
! anis. No pew or seat ki this church 
i can possibiy be rented. "First came,. 







INTERIOR OF ST. PHILMP 8 CHURCH, SPADINA AVENGE. 



mental corbels. There are twelve 
broad windows in the sidea of the 
church, and two lancet windows above 
the school- house: in the western end. 
These windows are so proportioned 
that they serve to enhance the massive 
appearance of the interior. It is not a 
very large nave, sea-ting only 750 per- 
ons, and yejt it seems to present a 
much greater area. 



first served" is the rude and no distinc 
tions are made in any way. 

The career of this parish for the 21 
years of its existence has been one of 
great prosperity. Prom the very first 
it was a pledged success, and rapid 
ly grew from the little Ttolfree cot 
tage through the school house to the 
present commodious and comfortable 
structure. Underneath is a fine larcr* 



80 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



basement ten feet high, fitted up for 
Sunday school. Underneath the chan 
cel is a cheerful room in which Bible 
classes meet. 

The church was opened for service 
January 27th, 1884, and those who be 
gan the work in the little cottage were 
gratified to see their union and labours 
so richly crowned with success. Among 
the organizers of St. Philip s the fol 
lowing prominent men may be named : 
The late Chief Justice Harrison, High 
Constable J. T. Jones, Lieut.-Col. R. B. 
Denison, City Solicitor Wm. G. Mc- 
Williams, Lieut.-Col. Geo. A. Shaw, Col. 
C. S, Gzowski, Messrs. G. M. Evans, 
Thos. Phillips. James and Philip 
Brown, T. Murray and Wm. Griffith. 

The rectors of the church have been 
Revs. G. H. Moxon, now vicar in Sun- 
don, Bedfordshire, England, and Rev. 
Jas. S. Stone, D. D., now rector of St. 
James, Chicago, and then the present 
rector, Rev. Canon Sweeny, M. A., D. D. 
} his gentleman was born in London, 
England, and came to Canada in 1868. 
He is a. graduate of McGill University, 
taking the Arts course there and a 
Divinity course ait the Montreal Dio 
cesan Theological College, of which he 
was one of the first graduates. He 
engnged in missionary work, and after 
ordination became rector of St. Luke s 
parish, Montreal, which he left in 1882, 
to leoome rector of St. Philip s. The 
degrees of M. A.. B, D. amd D. D., 
were conferred upon bim here by Trin 
ity University. He was made canon 
in 1889, and elected rural dean in Oct., 
185)"). 

Dr. Sweeny is a social man, and an 
exceedingly hard worker. He is ener 
getic and zealous, both as a preacher 
and a pastor. {The limits of his parish 
are Queen street on the south, touch 
ing St. John s, St. Patrick and Arthur 
streets on the north, touching St. 
Stephen s, SpaxHna avenue on the east, 
touching St. George s amd Palmerston 
avenue on the west, touching St. 
Matthias . It will be seen from this 
geographical statement that the work 
of the church is with a concentrated 
and dense population. (There are about 
350 communicants of the church, but 
over 400 families are represented in it, 
and the oversight of all these entail 
upon the minister a vast amount of 
parochial work. 

The following very just estimate of 
Canon Sweeny and his work in the 
Canadian Churchman of O:toV>er, 17th, 
1895, when the reverend gentleman 
was appointed Rural Dean of Toronto: 
".We heartily congratulate the R. D. 



Chapter of Toronto on their selection 
of Rev. Canon Sweeny, M. A., D. D., 
rector of St.. Phillip s church, to be 
their Rural Dean for the next ensu 
ing term of four years, and extend to 
the Rural Dean elect our best wishes 
for his success in the important office 
to which his brethren have elected 
him. We hail the appointment with 
every satisfaction, knowing that all 
parties in the church will receive fair 
treatment at his hands, since we have 
ever looked upon him as standing for 
moderation, toleration and impartial 
ity. May the church s interest in the 
Deanery of Toronto be well to the fore 
during the next four years. Canon 
Sweeny is the son of Col. Sweeny, late 
staff officer HL M, pensioners, Mont 
real, and formerly of H. Mj. 83rd and 
12th Regiments. Hfe came to Canada 
in 1869, and was educated in Montreal, 
graduating at McGill University, tak 
ing his degree of R A. in 1878 and ML 
A. in 1881. He was admitted to the 
diaconate in 1880, and to the priest 
hood in 1881. For a short time he was 
rector of St. Luke*s church, Montreal, 
and on the 16th of December, 1882, he 
was appointed rector of St. Phillip s 
church, Toronto. Taking an ad eundem 
degree of M. A. from Trinity Uni 
versity, Toronto. Mr. Sweeny proceed 
ed in that university by regular course 
to the important degrees of B. D. and 
D. D., which last he obtained in 1888. 
In the following year the B shop of 
the Diocese appointed him an honorary 
Canon of St. Alban s Cathedral, To 
ronto. Canon Sweeny is a good active 
worker in the church, and many 
branches of it outside his own parish 
have received and still receive his at 
tention. For a time he was a mem 
ber of the Board of Management of 
the Domestic and Foreign Missionary 
Society, and has alwajys been an active 
promoter of the Sunday School Asso 
ciation and of the Church of England 
Temperance Society. Rev. Canon 
Sweeny is the third rector of St. 
Philip s church, also the third Rural 
Dean of Toronto." 

The clergy who have been associ 
ated with Dr. Sweeny as curates have 
been Rev. H. P. Hobson, Rev. F. W. 
Bayley-Jones. R.N., Rev. T. R. O Meara, 
Rev. F. M. Baldwin. Rev. J. J. Hill. 
M.A., Rev. F. Wilkinson. 

The organist and choir master In 
j 18% was Mr. Ernest Pearce. 

The churchwardens since the church 
was established have been 
l8Rfi-1888 G. M. Evans, H. Mortimer. 
1890-1890 Henry Smith, G. M. Evans. 
lc.H)-1891 Dr. Millman, G. M. Evans. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



31 



1S9I-1895 Henry Smith, W. D. Mc- 

Pherson. 
1895-1896-T. S. Sharpe, W. D. Mc- 

Phersoa. 
1896-1897 M. Shcppard, W. D. Mc- 

Pherson. 



CHAPTER XX. 
ST. MARY MAGDALENE. 

A Hearty Service and Ritual -A ITell 
Worked Parlnh. 

This may be called the grandchild 
of the church of St. John the Evan- 
gelist, for it is the outgrowth of St. 
Matthias parish, which sprung from 
the former church. The northern part 
of this parish has recently enlarged 
so much that another church in ad 
dition to that on Bellwoods avenue is 
found to be necessary. The mattsr was 
taken in hand in June, 1886, by Rev 
Charles Darling, the curate of St. Mat 
thias, and he raised $4,000 towards the 
new building. A lot at the north-east 
corner of Manning avenue and Ulster 
street was bought for $2,600, and the 
erection of a temporary church begun. 
Ehe chancel only is now being built 
and the walls will be raised fifteen 
feet, when a temporary roof will be 
put on. There will be a handsome 
room in the basement, eleven feet high 
and of the same size as the church 
above. This room wjll be used for the 
Sunday school. It is intended to open 
the present church at Easter, if the 
work can be sufficiently advanced by 
that time. No foundation stone will 
be laid until the nave is built. The 
present building- will accommodate only 
about 150 persons, and will certainly 
be inadequate for its purpose. But the 
urgency for a new church in that sec 
tion is so great that it was deemed 
best to begin the work at once, look 
ing to the liberality of the neighbour 
hood and of the church generally for 
its completion. The cost of the present 
bunding will be about $3,500. The 
church when completed will seat 1,000 
persons, and will cost about -150,000. 
The geographical limits of the new 
parish will be Bloor ou the north, Bath- 
ursc ou the east, College on the south, 
aa.d Shaw street on the west. This < 
section of the city is being rapidly 
mint up, and the new church, when i 
completed according to the present de- ! 
sign, will be an architectural oma- I 
ment to that part of Toronto. Another 
feature that will make the new enter- ! 
ruie a success is the superior music i 
and service that will be given. The 



service will be choral, and of a style 
siai iar to that used in St. Matthias 1 
cnurch, and which has made that 
church KO remarkably successful and 
popular. The choir of the new church 
S :il -? spliced. It is in charge of 
JVjr. W, P. Thompson- Mrs. Thompson, 
a graduate of the Royal Academy of 
Music, England, will be the organist. 
Rev. Charles B. Darling, an Oxford 
man, through whose instrumentality 
the church of St. Mary Magdalene has 
been organized, and upon whom has 
fallen the burden of securing the 
I money so far accumulated, will be the 
first rector. He is a son of the late 
Rev. W. Stewart Darling, who has left 
an enduring monument of his life and 
; labour in Holj Trinity church. Just 
i as he was the means of bringing to 
that church much of its present pros. 
i perity, and was th spirit that gave 
; vigour and life, so the son, follow- 
mg the same career, with the same 
{ spirit and ability, will doubtless en- 
i sure the success of this new parish 
in the north-western part of the city. 
Mr. Darling is genial in manner and 
popular among the people, especially 
I among young people. He has in him, 
| in addition to this social power, that 
I spirit of consecration to his work that 
j is the guarantee of its ultimate success. 

A Sunday school was begun in June, 
186, in a house on Manning avenue. 
! But it grew so rapidly that it had to 
I be moved twice. It now numbers 70 
i children. When the basement is ready 
j for occupancy it will probably soon 
1 prove to be too small, so hopeful 
already is the outlook for growth and 
prosperity. The parish not yet having 
j been organized, no statistics can be 
j given concerning it. 

The new church architecturally will 
i be very massive, in the late Norman 
| style. It will be 130 feet long by 50 
I r eet wide inside the piers, with a chan- 
! eel 43x30 feet. All the work now being 
done, except the roof, is permanent. 
The only part that will be removed 
when the church is extended will be 
, the west wall, which is of \\ood. There 
is no temporary brick work, except 
that filling up the arch which will 
open into the future organ chamber, 
on the north side. The walls will be 
27 inches thick, thus giving the build 
ing the solidity in keeping with the 
Norman architecture. When the chan 
cel is completed it will be nearly 50 
feet high. 

The land stands in the name of 
trustees, who will hold it in trust for 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



the Rev. Charles Darling and his suc 
cessors in office. 

****** 

Since the above was written, the 
mission church, which was opened on 

Sunday, 1888, was made a parish 

church on March 9th, 1889, and Mr. 
Darling made its first rector. Steps 
were soon after taken to build two 
bays of the nave. This was accom 
plished as far as the sills of the 
future windows, and was opened for 
divine service at Easter, 1890. Since 
then the parish has gone on making 
steady and continued progress, not 
withstanding the scanty population of 
the, district and great financial weak- 
nes->. A site for a rectory at the cor 
ner of Euclid avenue and Ulster street 
was secured in that year, and in 1892 



population carries people in greater 
numbers into this district, which ad 
joins the dense populations now lying 
east and south, of it. The next stage 
of the building will be materially the 
completion of the ground plan of the 
church, with the walls carried up some 
25 feet of their ultimate height, em 
bracing! the beginning of the windows, 
which will commence above the line of 
the aisle roofs. The whole nave then 
will be roofed with a better and lof 
tier roof. Tjhe whole area of the church 
to seat 800 people easily, will be thus 
secured, and all ai a total cost of some 
$20 030 or $25,000, or $ 10,000 more than 
.has been expended. Subsequently the 
task of raising the walls to their full 
height over, first the choir, and then 
the nave, and the putting on of the 




CHURCH OF ST. MARY MAGDALENE, MANNING AVK.NUE. 



an additional 20 feet of land was pur- 
abased on Manning avenue, in order 
to enable the full plan of the architect 
to be ultimately carried out. Tjhe pro 
perty now consists of 120 feet on Man 
ning avenue, and 50 feet on Euclid ave 
nue.; and a flankage of 270 feet on Ul 
ster street. In 1891 an organ, suffi 
ciently large for present requirements, 
was put in and paid for. In 1894 the 
temporary roof of the chancel was rais 
ed bodily, aaid the beginnings of the 
seven great east windows were put in, 
in order to afford greater light and 
ventilation^ Upwards of $10,000 has 
been raised and expended so far, and, 
judging by the strong growth amid 
building 1 stagnation and many adverse 
circumstances, a great future would 
seem to be before" the church and con 
gregation, when the next movement of 



permanent roofs, will be taken in hand, 
but only as the condition of the 
church s finances allow. The rector is 
a great believer in patient building, 
and will be satisfied, if in his day, he 
is able to build no more than the 
ground plan of his noble church, a cut 
of which is shown above. 

The. first churchwardens of the 
church were Mr- A. Clubb, who worked 
hard and earnestly for the foundation 
of the new parish, and Mr. James 
Perks. Since then Mr. E. Restall, Mr. 
Chick, Dr. Pringle and Mr. C. B. Mur 
ray have done all they could in a simi 
lar capacity to support the. rector in 
his anxious and arduous work. While" 
Mr. A. H Lightbourn, the. treasurer 
of the Building Fund, has watebed 
over the undertaking as it progressed, 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



83 



with the greatest interest and most 
assiduous care. 

A visit to this interesting beginning 
of a great work will be amply repaid, 
and the lover of good music will be 
delighted with the singing of the large 
choir of 40 voices, which is acknow 
ledged to be one of the best in the 
eity. Mr. Ernest Callaghan is the 
choirmaster, and has deservedly won 
great praise for the efficiency and 
good order of this choir. 

The Sunday school has grown from 
10 to 200, the communicants from 35 
200, the Sunday offertories from about 
$8 and 10 to $25 a Sunday. 

The full ritual and teaching of the 
Church of England is in force, the 
congregatipn is united and enthusi 
astic and the work is well and strongly 
organized 



certain parishioners residing in the 
district presented a petition to the 
Bishop, praying that the district be 
created a separate and distinct parish. 

For some two years previous mission 
services had been conducted in a 
small brick building on Bartlett 
avenue, near Bloor street west, by the 
Rev. F. W. Squire, B.A., Trinity Uni 
versity. Two laymen, Messrs. G. R 
Kirkpatrick and H. C. Dixon (the lat 
ter since admitted to the diaconate)^ 
for nearly two years conducted ser 
vices alternately on Sunday evenings 
in an upper room of a building on 
th corner of B oor street and Pover- 
court road, which was placed, rent free 
at their service by Mr. Edward Dawesu 

In the hope of uniting these two 
congregations, the Lord Bishop of 
Toronto, on the 1st of June, 1888, 




CHURCH Or ST. MART THB VIRGIX, DOVKBCOUKT. 



{ ! . CHAPTER XXI. i , ; 
ST. MARY THE VIRGIN. . 

1 Hh->rt Parish F*rty Tears Ag* In 

I be Fret. 

The district of Dovercourt origin- 
juy formed part of the Parish of St. 
Mark, Carleton West, of which the 
Rev. O. E. Thomson, M.A., was and 
ttll is In 1898 the rector. In May, 1888, 



created the district of Dorercourt a 
separate and independent parish,, and 
offered the charge of it to the Rer. 
Anthony Hart, then incumbent of 
Grace church, Markham, and Christ 
church, Stouffyille. Mr. Hart accepted 
the offer, and on the 17th June made 
his first visit and held his first ser 
vices iu. the new parish. 

The vestry meeting was held on the 
following day. when the rector waiv- 



84 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



ing his right to appoint one of the 
wardens, Messrs. Edward Dawes and 
H. E. Eastman were elected by the con 
gregation churchwardens. Until a 
church could be erected, it was decid 
ed to hold the services in Mr. Dawes 
room. In September, 1888, Mr. Dawes 
offered to give the site for a church, 
school room and rectory, namely, 100 
feet on Bloor street by 170 along Del 
aware avenue, on certain conditions, 
which were agreed to by the vestry. 

The plans for a school house to be 
used temporarily as a church and 
rectory were prepared by Mr. John 
C. B Horwood, and the contract let 
to Mr. S. Gregson. They were sub 
stantially built of stone and red brick, 
and slate roofed. 

The school house contains a light 
and cheerful basement, with several 
rooms in which ihe Sunday school as 
sembles. In the room above the Sun 
day services are held, and 450 people 
can be comfortably accommodated. 

The first sod was turned in Novem 
ber, 188S, by Mr. G. B. Kirkpatrick, 
"Coolmine," Toronto, who has been a 
lay representative to the Synod of the 
parish since its inception. The opening 
services were held on Sunday, June 23, 
1889, the preachers being the Ven. Arch 
deacon Boddy, M.A., and the Revs. Ber 
nard Bryan and John Langtry, D.C.L., 
rectors of the churches of the Epiphany 
and St. Luke s respectively. 

The cost of the buildings and fur 
nishings was nearly $ 14,000. 

In every way there has been steady 
am. substantial progress since the 
formation of the parish, when, by 
resolution of the vestry and congrega 
tion in the autumn of 1888, it was 
decided should be described as that of 
"St. Mary, the Virgin, Dovercourt." It 
is attended by regular and steadily 
increasing congregations now (1898) 
averaging about 200 at each morning 
and evjening service. The number of 
communicants has risen from 30 at 
Easter, 1889, to nearly 200 at Easter, 
1898. The Sunday school has a roll of 
340, with an average attendance of 240. 
The income of the parish has nearly 
trebled since its inception. There are 
several flourishing organizations in con 
nection with t,he church, such as the 
Ladies Aid. Young People s Society, 
and Company No. 23, Church Boys 
Brigade. Tihe services are usually said 
in a monotone, and are thoroughly 
congregational, being heartily joined 
in "by all. On the great festivals they 
are partly choral. Mir. H. E. Eastman 
removed, to British Columbia, and the 
rector appointed Mr. G. G. Mackenzie 



as his churchwarden in the spring of 
1890. Mr. Dawes resigned his position 
as churchwarden at Easter, 1895, and 
Mr. G. G. Mackenzie was elected peo 
ple s warden in his place. Mir. C. C. 
Foster was appointed churchwarden by 
the rector. Tjhese gentlemen still re 
tain their positions. 



CHAPTER XXII. 
SI. ALBAN S CATHEDRAL. 

Th Cathedral Church of the Dtorcse f 
Toront*. 

A Churdh. of England Cathedral es 
tablishment for the diocese of Toronto 
had been in contemplation for many 
years, although the project only took 
definite shape when Dr. Sweatman be 
came bishop. In the year 1843 Bishop 
Strachan gave four hundred acres of 
land for the purpose. Tftue rents and 
the proceeds of sales of this land form 
ed a fund which, amounted to about 
4,000, and with this as a nucleus, St. 
Alban s Cathedral was begun. A site 
was purchased east of Bathurst, above 
Bloor street, consisting of 4 1-2 acres, 
the purchase price of which was f 10,- 
488. It was not until 40 years after 
Bishop Stradhan s donation that any 
thing practical was done looking to 
such establishment. The present bishop 
then reviewed the matter and a Cath 
edral Chapter was incorporated by an 
Act of the Provincial Legislature ia 
1883u From a pastoral issued by the 
Bishop, it is learned that attempts were 
made to secure for the establishment 
a home in some one of the existing 
city churches; but difficulties present 
ed themselves which were found to be 
insurmountable, prominent among 
these being the parochial organizations 
and interests and proprietary pews. It 
thus became necessary to seek an in 
dependent site for the erection of cath 
edral and other diocesan buildings, 
which should be of sufficient size for 
fill future requirements. Hence ihe 
above-named site was purchased and 
the work began to assume tangible 
shape. The site was bought from the 
proprietors of the St. Alban s Park es 
tate. 

A necessary feature in the Cathedral 
scheme was felt to be the residence of 
the Bislhop within the Cathedral pre 
cincts ; indeed, the only way in which 
ity is to be naturally expected that the 
work of the Cathedral should take 
shape and develop is by starting from 
the spot where the Bishop is estab 
lished, as a centre, and gradually 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



85 



grouping its various forces and agencies 
around that nucleus. A oortion of the 
Cathedral close, consisting of two 
frontages of 100 feet each with a depth 
between of 300 feet, was transferred 
by the Chapter, deeded to the Synod 
and a See-house costing $10,400 erect 
ed upon it where B.ishiop Sweatman now 
lives. The present site is very nearly 
in the centre of the present map of 
the City of Toronto, with) its suburbs 
to the east and west, and at no great 
distance from the centre from north 
to south. 

This locality, extending eastwards 
from, these points, has been much built 



available for use, while the bui Idling 
progressed above it. 

For some time before this a congre 
gation had been meeting in a room 
over tlhe driving shed of a tavern at 
the corner of St. Alban s Park. The 
people requested the privilege of using 
the crypt for worship, and the request 
was granted. Services were commenced 
and have been continuously carried on 
simoe then, first in a small room 40x15, 
and then in the main crypt, which has 
a seating capacity of 300, and from 
November, 1891, Ln the choir, which was 
then completed, having cost about $70,- 




ST. Af.BAN s CATHKDRAL (UNFINISHED) EXTERIOR OF CHANCEL. 



uip during the decade ending in 1895 
with for the most part a high class style 
of residences, and is evidently destined 
to be one of tflie principal residential 
districts of the city. 

The St. Alban s Park Syndicate, who 
most generously gave to the Chapter 
one-half of the purchase money of the 
site, made a further offer of $2,000 on 
tihe condition that the choir and chan- 
oel of the church were commenced be 
fore the 3rd of August, 1885. 

The first sod was turned August 
GOfch, 1885, and the corner stone was 
laid by the Bishop June IGth, 188fi. A 
portion of the walls was speedily built 
and covered, in rendering the crypt 



000. No further extension of the build 
ing has as yet been begun. The choir, 
I including the chancel, measures about 
j 90 by about 70 feelt in the greatest 
width, and comfortably seats over 300, 
though more can be accommodated in 
it, as was the case when the opening 
service of the first General Synod of 
Canada was held at St. Alban s in 
September, 1893, at which 400 _ persons 
were present. Besides the portion used 
for services, the building as it stands 
contains bh? Diocesan, library, choir 
an I ample Sunday school rooms, for 
although a Sum day school is not usu 
ally a part of cathedral work, it has 
been found desirable to maintain ono 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



here, which has been done, and done 
most successfully. 

The estimated cost of the cathedral, 
which cannot be built for many years 
to come, is $250,000. It will be deco 
rated handsomely, following the early 
English style of architecture. When 
the naves and transepts are completed 
tbe whole structure will be 250 feet 
long. It will be built of Credit Valley 
stone, and it is the design of the, archi 
tect to have a tower at the south 
west corner 135 feet high. 

% may be mentioned here, though, 
that the designs for the building when 
completed have not yet been definitely 
adopted. 

Tlbe interior of St. Alban s as it is 
in 1898 presents a Remarkably hand 
some appearance, despite the unfinish 
ed state of the exterior. 

The desire of the bishop at first as 
Bet forth in his pastoral of 1886 was 
to complete, as far as possible, the 
organization of a cathedral staff for 
the purpose of assisting in diocesan 
missionary work before attempting 
the erection of any part of the build- 
Ing. And it would have been better, 
no doubt, as events have turned out, 
If this plan had been adhered to, lout 
a. very strong inducement one which 
certainly ought not to have been 
ignored ,vas that made by the St. 
Alban s Park Syndicate for the imme 
diate commencement of the cathedral 
edifice. Tiieir offer was accepted and, 
In accordance with it, the portion of 
the building shown in the illustration 
was erected. 

^ But this involved the chapter in 
financial difficulties from which, un 
less some timely aid arrives, it will be 
impossible to extricate itself. In a re 
cent statement issued the total in 
debtedness resting on the building 
and the property is $60,000 not sure 
ly a hopeless sum of money for a 
diocese like Toronto to deal with. Still, 
no adequate effort, as yet, has been 
made to meet this present difficulty. 
The bishop s last appeal to the city 
clergy and congregations brought 
forth some contributions, but not 
^enough to relieve, to any perceptible 
extent, the grave financial difficulty. 

Since the commencement of the ser 
vices, these have been from time to 
time carried on by different clergy, 
^acting under the direction of the 
bishop, as dean. Of these we may name 
the Rev. James George Lewis, who 
held the office of Priest-Vicar as the 
clergyman responsible for the regular 
conduct of cathedral services is styled 
for some time. He was subsequent I v 



assistant minister at St. James Cathe- 
dial, and afterwards accepted the 
charge of a parish in the State of 
New York. He was succeeded by the 
Rev. J. G. Waller, who left to take 
up missionary work in Japan, where 
he holds an important post, having at 
the present time some eight assistants 
working under him. The Rev. Charles 
H. Shortt had the charge for some 
time, retiring from it to become rec 
tor of St. Cyprian s, which parish was 
partly formed by the efforts of the 
congregation of St. Alban s. From 
about. Easter, 1893, the offfice has been 
held by the Rev. A. U. De Pencier, 
who came to Toronto from the Diocese 
of Ontario. 

The following constitute the cathe 
dral staff in 189g. 

Eishop, Right Rev. Arthur Sweatman, 
D.D., D. C. L. 

Archdeacons Venerables Samuel J. 
Eoddy (Toronto), and Thomas W. Al 
len (Peterborough). 

Fishop s chaplains Revs. H. Scad- 
ding, D.D., and A. J. Broughall, M. A., 
(examining.) 

Canons, residentiary Revs. H. Scad- 
ding 1) D. ; E. A. Welch, M. A., 
(chancellor), J. D. Cayley. M. A., (pre 
centor). 

Canons, non-resident Revs. H. B. 
Osier. Francis Tremayne, Alexander 
Sanson, C. C. Johnson, E. W. 
Murphy, R. W. E. Greene, P. Harding, 
A. W. Spragge, John Farncomb, W. 
Reiner. 

Honorary canons Revs. J. P. Shera 
ton D.D., J. F. Sweeny, D.D., and C. H. 
Mbckridge, D.D. 

Priest-vicar Rev. A. IT. DePencier. 

Choir master Mr. David Kemp. 



CHAPTER XXIII. 

TRINITY COLLEGE CHAPEL. 

The Hnnd*emc linirernlly College and II* 



Trinity College Chapel, in the east 
ern wing of the university building, is 
in its interior one of the handsomest 
ecclesiastical structures in the city 
of Toronto. It has been spoken 
of by competent critics as a "gem of 
ecclesiastical architecture," and when 
one enters within its walls this praise 
does not appear in the least exagger 
ated. 

From 1852 until 1884 what is now 
the college library wsas used by th 
professors and under-graduates of 
Trintiy for divine service. Morn ns and 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



87 




INTKRIOB VIEW OF TRINITT COLLKGK CHAPEL. 



evening prayers were held there 
throughout the year daily, while on 
Sundays many families who resided 
near the University also worshipped 
in its precincts. In the year 1883 it 
WBS decided to build a chapel as an 
adjunct to the college, and the funds 



having been in great measure provided 
owing to a donation of $10,000 from 
the family of the late Mir. James Hen 
derson in the previous year, the work 
was commenced and carried to a suc 
cessful completion , the chapel being 
opened on October 18th, 1884. 



88 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



^ Tihe style of architecture is later 
Gothic and there aTe some very fine 
stained glass windows in the chancel, 
as well as excellent examples of wood 
carving in the stalls and seats. 

The chapel will comfortably seat 
rather more than 150 worshippers, 
though, except on special occasions, 
it does not often happen that as 
many are present at any of the 
services. It is extra-parochial and the 
pulpit is usually filled either by the 
Provost or by some one of the clerical 
professors. Daily prayers are said 
there throughout the academical year 
and the Holy Communion is adminis 
tered not only upon Sundays but upon 
all holy days. The* brass lectern Ls a re 
markably handsome piece of furniture, 
while the chancel, to the south of which 
ie the organ, is in exquisite taste, 
neither being too ornate or too severe 
in its several eufroun dings. 

A noticeable feature in the chancel 
is the massive carved oak Episcopal 
chair, presented by the family of the 
late Major Charles Jones, a distin 
guished officer in the Royal Artillery, 
and brother of Professor Wyiiam Jones, 
now (1899) Bursar of the University. At 
the bock of the phair is a brass, bear 
ing the following Latin inscription : 

In Plain Memoriam 

fratris dilectissimi 

Caroli Jones, tribuni militum 

Ooh ortis regiae ballistariorum praefec- 

ti, istius collegii dim scholaris 

ianc cathedrain episcopaJeno. 

P. C. 

frater 

A. D. MDCCCXCVI. 

Another beautiful adjunct to the fur 
niture of the chancel are the brass gas 
standards standing respectively to the 
nortjh and south of the holy table, 
while upon the latter stands a massive 
brass cross and chaste flower vases. 

The wood carving on the stalls of the 
provost and dean are exquisite speci 
mens of workmanshijp. They are em 
blematic of the four Evangelists, Mat 
thew, Mark, Luke and John. These 
stalls are in the western end of the 
Chapel, directly facing the holy table. 

The first Provost of Trinity was the 
Reverend George Whittaker, who fill 
ed that position for exactly thirty 
years. He resigned in 1881. Leaving 
Canada, he returned to England, where 
he died about three years later. 

Provost Whittaker was succeeded by 
the Rev. C. W. E. Body, who held office 
until the summer of 1894, when he was 
translated to the professorship of Old 



Testament History in the General Theo 
logical Seminary of JNew York. 

Following Provost Body at Trinity 
came the Reverend E. A. Welch, who 
was, at the elite of his appointment, 
vicar of the Church of the Venerable 
Bede at Gateshead, England. The last- 
named gentleman still holds office in 



It; is a coincidence that all the three 
provosts of Trinity have been graduates 
of Cambridge University, belonging re- 
i specti-vely to Queen s, St. John s and 
I King s Colleges. Of the other clerical 
professors, their numbers are almost 
equally divided from among Oxford, 
Cambridge and Trinity itself. 

CHAPTER XXIV. 
ST. ANNE S AND ST. OLAVE S. 

The Flr* Brockton IMee el Workhip for 
Anglican*. 

On the east side of Dufferin street, 
north of Dundas street, is a little 
church of rather quaint appearance, 
situated amid picturesque surround 
ings. That is, the surroundings are 
j picturesque in summer time. In the 
winter though they are rather bleak 
and_ drear, ^Ihe propsrty of St. Anne s 
parish lies in a depression and is com 
posed of a large lot with a small 
church, a rough-cast frame school 
building and an old-fashioned rectory. 
The church is a red brick structure 
with a little framexl porch in the front 
gable, facing Dufferin street, where 
on is a placard announcing "All seats 
free at evening service." A fanciful 
stone belfry rises from the front and 
the impression made by this little 
Gothic structure is a pleasant one. 

This impression is heightened when 
regarding thu interior. It is a pretty 
nave, very suggestive of the old Eng 
lish chapel style. The walls are un- 
plastered, the roof is of open timber 
work pierced by neat dormerlet win 
dows. There is a spacious centre aisle 
and two side aisles, and a number of 
l pretty lancet windows admit a sub- 
dued light which adds much to the 
happy impression made and serves to 
increase the religious sentiment of the 
worshipper. The roof is supported by 
slender wooden pillars. The chancel 
contains organ, seats for the choir, 
and a small sanctuary. A triple lan 
cet window of variegated colours 
adorns the eastern end above the 
altar. 

A handsome memorial window is in 
serted to the side of the little vestry, 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



89 



at the north-east corner, upon which 
is inscribed, "Sacred to the Memory of 
William Murray Gooch, who was acci 
dentally shot near the Humber, March 
26th, 1881, aged 1G years." 

The school-house is entirely detached 
from the church, and while not pretty 
nor architecturally noticeable, yet 
serves its purpose. It contains an ele 
vated platform at the eastern end, 
with a reading desk, piano and organ. 
A gallery at the western end, made 
to communicate by a sliding partition 
with the main room, is also used for 
the infant class, and also contains an 
organ. 

St. Anne s seems to have been set 



hers Gibson, B.A., succeeded to the in 
cumbency. 

Mr. Gibson died July 22, 1872, and 
was succeeded by the Rev. S. S. Strong, 
D.D.. D.C.L., who remained rector till 
the autumn of 1877, when he resigned, 
and retired from active duty, after 
many years spent in the church s ser 
vice. He was succeeded by the present 
incumbent, Rev. John McLean Ballard, 
M.A.. of Trinity College, Toronto. 

On June 26, 1879, the parish was 
divided by the formation of St. Mark s 
parish, Parkdale, where a school house 
had been built and services conducted 
by the rector of St. Anne s, with the 
help of Prof. Maddock, of Trinity 




ST. ANNE S CHURCH, DUFFERIN STREET, (BROCKTON.) 



apart as a separate parish in Janu 
ary, 1863, the Rev. John Hilton being 
the incumbent, and R. L. Denison and 
Joseph Church the churchwardens. Tiie 
parish was first represented in the 
Synod of the Diocese in June, 1863, 
R. L Denison being the lay represen 
tative. The church was built in 1862, 
but Church of England services were 
held in the neighbourhood before that 
date, in a private chapel erected by 
Col. R. L. Denison at his residence, 
then known as Dover Court, which has 
since been demolished and the ground 
surveyed into a new street, named 
Churchill avenue, connecting with 
Lakeview avenue. 

On the death of the Rev. John Hil 
ton, in 1871, the Rev. Joseph Cham- 



College, Mir. C. L. Ingles, then a stu 
dent at the college, and Mr. Rawlin- 
son, an earnest lay worker in Park- 
dale. In the autumn of 1879 St. Anne s- 
church was enlarged by the addition 
of an aisle on the south side, the ser 
vices for the time being held in a 
school house, which had been erected 
on Grove avenue, in a part of the 
parish which was rapidly building up. 
In 1881 the church was again enlarged 
to meet the rapid growth of the 
neighbourhood, an aisle being added to 
the north side, with an organ chamber 
and vestry. An organ was also pur 
chased and first used at the re-open 
ing of the church. 

In February, 1885, the parish was 
again divided, and a new parish. 



90 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



formed, on the south-east, including 
a part of St. Matthias parish, and. 
constituted the parish of St. Barnaba^. 

In 1887 the school house was removed 
from Gxove avenue to the lot on Duf- 
ferin street, beside the Church of St. 
Anne. There was also erected in the 
parish during the summer of 1887 St. 
OLave s church by the lake at Swansea, 
near the mouth of the Humber, the 
Rev. Henry Softley conducting the ser 
vices there and at the Howard street 
mission, where a church has since been 
built on Roncesvalles avenue, known 
as St. Jude s church, Toronto. 

In 1888 the continued growth, of the 







Anne s parish, and subject to the 
supervision of its clergy, the Sunday 
duty at present being chiefly taken by 
Mr. F. R. Dymond and Mr. W. J. Med- 
ford, licensed lay readers of the dio 
cese. 

Those who have officiated as curates 
in the parish have been the late Arthur 
Boultbee, the Rev. Herbert Symonds, 
M. A., the Rev. J. J. Johnston, L. S. T., 
the Rev. T. G. Waller, M. A., the Rev. 
A. U. De Pencier, and the Rev. G. F. 
Davidson, B. A. 

The rectors of St. Anne s have been : 
1663-1871 Reverend John Hilton. 




ST. OLAVES* CHURCH, WINDBRMKRE. 



neighbourhood made it necessary to 
again enlarge the church by the addi 
tion of transcepts and a new chancel 
and tower, thereby more than doubling 
its former size. The plans were pre 
pared by Mr. A. R. Denison, and sev 
eral handsome memorial windows and 
a chima of eight tubular bells have 
since been added. 

Mr. Bollard is still rector and is now, 
in 1F96, ably assisted by the Rev. Gil- 
1 e: t Furquar Davidson, B. A., of Trin 
ity College. 

; The church of St. Olave s, Swansea, in 
charge o: tha Rev. H. Softley, and the 
church of St. Jude s, Roncesvalles ave., 
continue to be mission churches of St. 



J. C. Gibson, 

S. S. Strong, 



1871-1872 Reverend 
B. A. 

1872-1877 Reverend 
D. D.. D. C. L. 

A877 Reverend J. McLean Ballard, 
M. A. 

The churchwardens at St. Anne s 
since its foundation have been these : 

1863-1861 R. L. Denison, Joseph 
Church. 

1 C 6 1-1868 R. L. Denison, Kivas 
Tully. 

1?68-1870 R. L. Denison, Henry 
O Brien. 

1870-1871 R. L. Denison, G. B. 
Kirkpitricik. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



91 



J871-1872 John Bacon, G. B. Kirk- 
pat rick. 

1872-1873 R. L. Den son, John Bacon. 

1873-1874 R. L. Denison, R. N. 
Gooch. 

18-74-1875 R. N. Gooch, J. G. Dem- 
son. 

1875-187S J. G. Denison, F. Baker. 

1876-1877 J. A. Donaldson, Colonel 
Alger. 

1877-1878 R. L. Denison, R. N. 
Gooch. 

1878-1880 J. S. Lockie, R. Steven 
son. 

1880-1881 R. N. Gooch, Major W. L. 
Milligan. 



1893-1 R91S. Shaw, G. G. Lindsay. 

1894-1897 W. Williams, A. H. Rich- 
a,rdson. 

1897-1899 S. A. Matthews, J. Bar 
low. 



CHAPTER XXV. 
CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH. 

An Architectural Gem In tbe Northern 
huburbft. 

The formation of the parish known 
by the above name was brought) about 
in this way: 

The most northerly Church of Eng- 




CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH, AVENUE ROAD. 



1881-1 883 Major Milligan, Clarence 
A. K. Denison. 

1883- 1 834 Major Milligan, Septimus 
A. Denison. 

l?8t-?885 Charles L. Denison, G. A. 
Denison. 

1885-1886 Alfred Wright, J. J. 
Dyas. 

1886-1888 Alfred Wright G. A. Deni 
son. 

1888-1891 James Armstrong, Alfred 
Wright. 

1891-1893 T, N- Sampson, E. J. 



land parish in the city was, prior to 
the formation of the Church of the 
Messiah, the Church of tha Redeemer, 
on Bloor street west, whose northerly 
limits were identical with those of the 
city, the parish of Christ Church, Deer 
Park, extending southward to the city 
boundary. 

As the great area between Bloor 
street and Deer Park church filled up, 
the necessity for better church accom 
modation began to be felt. To meet, in 
some measure, this want, the Church 
of the Redeemer established a mission 



92 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



in the neighbourhood of the Davenport 
Road, in charge of which, in, the win 
ter oi 1888-89, the Bishop appointed the 
Rev. John Gillespie. The old building 
used by the Primitive Methodist 
Church an the corner of Yonge street 
and the Davenport road, whose congre 
gation had removed to their new 
church on Avenue road, was secured 
and the church s work was zealously 
prosecuted. Under Mr. Gillespie s care 
rapid progress was made, and the ne 
cessity for more extensive and suit 
able quarters was soon apparent, with 
this result, that in the spring of 1890 
the Bishop sanctioned the formation of 
th_e parish of the Ghurch of the Mesi- 
siah, and appointed the Rev. John Gil 
lespie iits rector. 

The boundaries of the parish are as 
follows: Commencing at the corner of 
Yonge and Beimont streets, northerly 
to Rioxborough avenue, thence easterly 
to the ravine, thence northerly to Sum- 
merhill avenue, and the north city 
limits, thence westerly to Poplar Plains 
road, thence southerly to Davenport 
road and easterly to the point of begin 
ning. 

The little congregation were full of 
zeal amd hope, and the present fine 
site on the corner of Avenue, road and 
Dupont street, was purchased. A 
Sunday school building, facing on Du 
pont street, was at once erected, the 
first service therein being held about 
the middle of September, 1890. In the 
meantime Messrs. Gordon & Helliwell, 
architects, of this city, \vere engaged 
in preparing the design for the church 
building, a handsome stone structure 
destined to form, a notable addition to 
the church architecture of Toronto. 

The contract for the stone work of 
the church was let to Messrs. Oakley 
& Holmes, and the construction of the 
building begun. 

In the fall of 1890 the new church 
was completed, the Bishop of Toronto 
opening it with special service. 

La architecture the church is an 
example of the perpendicular gothic 
style. The rough grey lime stone is 
adapted to none but simple treatment, 
and the effect of the building is due 
to its general form and proportions, 
rather than to elaborate detail. The 
massive battlemented tower on the 
Dupont street elevation is a conspicu 
ous object even from Yonge street. 
The interior of the building is 
in harmony with its exterior, the 
architects having adhered to the same 
style in the open timbered roof, oak 
seats and chancel fittings. The seat 
ing accommodation is about 700. The 
total cost of site and buildings has been 
about $35,000. The first churchwar 



dens were Joseph Jackes and A J 

k e f. 11 wiu) he]d offi e f rom Easter, 
| 1890, till Easter, 1892. Their suc- 
J cessors were Grant Helliwell and John 

D Armstrong. On the lamented death 

?ln- la -tter gentleman in November, 

9o, William Stone was appointed. Mr. 

Stone and Mr. John Patterson ivere 

appointed wardens at the Easter vea- 

try meeting in 1896. 



CHAPTER XXVI. 
ST. CYPRIAN S. 

A Hnmli < hnrcb with an Excellent Re- 
con!. 

At the time of the great and sudden 
growth of Toronto, about ten years 
ago, the suburb then known as Seaton 
Village became so populous that it was 
taken into the city boundaries. A 
large proportion of the people were 
English, having been attracted to 
this country by the great " boom " in 
the building trades, and of these there 
were, as one would naturally expect 
to find, many Church of England 
people. Although part of St. Thomas 
parish, the section just spoken of was 
a long way from the church, and as 
at St. Alban s cathedral services had 
been begun in the crypt, many of the 
people attended there. A cathedral 
does not pretend to do parish work, 
yet the priest-vicar of the time, Dr. 
J. G. Lewis, was able to look after the 
people to some extent. He was followed 
by the Rev. J. G. Waller, who in the 
autumn of 1890 was sent out as a 
missionary to Japan, nobody being 
appointed to his place at the cathedral. 
The care of Seaton Village then fell 
upon the clergy 6f St. Thomas , who 
already had their hands very full. A 
most opportune offer of assistance 
came to these gentlemen at the close 
of 1890 from the members of the sister 
hood of St. John the Divine, who estab 
lished a mission house .on Johnson, 
now Follis, avenue. For some time, in 
consequence of this help, the Revs. C. 
J. Roper and L. I. Smith were enaoled 
to effectually carry on the work. A 
free dispensary was opened, mothers 
meetings, sewing classes, Band of 
Hope and work among the poor were 
successfully maintained. 

In 1891 it was deemed necessary to 
form a new parish, which was named 
after St. Cyprian, the Bishop of Carth 
age. The boundaries of the parish 
were Bloor street, Ossington avenue, 
Davenport road, Brunswick avenne, 
Wells and Bathurst streets, and these 
have not since been changed. The Rev e 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



93 



C. H. Shortt, M.A., of Woodbridge, was 
appointed by the Bishop the first rec- 
toor of the new parish, while services 
were continued in St. Alban s crypt 
until such time as a church could be 
built. 

The site selected for the church was 
a lot of 65 feet on Christie street, on 
the south-west corner of Dupont street, 
and was purchased from Mr. Frank 
Turner for $1,500. On September 26th. 
1891, the first sod was turned for the 
foundation of the new church by the 
Bishop of the Diocese. It was thought 
advisable at this time, in order to buiJd 
up a congregation with proper paro 
chial organizations, to hold the ser 
vices in Turner s Hall, on Christie 
street, the Sunday schools being still 
held in St. Alban s and the Mission 



time to time have been made, while 
ome of the parochial guilds did much 
good work under the direction of the 
Sisters of St. John. The latter have 
themselves made many gifts of neces 
sary furniture. The clergy and con 
gregation of St. Thomas Church also 
have given much assistance to the par 
ish, and still continue to do so, Rev. 
F. G. Plummer, of St. Thomas Church, 
being instructor of St. Cyprian s choii . 
By the energetic work of the rector, 
Rev. C. H. Shortt, and his assistants, 
work in the new parish of St. Cyprian 
rapidly proceeded. Parochial organiza 
tions o all kinds, and a parish maga 
zine, were soon got under way, and 
ever since have been doing excellent 
work. The congregations and Sunday 
schools have steadily increased since 




ST. CYPKIAN S CHURCH. 



house previously spoken of. Work on 
the new church proceeded rapidly: 
which, with the rectory attached, was 
completed at a cost of $4,500. Mr. 
Eden Smith was the architect, and 
Messrs. L. J. Bland and F. J. Goodman 
tie contractors. 

On June 19th, 1892, the church was 
formally opened, the services in con 
nection therewith extending over a 
week. It is a plain building, seating 
about 350 people. In the basement are 
rooms for the Sunday schools, choir, 
guilds, and Church Boys Brigade. 
There is a beautiful east window, pre 
sented by^ a generous member of the j 
congregation, while a fine organ has 
recently bee-n added at the cost of the 
same individual. Many gifts of church 
furniture of all kinds by friends from 



the parish was organized. 

For five years Mr. Shortt continued 
his work as rector of St. Cyprian s, but 
when, in the spring of 1897, Rev. J. 
C. Roper resigned the acting rectoriate 
of St. Thomas church to take up col 
legiate work in New York, Mr. Shortt 
was appointed by the Bishop to take 
his place; and at Easter, 1897, took 
farewell of the congregation. 

Notwithstanding many great finan 
cial difficulties, Mr. Shortt left be 
hind him a well-equipped church, and 
a congregation able to meet the fu 
ture with great hope. Mr. Shortt s suc 
cessor had in the meantime been ap 
pointed in the person of the Rev. C. 
A. Seager, M.A., assistant curate of 
Saint Thomas . On the first Sunday 
after Easter, 1897, Mr. Seager assum 
ed charge and is now rector. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



The present incumbent is working 
along the lines which have proved so 
successful in the past. At the pre 
sent time the work ot the parish is as 
follows: The services being moder 
ately advanced in ritual, there is a 
surpliced choir of men and boys as 
sisted by several ladies. 

Services are held at 8 o clock every 
Sunday morning; at 7, 8 and 11 o clock 
on the first Sunday in each month, 
and on Tuesday and Thursday morn 
ings at 7 o clock, in the Mission House. 
Wednesday evening services are held 
at 8 o clock in the Mission House dur 
ing the winter and in the church dur 
ing the summer. Sunday schools are 
held at 9.30 a.m. and 3 p.m. in the 
church. Other Sunday services are as 
follows Morning and evening prayers 
are said at 11 o clock a.m. and 7 o clock 
p.m., respectively, except on the first 
Sunday in the month, when a choral 
celebration of Holy Communion takes 
the place of matins. 

The lay reader is Mr. V. E. F. Mor 
gan, and Mr. G. Wjard also assists in 
the services. 

It has already been mentioned that 
much work is done by the Sisterhood 
of St. John the Divine in St. Cyprian s 
parish. They continue to render most 
valuable aid through their Mission 
House. A free dispensary is open each 
day fiom 2 to 5 o clock, attended by 
an efficient staff of medical practition 
ers. In the Mission House -are held 
mothers meetings, sewing classes for 
children, etc., managed by the Sisters. 
Here also is the centre for jpoor relief 
of all kinds for the parish. The sisters 
are aided in their work by, ladies from 
different churches in the city, as well 
as fiom St. Cyprian s. A beautiful 
little chapel is in connection with the 
Mission House, where services are held. 
The sisters also render valuable help 
to the rector by visiting, where neces 
sary. 

The parcoh ; al organizations are 
as follows: Woman s Auxiliary to 
Missions in connection with which are 
two subordinate organizations, the 
Girls Branch and the Junior Branch; 
a circle of the King s Daughters, which 
confines its work to the parish, and a 
Chancel Guild, all of which meet In 
the guild room of the church. Besides 
these are a large sewing class for 
children, and a mothers meeting, 
which assemble io the Mission House. 
There are also a chapter of the St. 
Andrew s Brotherhood, a company of 
the Church Boys Brigade, and a busi 
ness committee consisting of men for 
the purpose of discussing and carrying 



! out necessary work about the church, 
i Quarterly meetings of the congrega- 
! tion .are held, as well as the Easter 
I vestry meeting, to discuss the affairs 
i of the church, A parish magazine also 
I is published monthly. Altogether there 
j has grown up during the last six years 
; a congregation well equipped and or- 
ganiz.ed for the work of the church. 
Church wardens were from 

1891-1892, L. J. Bland and D. Orr. 

1692-1898, L. J. Bland and J. Harni- 
man. 

1893-1894, L. J. Bland and F. J. Good 
man. 

1894-1898, L. J. Bland and T. W. Slean. 

189S-1899, E. Prince and T. W. Slean. 

CHAPTER XXVII. 
ST. MARK S, PARKDALE. 

An Energetic Reet*r and Very Large 
Congregation. 

St. Mark s church was built as a mis 
sion church within the parish of St. 
Anne s, Dufferin street, during the in 
cumbency cxf the present rector of St. 
; Anne s, Rev. J. M. Ballard. Among the 
| laymen especially interested in the 
\ mivssion was the late Mr. T. W. Raw- 
; linson, who had come to live in the new 
village of Parkdale. Not only was he 
j interested in the building of the little 
mission school house, which was us ;i d 
| as a church until the erection of the 
| present building, but he was also a 
j lay reader under Mr. Ballard. 

The first building was opened in De- 
i comber, 1877, with a seating capacity 
of 120, and was put upon a lot with 45 
j feet frontage. The present building 
| wias completed in January, 1881, and 
| opened for service on the 20th day of 
j that month. The present church, built 
I in the Gothic style, will seat 400 per 
sons. Its exterior is of red brick and 
the interior of white brick with red 
brick facings. The chancel measures 
18x122 feet, the nave 39x66 feet; the 
j height of the wnlls is 18 feet and of 
! the roof 48 feet. The land has 90 feet 
I frontage on Convan avenue, and cost 
about $900; the cost of the school house. 
| was $600 and of the church $5,000. The. 
I present total value of the property is 
j upwards of $8,000, on which there is a 
I debt of $3,600. 

The income of the parish in 1887-88 
from all sources was about $2,400. The 
pew rentals amounted to about $825 
and the offertory to $1,111. The finan 
cial as well as moral work of the, par 
ish is aided by several auxiliary bodies 
well organized and zealously conduct- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



95 



ed. These consist of guilds, associations 
and other societies enlisting the inter 
est of the people, and are very success 
ful in their results. 

There, are 25 officers and teachers in 
the Sunday school and 185 children, 
wi-th an adult Bible class of about 30 
members. The superintendent of the 
school in 1888 was Mr. Walter Crest- 
wick, a student of Trinity College, who 
is also the rector s lay assistant. In 
connection with the work of the church 
a very interesting parish magazine is 
published monthly, containing a scheme, 
of all the services and associations of 



emit inoutabpnt of St. Mark s, is a son 
of the late Rev. C. L. Ingles, rector of 
Stamford, Diocese of Niagara. Mr 
Ingles graduated B. A. at Trinity Col- 
leg s in 1877, ordained deacon by the 
present Bishop of Toronto on St. Mat 
thew s day, 1879, and ordained priest 
on September 26, 1880. He was ap 
pointed to Parkdala September 22, 1879. 
In 1877 St. Murk s began as a mis 
sion of St. Anne s with the incumbent 
of the latter as rector. In July, 1879. 
iit was set apart as a separate parish* 
with less than forty families. Now 
there are two hundred and thirty fami- 




ST. MARK S ( HURCH, PARKDALE. 



the parish, together with a forge 
amount of valuable reading matter. 

The choir is a STirpliced one, consist- 
Ing of eight men and sixteen boys. The 
service in the morning is monotone 
and in the evening full choral. The 
surpliced choir was introduced for the 
first tifcae on Easter Sunday of 1888 
under the leadership of Mr. R. G. 
Doherty, the present choirmaster, un 
der whose tuition it has been brought 
to its present excellent condition. Miss 
Gray, daughter of Lieut.-Col. Gray, is 
the orgatadst. 

The Rev. Charles L. Ingles, the pres- 



lies connected with it. In the summer 
of 1887 the rector was taking steps 
to organize a mission for the north- 
iwetsft portion of the parish the most 
distant part from the church soma 
otf the parishioners in that neighbour 
hood. Being anxious to obtain a pas 
tor and form a separate parish, a pe 
tition was immediately circulated, for 
which signatures were soon found, ask 
ing that on account of the increase in 
population a new parish be set apart 
and an incumbent appointed. Instead 
of the mission church, th?refore, the 
nwr parish otf the Church of the Epi 
phany was cut off from St. Mark s 



96 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Jameson and Macdonnell avenues form 
ing the boundary. 

Alt the time of the division there 
were 320 families in connection with 
St. Mark s. In the eight years from 
the ita/ception of the parish the num 
bers had increased just eight times. In 
May, 1888, the seats were made free, 
and since that time the congregations 
have greatly increased, and the con 
tributions through the offertory have 
be?jn sufficient for current expenses 
and the church is financially prosper 
ous. 

* 

Eight years have passed since the 
first portion of this account of St. 
Mark s was written. In the mean 
time there have been some, though not 
many, chang.es in the congregation, 
though there has been none in the 
rector, Mr. Ingles still continuing his 
ministry there. Mr. Walter Cres- 
wick, referred td as the superintendent 
of the Sunday school, took holy orders 
shortly afterwards, and became min 
ister in charge of St. Simon s church, 
East Toronto. 

The congregation of St. Mark s has 
grown as far as present seating capa 
city will allow, and as the neighbour 
hood is continually growing, increased 
accommodation must bei provided if the 
church people of the parish are to find 
opportunity to attend the services ot 
the church. 

The wardens of St. Mark s have been 
these : 

1878-9 Thomas McLean, Major Gray. 

1879-80 William Atkinson, Dr. Playter. 

1880-1 J. S. Lockie, Thomas W. Raw- 
linson. 

1881-2 J. S. Lockie, W. A. Walker. 

1882-3 J. S. Lockie, W. A. Walker. 

1883-4 H. J. Hill, B. Goodman. 

1884-5 J. Walker, B. Goodman. 

1885-6 George D. Perry, G. N. Rey 
nolds. 

1886-7 George D. Perry, John Walker. 

1887-8 Charles J. Brown, B. Goodman. 

1888-9 James A. Saunders, B. Good 
man. 

1889-90 Samuel Horton, S. W. Black. 

1890-91 George D. Perry, S. W. Black. 

1891-2 Fred. Kelk, A. J. La Venture. 

1892-3 Fred. Kelk, B. Goodman. 

1893-4 S. W. Black, F. G. Mingay. 

1894-5 S- W. B.lack, F. G. Mingay. 

1895-6 Fred. Kelk, J. Champlin Hari- 
son. 

1896-7 Fred. Kelk, J. Champlin Hari- 
ton. 



CHAPTER XXVIII. 
ST. SIMON S. 

Edifice In ibe Vortli-enst part f the 
a Pleating Iiutory. 



About 1884 Rev. Canon DuMoulin in- 
| stituted regular services in St. James 
! Cemetery Chapel, on Parliament street. 
1 The work was undertaken as a mission 
; of St. James Cathedral, and it proved 
| a success from th.3 start. With the 
I increase of the congregation the ne 
cessity for enlargement \vas paramount; 
it was felt by Church of England peo 
ple residing in the norih-eastern part 
i of the city, that a thorough parish or- 
I ganizatipn and a more convenient ami 
j commodious church building were call- 
! ed for. In accordance with this ne- 
! cessity the Bishop organized the parish 
of St. Simon s, and named Rev. T. C. 
Straet-Macklem, B.A., the curate of 
| All Saints church, as the first rector. 
The appointment was a happy one; 
1 for Mr. Macklem, who is a graduate 
, of St. John s College, Cambridge, is 
the embodiment of a popularity, an 
: energy and enthusiasm that, in less 
than one year, crowned the new move- 
! ment with the most signal success. A 
i vsuitable church has been erected, a 
I flourishing congregation and Sunday 
school have been established, and St. 
Simon s is in the front rank of To 
ronto s Church of England parishes. 

A most eligible site was bought at 
the head of Ontario street, measur 
ing 150 feet frontage with a depth of 
! GOO feet. The church crowns the south 
ern slope of the picturesque Rosedale 
ravine, and it is a structure as hand 
some as it is unique. The style of 
architecture is the half-timbered 
Elizabethan, an adaptation success 
fully made in this case, though the 
style is unusual in church architec 
ture. 

The structure rests upon a founda- 
| tion of Credit Valley stone, with red 
I brick walls to the window sills, and 
! then ornamental rubble and timber 
work to the roof, the whole interming 
ling arrangement being very ornate 
and tasty. The long line of the nave 
Is broken by a fine gable at the west 
end, surmounted with a cross. Un 
derneath this is a beautiful cloistered 
entrance, and near it, on the south 
ern side of the church, a graceful 
yorch; the gables of the baptistery at 
this end give the building a novel, 
but effective, finish. Clerestory, 
windows pierce the chancel walls, 
the roof of which has been raised for 
the purpose; while above the organ- 
chamber gable a little bell-turret is 
erected in harmony with the chimneys 
and ventilating shaft. The fine 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



97 



quality and finish of the wood, stone, 
rubble and brick work taken with 
the graceful harmony in colour of the 
terra cotta tile give the church an un 
usual but artistic and even picturesque 
appearance. 

The church will seat 400 persons and 
has a centre and two side aisles; the 
seating, in ash, is arranged with draw 
seats at either end. The decoration of 
this part of the chuTch is in copper 
reds, to harmonize with the Leaded 
glazing of the windows, and, joined 
with the brick dodo around the church, 
it gives it a warmth and finish of tone. 



stands ohut from, the chancel on the 
north side of the church, the lectern 
occupying a corresponding position on 
the south side. In the chancel are four 
seven-branched gas standards, which, 
together with the lectern and other 
furnishings for the chancel, were pre 
sented to the parish by the rector, he 
having obtained them in England. The 
altar cross was presented by one of 
the parishioners. 

There are vestries on the north for 
the choir and clergy, v^iiile Sunday 
school rooms are to be fitted up in the 
basement., A sweet-toned bell, weigh- 




ST. SIMON S CHURCH, HOWARD STREET. 



The baptistery at the west end is 
novel but pleasing. The chancel is 
tastefully decorated, and has seats for 
thirty choristers and five clergy. The 
organ chamber is on the south, well 
oat in the building, but partially 
screened from it. The ceiling and 
walls of the chancel are panelled and 
finished in ornate stucco work, the 
sanctuary being enriched with a ribbed 
elliptical bronzed ceiling and ornate 
friezes. The ea^t wall contains a 
handsome window with a central cross 
of ancient cathedral glass; above the 
altar it is diapered in riohly coloured 
bronzes. The pulpit, of carved wood, 



ing 1,794 pounds, swings in the petite 
turret and sends its glad notes out 
over the ravine so becomingly beauti 
fied by tins handsome church. And al 
though the present church is intend 
ed to be really the Sunday school room 
of a future larger and more, suitable 
structure, yet, in the beauty of its con 
ception, in the novelty and chastensss 
of iis exterior and interior decoration, 
and in the value of all its arrangements 
and appointments, it surpasses almost 
every other church in the city. Ar 
tistically the Church of Our Lady of 
Lourdes is its only superior. St. 
Simon s church cost only 11000, an 



98 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Insignificant sum when the beauty and ; 
finish of the building are considered, j 

Rev. Mr. Macklem is assisted by Rev. 
C. L. V. Srine, B, A., of King s College, 
Nova Scotia. Communion is celebrated 
twice every Sunday, with choral litany j 
at 4.15, and evening song at 7. Two ; 
services are held every day in the week j 
at 10 a. m. and 5.30 p. in., with even j 
song on Wednesday at 8. All thea 
services are very largely attended; on 
Sunday evenings num.h-r- are oft-n 
turned away, while many who can Just 
find entrance are content to stand dur 
ing the entire service. The choir is 
accompanied by a vocaliou played ef- , 
fectively by Mr. Ernest Wood, the 
choirmaster being Mr. J. W. F. Har 
rison There is a surpliced choir of ^0 
voices, and while the singing yet re 
veals the recenit organization, it 
charmingly done. "The service is 
choral and is given with all the dignity 
and grace that make such a service 
pre-eminently beautiful, impressive and 

helpful. 

The church was opened for service on 
the 18th day of March. 1888. The, 
building was begun in the fall ol 1WJY, 
and completed In 1888. While the 
no.elty oi the movement doubtless at 
tracted many at first, it was soon seen 
that St. Simon s church was estab 
lished upon a sure foundation, and 
that its outlook was of the most san 
guine character. 

Since the foregiong article was writ 
ten St. Simon s church has undergone 
a structural change so complete that 
it could hardly be recognized to-day 
from the description given above, 
congregation outgrew the accommoda 
tion provided so much more rapidly 
than had been anticipated that it be 
came necessarv to abandon the plan 
at first entertained of occupying the 
original building for ten or twelve 
rears till the debt should be paid off, 
ap l of then diverting it to Sunday 
school purposes, and erecting in front 
of it a permanent stone church, 
fore three years were past increase 
accommodation was rapidly becoming 
an imperative necessity, and at 
Easter vestry meeting m 
were taken for the immediate re-con- 
utruH o-i of th.- --x stino: building, on 
a seal-" which would double the seating 
rapacity and l^av? I ttl". o? the origi 
nal buildm-r recognisable, except 
chancel. whVh bavin? ben bu-1 
ample proportions in the first instance, 
reouired little change. The nave was 
extended westward, transepts 
built out on the north and south, new 
entrances were provided, and tne 
u-ho^e appearance of the building, botn 



externally and internally, were ma 
terially altered. The result, as far 
as the exterior is concerned, betrays 
its patchwork history, but not so with 
the interior, which has been vastly im 
proved, and may be termed pleasing, 
dignified and churchly. These exten 
sive alterations were pushed through 
with considerable energy, and services 
were held in the enlarged church for 
the first time on Sunday, 30th October, 
1892, the congregation having been de 
prived of the use of their building for 
four months only. The services in Ihe 
interval had been carried on in the 
little mortuary chapel in St. James" 
Cemetery, which had been the or:c - 
nal gathering place, and remained for 
several years afterwards the spiritual 
home of the worshippers who formed 
the nucleus of the St. Sinnn s congre 
gation when the new parish w r as set 
apart. Coincidently with thj enlarge 
ment of the church the organ also was 
enlarged, and it is now an excellent 
instrument and very sweet-toned, al 
though the addition of a third i- anual 
is needed to render it as powerful as 
it ought to be for the size of the church. 
The blowing of the organ is done bv a 
small electric motor, which performs 
its work efficiently and very quietly. 
Electricity is used also throughout 
building for the purposes of lighting 
and ventilation. The specification of 
the organ is as follows: 

Violin diapason, stopped diap 
ason, gamba, traverse flute, flautina, 
oboe, cornopeon. 

Great Open diapason, doppel flute, 
dulciana, gamba, principal, twelfth, fif 
teenth. 

PedalsDouble open and Bourdon. 
Couplers Octave coupler to swell, 
swell to great, great to pedal, swell to 
pedal, two combination pedals and tre 
mulant. 

The period of church enlargement 
was quickly followed by th^ more 
marked phases of the general business 
depression, so well known to us all, 
and it was inevitable that the church 
should feel it in many ways. Never 
theless, the progress of the parish has 
been decidedly encouraging, and sub 
sequent events have amply justified the 
enlargement of the building. The last 
annual reports, published at Easter, 
1896, shew the average Sunday con 
gregations for thu year to be 
the morning and 516 in th- evening; 
while tha congregations on Easter Sun 
day of that year were 779 at I a.m. 
and 854 at 7 p.m. Adding to these two 
services the two early celebrations c 
the Holy Communion and a children s 
service in the afternoon, the total at- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



99 



tendance for the day was 2,199. The 
following table, showing the number 
of communicants year by year on East 
er Sundays sines the first opening of 
the church, affords better evidence 
than anything else of the stability and 
steady growth of the congregation: 

COMMUNICANTS ON KASTEB SUNDAY, 1895 



Hour of 
Celebration 


1888 


1889 


1890 


1891 


1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 

182 
211 
85 


7.00 a. m 


87 
60 


50 
102 
45 


58 
81 
tiO 


89 
106 

57 


92 
140 

72 


79 
141 
132 


136 
201 
81 


8.CO am 
Mid -day 


Totals... 


147 


197 


20u 


252 


301 


352 


418 


478 


Year s in 
crease .. . 
Tot l iucre se 




50 
50 


3 
53 


52 

105 


52 
105 


48 
205 


66 
271 


60 
331 



From the very Inception of the parish 
the rector and congregation have en 
joyed the services of very able assist 
ant clergy, in the persons o the Rev 
erends Cnas. le V." Brine, B.A., E A. 
Oliver, M.A., and F. C. C Heathcot^, 
L.Th., as Assistant Curates, and of the 
Reverends Prof. Clark, M.A., D.C L., 
and Prof. Lloyd, M.A., as Special 
Preachers, and of the Reverend Ernest 
J. Wood, to whose untiring zeal and 
great ability, at first as Lay 
Reader and since as Deacon-As 
sistant, the parish has for eight 
year* owned no small part of its gen 
era 1 prosperity and stable financial 
condition. Mr. Wood also filled the 
post ot orginist for a few months after 
the opening of the church. Mr. J. W. 
F. Harrison, choirmaster from the com 
mencement, being at that time engaged 
elsewhere as organist. It was not 
long, however, before Mr. Harrison re 
signed, his other post that, as both 
choirmaster and organist, he might give 
his undivided attention to St. Simon s 
church.. Mr. Harrison quickly succeed 
ed in stamping his own genuis upon the 
choir he had formed, and in placing it 
in the very front rank of church choirs 
in Toronto. His success is due not 
alone to musical ability, of which, he 
possesses no lack, but also to his pleas 
ing personal characteristics and ready 
tact, which, eliminated from the outset 
all those bickerings and disputes which 
so often fatally weaken what else 
would be strong choirs. 

The pariah has been fortunate also 
in enjoying the services of excellent 
churchwardens, and in not suffering 
many changes in the personnel of these 
officers. Dr. E. H. Kertlaad has been 
the Peoples Warden from the first, 
the Rector s Wardens have been 



Mr. Frank E. Hodgins. from 1838 to 

93, and Major H. M. Pellatt, from 
1893 to the present time (1898^, re- 
elected). 

Of the many zealous lay-workers, 
whose devotion has so materially help 
ed to make the parish what it is. two 
names stand out pre-eminently, at two 
important spaces in its history. Tlue 
inception of the parish, and the erec 
tion of the first church building was 
due in no great measure, to the energy, 
perseverance and tact of Mr. T. ~E. 
Moberly; while to Major Pellatt must 
be accredited the wise foresight, and 
financial ability which carried through 
to so successful an issue the building 
of the present enlarged and suitable 
structure. 

Another name, well known in the 
work of the CJhurch of England in To 
ronto, that of Mr. A. McLean Howard, 
is found on St. Simon s list of members 
from the very first. In the erection 
and organization of this pariah, Mr. 
Howard contributed the same devotion 
to the church s interests and the same 
eager desire for church extension that 
had been so powerful a factor for sev 
enteen years before, in the inception 
and organization of the parish of Ail 
Saints. 

St. Simon s church, will doubtless con 
tinue to be for many years to come, 
the chief place of worship for East 
Rosedale, as well as for a large sec 
tion of the north-eastern part of the 
city. 



CHAPTER XXIX. 

ST. BARNABAS. 

The Anglican Pliee of vrortlilp Rnllt en 
the Old CUvin fc Proper!;. 

In the year 1885 the eastern portion 
of the district assigned by the ecclesi 
astic authorities to St. Anne s, Brock 
ton, having greia tly increased, and as 
tlie western portiton oif the parish of 
St. Matthias bad likewise materially ex 
tended, it was felt on all sides that 
cihurch extension was absolutely re 
quired in tihe niorth-western portion 
of the city. 

This want was met by the bishop of 
the diocess with the full concurrence 
of the rectors of 8t. Anne s and of St. 
Matthias setting aside a portion of 
these last named parishes to form the 
new district of St. Barnabas, the Rev. 
W. H. Clarke, tfa/en incumbent of Bol- 
ton, being appointed as its first rector. 

On April 20tih, 1885, a committee,. 



100 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



composed of Messrs. J. A. Donaldson, 
G. B. Boyle, Edward Predam, H. Brown 
and the church wardens, was appointed 
to raise funds for the erection of a 
church. 

On May lOtih following, a motion was 
carried unanimously that immediate 
steps should be taken to obtain a sLte 
for the proposad new church. On June 
7thi it was dleckted to buy the lot 
whereon the church now stands. 

IBulldmg operations began on Sep 
tember 28t!h/, 1886, and on May 1st, 
1887, the church, being the nave only 
of the proposed bualdLog containing 



parish all along. He assisted in every 
improvement most generously, es 
pecially in procuring the organ, and 
at Easter, 1896, presented the church 
with an exceedingly handsome new pul 
pit. The altar was a gift from Mr. 
Hallam, while its hangings were given 
by the Sisters of St. John. The commun 
ion plate, which is of solid silver, was 
largely contributed to by Mr. Frank 
[Wootten, who was also a generous 
donor to the church of many other 
things. 

The Sunday school numbers upwards 
of 200 and is superintended by the 
rector. The church is fairly filled at 




ST. BARNABAS, HALTON AND GIV1NS STREETS. 



temporary chamcel, was first used for 
divine service. 

On June lltlh, St. Eai na.1 as Day, the ! 
church was formally opened by the 
Bishop of Toronto. 

One of tiha most ardent supporters 
of St. Barnabas church has been Mr. 
J. A. Donaldson, and he i<s in 1896 the 
only original member of the building 
committee stilll connected with/ the 
church. 

He collected a large amount of money 
for the building of the church, and 
has kept up his active interest in the 



the morning service, but the evening 
service is largely attended. In this 
respect St. Barnabas follows the gen 
eral church custom of this city. There 
is probably no church in the city that 
is, strictly speaking, filled in the 
morning, and there are comparatively 
few that are not filled in the evening. 
In the Roman Catholic churches the 
rule is reversed; all the morning masses 
are attended by crowded congregations, 
while the vesper service is not so largew 
ly attended. 
The service at St. Barnabas church is 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



101 



choral. The choir is composed of 20 
surpliced men and boys, and the in 
toning and singing are of the highest 
order, very similar to that at Holy 
Trinity church. The rector is the in 
structor of the choir. There is an eerly 
celebration every Sunday morning at 

8 and at 11 o clock. Sunday school 
meets at half-past two, and evensong 
is celebrated at 7 o clock. Every day 
in the week a plain service is held at | 

9 a.m. and 5 p.m. The majority of the 
members are of the middle class of so 
ciety, and have no time to go to church 
every day. The income of the parish 



cellent condition, well worked, and 
popular in the parish. 

Tlie church-wardens of St. Barnabas 
have been as follows: 
1885 1886 John Pearson, Frank Woot- 

ten. 
1886 1888 Dr. J. H. Lowe, Walter R. 

Strickland. 

1888 1890 Alan McDougal, W. Miles. 
1890 1891 W. Miles. 7. A. Fowler 
1891 1892 W. Miles. Dr. J. H. Lowe. 
1892 1898 Chas. P. Lennox, Howard 

Bovell. 
1898 1899 Burns, Peake. 



I ,.- I - , L_4_k 

>i / i t^tfFy^f^&ffys&w 




INTERIOR OF ST. BARNABAS. 



is about |20 per Sunday; in the old 
chapel it was $18 per Sunday. In this 
respect the income is not proportionate 
to the increase of accommodation and 
improvement of church facilities. The 
seats are free and unappropriated, and 
toe offertory is the only source of in 
come The rector of St. Barnabas is 
Bey -. W. H. Clarke, B. A. He is a native 
of Pans, Ontario, and a graduate of 
Trinity College. He was ordained by 
Bishop Bethune, and was first located 
Bolton, in this province. While 
there he was granted la year s leave of 
absence, and then visited British Col 
umbia. Shortly after his return he 
was called to Toronto and took charge 
o St. Barnabas, and has been its only 
rector. 

. The roll of communicants is 190 in 
number, and there are 175 Sunday 
School scholars. The schools are in ex- 



CHAPTER XXX. 
CHURCH OF THE EPIPHANY. 

An OfT.t)*.! Fr.m t. Mark * with an Kx. 
rcllcat Record. 

The Church of the Epiphany, situated 
on the south-west corner of Beaty 
avenue and Queen street west, though 
a substantial building, is not intended 
to be used permanently for divine ser 
vice. There is sufficient land adjoin 
ing that whereon now stands the 
church to build a much larger edifice, 
and it is intended as soon as funds 
will permit, to erect a larger and 
more pretentious church, and that the 
building now in use on Sunday for 
divine service shall be converted into 
a school room. 

The present parish of the Epiphany 



102 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



was taken from that of St. Mark s, 
Parkdale. It is bounded on the north 
by Queen street west, on the west by 
.Macdonnell avenue, on the south by 
the waters of the bay and on the east 
by Jameson avenue. Under the au 
thority of the Bishop of Toronto the 
parish was created in 1?87. A congre 
gation, constating of some Anglicans 
who had hitherto worshipped at St. 
Mark s, and of new residents in the 
district, was speedily formed, who, un 
til a building could be erected for 
their accommodation, met for worship 
in the Masonic Hall, Parkdale. The 
first service was held on November 
13th, 1887. 

The rector appointed to the parish 
\vas the Rev. Barnard Bryan, who came 



that month. The first bnnt sm was on 
the 14th October, 1883. The first con 
firmation by the Bishop of Toronto 
was on May 19th, 1889. 

The church is an exceedingly plain 
building both in its exterior and in 
terior. It is built of pressed red brick 
and possesses neither to.ver or steep e. 
Unlike the majority of ecclesiastical 
edifices belonging to the, Anglican 
church, it does not stan-i east and 
west, but north and south. It will seat 
comfortably about 300 worshi_ pers, 
who are accommodated in varnished 
pine open sittings. There are three 
rows of seats with two aisles to the 
east and west of the church. Unlike 
nearly every other Anglican church in 
the diocese the Church of the Epiphany 




CHURCH OF THR EPIPHANY, BEATT AVKNT7K, (PARKDALE.) 



from Bradford. Mr. Bryan was educat 
ed at Wycli r fe College, Toronto, and 
was the first of that institution s gra 
duates who took Holy Orders. 

He was what may be described as a 
moderate Low Churchman, and was 
.noted before he came to Parkdale for 
his assiduity in parish -work. The repu- 
iation which he gained in Bradford 
has been increased s nca h& entered 
=uron his work at the Ep ; phany. 

The earlier trustees for the erection 
o r the Church of the Emphany were 
the late Mr. Thomas McLean. Mr. 
Samuel Shnv and Mr. Richard Thorne. 

They worked unceasingly until their 
efforts to obtain a church were crown 
ed with success. The present church 
was opened for divine service in Sep 
tember, 1^83. The first wedding took 
place within its walls on the 18th of 



possesses no lectern, the lessons be 
ing read from the prayer desk. It may 
be mentioned, though, that this lat 
ter practice was all but universal in 
the Anglican church fifty years since, 
the introduction of lecterns having 
taken place within the last half cen 
tury. 

The architects of the church were 
Alessrs. Strickland and Symons, of 
S Oerdeen Chambers, Toronto. The 
builders were Mr. Wm. Geddes for the 
brick and stone work, while Mr. W. 
P. Parsons was responsible for the 
woodwork. 

Tihe total cost of the building, ex- 
elusive of land, was $5,700, part of 
which was discharged at the time of 
building, only a comparatively small 
debt being left when the church was 
opened. The first wardens were Mr. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



103 



Samuel Shaw and Mr. Thomas McLean. 
On the resignation of Mr. Shaw in 
1891 Mr. J. S. Loekie took his place. 
He was succeeded in 1893 by Mr. 
Sharp, and on the e ith of Mr. Mo- 
Lean, Messrs. T. O Meara and Mr. 
Herbert Mortimer became the wardens 
and they were re-elected at the Easter 
Vestiy of 1896. 

The choir of the church is a mixed 
one, consisting of male and female 
voices. There is a small organ placed 
in what may txe called the western 
transept. There is a large and capa 
cious vestry, which is used for the 
meetings of the Women s Auxiliary 
and other paroshical purposes. Mr. 
Bryan, the rector, has as yet no rec 
tory, but resides in a rented house in 
Bowling avenue, contiguous to his 
work. 



CHAPTER XXXI. 
ST. MATTHEW S. 

An Bait Knd Partita with a Very Hand 
some Edifice. 

In 1874 a Sunday school, followed 
by an Anglican service was held in 
Leslieville, various clergymen and 
students from Trinity College offici 
ating. This was the nucleus of what 
is now known as St. Matthew s church, 
at the corner of -De Grassi and Gum 
ming streets, east of the Don. At first 
it was but a mission of St. Bartholo 
mew s, and the latter was a mission 
of All Saints church. The maternity 
oi ot. Matthew s i s to be traced, there 
fore, to All Saints . In November, 1874, 
Rev. J. M. Ballard, now of St. Anne s, 
was the first rector, and services were 
then held in a brick building on 
Bolton avenue, formerly the district 
school. In August, 1875, the parish was 
separated from St. Bartholomew s and 
began an independent existence. The 
corner lot on which the church, stood 
was bought and a rough-cast frame 
building erected. It was opened for 
service July 11, 1875. In January of 
the next year RpfV. Gr. I. Taylor was 
appointed rector, and had charge of 
St. Bartholomew s. In 1880 Rev. W. S. 
Rainsford conducted the service, and 
did so until 1882, when he left, Mr. 
Taylor meanwhile continuing in 
charge. 

This is a brief outline of its history 
to October, 1882, When the present 
rector, the Rev. J. Scott Howard, took 
charge. The parish was in a most en 
feebled condition at this time. There 
a debt of $1,400 upon the build 



ing, it needed repairing badly, no fence 
enclosed the property, there were only 
about 60 Sunday school scholars, the 
offertory was only $3 per Sunday, 
about 15 persons attended the morn- 
| mg service ana 50 were present, as an 
average, in the evening, and there 
were only 10 communicants. 

The parish at once began to pros 
per, slowly at first, but with each suc 
ceeding year there came greater pros 
perity. The old church was repaired, , 
a fence was built, the old debt was not 
enlarged and an addition was made to 
the eastern end of the church at a 
cost of $600. It was re-opene d in July, 
18J25. A school house, finished in 1885, 
cost $1,400; in October, 1886, it was en 
larged at an additional cost of nearly 
$800, to accommodate 500 persons. It 
was detached from the church, and 
stands with its southern gable front 
ing Oumming street. It was a well 
lighted, plain but neat building fur 
nished with chairs, an organ, a piano 
costing $300, and all the conveniences 
necessary for the conduct of all the 
activities of the school and parish. 
There were two class rooms adjoining, 
a large library, together with ar 
rangements for social as well as reli 
gious purposes. The late Mr. Samuel 
Platt and Mr. Henry Goulding were 
generous patrons towards these im 
provements. 

The school from 75 in 1883 grew un 
til four years later there were more 
than 400 on the roll, with an average 
attendance of nearly 300. The offer 
tory from the school was in 1883 but 
eighty cents a Sunday, yet four years 
afterwards it had reached $3.21. In 
addition, a lot east of the school house 
was purchased at a cost of $1,600, giv 
ing the parish a property of 100 x 245 
feet. This lot and all improvements 
made were entirely paid for. 

Rev. J. Scott Howard, M.A., is a son 
of Allan McLean Howard, the clerk of 
the Eastern Division Court. He was 
educated at Trinity College School at 
Port Hope, and Trinity University, 
where he graduated, both in divin 
ity and in arts. He was ordained by the 
present Bishop of Toronto in 1882, and 
at once assumed charge of his present 
parish. 

The outside appearance of the church 
building fully prepared one for the sur 
prise in store when the inside was seen. 
It was a cosy, comfortable and pretty 
rocrai, with an elevated chancel, where 
in the choir sat. A small organ stood 
on the northern side, and at little ves 
try on the southern side. The writer 
noticed several interesting objects, 



104 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



which, for artistic beauty, are cer 
tainly not excelled by any church in 
the- city. Among these was a hand 
somely carved stone baptismal font il 
lustrated with scriptural symbols cut 
thereon. The beautiful window above 
the altar, the gift of the rector s father, 
the handsome reredos, the richly- 
wrought communion vessels, the brass 
alms basin and altar vases, the latter 
the gift of the rector testifying to 
the good taste and liberality ot the 
donors. 
Messrs. Jos. Otter and Edward 



was mobted, and it was finally decided 
to do so. The purchase of a site was 
accomplished and the land paid for, 
with the exception of a very trifling 
amount 

In the autumn of 1888 the state of 
the church building was such that ex 
tensive repairs were found to be abso 
lutely necessary, and the rapidly in 
creasing congregation soon brought 
about a decision to build. The finan 
cial position of the church at this date 
was as follows: There was a balance 
due on the original mortgage of the 




ST. MATTHEW S CHURCH, FIRST AVKNDB. 



Hirons were the churchwardens at the 

period the sketch refers to. 

** 

St. Matthew s, as sketched in the pre 
ceding section of this article, no longer 
exists. "The old order changes giving 
place to the new;" even in 1886, when 
the description of the district and its 
Anglican clergy were penned, it was 
felt that sooner or later (and it was 
hoped the former rather than the 
lattetr) R. large church must be erected 
if the Anglican body were to keep pace 
with the growing spiritual necessities* 
of the east end. 

In 1887, when the vestry meeting! was 
called for the election of churchwar 
dens, the question of building a rectory 



church building of about $900, the 
school house was unencumbered and 
the rectory lot was also free. It was 
decided to build a permanent church, 
and plans were promptly prepared and 
approved of in April, 1889. Mr. Noel 
Marshall undertook the collection of 
funds to clear off the existing lia- 
! bilities, and largely through Mr. Mar- 
| stall s efforts the late Mr. John Smith 
offered to the church a free site of 66 
feet on First avensie, and to sell a 
further 66 feet on very reasonable 
j terms. This generous offer was grate 
fully accepted, and a further 52 feet 
adjoining purchiaged as a rectory site, 
the old rectory lot having been dis 
posed of to advantage. Contracts 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



105 



were awarded and the new church 
opened for divine service by the Bishop 
of Toronto on Easter day, 1890, Arch 
deacon Boddy preaching in the even 
ing. Three years later Mr. Greer gave 
up the vestry clerkahip after ten years 
of office, and at the same time Mr. 
Marshall and Mr. Vick resigned after 
four years of joint office as church 
wardens. These three gentlemen had 
rendered invaluable service to the 
church at a critical period in its 
history. 

St. Matthew s congregation has 
every reason to feel proud of their 
church. If not remarkable for its ex 
ternal beauty, in its interior it is one 
of the handsomest churches of the 
city. The total cost was a shade less 
than $20,000, and this sum included 
architect s fees. What the exterior of 
St. Matthew s is like can be seen from 
the accompanying cut; of its interior 
one cannot form a very accurate idea 
unless they see it for themselves. 

The roof is an open timbered one 
with six principals, fitted with tracing 
and curved braces, with the rafters 
fexposed, making one of the finest in 
any Anglican church of Toronto. The 
choir is finished in pressed brick and 
oak panelling, the walls finished in 
colour, with arched ceiling ribbed into 
panels. The walls of the church are of 
red brick, with brown Credit Valley 
stone, with Ohio stone dressings. 

All seats are free and unappropri 
ated; there are no pew rents of any 
kind. 

The screen separating the choir from 
the nave is a beautiful specimen of 
carved oak work in later Gothic, the 
central arch ornamented by a cross, 
which is slightly out of proportion in 
height to the size of the screen. This 
was given by Mr. John Greer. 

The east window is a very plain one, 
having three lights, in the northern 
the Greek alpha, and in the southern 
tih.e omega, in allusion to the verse in 
Revelations, "I am Alpha and Omega, 
the beginning and the end;" in the 
central light the letters I. H. S. 

Two remarkably handsome standard 
gas burners in polished brass hand 
work, the gift of Mr. A. McLean How 
ard, stand to the north and south of 
the chancel; they are about eight feet 
in height, and as specimens of exquisite 
workmanship cannot be surpassed. The 
altar rails are also very good examples 
of finish and d.esign in brass work. 
These were presented by Mr. and Mrs. 
P. W. Thomas. 

There is a pretty stained glass win 
dow in the south transept of arabesque 



design, removed from the old church; 
the colours are good and the blend 
ing harmonious. The organ, which is 
placed on the north side of the choir, 
is not a very powerful instrument, 
but it is of good tone and is well play 
ed by the organist, Mr. Percy Milne, 
who succeeded Mr. A. Jordan. The 
choir is a mixed one of male and 
female voices, and includes about 50 
members. 

The architects of the church were 
Messrs. Strickland & Symons; the car 
pentering was done by Davidson & 
Kelly, the brick work by John Smith, 
the stone work by Yorke of Front 
street, the glazing by McCauslands, 
and the gas fittings by Keith & Fitz- 
simmons. 

There have been no cTerg-y ;it St. 
Matthew s since its inception except 
ing the rector, Reverends J. Scott How 
ard and J. W. Blackler, who came to 
the district in July, 1888. The Rev. 
J. W. Blackler was appointed to the 
rectory of Newmarket in September. 
1898, he thus having worked in the 
district for more than ten years. He 

| was succeeded by Rev. R. H- B. Bell. An 
excellent record for an assistant min 
ister, and one that in a Toronto parish 
has rarely been equalled. 

The churchwardens have been these: 
1882-1884 Jos. Worters, James Mourit- 

stephen. 

1884-1887 Ed. Hirons, Joseph Otter. 
1887-1889 A. Mitchell. J. B. Vick. 
1889-1893 Noel Marshall, J. B. Vick. 

! 189S-1895 P. W. Thomas, Jos. Taylor. 
1895-1896 Noel Marshall, J. A. Ewan. 

I 1896-1899 C, Norris, J. Taylor. 



CHAPTER XXXII. 
ST. MARTIN S. 

rhe Clmrch Known n "St. Martin s - !n- 
the-Fleldv 

The church of St. Martin, situated 

I on Perth avenue, to the north-west of 

I tho city, was built in 1890, the district 

being formed partly from Carlton ajad 

partly from the already existing city 

parishes in that portion of Toronto. 

j It is a plain frame structure, capable 

I of seating from 150 to 175 worship- 

I pers, and its interior is as devoid of 

1 ornamentation as is its exterior. 

The first rector of St. Martin s was 
the Rev. Isaac Middleton, who was 
transferred from Oshawa. He assumed 
charge of the parish early in 1891, and 
remained at his post until removed by 
death on February 25th, 1893. Mr. 
Middleton received his education at th 



106 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



hands of the. Rev. Thomas Greene, late 
rector of Wellington Square, now 
known as Burlington. His first charge 
was at Brampton. He then went to 
Oshawa: finally came to Toronto. On 
the formation of the Chapter of St. 
Alban s, Mr. Middleton was appointed 
one of the canons, a purely honorary 
office in every respect. 

After the death of Canon Middleton 
the Rev. R. Seaborne was appointed 
to the rectory of St. Martin s. He filled 
the pulpit for very nearly six years, 
and was a most indefatigable parish 
worker. He resigned in January, 1899, 
having been appointed to a charge In 
Bowmanville. Succeeding Mr. Sea- 
bome is the Rev. A. W. Macnab, who 



March, 1890. The style of architecture 
is what is termed Romanesque, the 
plans being prepared by Mr. W. A. 
Langton, of this city. 

The total cost including land was 
about $12,000. 

The rector of St. Margaret s Ls the 
Reverend Robert James Moore, who 
was appointed to the office when the 
church was opened. He is a graduate 
of Trinity College, Toronto, where he 
took his degree as M. A. in 1883. He 
i was ordained deacon by the Bishop of 
I Niagara in 1882, and priest in 1883. 
His first curacy was at St. George s, 
St. Catharines, and afterwards he came 
to St. George s, Toronto, where he was 
exceedingly popular. He remained in 



f. 




ST. MARTIN S ( H0RCH, PERTH AVENUE. 



was appointed simultaneously with the 
resignation of Mr. Seaborne. 

St. Martin s is in a sparsely ropu- 
lated district of the. city, and (here 
are very few of those who attend its 
services who have not to earn their 
living by manual labour 



CHAPTER XXXIII. 
ST. MARGARET S. 

A Hearty Service with nn Energetic Rec 
tor niiti Tnlleil People. 

St. Margaret s church, on the east 
side of Spadina avenue, a little to the 
south of Qu<>en street west, is a hand 
some brick structure erected in^ 1889- 
90. and opened for divine service in 



the latter post until his appointment 
to his present charge. 

The services in St. Margaret s are 
on the model of an English cathedral, 
there being a surjpliced choir of both 
men and boys. 

Holy Communion is celebrated twice 
each Sunday, and on all church festi 
vals. There are no daily services ex 
cepting on Wednesdays and holy days. 

Reverend Prof. W. Clark, of Trinity 
College, has always taken a great in 
terest in St. Margaret s, and constant 
ly preaches there. Professor Hunting- 
ford, also of Trinity, is always willing 
to assist in St. Margaret s, and often 
occupies the pulpit. 

There is a handsome three-light 
stained glass east window in St. Mar- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



107 



graret s, the centre being a representa 
tion of the Saviour, the whole three 
being 1 memorial of past attendants at 
the church. 

The altar was a gift from the Chan 
cel Guild to the church in memory of 
Jeannette, the wife of Mr. J. R. Code, 
one of the present wardens (1896.) The 
font was also a gift from the same 
Guild in remembrance of Annie Battia, 
a deceased member. The handsome 
brass altar cross was given by Mr. 
Benjamin Parsons as a memorial of 
bis son 



CHAPTER XXXIV. 
ST. CLEMENT S. 

Tbe Only Anglican Cbnreh In the Extren* 
Kn*l Rnd of ihe Clly. 

In the closing days of the summer 
of 1888 it was felt by the Anglicans 
of the east end portion of Toronto 
that it was incumbent upon them to 
provide more liberally than had been 
done up to that date for the spiritual 
necessities of the population east of 
the Don River, contained within the 
city limits. True, there was a flour- 




ST. MARGARET S CHURCH, SPADINA AVENUE. 



The whole of the seats in the church 
are free and open, none being reserved 
except for the choir. The church will 
comfortably contain 000 people, but 700 
have been accommodated. 

.The wardens since the church was 
opened have been these: 

1890-1892 Albert Harvard, Dr. G. H. 
Buralrain. 

1898-1893 Albert Harvard, "W. H. Par 
sons. 

1893-1896 Albert Harvard, J. R. Code. 
189Qbl897 John J. Oooke, J. R. Code. 
iarr-1896 J R. Code, Charles Phillips. 



Lshing Anglican congregation at St. 
Matthew s, and a handsome church 
was in course of construction, to sup 
plant the one that congregation had 
hiiherto used; but with that exception, 
there was no other provision made by 
the Anglican body for church-goers 
residing in that part of the city. 

lu August, 18$3, a number of Angli 
cans, foremost among whom were the 
Ilev. John Usborne and Mr. John 
Jones, purchased from the late Mr. 
George Leslie a plot of land ont the 
Routh side of Queen 1 street, east of 
the Toronto Nurseries and Caroline 
avenue. 



108 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Thereupon the church was built, and 
opened for divine service in the spring 
of 1889. The church is an exceedingly 
unpretentious frame building, capable 
of seating, perhaps, 150 worshippers. 
It consists of nave and chancel, and 
there ia little or no ornamentation 
either in its interior or exterior. The 
congregation is not by any means a 
wealth} one; but "what they lack in 
means they make up for by zeal and 
heartiness in supporting, as far as 
their means will allow them, all the 



minimize dogmatic teaching in any 
way, but he always impressed upon 
his hearers that, though it is a great 
thing to have a settled creed, it is 
a much greater thing to live up to 
the teachings of that creed. The 
leaching of the Sermon upon the Mount 
and the doctrines contained in St. 
Paul s first epistle to the Corinthians, 
chapter xiii., were embodied in all Mr. 
Usborne s discourses. 

The. service at St. Clement s is of a 
moderate Anglo-Catholic type, no 




ST. CLEMBNT S CHURCH, QUEEN STREET BAST. 



Institutions in connection with the 
church. 

The first rector, the Rev. John Us- 
borne, had a complete hold on his 
flock, based upon the confidence he 
inspired by his consistency of life and 
devotion to his work. His sermons 
were plain, practical discourses, .not un 
touched now and then by a vein of 
poetry. To do what is right, not from 
the fear of punishment for doing what 
is wrong, nor through a hope and 
desire for reward, was what Mr. Us- 
borne taught. He did not neglect or 



eucharistic vestments are worn and 
there is no undue bowing or genuflex 
ion during any portion of the services, 
all is becoming and reverent, though. 
During prayers the whole congregation 
kneels, and in the Creeds, at the name 
of the Saviour, all reverently bend the 
head. Here and there may be seen a 
worshipper who bows his head at the 
recital of the Gloria, but this is an old 
custom, observed by many Anglicans 
who have not the faintest leaning to 
wards Rome. 
The choir of St. Clement s is very 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



109 



efficient, being what was at first 
termed, on its introduction, an " An 
gelic " one. That is, it is a mixed one 
of male and female voices, all being 
habited in cassock and surplice, the 
female portion wearing square college 
caps with tassel. It is composed of 
about twenty-six voices, eight of whom 
are ladies. The organist is Mr. Charles 
Edwards. 

Since the foundation of the church 
the wardens have been Mr. John Jones, 
from 1889 until 1894, with the follow 
ing: 

1889-90 George Reid. 
1890-91 Henry Compton. 
1891-93 A. Clark. 
1893-94 Dr. Passmore. 
1894-95 Dr. Passmore, John Jordan. 
1895-96 W. Montgomery, J. Struggles. 

A school house was erected in con 
nection with St. Clement s in 1895, 
this being done for the most part by 
voluntary labour, the materials, of 
course, having to be paid for. It is a 
spacious and well lighted room, and 
contains all recent improvements in 



used any longer for divine service. 
The reasons which caused this change 
wexe as follows: 

On March 1st, 1897, the Rev. John 
Usborne who, for the whole previous 
history of the parish, had been in 
charge, found it necessary to hand 
pver his work into the hands of a suc 
cessor. The affairs of the church had 
been so much in the hands of the first 
rector, that it was with some disap 
pointment to the congregation, that at 
the Easter vestry meeting it was an 
nounced that there was upwards of 
$5,000 debt upon the church as it stood. 
For some time the church had not been 
paying its way, arrears of interest 
were accumulating, taxes were un 
paid, and a considerable amount of 
debt for current expenses and in con 
nection with the organ had been in 
curred. The church itself was still the, 
property of the former rector, subject 
tp two morfeages, one of $3,303 and 
the other of $1,100. 

At this time, Easter, 1897, the first 
mortgagee being dissatisfied with tha 




ST. CLEMENTS CUDRGU ^NliWJ, BK.OoK.UYN AVENUE. 



the shape of class and retiring rooms. 
There is a good orchestral stand, and 
many pleasing entertainments take 
place in it during the winter months. 
Mr. Usborne resigned the rectory 
torly in 1897, going to Honolulu, and 
was succeeded by the Rev. F. C. Heath- 
cote, who carried on the work on the 
same lines. 



The preceding sketch has been re 
tained as it was written, though the 
St. Clement s church therein described 
ceased in the latter days of 1898 to be 



way in which interest had been left 
unpaid, leased the property for one* 
year to the congregation, the rental 
Joeing equal to the interest. At the 
close of the year the mortgagee had 
np wish to continue such an arrange 
ment indefinitely, but preferred ! 
have the property transferred to th 
church trustees, with new securities. 
The congregation in the meantime had 
grown to fill the building to its utmost 
capacity, while people who wished to 
attend could not be, given seats in the 
building. The contributions in the 



110 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



offertory were not sufficient to do 
more than barely pay running ex-> 
penses. If tha church could have been 
enlarged this difficulty could have 
been surmounted. At the time the 
congregation was in no position to buy 
the building for two reasons, first, be 
cause there were no members willing 
to become security for the payment; 
secondly, because it was hopeless ever 
to expect to pay off the principal, when 
all that could be done with a crowded 
church was to pay current expenses. 

The congregation therefore proposed 
to rent the building for a number of j 
years on such terms that it could be 
enlarged, with the hope of buying it 
at the expiration of the lease. The 
mortgagee, however, would not wait, 
but wished to dispose of the property 
at once. The only thing left for the 
congregation to do was to see if a new 
church coald be built. After a suc 
cessful canvass o! its parish a site was 
procured near Queen street, on Brook 
lyn avenue. Messrs. Bond & Smith | 
were asked to prepare plans, the con- j 
tract was let to Mr. T. E. Webb, and 
on October 8th, 1898, Bishop Sul 
livan laid the corner stone. The church 
was sufficiently completed for the 
opening servcie to be held on New 
Year s day of 1899, when the bishop of 
the diocese was present at the dedica 
tion service. 

The church and land cost $3,800, of 
this amount $2,000 still remains un 
paid. The congregation has increased 
by twenty-five per cent, in the morn 
ing and at night the church, which 
holds about 400 people, is full. There 
is a large basement, affording accom 
modation for the Sunday school, so 
ciety woxk, etc. 

The church itself is very plain, the 
greatest economy being exercised 
throughout, nevertheless it is bright 
and attractive. The services, which are 
particularly congregational and hearty, 
saiit the Jocality, and the interest is 
of such a moderate character that 
pepple of various leanings feel thor 
oughly at home. 

Bright, prospects are before this con 
gregation in their new building with 
their growing congregation. 

(CHAPTER XXXV. 
ST. JOHN S, NORWAY. 

A Pretlr Conntrr Church wltta IU ffht 
nt ClirMer. 

Of the many churches in and around 
Toronto, there are very few situated so 



attractively as that of St. John s, in 
Norway. The site is a lovely one on 
the western side of the Kingston Road, 
and from the southern side of the 
church a magnificent view of Toronto 
and the lake can be obtained, while to 
the north and east stretch wood and 
forest, which at all seasons of the year, 
evem in mid-winter, are rich in colour 
and natural beauty. 

The present St. John s church is an 
exceedingly modern building, but the 
parish is an old one, asl age is counted 
in Canada, having been founded in the 
latter "forties." At first divine ser 
vice was held in a barn, belonging to 
a member of the Playter family, but 
in 1850 a small wooden church was 
built, and the Reverend James Beaven, 
D.D., appointed minister. Dr. Beaven 
was also one of the professors at To 
ronto University, and was a scholar 
of rather more than average capacity. 
frior to the appointment of Dr. Bea 
ven, Norway was principally depend 
ent upon lay help for its Sunday ser 
vices, Mr. Thomas Champion, the lay 
secretary of the church society, very 
often taking the duty. 

The original church probably cost 
about 100 currency, or $400, exclusive 
of the value of the land, much off the 
labour being given gratuitously. It 
could not possibly have been of plainer 
construction; it seated about sixty 
people. 

The first baptism took place in St. 
John s church, February IGth, 1851, 
Dr. Beaven being the officiating min 
ister. The name of the child was Wil 
liam, his parents being Irwin and Mar 
garet Wallis, of Norway. 

The first delegate appointed to re 
present the congregation of St. John s 
in the Diocesan Synod was Mr. George 
Madison, he being nominated October 
9th, 1853. 

Sufficient land was obtained shortly 
after the first church was built to pro 
vide a graveyard surrounding the 
church. This was duly fenced in, and 
the first burial took place on July 19th, 
1854, the person interred being William 
Dawes, a farmer of Berkeley, who had 
reached the mature age of 76 years. 
The Rev. J. G. D. McKenzie was the of 
ficiating clergyman. 

From the date when the church was 
erected until 1855 there had been no 
bell to summon people to Divine ser 
vice, and although all other denomina 
tions, excepting the Anglican and Ro 
man bodies, discountenance their use, 
an Anglican church without at least 
one bell, is a very exceptional build 
ing. This want was supplied by the 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Ill 



kindness of Mr. Richard Edmunds, of 
Toronto, who gave the church the bell 
still in use. It was rung for the first 
time on June 24th, 1855, Midsummer 
Day. 

The church was consecrated, as was 
also the adjoining graveyard, by the 
Bishop of Toronto, on July 1st, 1855. 
The minute in the parish books record 
ing the fact, is signed by "James Bea- 
ven. incumbent, James Beamish and 
Irwin Wallis, churchwardens." 

Atmong those who repose in the 
{ God s A-fcre" of St. John s, Norway, 
is Sarah, relict of John Ashbridge, 
who was, so the parish records declare, 



use any longer, it was both incommo 
dious and insecure and was beyond re 
pair or enlargement. It was therefore 
determined to build a new church, and 
the handsome building on Kingston 
r|oad is the result of their efforts. It 
is of later Gothic architecture and like 
all modern Anglican churches has no 
galleries. The principal entrance is 
at the south-west corner, and there are 
also separate entrances in the east end 
to the clergy, aud on the south side to 
the chcir vestries. The church has an 
open roef, and seats 350 people, the 
kneelings being of oak throughout. In 




ST. JOHN S OHOKCH, NORWAY. 



"one of the United Empire Loyalists." 
She died on February 29th, 1860, at 
the age of 75. Another departed 
worthy, who also rests here, is 
Terence Oonroy, or Conway it is the 
former on the tombstone, the latter in 
the register. Oonroy was a pensioner 
from tine 3rd Huffs, and died Septem 
ber 9th, 1863, agwd 100 years. This is 
ttie only case in or near Toronto where 
a tombstone recordls tib- death of a 
centenarian. 

(The small wooden church was several 
times altered in construction and once 
enlarged, but in 1892 it was found 
absolutely impossible to continue its 



the east end are three lancet windows,, 
and in the west one single large win 
dow. The estimated cost o" the buMd- 
ing was $} 467, hut the actual oost was 
nearly 88000. [The architect was Mr. 
C. J. Gibson, of Toronto, the builders 
being Messrs. Robert Marshall and 
George Mortimer. Mr. N- T. Lyon 
supplied the glass. Tho work was 
commenced in 1 C 9;2 and completed in 
the summer of the following year. 

Dr. B ; aven was minister of St. John s 

from 1850 until 1868. He was followed 

by Rev. E. R. Stimson, w"ho held the 

charge for exactly five years, and was 

! followed by the Rev. Charles Rut (an, 



112 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



wiho entered on his duties September 
EOtih. 1873, and continued to perform 
them until Easter Day. 1896, when he 
was succeeded by the Rev. G. L. Starr, 
wiho was removed to Kingston early in 
1898, and was followed by the Rev. 
W. L. Baynes-Reed. 

Mr. Ruttan s first charge was in 
Toronto, he being the first rector of 
St. George s church on John street. 
Leaving St. George s in 1847, he did 
duty in various parts of Ontario, until 
he was appointed to St. John s in 1873. 
He was a son of the -late Sheriff Henry 
Ruttan of Cobourg, and a grandson 
of Ruttan, the well known U. E- 
Loyalist, who nelped, to settle 
Adolphustown, on the Bay of Quinte. 

Unfortunately the records of St. 
John s were badly kept in the early 



1869-1871 Peter Patersom, Jas. Smith. 
1871-1872 Peter Patersom, George Mad 
den. 

1872-1875 Peter Paterson, Jas. Smith. 
1875-1878 Peter Patersom, F*. Boston. 
1878-1879 F- Boston, W. Darling. 
1879-1880 W. Darling, Jas. Hewitt. 
1880-1882 Jas. Hewitt, Lamotnd Smith. 
1882-1883 Lam/ond Smith, Ira Bates. 
1883-1884 C. T. Whitney, Ira Bates. 
1884-1886 Ira Bates, J. Davids. 
1886-1890 Ira Bates, J. Randall. 
1890-1898 Ira Bates, J. W. Miller. 
1898-1899 E. Philpott, J. Spencer Over. 
**** 

St. Barnabas church, Chester, is also 
within the ecclesiastical parish of St. 
John s, Norway. It is, as will be seen 
by the cut, a, pretty little building in 
Gothic, architecture. 




ST. JOHN S CHURCH, (NEW) NORWAY. 



days, and it is not possible to give 
an absolutely correct list of the war 
dens since the district was formed. Up 
to 1858 the only two wardens whose 
names can be ascertained were Messrs. 
James Beamish and Irwin Wallis, but 
since then the list is complete, as fol 
lows : 
1858-1861 Peter Paterson, Richard 

Thornbeck. 

1861-1862 Peter Paterson, John Tur 
ner. 
1862-1863 Peter Paterson, William 

Johnson. 
163-1865 Peter Paterson. G. McCul- 

lough. 
1865-1867 Peter Paterson, Thomas 

Webb. 

1867-1869 Peter Paterson, John Tur 
ner. 



It was erected about 1870 by the 
exertions of Messrs. Garrett Fi. Frank- 
land, John Lee and Emanuel Playter, 
all lay members of the Anglican church 
living in close proximity to the church. 

Tihe clergy oi St. John s have always 
been responsible for the services at St. 
Barnabas, whoever has officiated there 
has never been more than an assistant 
to the rector of, the former church. For 
some time the Rev. R. Ashcroft, now 
(1899) one of the assistant ministers at 
the church of Sjt. James in this city, 
was the officiating clergyman. He was 
there from 1891 to 1896. After that 
time, he came to St. James . The present 
staff at St. Biarnabas is (1899) as fol 
lows : 

Wardens Mr. Albert Playler, Mr. 
R. W. Proctor. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Vestry Clerk Mr. Proctor. 

Sidesmen Mr. Sparkhall, Mr. Tal- 
bot. 

Organist Mr. R. Whittaker Proc 
tor, B. A. 

Supt. S. S. Mr. H. R. Rrankland, 

Librarian Mr. A. Playter. 

Sec.-ffU eas. Mrs. Soutbergill. 

Organist Miss M. Playter. 

(One- services cm Sundays are at 11 
a. m. and 7; p. m., while the Holy Com 
munion is administered on the second 
Sunday in the month after morning 
prayer. There is a week day service 
a,t 8 p. m. eaclh \Ytednes|iay, and a 
Bible class a,t the Bame hour. There is 



is situated on lots 11 and 12 in the sub 
division o_ ? lot 31, in the _nd concession 

i from the bay, in York township. The 

I land was given by the late Samuel 
Thompson, a hard-working English 
churchman, who had a residence in 
the neighbourhood. 

Besides giving the land Mr. Thomp 
son was a most generous benefactor to 
the church in money, time, and coun- 

1 sel. 

ih; subscription list for the building 

I is a curiosity, showing how generous 
and liberal churchmen were in the 
year 1F60, in their contributions to 
what we should in these days, perhaps, 




ST. BARNABAS CHURCH, CHESTER. 



also a branch; 6S the Woman s Asso 
ciation of the Young Peoples Guild 
and the Brotherhood, of St. Andrew. 
Possibly at some future date St. 
Barnabas may become a separate 
parish, though at present <the prospect 
of such an event is still in the dim 
end distant future. 

CHAPTER XXXVL 
T. MARK S, TORONTO JUNCTION 

Vint AoKllrnn Church Built In I bat Part 

of fork TwnOilp 

This church was for a good many 
years known as St. Mark s, Carlton. It 



consider small and distant and unfm- 
porlaut church enterprises. Carlton 
was then a very small hamlet, six 
miles from the city hall, and a place 
of no commercial or manufacturing in 
terest. The subscriptions were of 
course in pounds the old Halifax cur 
rency. These are some of them; The 
Bishop 10, D. Macdonell 50, G. W. 
Allan 12 10s, S. Thompson, 50, W. 
Wakefield 12 10s, J. S. Dennis 10, 
R. B. Denison 12 10s. W. H. Boulton 
12 10s, Messrs. Cawthra 5, E. W. 
Thomson 5, J. L. Robinson 5, J. B. 
Robinson J 5s, Hon. P. M. Vankough- 
net 5, M. R. Vankoughnet 5. 
Hhe church seems to have been com- 



1H 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



plated in the year 1859. It is a small 
building, about 80 x 30, including tlie 
chancel, with a good open roof. The 
style of architecture, is the simplest 
Early English. Because of its sim 
plicity and thoroughly church charac 
ter, this little building, standing on 
the highest ground in the neighbour 
hood, and distinctly visible from the 
railway, and from all the roads around, 
used to be much noticed, and favour 
ably spoken of. Those who took most 
interest in the building of it were 
Mr. S. Thompson, and Messrs. John 
Dennis and St. George Scarlett, and 
the Wakefield family of Beechboro . 

The congregation at Carl ton. never 
a large one in early days, forty years 
back met in a house fitted up for that 



Tice, or obtaining the help of some 
clerical friend. In 1884 the Rev. O. E. 
Thomson was appointed incumbent of 
Carlton alone, and has continued to 
reside there since 1865. 

As stated above, the members of the 
Church of England in Carlton and its 
neighbourhood never had been numer 
ous, and the congregation never has 
been a large one. Yet, small as it is, 
it is a quiet, united congregation, and 
the services in the church, though 
plain and simple, are good in propor 
tion to the small available resources. 
There are two services every Sunday, 
with a good choir and good singing 
and congregational responding, be 
sides an early celebration of the Holy 
Communion twice a month in summer. 




8T. MARK S CHURCH, TORONTO JUNCTION. 



purpose, and were ministered to by 
the Rev. W. Stennett, the Provost and 
processors of Trinity University and 
others. It may be said that there was 
no resident clergyman for tihe first 
twenty-five or thirty years. From 
1859 to 1871 the Rev. W. A, Johnson, 
of Weston. was the officiating minister; 
the late Rev. F. J. S. Groves, of Tor 
onto was the clergyman till June, 1878, 
followed for a year by the late Rev. 
Dr. Carry, who lived at Carlton, and 
then by the Rev. J. H. McOollum, of 
Toronto, for some months. In I860 the 
Rev. C. E. Thomson, of Hamilton, was I 
appointed assistant to Mr. Johnson at \ 
Weston, and gave a service every Sun- | 
day at Carlton, Major E. H. Foster, \ 
M. A., kindly taking a second ser- | 



The Holy Communion is celebrated 
every Lord s Day all the year round, 
and on the chief festivals. The list of 
communicants is nearly as large as 
the average congregation, and about 
one-third of the communicants is the 
average attendance at mid-day cele 
brations. 

There is a very good Sunday school 
held In a large frame school house, 
built near the church, on a lot kindly 
given by Major E. H. Foster and Mrs. 
Foster; and likewise a Bible class 
taught by the rector. 

There is also a branch of the Wo 
man s Auxiliary, and a junior branch 
of the same called the "Busy Bees." 

In cbmtnon wi/th many other parishes 
St. Mark s, Toronto Junction, has felt 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



115 



thB financial depression and Its con 
sequent difficulties, but through ^ all, 
and notwithstanding the loss by divis 
ion of considerable portions of its terri 
tory, has managed to hold its own. It 
Is circumstanced, perhaps, as adversely 
as any other parish in the diocese, but, 
though poor, it is hopeful and united. 



CHATTIER XXXVH. 
ST. JOHN S. TORONTO JUNCTION, 

th Old mber Plain* within Sight 
or th Lake. 

The church of St. John, Toronto 
Junction, standing as it does in the 
woods to th-i south side of Dundas 
street, not very far from "Runimedt ," 
the first dwelling house ever buiit in 
the locality, is a pretty little building 
in modern Gothic architecture. It is 



ings. Mr. Murray went to the house 
of a Mrs. Marshall near by, and bor 
rowed two chairs; he also obtained a 
moderately long plank which he plac 
ed on two empty boxes, and in that 
fashion accommodated the congrega 
tion. 

After the service was over a business 
meeting was held to consider the best 
means to be employed to put the ruin 
ous old building in order, the result 
being that Mr. James Kennedy agreed 
to make some seats, to re-hang the 
doors and glaze the windows. He was 
greatly assisted by Mr. John Canavan 
and also by Mr. Murray. 

Early in the following year Mr. MUM 
ray learned that Mr. John Fisken was 
willing to give a site to any of the 
religious bodies in Toronto who would 
erect a place of worship in that part 
of Toronto Junction. He waited on 




ST. JOHN S CHURCH, TORONTO JTTNCTIOK. 



pleasing to the eye in its exterior, and 
of exceedingly neat appearance when 
one enters the interior. Unlike the 
vast majority of churches the chancel 
is not in the east, but in the west end, 
and the organ is in the northern 
transept. 

Th work of the parish began as far 
back as 1882, in a dismantled house, 
without either doors or shutters, on 
the south side of Elizabeth street. Mr. 
B. W. Murray originated the work, 
and he and some half-dozen other lay 
men met there one September Sunday 
in the year named, and having secured 
beforehand the services of the Rev. J. 
H. MeCollum, of St. Thomas parish, 
a service was held. It will be of inter 
est to relate how the congregation 
were seated, as there were, it is need- 
to aay, neither pews nor kneel- 



Mr. Fisken, and learning where the 
land was, went at onoe to the bishop 
and asked for his support. The bishop 
gave this readily, and also headed a 
subscription Hat with the sum of $5. 
Among other donors was Mr. S. H. 
Blake, Q.C., and Messrs. John Canavan 
and S. McMurray. The result was that 
the first church was built at a cost 
of a little more than $700, and when 
the first service took place the deed 
conveying the land to the church was 
laid on the offertory plate. 

The building of which this account 
is given, continued in use until 1891, 
when the present brick church was 
erected. The congregation attending 
St. John s is numerically a good one, 
but there are few well-to-do people 
among them, and the amount raised 



116 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



for church and other expenses is not 
a very large one. 

Since the church was founded the 
clergy have been as follows: Rev. J. H. 
McCollom, from 1882 until 1888. In the 
latter year the church became a se 
parate rectory, and the Rev. A. G. 
Miles on March 1st, 1888, became rec 
tor. The Rev. C. P. McKim was ap 
pointed curate on July llth, 1892, and 
on July 1st, 1894, succeeded Mr. Miles 
as rector. The latter remained in of 
fice until May 1st, 18*5, when ha was 
followed by the Rev. F. H. DuVernet, 
the present holder of the office 1899. 



e^ main, street, and is a very pleasing 
object Ln the surrounding landscape. It 
is built of brick, in the Old English 
style, with gables. The entrance to the 
church is on the south side, and from 
the porch a lovely stretch of country 
can be seen. There is a small belfry 
on the north-east end of the church, in 
wihiclh is a well-toned bell. The inter 
ior of the church Is as pleasing as its 
exterior, the seats are all, as in the case 
with the majority of Anglican churches, 
free and open, and the little building 
wli l l . contain about 180 worshippers. 
There are two handsome stained glass 
windows in the .church, and more will 




ST. CLEMENT S CHURCH, EGLINTON. 



CHAPTER XXXVIII. 
ST. CLEMENT S, EGLINTON. 

A Pretty North Tcronle Cburch Con 
nected with T.rk Mills. 

Any visitor from England to Eglin- 
ton, one of the prettiest of Toronto s 
suburbs, would, when he came to the 
Anglican church of St. Clement s, be 
excused, for thinking that he was un 
expectedly transported back to the old 
country. 

There are very few churches in or 
near Toronto which present such a 
thoroughly English appearance as does 
this one. It is situated on the west side 
of Yonge street, about 400 yards from 



be added as the funds will permit. Ttoe 
church was! built in 1891, and with the 
land cost a little more than $4,000. 
Only a very small portion of this sum 
now remains unpaid (1896). 

St. Cleinent 3 is not a separate Angli 
can parish, but is wliat in England 
would be called a "Chapel of Ease," 
of York Mills church, where the Rev. 
Canon Osier is the rector. It may be 
fitly mentioned here that at this date 
(1898) Canon Osier is the second oldest 
Anglican clergyman in the Dominion of 
Canada, he having been in Holy Or 
ders, for considerably more than half a 
century. 

The curate in charge of St. Clement s 
La the Rev. Ti. W. Powell, a graduate 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



117 



of Trinity 1 University in this city. Mr. ! 
Powell came to York Mills early in 
1891, and he had a great deal to do in ; 
conjunction with Canon Osier, in erect- \ 
ing the church. 

For several years, between 1871 and ] 
1880, St. Luke s church Ln Toronto, be- ! 
fore the establishment of St. Clement s 
at Eglinton, w^a in the habit of send 
ing! a l>ay reader to hold cottage meefc- 
ing|3 in Egiinton in order to assist the 
Rev. Canon Osier in the large district 
of which he had spiritual charge. These i 
services were continued perhaps a lit- 
tie later than the year 1880, and were 
not wholly abandoned until the project 
of building\ a church wap in a fair way 
to be accomplished. 

The church wardens of St. Clement s 
have been as follows: 1891 to 1895, T, 
Robinson, G. Wiltshire; 1895 to 1896, 
H. Carswell, F. Manton ; 1896 to 1898, 
T. Boulden, F. Manton. 

The organist is Miss Manton, and the 
Rev. T. W. Powell has a flourishing 
Sunday school under his w oerinten- i 
dence. 

CHAPTER XXXIX. 
CHRIST CHURCH, DEER PARK. 

A Prtlj Suburban Parish with Many 
i::irne Workers. 

On a commanding site overlooking 
the city, and even with a glimpse of 
th? blue waters of the lake in the far 
distance, stands Christ church, Deer 
Park. It is not only a commanding 
sire, bur. one of picturesque surround 
ings. Tb.2 gore formed by Yonge 
srreet on the east and Lawton avenue 
on the west is filled with fine trees 
that, in summer time, hide all of the 
church from the south save the little 

elfry giving notice of the building 
beneath. The property is surrounded 
by a picket fence, and the entrance 
to the church is through a quaint 
little porch, but a very pretty one. 
The building is solidly erected, of 
timber, and internally is neat, cosy, 
and artistic in its decorations. The 
ceiling is open timber work with five 
neat blue gasaliers pendant therefrom. 
The walls are wainscotted and the pine 
seats are cushioned. The pretty little 
chincel is carpeted with Brussels and 
contains two reading desks, the front- 
als of which and of the altar are 
changed to accord with the festival 
seasons of the church. Upon the altar 
Is a brass cross, a memorial to the 
late Mr. Norman Baldwin, and above it 
* handsome window, a memorial to 



the late Miss Fisken. The organ cham 
ber is on the west and the vestry on 
the east. 

The school room is north of the 
church, with the eastern gable facing 
Yonge street. It is ornamented with 
mottoes and bannerettes and is a very 
bright and pleasant room, as attractive, 
in its way, as the church. 

On thP 6th June, 1870, a meeting of 
churchmen took place in the brick 
school house in Davisville to consider 
the best means to secure the erection 
of a church in connection with the 
Church of England on Yonge street, 
between the villages of Yorkville and 
Eglinton, this meet ng being composed 
posed of the late Frank Shanly, John 
Fisken, L. W. Smifch, Edward Burke, 
Joseph Jackes and John Burke. At a 
subsequent meeting, on July 18, a 
building committee was appointed, con 
sisting of Messrs. Frank Shanly, W. A. 
Baldwin, E. Burke and J. Jackes. The 
gore between old and new Yonge street 
near Deer Park, havinor been purchased 
from Mr. Thomas Griffith for $100 as 
a site for the new church, and the pJans 
for the building prepared by Messrs. 
Smith & Gemmell, architects, accept 
ed, the work of erection was commenced 
by Mr. Joseph Gearing, builder, on the 
5th October, and the church was ready 
for occupation in just 11 weeks there 
after, the cost of the church, dri"? 
shed and fence having been $3/X)X 
Then, on St. Thomas Day, 21- 1 Decem 
ber, 1870, the church was opened for 
service the Bishop of Toronto, Right 
Rev. A. N. Bethune, officiating, as 
sisted by the late Rural Dean Givins, 
of St. Paul s, Toronto, the Rev. A. G. 
L. T rew, and a large number of clergy. 
The evening sermon was pr ach- 1 . i ny 
Rev. J. S. Boddy (now Archdeacon > of 
St. Peter s church. On the same nay 
the next year, 21st December, 1871, the 
church was consecrated by the bishop. 

In addition to the church and school 
house, the latter erected in 18^1, thrre 
is also a commodious rectory, -which was 
built in 1872, on Heath street, on land 
donated by the late Mr. John Fisken. 

The first incumbent of the parish 
was the Rev. A. G. L. Trew, who had 
been formerly assistant minister at i 
George s church, Toronto. After seven 
years of successful work he was com 
pelled, owing 1 to failing health, to seek 
a new home in the warm congenial 
climate of California, where he is now 
Rector of San. Gabriells and Dean of 
the Diocese of Southern California. He 
was succeeded at Christ church in 
October, 1878, by the Rev. T. W. Pater- 
son, tbe present Rector, who was or 
dained deacon at Whitby in 1871, and 
nnVst at Wnlv Trinity o.hnrch Toronto. 



118 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



in 1872, by the Right Rev. A. N. 
Bethiune; he is a native of Toronto and 
a graduate of Trinity University, hav 
ing received his earlier education at 
Upper Canada College. His former ap 
pointments were Manyers, Hastings and 
Bradford, and immediately previous to 
his appointment to Christ Church, he 
had spent a year in foreign travel, 
visiting Egypt, Palestine, and several 
of the countries of Europe. 

The first churchwardens of the 
church were the late W. A. Baldwin 
and Joseph Jackes. The present ward 
ens are Mr. J. H. Farr and Mr. F. C. 
Snider; and the delegates to the 



1880-1883 Dr. Larratt W. Smith, Mr. 

Weymouth G. Schreiber. 
1881-1887 Dr. Larratt W 1 . Smith, Mr. 

Alfred F. Hoskin, Q.C. 
1888 Mr. Alfred F. Hoskin, Q.C., Mr. 

Charles D. Warren. 
1889-1890 Mr. George A. Mackenzie!, 

Mr. Charles D. Warren. 
1891-1893 Mr. George A. Mackenzie. 

Mr. George H. Park. 
1893-1894 Mr. Jos. H. Farr, Mr. Thos. 

Moore. 
1895 Mr. Jos. H. Farr, Mr. F. C. 

Snider. 




(JURIST CilUKCK, DKKK PARK. 



Synod, Messrs. C. W. Allan, Thos. Moore 
and Manell Willmot. The. organist 
is Mr. Arthur Semple. The Sunday 
school in connection with the church 
numbers 120 with an average attend 
ance of 99. 

Attached to the church are two mis 
sions, one to the east at Leaside, and 
tbe other to the west, St. Hilda s, Fair- 
bank. The latter is carried on by the 
Theological and Missionary Society of 

Trinity University. 

i 

PKURCHWAKDENS 

1870-1876 Mr. William A. Baldwin, Mr. ( 

Joseph Jackes. 
1877-1879 Dr. Larratt W. Smith, Mr. 

Joseph Jackes. 



CHAPTER XL. 
TENT CHURCH. 

The ftuBinier Cburch where Gather* * 

ojigrrg.illon of All Dcnomiii .1 tonx. 

To the extreme east of the city on 
Queen street, almost at the entrance to 
Munro Park, stands in the midst of 
shady trees the church, dedicated to 
no saint by name, used by the great 
bulk of those who spend their sum 
mer at Kew Beach, Balmy Beach or 
Victoria Park. The ritual is according 
to the rites of the Angli;:-ia church, 
and the officiating minister is and has 
been since the services were inaugur- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



119 



ated, about 1894, the Reverend Hill- 
yard Cameron Dixon. Mr. Dixon is in 
deacons orders of the Anglican body, 
and was for some time during the rec- 
torate of Mr. Baldwin, assistant min 
ister at the church of the Ascension. 
The Balsam avenue church is a uni 
que structure in dimensions, about 45 
x 25 feet. It may be described as 
a church with roof and foundations, but 
no walls. The former is supported on 
tall cedar pillars, stripped of their 
bark, and there are none other than 
canvas walls. The chancel consists of 
a platform slightly raised, where, 



them in the chairs under the roof or 
in the anneis on both the north and 
pouth sides of the structure. 

There is a small harmonium at which 
various ladies have presided from time 
to time. The singing, considering that 
there is no possibility of practice, is 
exceedingly good, and of course is 
who ly congregational. SLmpler tunes 
and familiar hiymns are always chosen, 
j suoh as "Rosk of Ages." "Abide with 
Me," and others with which everyone 
is conversant. 

It tneuy be jtshteut in future years a per 
manent building will be erected where 




ST. AUGUSTINE S CHDRCH, PARLIAMENT AKD 8PRCCK STREETS. 



though, is the communion table, prayer 
desk and lectern. The back of the 
chancel is boarded up. There is no 
boarded floor; simply coarse tan bark 
on the ground, and, it is needless to 
nay, there are no furnaces. Handsome 
oil lamps are suspended from the open 
roof, and these during August and 
September have always to be lighted 
for at least a portion of the service. 
Divine service is held during June, 
July, August and September, on Thurs 
day evenings, and on Sunday evenings 
also. People of every denomination at 
tend, and frequently it happens during 
the summer that people are obliged 
to go away, there being no room for 



now is the unpretentious structure, but" 
if ever that time does come, though it 
will be gladly welcomed by the Angli 
cans who reside in the vicinity, many 
pleasant memories wLll remain with the 
"tent church" as it onpe was on Bal 
sam avenue. 



CHAPTER XLL 
ST. AUGUSTINE. 

A Bvlldlng which I* no L*n(r In Pg- 
enlon oi the Angllrnn Bdjr. 

Bt. Augustine s church is on the 
north-east corner of Parliament and 



120 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Spruce streets, and was built by private 
subscription or guarantee, to provide 
additional church accommodation for 
Anglicans resident in the east end of 
the city. It was erected in 1688-9, and 
for some time was under the pastoral 
care of the Rev. G. I. Taylor, rector 
of St. Bartholomew s. It was from the 
very first heavily in debt and this was 
a great drag on the scanty congrega 
tion. At last it was found impossible 
to meet the charges on the heavy mort 
gage, the mortgagor exercised his right 
of foreclosure, the church was closed 
and the congregation dispersed. 

The building itsalf is an exceedingly ! 
handsome brick structure in Gothic ; 
architecture. It seats about 500 people, ! 
and was intended to be on the free and | 
open system without pew rents. It con- ; 
tains a handsome stained glass win- [ 
dow in the east end, the gitft of Mr. j 
A. McLean Howard. 



CHAPTER XLIL 
THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCHES. 

Prefatory Remark* The FlrM Toront* 
Precbyterlnns and Their Places of Wor 
ship Grwth of Preib.vtcrlanUm. 

In this and the following pages will 
be found detailed accounts of the 
whole of the Presbyterian churches at 
present established in the city of Tor 
onto or in its immediate precincts. 

Jt is customary for some partially in 
formed people to state that the Presby 
terian Church, the old Scottish Kirk, 
had no place of worship and had no 
hold upon the people of York, now the 
city of Toronto, until St. Andrew s 
church was built on the south-west 
corner of Adelaide street east and 
Church street. This statement is 
wholly erronous. There were not only 
a considerable number of Presbyter 
ians in Toronto before St. Andrew s 
church was built, but they assembled 
together for divine service from Sun 
day to Sunday, sometimes in the pri 
vate house of one member, sometimes 
in that of another. Their number, 
though, was not very large, and their 
means were very limited, nevertheless 
{jo soon as their numbers had increased 
to such an extent that they could see 
a prospect of supporting a church and 
its minister, after they had built the 
(one and obtained the other, they set to 
work to canvass for subscriptions to 
build a permanent place of worship, 
and the old Church of St. Andrew 
was the result of their efforts. 



This church may be spoken of as 
the "Cathedral of Presbyterianism " in 
Toronto, though it was by no means 
the first Presbyterian place of wor 
ship erected in the county of York. 
The old wooden church in Toronto 
township, some twelve miles to the 
west of the city, and the original St. 
Andrews church at Scarboro , were 
both built for some years before there 
was any permanent building belonging 
to the Presbyterian body in the town 
of York. 

It is the history of St. Andrews 
church in Toronto, its inception, 
growth and progress, of those more 
intimately connected with it, of its 
ministers, their lives and labours that 
is sought to be told in these sketches. 

As with St. Andrews, so with the 
other Presbyterian churches in the 
city, their history will be told as well 
as that of the mother church. 



CHAPTER XLIII. 
ST. ANDREW S, KING ST. WEST. 

The Pint Toronto i mbyterUn < liar ch 
it* Minister* I rm the Beglnul g. 

The Presbyterian church on the 
south-east corner of King street west 

i and Simcoe street, popularly known of 
as "New St. Andrew s," ia in reality 
the successor of Old St. Andrew s 
church, which stood on the south-west 
corner of Church and Adelaide streets. 
The Presbyterian church on Jarvis- 
street known as "Old St. Andrew s" 
is in reality a congregation, with a 
history dating from 1876, chey having 
seceded from the old congregation on 
a question not of doctrine but of ritual. 
The great bulk of the adherents of the 

j original St. Andrew s church decided 
in 1875 to build a new church, and 
the site selected was where\ now stands 
the handsome ecclesiastical structure 
known as St. Andrew s. 

It will be necessary to* go back for 
many years to record the history of 
this congregation. In 1821 there was 
a Presbyterian congregation in York, 
and they held their meetings for Divine, 
service in a house on Hospital, now 
Richmond street, but it was little more 
than what would be now called a mis 
sion. It is recorded by a writes re 
specting the first inception of St. 
Andrew s church, that the "Honour 
able William Morris, of Perth, a mem 
ber of the Legislative Assembly of 1830, 
and connected with the Church of Scot 
land, being in York one Sunday morn 
ing while on his way to the Episcopal 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



121 



church, passed the ruins of the former 
Parliament House, and the sight sug 
gested to him the possibility of secur 
ing the ruined building and converting 
it into a place of worship in connection 
with his favourite church. Perhaps 
the contemplation of these ruins de 
tained him; at all events he was late at 
church, and just as he entered the 
Episcopalain clerk was reading the 
132nd Psalm: 

I will not go into my house, nor to 

my bed ascend; 
No soft repose shall close my eyes, 

nor sleep my eyelids bend, 
Till for the Lord s designed abode, I 

mark the destined ground; 
Till I a decent place of rest for Jacob s 

God have found. 

"Burdened with the suggestions 
awakened by the old building it seem 
ed to Mr. Morris as if the Church of 
England were voicing the duty of the 
Church of Scotland. The coincidence 
so impressed him that the impression 
became an inspiration to him; the next 
day he called a meeting of his asso 
ciates, who were of likei faith, an or 
ganization was formed, subscriptions 
received, and the list bears the names 
of some of the most prominent men 
of that time, among therm the men of 
the 71st and 79th Regiments, then sta 
tioned in York." I 

The proceedings of this meeting are 
thus recorded in a paper of the period. 

At a meeting of the adherents of 
the Church of Scotland in the town 
of York, held on the 3rd of March, 
1830, John Evvart, Esq., in the chair, 
it was, on motion of Dr. Dunlop, sec 
onded by Mr. H. Carfrae, unanimously 
resolved to take immediate steps for 
the erection of a place of worship in 
connection with the Church of Soot- 
land and for the calling of a clergy 
man of that church to officiate therein 
as their minister. 

Dr. Dunlop, mentioned as the mover 
of thus resolution, was a native of 
Greenock, in Scotland, where he was 
born in 1791. He came to Canada in 
1826, and was for several years con 
nected with the Canada Company, 
holding the office of "Warden of the 
Woods and Ranger of the Forests." 
He also founded, in 1836, the City of 
Toronto Library Cluo, and was elected 
to the Provincial Parliament as the 
first representative of the Huron dis 
trict, in the county of Huron, in 1841. 
He, about 1837, went to reside at Fair- 
braid, in Colborne township, county 
of Huron. He died June 29th, 1848, 
at Cote St. Paul, in his 58th year. 



The foundation stone of St. An 
drew s church was laid by Mr. Thomas 
Carfrae, jr., on June 24th, 1830. The 
first trustees were: James F. Smith, 
wholesale and retail grocer, whose 
place of business was at 141 King 
street, on the south side, west of 
Leader lane, his private residence be 
ing at 32 Front street, on the north 
side, a little to the west of where 
the Coffin block stood ; Thomas Car 
frae, jr., who kept a general store 
at 209 King street, next to the old 
Theatre Royal, close to the site now 
occupied by the Bank of Commerce ; 
John Ewart, the builder, whose resi 
dence and business abode was at 30 
Front street ; Hugh Carfrae, an offi 
cial of the Legislative Council, who 
resided on Bay street, north of King 
street ; Walter Rose, of the Receiver- 
General s office, who lived at 3G Hos 
pital, now Richmond, street, on the 
north side, a little east of York street; 
Alexander Murray, of the firm of Mur 
ray, Newbigging te Co., 80 and 82 King 
street, exactly opposite the present 
St. Lawrence Hall (1899) ; and Jacob 
Latham, a builder, oi. Duke street, 
east of Berkeley street. 

The first minister was the Rev. Wil 
liam Rintoul, who was the\ pastor un 
til May, 1834, when he resigned to un 
dertake scholastic work. For more- 
than a year the church was without 
a settled minister, until the appoint 
ment of the Rev. W. T. Leach, who waa 
inducted on July 15, 1835. Mr. Leach 
seceded from the Church of Scotland 
in 1842, joining the Anglican body, and 
on December 26th of that year the Rev. 
John Barclay was inducted, he filling 
the office of pastor until October 27th, 
1870, when he resigned his charge. Dr. 
Barclay was succeeded by the Rev. D 
J. Macdonnell, who died on Tebruary 
19th, 1896, at Fergus, Ontario, where 
he had gone for change of air for what 
proved a vain hope, the recovery of 
his health. For the second time in 
the history of St. Andrew s the pas 
toral was vacant for a year, when the 
Rev. W. J. McCaughan, of Belfast, Ire 
land, was appointed, his induction tak 
ing place March 25th, 1897. Mr. Mc 
Caughan resigned his charge to ac 
cept a pastorate in Chicago, in Octo 
ber, 1898. 

Flew men ever held at congregation 
together better than Dr. Barclay? and 
his immediate successor, Mr. Macdon 
nell. Dr. Barclay s influence with his 
congregation was never more severely 
tried than in 1843, when the celebrat 
ed "Disruption" occurred in the mother 
Church of Scotland, on the question 



122 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



of patronage. It is well known that 
a large portion of the Established 
Church of Scotland, both clergy and 
laity, resolved to secede from) the Es 
tablished Church, after the proceed 
ings of the General Assembly held in 



many of them) "old kirk," but essen* 
tially, diametrically, opposed to that 
body on the question of State control. 
With the seoeders the absolute separa* 
tion of Church and State was a shib 
boleth, and with very fewi exceptions 




THE ORIGINAL CHURCH OF ST. ANDREW, CHURCH STREET. 



Edinburgh in 1843. They did so and has so continued from lhab day until 
formed "the Free Church of Scotland," the present (1899.) 



differing not in doctrine and 
practice from the dearly loved (by 



It was not to be expected that the 
Presbyterians of Canada would view 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



123 



unmoved or unheeded the upheaval in 
the Scottish church at home. An at 
tempt was made by some of Dr. Bar 
clay s congregation to have a pro 
nouncement made by St. Andrew s 
churb .collectively in favour of the 
Free Church. Among those who sup 
ported this proposal were the Honour- 
ables Isaac Buchanan and John McMur- 
rich, James Shaw, "William Ross and 
Peter Brown, the latter father of the 
late Honourable George Brown. Among 
those who opposed the proposal, and 
who helped Dr. Barclay to hold the 
majority of his people together, were 
Chief Justice McLean, George Michie, 
John Cameron, John Robertson, E. W. 
Thomson, John Jacques, Hugh Scobie, 
Peter Morgan, and others. All of 
those who have been named have long 
since died, and it is probable that not 
half a dozen people are now alive in 
Toronto, in this the closing year of the 
century, who can recall the contro 
versy of 1843-44. 

The final result was that a portion 
of St. Andrew s congregation did se 
cede, and in connection with the Irish 
Presbyterians, formed Knox church, 
ffhere was happily little if any bad 
feeling engendered and the memory of 
the dispute soon passed away, so com 
pletely in fact that the younger gen 
eration of Presbyterians ten years after 
the controversy were wholly unaware 
that it had ever existed. Among other 
prominent laymen in this and later 
years in St. Andrew s were Judge Wil 
son, Isaac C. Gilmour, Henry Fowler, 
[William Mitchell, A. T. Fulton, G. H. 
.Wilson, Robert Hay, James Maclennan 
and James Bethune. 

Dr. Barclay, after resigning the pas 
torate of St. Andrew s, continued to 
reside in Toronto, where he died Sep 
tember 27, 1887. 

The fourth pastor of St. Andrew s, 
like his predecessor, had ministerial 
charge of the church for more than 
a quarter of a century, to be exact, 
for twenty-eix years and two months. 
He was a son of the Rev. George 
Macdonnell, and was born in Bathurst, 
New Brunswick. He was educated in 
Glasgow, Edinburgh, and Queen s Col 
lege, Kingston, Ont. Ha was ordained 
in Edinburgh on June 14th, 18(56, and 
after working in Scotland and else 
where for a few years came to St. 
Andrew s in the closing days of 18^0. 
St. Andrew s was his life work, and 
few men ever left such a record or 
carved such an enduring epitaph to 
themselves as did he. Principal Grant, 
of Kingston, speaking at his funeral, 



in the course of his remarks said: 
"I never knew a man of such abso 
lute purity he has not left his like 
behind." 

The funeral of Mr. Macdonnell took 
place on February 21st, 1896, from St. 
Andrew s church to Mount Pleasant 
cemetery. Probably few men were 
ever more sincerely mourned. Around 
his grave stood men o all shades of re 
ligious opinion and of no religious 
views. Anglicans, Romanists, Method 
ists, Unitarians joined with their Pres 
byterian friends in the last tribute 
of respect to one who in his life s 
career had exemplified the words of 
the poet, " Tis only noble \to be good." 

To return to the description of St. 
Andrew s church. The original build 
ing on Church street (was a plain, un 
pretending brick structure, coated to 
resemble stone, capable of seating, 
with the galleries, probably about 900 
people. On the floor were two double 
rows of square and oblong pews; on 
the north and south sides was a row 
of oblong pewa with an aisle between 
them and the centre rows. In the 
west end there were three pews on 
the north and south sides, which 
formed a transept facing the pulpit 
and communion table, which were in 
the west end. On the northern and 
southern sides of the church and also 
at the eastern end wa sa galelry. In 
the last named the choir sat, while a 
portion of the .southern gallery was, 
during the time the military were in 
Toronto, reserved for the use of the 
troops. The entrance was on Church 
street, and there was a small vesti 
bule, from which to the right and 
left as one entered was a flight of 
steps leading to the galleries. 

St. Andrew s church had at the time 
of its demolition in 1877 a towsr and 
spire, this though was not built until 
1850 under the superintendence of Mr. 
J. G. Howard, Ihe well-known archi 
tect. The latter, In his autobiography, 
writes, under date July, 1850, Built 
a tower and spire and made sundry 
alterations and additions to St. An 
drew s church on the corner of Church 
and Adelaide streets." 

St. Andrew s was the first Presby 
terian church in Toronto, and it was 
also (he first which introduced instru 
mental music in the service of the 
church, not alone in Toronto, but in 
Canada. In 1852 the band of the 71st 
Highland Light Infantry attended the 
services of the church in the morn 
ing and furnished the music, the next 
year a choir was formed and a melo- 



124 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



deon purchased; five or six years later 
a cabinet organ was introduced, but 
la prominent member objected; the 
Kirk session sustained the organ, as 
also did the Presbytery, to which ap 
peal was made; the appeal was then 
carried to the Synod, which ordered 
the removaJ of the obnoxious instru 
ment * with as little delay as possible." 
3ut it was not removed, although not 
used; subsequently the Synod allowed 
the use of an organ where a majority 
favoured its use. When the General 
Assembly in Scotland was debating 
the matter of instrumental music, St. 
Andrew s church, of Toronto, was 
quoted as an example of the success 
of instrumental music in Presbyterian 
churches. A pipe organ costing $2,200 
(now in St. Andrew s, Guelph) succeed 
ed the cabinet organ, and then the 
present magnificent organ was erected 
in 1885 at a cost of $13,000. 

The corner stone of the present 
church was laid on April 20th, 1875, by 
the pactor of the church, the silver 
trowel used by him on the occasion 
being presented by Messrs. Lash & 
Co. Among those who were present 
were the Reverends Dr, Barclay and 
Topp, Sir John Macdonald and the 
Honourable Williacm Cayley. 

Rather more than a year had elapsed 
from when it was decided, on February 
23, 1874, by the congregation to build 
a new church to the laying of the 
corner stone, the first sod having been 
turned on October 12th, 1874. Work 
was delayed during the winter, but 
was resumed in March, 1875, and the 
corner stone was laid in April. 

The Building Committee was com 
posed as follows : James Michie, chair 
man and treasurer ; William Mitchell, 
secretary ; R. W. Sutherland, assist 
ant treasurer; A. T. Fulton, J. C. Gil- 
mor, Robert Hay, J. Jacques, W. M. 
Jamieson, R. Guest, T. M. Pr ingle, G. 
A. Lash, W. Higginbotham, W. Arth 
urs, James Bethune, G. H. Wilson, 
Russel Inglis, W. Milligan and J. M. 
Rogerson. 

Architect W. J. Storm. 

Contractors Lionel Yorke, masonry; 
J. C. Townsend, carpentering ; R. Hay 
& Co., upholstering ; E. Bell, plaster 
ing ; G. Duthie, slating ; H. Cooley, 
galvanized iron ; D. S. Keith, plumb 
ing ; A. Hamilton & Son, iron casting ; 
W. McCaueland, painting. 

The following were the names of the 
elders of the church and the Board of 
Managers at the time the corner stone 
was laid: 



Elders G. H. Wilson, A. McMurchy, 
T. A. Maclean. William Mitchell, Jas. 

In a year s time the church was com 
pleted and occupied by the congrega 
tion, the opening services taking place 
on Sunday, February 13, 1876, the ser 
mon in the morning being preached by 
the Rev. R. Campbell, ofi St. Gabriel s 
church, Montreal, that in the after 
noon by Professor McLaren, of Knox 
College, and in the evening by the Rev. 
D. M. Gordon, of Ottawa. There were 
large congregations on each occasion. 
The last service in St. Andrew s on 
Church street, was on February 10th, 
1876. 

The new church has a frontage of 
82 feet on King street west and of 
165 feet on Simcoe street, the tower 
being 116 feet in height and 31 feet 
square at the base. The materials used 
in the construction of the building are 
Georgetown, Ohio, stoue with yueena- 
ton dressing, and columns of Bay of 
Fundy granite. The building is on 
the model of the famous Kirkwall 
cathedral, and the style of architecture 
is what has been described as "Norman- 
Scottish. 

The interior of St. Andrew s is as 
pleasing in appearance as the exterior, 
the whole of the furtaishing and fit 
tings being in excellent taste. The 
pulpit, communion table and font are 
in the south end, the latter to the left 
of the pulpit as you enter the church 
from King street west. There are 
double rows of oepn pews in the centre 
and two aisles to the west and east of 
them, to the right and left of each be 
ing rows of single pews. Galleries run 
round the church on all sides, except 
the southern end, in the northern one 
being the organ and choir seats. The 
organ was built by Messrs. S. E. War- 
ne n & Son, of Toronto, and) is a re 
markably fine instrument. It possesses 
2,736 pipes, 73 stops, is 42 feet in 
width with a height of 36 feet and a 
depth of 12 feet. It has 1 one 32 feet 
pipe, nine sixteen and 19 of eight feet. 

Over the pulpit, in the southern end 
of the church, is a beautiful stained 
glass window, the subject being "The 
Good Samaritan " This v/as erected 
to the memory of the late James 
Michie, for a long time a member of 
St. Andrew s. Beneath the window 
is the motto, taken from the parable, 
"Go and do thou likewise." In addi 
tion to this memorial window there 
are three brass tablets in the church. 
The first is to the left of the pulpit, 
to the memory of the Rev. D. J. Mao 
donnell; the second and third are oa 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



125 



UwZr: "-Ai : .ll .Vrv/.WHi^.VV ^HV ! 










126 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



the northern wall as you enter, to 
the right and left of the door. They 
are respectively in memory of Alex 
ander Thomson Fulton and John Kay. 
Both were placed where they are by 
the congregation of St. Andrew s. 

At the southern end of the church, 
to the right as one enters from Sim- 
coe street, is the Sunday school, a 
capacious room 46 x 36 feet in dimen 
sions. Class rooms adjoin it, besides 
the necessary offices. Underneath the 
school room is that uaed for lectures, 
which will seat 300 people, and there 
are, in addition, the minister s ves 
try, managers and session rooms. 

The pulpit of St. Andrew s Church, 
after the death of the Rev. D. J. Mac- 
donnell, remained vacant for just 
twelve months, the Presbytery finding 
clergy from Sunday to Sunday. In 
February, 1897, the ,Rev. W. J. Mc- 
Caughan, a clergyman from Belfast, 
Ireland, was called to the church, and 
inducted on March 25th following- 
There is no room for doubt that the 
Rev. W. J. McCaughan s ministry was 
highly acceptable to the vast bulk of 
the congregation of St. Andrew s, and 
there can equally be no doubt that 
it was with sincere regret on the part 
of his flock that in October, 1898, his 
resignation was accepted. 

The last sermon ever preached by Mr. 
McCaughan at St. Andrew s was & 
somewhat singular one, and though it 
was well known by his hearers that at 
the time of its delivery an offer had 
been made to Mr. McCaughan to mi 
grate to Chicago, there to assume an 
important ministerial post, it was not 
believed that he would leave St. An 
drew s, and that that was the last time 
he would as their pastor ever address 
them. 

Before morning service on Sunday, 
October 2nd, 1898, Mr. McCaughan,, 
speaking to the congregation on the 
financial affairs of St. Andrew s, stat 
ed that the churdh was then no less 
than $2,100 behind hand in their fin 
ances so far as the financial year had 
gone. He continued, "The church has 
been running behind to the extent of 
f 50 per Sunday since the beginning of 
the year." 

Mr. McCaughan further added that 
he had refused to cash his cheque f^r 
salary some time previously, because he 
objected on principle to an overdruli. 
of the church s banking account. The 
pastor also stated that, thanks to the 
liberality of two members of the con 
gregation, who had each cashed a 



cheque for $700, the church s financial 
troubles had for the time been got over; 
at the same time Mr. McCaughan 
pointed out that on the day previously 
there was only $300 in the bank to pay 
him his quarter s salary. 

The pastor continued : "I don t think 
the people heed be told that the pres 
ent difficulty exists on account of our 
branch, St. Mark s church. We are be 
hind financially solely on account of 
our own congregation. I have been 
here but a short time, but if in the 
first eighteen months it is not pos 
sible for us to make ends meet, what 
shall we expect in five years? It is 
said that in a minister s first year 
his people indulge him, in the second 
criticize him, and in the third crucify 
him. Personally, I think this congre 
gation should pay its own debts. Last 
spring I asked the members for 
enough to make our bank account sat 
isfactory. I regret that results have 
not been what they should have been. 
In all my career as a minister I have 
never had so much worry as I have had 
in the last six months, and the last 
eighteen months experience has not 
been to my liking in the direction that 
I have indicated. I have taken no holi 
days this year, and have done what I 
could to aid the congregation. I could 
say more, and say things that would 
be unpleasant, but I do not like doing 
so. I feel it necessary, though, to tell 
the truth. People do not like the truth 
sometimes, but, pleased or displeased, 
I have told it now." 

A very liberal response to this ap 
peal showed the congregation of St. 
Andrew s Church was not lacking in 
their desire to put the church on a 
sound financial foundation. 

A" this particular incident caused _a 
great deal of comment at the time, it 
will be as well, so that the matter may 
be fully understood, to give the report 
in full presented to the congregation 
of St. Andrew s at the annual meeting, 
January 18, 1899. It was as follows: 

Sixty-Eighth Annual Report of the 
Boatd of Managers of St. Andrew s 
Church. 

The managers beg to submit the 
1 sixty-eighth annual report of St. An 
drew s church, together with a ftate- 
ment of the receipts and expenditures 
for the year 1898. A condensed sum 
mary of the financial statement is as 
i follows : 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



127 



REVENUE. 

Sunday collections (open) $3,275.47 
Sunday collections (by enve 
lope 6,535 87 

Pew rents 

Special subscriptions (to 

church debt) 135.00 

Special subscriptions (to St. 

Mark s Church) 183.00 

Special subscriptions (to pay 

for sodding) 7.60 



$9,811.34 
4,007.79 



325.CO 



$14,144.73 

EXPENDITURE. 

Stipend, salaries, and piilpit supply . . . $5,011.93 

Mortgage on Church, paid on principal 2,000.00 
Interest on Church and St. Andrew s 
Institute debt, on overdraft in Bank, 

and on temporary loan 1,567.92 

St. Mark s Church in full of all 
claims, including insurance pre-. 

miums 1.344.01 

Presbytery, Synod and Assembly Fund 47.00 

.Family late Rev. D. J. Macdonnell.... 300.00 

Sunday School 200.00 

Insurance on Church 421.00 

Taxes on Manse and on Rev. W. J. 
McCaughan s stipend, and local im 
provements 370.SI 

St. Andrew s Society collection 40.00 

Miscellaneous expenses 2,187.11 

Balance 654 95 



$14,144.73 

In the last annual report it was i 
Stated that the sum of 27,000 had I 
been advanced on the $36,000 mortgage 
which had been negotiated with the 
North British and Mercantile Insurance 
Company, out of which advance the 
mortgage to the Standard Life Assur 
ance Company and the floating indebt 
edness had been paid, and that the re 
maining sum of $9,000 had been retain 
ed until the St. Mark s church arrange- , 
ments should be closed, when that sum i 
would be applied towards payment of 
the mortgages on the St. Mark s church 
property, and the managers then esti 
mated that about $1,500 more would 
be required to discharge the balance 
of such mortgages and a proportion of 
the floating debt of St. Mark s, which 
the members of that church expected 
to be paid by St. Andrew s church. 

Since then the St. Mark s church ar 
rangements have been completed. The 
property has been conveyed by the 
mortgagees to the trustees appointed 
by that church and the mortgages have 
been discharged, the sum of 9,000 re 
tained for that purpose having been 
advanced towards payment of same, ! 
and the balance amounting to $844.01 | 
having been paid out of ordinary re- 
venue. 

The sum of $500 was agreed upon as 
the proportion of such floating debt 
to be paid by St. Andrew s church. 
Same has been paid out of ordinary 



revenue and a full discharge of all 
claims by St. Mark s church against St. 
Andrew s church has been obtained. 

The sums so paid out of ordinary re 
venue amount together to $1,344.01, be 
ing less than the sum estimated by the 
last annual report, and by these pay 
ments our fiscal connection with St. 
Mark s church has been closed. 

The managers think the congrega 
tion are to be congratulated in hav 
ing got this long pending matter fin 
ally settled. 

From an examination of the accom 
panying financial statement it will be 
seen that in addition to the payments 
in connection with St. Mark s Church 
and other considerable extraordinary 
expenditures the sum of $2,000 has been 
paid on the mortgage to the North 
British and Mercantile Insurance Com 
pany on account of principal (one half 
of same having been paid during the 
last quarter of the year) and that there 
was a balance to the credit of the 
church at the end of the year of 
$654.07. 

It will also be observed that the open 
and envelope collections for the year 
amount to 89,811.34 as compared with 
$6,874.89 during the previous year, 
showing an iucrease of about 40 per 
cent, over those of the previous year. 

The Managers ate of the opinion that 
this large increase is due to the gen 
eral adoption of the envelope system. 

No less than 201 persons used en 
velopes, as compared with 120 during 
the previous year, and the Managers 
hope that this increase will continue 
until -all members adopt the system. 

Of those who used envelopes 185 gave 
stated sums weekly, or if absent made 
up arrears, and 16 used envelopes oc 
casionally and gave irregular amounts. 

Of the 185 who used envelopes re 
gularly : 

1 gave $9.50 per week 7 gave $0.75 per week 



5.00 
4.50 
4.00 
3.50 
3.00 
2.50 
2.25 
2.00 
1.50 
1.00 



1 

17 

1 

4 

5 

17 

13 

15 

43 

20 



.60 
.50 
.45 
.35 
.30 
.25 
.20 
.15 
.10 
.05 



In regard to pew rents it will also 
be observed that there is a slight in 
crease from $3,978.65 during the pre 
vious year to $4,007.79. Of the total 
number of 1,152 sittings in the church 
there are let on the ground floor 606, 
and in the gallery 262, leaving 120 va 
cant on the ground floor and 114 in 



128 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



the gallery, the total number of pew 
holders being 306. 

Owing to the recent unfavourable 
and misleading comments in the pub 
lic press and other sources on the fin 
ances of the church the managers con 
sidered it their duty to place onf record 
the true condition of such finances, 
and inasmuch as comments reflected on 
the church generally the matter was 
dealt with at a joint meeting of the 
Session and Board of Managers held 
on the llth day of October last, when 
the financial position of the church was 
considered and the following reports 
were adopted and were afterwards laid 
before the congregation at a meeting 
held on the 19th day of October last. 

The Board of Managers consider that 
these reports should be incorporated 
as historical records in the present re 
port. 

They are as follows : 
Report read to the congregation by 
Mr. S. R. Hart ; 

After full and earnest discussion it 
was generally realized that it was the 
desire of the congregation that Mr. 
McCaughan should be retained and it 
was unanimously decided that every ef 
fort should be made to induce him to 
remain with St. Andrew s. It was 
then decided to appoint a deputation 
to wait upon Mr. McCaughan. The 
\ve3k previous a deputation from the 
Board of Managers had waited on him 
to ascertain his mind in respect to the 
call, out without result. Other in 
dividual, efforts were made to induce 
him to remain but it was considered, 
that a deputation coming from a joint 
meeting of the two boards of the 
church the Session and Board of Man 
agersand directly representing the 
various interests of the congregation 
would exercise the greatest influence 
in inducing the minister to remain. 
Accordingly a deputation consisting of 
Messrs. Keith, Wylie and Hart from 
the Session, and Col. Cosby, Messrs. 
Michie and McMichael from the Board 
of Managers was appointed. 

The deputation met Mr. McCaughan 
by arrangement on Wednesday even 
ing, 12th inst., after the prayer meet 
ing in the manse, and was received in 
the mast cordial manner. The object 
of the visit was explained and a frank 
and informal discussion on all matters 
bearing on the case was invited. Mr. Me- 
Caughan facilitated the discussion and 
listened earnestly and sympathetically 
to the arguments of the discussion. He 
was definitely askad if there was any 
obstacle in the way of his remaining 



that could be removed or if he could 
suggest anything that might be done 
to induce him to consider favourably 
his remaining with St. Andrew s. Each 
one of the deputation urged with great 
earnestness the various interests in 
volved and the seriousness of leaving 
at such a critical period in the his 
tory of ths congregation. The depu 
tation undertook to promise him that 
if he felt the debt on the church pro 
perty a burden and an obstacle to 
the success of his work immediate 
steps would be taken to at once large 
ly reduce it and place it on a basis 
that would be no hindrance in the 
future. The good work he was doing 
in the congregation and city .was 
urged and the serious responsibility 
he would assume in leaving this work 
so lately and successfully undertaken. 
The deputation referred to the many 
who had come to St. Andrew s since 
his induction, many who had no regu 
lar place of worship previously but 
were now regular attendants and re 
ceiving benefit from his ministration 
who might now feel discouraged by 
him leaving. It was also urged that 
no other church work could have 
higher claims upon his services than 
the work that was now his in St. 
Andrew s. 

Mr. McCaughan told the deputation 
that nothing that has occurred had 
in any way influenced him in his con 
sideration of the call to Chicago , that 
the call had come to him in a peculiar 
manner quite unexpected by him. Two 
or three deputations from Chicago 
had called on him, but he gave them 
no encouragement he had not expect 
ed the call to be persisted in, as he 
told the last deputation his very seri 
ous objections to going to the United 
States he liked Toronto, his work 
here, and his homo in the manse. Mrs. 
McCaughan liked Toronto and her 
home here, and all his personal in 
clinations were to remain here, and 
if he were to consult only his own 
feelings he would not leave Toronto; 
but the call from Chicago had been 
so persistent, and had come in such a 
peculiar manner after so much dis 
couragement on his part, that he felt 
bound to give it his most earnest con 
sideration, and while his own per 
sonal inclinations were to remain, he 
was afraid to refuse the call for fear 
he would make a mistake that would 
interfere with his work and useful 
ness in the future He felt the seri 
ous nature of tbis call, coming as it 
did, and he would have felt bound to 
consider it under any "circumstances. 
The deputation pressed him for a de- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



1 29 



cision favourable to his remaining, but 
he was not prepared to give his final 
answer for a few days. He explained 
that he was going to New York the 
following day to consult the Rev. Dr. 
Kitteridge, a former minister of 3rd 
Presbyterian church. Chicago, and 
aifter his interview with him he would 
telegraph his decision. The deputa 
tion then withdrew again, earnestly 
appealing for a favourable considera 
tion of the claims of St. Andrew s. 
The deputation felt somewhat en 
couraged by the minister s cordial re 
ception and evident desire to consider 
fairly all tbe arguments and proposals. 
They were led to think that his answer 
might be favourable on account of 
his personal inclination to remain in 
Toronto, but Friday afternoon the fol 
lowing telegram was received : 

"Have seen Dr. Kitteridge. He 
thinks I ought to go, that it is the 
chance of a lifetime, that it would be 
a very serious matter to refuse what 
he thinks is a providential call. I 
am afraid to refuse myself, although 
my inclinations attach me to St. An 
drew s. My work there must be done, 
and there is some other man some 
where who will be sent you able to 
do the work better than I have done 
or ever could do." New York, Octo 
ber 14th. 

The Sessions and Board of Managers 
now consider that every effort has 
been put forth to retain Mr. Mc- 
Caughan as minister, but they have 
not succeeded, aiid they are convinced, 
as the congregation will now no doubt 
be, that any further efforts to retain 
him will be ineffectual. 

Report read to the congregation by 
Mr. J. W. Langmuir : 

The congregation of St. Andrew s 
having by order of the Presbytery of 
Toronto been cited to appear before 
that body to-morrow when the call 
to the Rev. Mr. McCaughan to the 
Third Presbyterian church, Chicago, 
will be considered, the Session and 
Board of Management consider it their 
duty to submit the subject to this 
meeting in order that instructions 
may be given aa to the action to be 
taken at the meeting of the Presby 
tery. 

The congregation will have learned 
with satisfaction from the statement 
that has just been read by Mr. Hart 
that every effort has been jnade by 
the Session and the Board of Man 
agement to retaiu Mr. McCaughan as 
our minister These efforts, unfortu 
nately unsuccessful, were made, they 
feel certain, in furtherance of the 
wishes of the congregation and in 



the earnest hope that they would have 
had a successful termination. 

The future of St. Andrew s under 
the pastorate of Mr. McCaughan ap 
peared to be without a cloud and full 
of high promise in every branch of 
church work. The evidences of good 
relationship between the minister and 
people and of appreciation both of Mr. 
McCaughan personally and of his 
work, were apparent everywhere and 
do not admit of a doubt ; indeed, 
everything pointed, under divine 
guidance, to years of progress and 
prosperity for the congregation and 
a lengthened and happy pastorate for 
our minister. 

Suddenly all this is changed, and 
now, although less than two years have 
passed since the induction of Mr. Me- 
Caughan, through no fault of the con 
gregation, so far as we know, no 
broken promises or neglect of duty on 
their part, no lack of appreciation of 
the minister or his work, on the con- 
trary with! a full church, an apprecia 
tive congregation, a largely increas 
ed membership, improved and constant 
ly improving finances, increased and 
steadily increasing interest in the work 
of the church, St. Andrew s is again 
called upon to face a vacant pulpit. 

It would serve no good purpose at 
this time to make a critical enquiry 
as to who is to Tblame for what has 
happened. That it cannot be charged 
to the system and practices prevailing 
in respect to ministerial settlement in 
the Presbyterian Church in Canada ia 
evident from the very few cases where 
the pastoral tie has been so abruptly, 
severed. It may therefore be relegat 
ed to the conscience of each individual 
member of the congregation and of the 
minister himself to settle the point. 

Here this unfortunate incident in 
our church history might close were 
it not that Mr. McCaughan has intU 
mated his decision to accept the call 
to Chicago, and in consequence the con* 
gregation of St. Andrew s must at once 
take steps to select his successor. It 
will be evident to the congregation 
that the injurious and misleading 
statements in respect to our financial 
affairs which have recently appeared 
in the press, and more particularly the 
utterances of Mr. McCaughan himself 
on the subject from the pulpit on the 
2nd of October, may very seriously af 
fect our efforts to secure a suitable 
minister to take his place. It is there 
fore, in our opinion, a simple act of 
justice to the congregation that these 
injurious reflections on the church fin 
ances, whether emanating from the 



130 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



press or tlie pulpit, should not be al 
lowed to pass unchallenged, and to that 
end it becomes necessary that the true 
condition of the finances of St. An 
drew s should be made public at this 
particular juncture. 

Since the year 1876 up to this time 
the congregation has expended in the 
acquirement of land and in the con 
struction of St. Andrew s church, St. 
Mark s church and St. Andrew s 
church Institute no less a sum than 
$167,752.17. These expenditures (with 
the exception of 21,000 from sale of the 
Glebe lands) have, all been met by spe 
cial and ordinary subscriptions of the 
congregation, except $41,780, which 
sum represents the entire indebtedness 
of the church, manse and institute at 
this date. 

The congregation has also contribut 
ed during the same period for mis 
sionary, educational and benevolent 
purposes the sum of $163,000, thus 
showing that in addition to the large 
sums paid for the ordinary (mainten 
ance of St. Andrew s church the congre 
gation have since paid no less a sum 
than $330,000 for the purposes named. 

It is not necessary, however, to go 
back ten or twenty years in the history 
of St. Andrew s church to prove that 
the congregation has always respond 
ed generously to the financial calls 
made upon them. We need not go fur 
ther back than to the time of Mr. Mc- 
Caughan s induction as our minister, 
the church debt, including the St. 
Mark s and Institute mortgages, at 
that time amounted to about $53,000., 
Through the settlement which the 
managers effected of the St. Mark s 
debt (which settlement the congrega 
tion knows erred on the side of extreme 
liberality to that church) and (notwith 
standing that abnormal expenditures 
amounting to $7,41{3.51 have been made 
during the nineteen months that Mr. 
McCaughan has been with us, the ag 
gregate debt has been reduced from 
$53,000 to $41,780.00, viz., $85,000 on 
church and manse and $7,500 on the 
Institute, less $1,300 at our credit in 
the bank. 

The managers think that the fin 
ancial record of St. Andrew s thus out 
lined will compare favourably with 
that of the largest and wealthiest con 
gregations in the Presbyterian Church 
of Canada, and whether viewed as a 
whole from 1876, or confined to the 
past nineteen months, is one that may 
reasonably afford cause for congratula 
tion instead of censure. 

In view of the statements referred to 



reflecting on the management of th 
financial affairs of the church, and; the 
publicity given to them, the managers 
consider it their duty to give public 
expression to their views. To this, end 
the following resolution was unani 
mously passed at the meeting of the 
Board of Management held on the 8th 
of October: 

"Whereas in connection with the pro 
posed removal of the Rev. Mr. Mc 
Caughan to the Third Presbyterian 
church, Chicago, there recently ap 
peared in the Toronto papers erroneous 
and misleading statements in respect 
to the financial condition of St. An 
drew s church. 

"And whereas Mr. McCaughan at the 
morning service on Sunday, the 2nd 
of October, without consultation of 4he 
Board of Management or the members 
of his Session, animadverted in very 
strong terms on the alleged neglect 
of the congregation to provide funds 
to meet the current expenses of the 
church. 

"And whereas Mr. McCaughan also 
stated to several members of the con 
gregation, as well as to representatives 
of the press, that prior to his accept 
ance of the call to St. Andrew s he had 
been informed that St. Andrew s 
church indebtedness was considerably 
less than he subsequently discovered it 
to be. 

"While the Board of Management 
deeply deplore the publicity which has 
been given to the business affairs of 
the church, they feel that as an act of 
justice to themselves and to St. An 
drew s, it is necessary, in view of the 
erroneous and misleading statements 
in the public press and the remarks of 
Mr. McCaughan, that the following 
statement of facts should be submitted 
to the congregation and the public in 
respect to the finances of the church, 
namely 

"Through the settlement of St. 
Mark s liability the aggregate amount 
of the church debt has within the past 
eighteen months, notwithstanding 
large abnormal expenditures, been re 
duced by nearly $10,000. 

"The remaining debt, with the excep 
tion of the mortgage on St. Andrew s 
Institute, has been consolidated at a 
much lower rate of interest, and now 
stands at $35,000, which with the In 
stitute mortgage at $7,500, makes a 
total debt of $42,500, instead of $52,348.25 
as shown in the last annual report. 

"The settlement of the St. Mark s 
church debt will alone etfect a saving 
of over $500 annually. ; 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



131 



"The financial condition of the church 
generally has been vastly improved. 

"The Board of Management further 
desire to state that they had arranged 
with their bankers to allow a tempo 
rary overdraft to meet all current ex 
penditures during the summer months 
when the collections are temporarily 
diminished, and all cheques, including 
the one issued to Mr. McCaughan, 
would have been duly honoured. 

"The Board further desire to state 
that it was their intention at an early 
date, and well before the end of the 
year, to have provided for this over 
draft, and to have further reduced the 
church debt, and at a meeting of the 
Board held on the day preceding Mr. 
McCaughan s censure, subscriptions 
greatly in excess of the overdraft were 
arranged for to be placed on the col 
lection plates at the morning service on 
Sunday, October 2nd, and had Mr. Mc- 
Oaughan given any intimation to the 
Board of his intended remarks on the 
church finances he would have learned 
that the particular time chosen by him 
therefor was most inopportune. 

"The Board of Management further 
desire to say respecting the alleged in 
formation given to Mr. McCaughan as 
to the amount of the church debt that 
no one representing the Board of Man 
agement had any authority to repre 
sent to him that the debt of the church 
was otherwise than as shown in the 
annual reports, which were transmit 
ted to him by the Clerk of the Session 
prior to his departure from Belfast." 

The managers whose term of office 
expires are .T. W. Langmuir, Geo. Bell, 
Col. A. M. Cosby and Hon. L. M. Jones, 
all of whom are eligible for re-election. 
All of which i3 respectfully submit 
ted. 

J. W. LANGMUIR, 

Chairman. 
GEORGE BELL, 

Secretary. 

Toronto, Jan. 16th, 1899. 
Again for many months there was 
no regular pastor for the 1 church, until 
September 14th, 1899, when the Rev. 
Armstrong Black, late of Birkenhead, 
Cheshire, England, was duly inducted 
to the spiritual care of the church. 
At the induction of Mr. Black the 
Rev. John McNair, of Oakville, de 
livered the induction sermon, taking 
as his text I. Corinthians x., 4: "And 
all did drink the same spiritual drink; 
for they drank of that spiritual Rock 
that followed, them, and that Rock 
weus Christ." 
The Rev. J. McP. Scott afterwards 



addressed the congregation, and the 
Rev. R. C. Tibb, secretary of the Pres 
bytery, read to the congregation min 
utes of the steps which had led to the 
appointment of Mr. Black. 

Mr. Scott then offered prayer on 
behalf of the new pastor, and on its 
conclusion the Rev. R. C. Tibb formally 
inducted Mr. Black to his pastoral 
charge. The members of the Presby 
tery then came forward in succession, 
extending to the new pastor the right 
hand of fellowship. After this the 
Rev. Dr. Carmichael, of King, one of 
the oldest members of the Presby 
terian ministry in Canada, addressed 
the minister upon his duties, not only 
towards the church, but towards the 
town in which he lived and towards 
himself. After a few words from Prof. 
Ballantyne- the ceremony came to an 
end. 

In the evening a reception in hon 
our of the new pastor took place in 
the lecture room of the church. There 
the members of the congregation, be 
sides many visiting friends, were in 
troduced to the pastor and his wife, 
and occasion was takejl by the ladies 
of the congregation to present Mr. 
Black with a new gown. 

Mr. Black preached his first sermon 
to the congregation of St. Andrew s 
as its pastor on the morning of Sun 
day, September 17th, when so great 
was the desire to hear him that many 
people were refused admittance, in con 
sequence of there being neither sit 
ting nor standing room for them- 

The officers of St. Andrew s church 
on the induction of Mr. Black were 
as follows : 

Kirk Session, Minister Rev. Arm 
strong Black. 

Elders George H. Wilson, William 
Mitchell, Hon. Mr. Justice Maclennan, 
Hamilton Cassels, James Massie, Geo. 
Keith, E. A. MaclaurLn, Jas. Strachan, 
A. F. Maclean, Session Clerk, Alex 
ander Stewart, R. J. Wylie, Charles 
MacBride, S. R. Hart, Dr. Alexander 
Primrose, Rev. R. G. Murison, R. J. 
Maclennan, J. Jones Bell, James Mac- 
, Gregor, F. C. Tisdell. 

-Board of Managers James Thor- 
bu-rn, M. D., J. B. Kay, John F. Michie, 
A. A. McMichael, James M. Alexander, 
George McMurrLch, W. B. Rogers, E. 
R. Greig, J. W. Langmuir, Chairman, 
George Bell, Secretary, Col. A. M. 
Cosby, Treasurer, Hon. L. M. Jones. 

Trustees of Church Property Col. A. 
M. Cosby, Hamilton Cassels, Z. A. 
Lash, Q. C., George Bell. 



132 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



The following extracts from the ; 
Registry of Baptisms and Marriages at 
the Church of St. Andrew have been 
taken from the books of the church. 
As a matter of course it will be under 
stood that though in the vast majority 
of cases the baptisms took place in the 
church itself, but few of the weddings 
did, they for the most part being per 
formed in the houses of one or other 
of the contracting parties. The bap 
tisms are these: 

David Turnbull, born March 25th, 1831. 
Parents, Robert Turnbull, tailor, in York, 
and Catherine McKinnon. Officiating min 
ister, Win. Rintoul, July 10th, 1831. 

Geo. Duff Sinclair, born July Gth, 1831. 
Parents, George Sinclair, paymaster-sergt., 
H. M. 79th Regt., and Isabella Sinclair. 
Officiating minister, Wm. RintoiUllo July 
21st, 1831. 

Andrew Henry McDonald, born April 25th, 
1831. Parents, Andrew McDonald, mer- 
tjQiant in Township of Wlutby, and Mary 
Louisa McDonald. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rinito-ul, July 24th, 131. 

James Andrews, born Sept. 24th, 1830. 
Parents, James Andrews, distiller, Don 
Bridge, York, and Ann White. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, July 17th, 1831. 

Ann Jane Oarfrae, born June 29th, 1831. 
Parents, H. Oarfrae, gentleman. King street, 
York, and Ann Oarfrae. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. Rintoul, Aug. 8th, 18,31. 

Henrv Hamilton, born April 30th, 1830. 
Parents, Thomas Gilead, carpenter in York, 
and Nancv Elamilton. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul, Aug. 8th, 1831. 

Caroline Maria Mclntosh, born Oct. 1 >th, 

1830. Parents, Charles Me- In tosh, ship 
master in York, and Caroline Maria Mcln 
tosh. Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, 

William McGill. born Feb. 17th, 1831. 
Parents, William McGill, yeoanan in Whitby 
Township. Officiating minister, Wm. Rin 
toul, Aug. 23rd. 1831. 

Agnes Reid, born Sept. 23rd, 1831. Par 
ents, James Reid, yeoman in the Gore, of 
Toronto, and Margaret Reid. Officiating 
minister. Wm. Rintoul, Aug. 27th, : 31. 

Esther Buchanan, born May 4th, 1829, 
and Rebecca Buchanan, born June IGth, 

1831. I arcnts, William Buchanan, niason 
In York, n.nd Ann Bmh.nan. Officiating 
minister, Win. Rintoul, Sept. 2nd, 1831. 

Barbara Hamilton, born Aug. 15th, 1831. 
Parents, Duncan and Effie Hamilton, emi 
grants from Kilcatmonell, Argyleshire, N.B. 
Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, Sept. 9th, 

1831. 

Angus McCallum, born Aug. 1st, 1831. 
Parents, John and Catherine McOallum, emi 
grants from Kilmeny Islay, Argyleshire, N. 
B. Officiating minister, Win. Rintoul, Sept. 

joiin Thomson, born Oct. 27th, 1830. 
Parents, Alex. Thomson, mason in York, 
and Janet Thomson. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul. Sept. 22nd, 1831. 

Mary Spankie, born Aug. loth, .-831. 
Parents, James Spankie, labourer m York, 
n.nd Catherine Spankie. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul, .Sept. 22nd, 1831. 

William Davidson, born Aug. 27th, 1831. 
Parents, Samuel Davidson, farmer, from Ad- 



gulaly, migrating to: New Orleans, and Mar 
garet Davidson. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, Sept. 30th, 1831. 

Alex. McMurchy, born Aug. 8th, 1831. 
Parents, Malcolm McMurchy, carpenter in 
the township of York. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul, Sept. 30th, 1831. 

Adison Walker, born Sept. 9th, 1831. 
Parents, Joseph Walker, weaver from Ed- 
na-ro, Roxburghshire, and Jessy Walker. Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, Oct. 2nd, 
1831. 

Alex. Stewart, born Aug. llth, 1831. 
Parents, Robert Stewart, carpenter in town 
of York, and Elizabeth Stewart. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, Oct. 30th, 1831. 

Alex. Maitland Monro, born Oct. 13th, 
1831. Parents, Wm. Monrp, yeoman, of 
York, andM:rv Monro. Officiating minster, 
Wm. Rintoul, Nov. 25th, 1831. 

Sophia R. Snyder, born May 23rd, 1828. 
Parents, William R. Snyder, shoemaker, King 
st., York, *Mid Margaret fe nyder. Officiating 
minister, Win. Rintoul, Nov. 21st, 1831. 

Angus Maodonold, born Oct. 29th, 1831. 
Parents, Halket Maodonald, labourer from 
the parish of Dornooh, Sutherlandehlre, X. 
B., a,nd Jean B. Maodonald. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, Nov. 27th, 1831. 

Christiana Burnham, born Oct. 21st, 
1831. Parents, Silas Burnham, merchant 
la York, and Mrs. Burnham. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, Dec. Gth, 1831. 

Isabella Alexander, born Oct. 3rd, 1831. 
Parents, James Alexander, labourer, emi 
grant from Armagh, Ireland, and Cather 
ine Alexander. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, Dec. 7th, 1831. 

Andrina Gifford, born Oct. 18th, 1831. 
Parents, Arthur Gifford, purser in Roy*] 
Navy, York, U. O., and Ann Gifford. Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, Dec. 7th, 
1831. / 

James Morrison, born Dec. 14th, 1831. 
Parents, Daniel Morrison, carpenter, King 
street, York, and Jean Story. Officiating 
Minister, Wm. Rintoul, Jan. 3rd, 18oL . 

John Magill, born Sept. 29th, 1831. Par 
ents, John Magill, yeoman in Township of 
Whitby, and Dorothy : Ixv?li">. Orfici tiing 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, Jan. Gth, 1832. 

Hotiry Cowan, born Xov. 28th, 1831. Par 
ents, Honry Cowan, blacksmith, York, and 
Mary Porteous. Officiating minister, Win. 
Rintoul, Jan. 16th, 1832. 

Marv Campbell, born 

William Crawford, born Dec. 21st, 1831. 
Parents, G. G, Crawford, doctor in medicine, 
York, juid Mary Crawford. Officiating min 
ister, Win. Rintoul, Jan. 17th, 1832. 
Alexa-nder Campbell, born Dec. 19th, 

1831. Parents, David Campbell, mason, in 
York, and Ann Campbell. Officiating min 
ister, Win. Rintoul, Jan. 29th, 1832. 

James Campbell, born Jan. 22nd, 1832. 
Parents., Arthur Campbell, yeoman, in W^st 
Gwillimbury, and Catherine Campbell. Of- 
fi"i *ing minister, Wm. Rintoul, March 2nd, 

1832. 
Kubocca Fraser, 11 weeks. Parents, Alex. 

Fruser, twaggon.maker, York, and Xelly 
hanky. Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, 
March. 

John Madill, born Jan. 26th. 1832. Par 
ents, John Madill, labourer in York, and 
Xnncy Midill. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, M*xrch 7th, 1832. 

M-rgaret Sarnli Butv, born Feb. 7th. Par. 
ents, Ohas. M. K. l^ty aaid^ Mary Baty. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



133 



Christian Cameron, born March 5th, 1832. 
Parents, Donald (Cameron, waggonmaker. 
Yonge street, and Christian Cameron. Of 
ficiating minister, Win. Rintoul, April 13th. 
1832. 

Isabella Mackenzie Baxter, born March 14, 
1832. Parents, James Baxter, printer, 
York, and Marr Baxter. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. Rintoul, April 8th, 1832. 

Goo. Wm. Sandilamls, born April 26, 1832. 
Parents, T. Sandilaiids, merchant. York, and 
Mrs. Sandilands. Officiating minister, Win. 
Rintoul, June 3rd, 1832. 

Margaret Marshall, born May 12th, 1832. 
Parents, James Marshall, carpenter, York, 
and Jennet Murray. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul, June 27th, 1832. 

Agnes Susanna Rogers, born June 9, 1832. 
Parents, Joseph Rogers, hatter, King street, 
York, -ui,i Christian Rogers. Officiating min 
ister, Win. Rintoul, July 5th, 1832. 

Dunca.n John Murchison. Parent, Dun 
can Murchison. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintiml, Jiily 22nd, 1832. 

Dugiild Campbell, born July 30th, 1832. 
Parents, Duncan Campbell, emigrant, pro 
ceeding to Qhinguacousy, and Joan Mc- 
Tavisli. Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, 
July 24th, 1832. 

Catherine McKenzie. Officiating minis 
ter. Wm. Rintoul, July 25th, 1832. 

James Broaden, born July 23rd, 1832. 
Parents, Robert Broaden, labourer in York, 
and Margaret Broaden. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul, July 29th, 1832. 

Catherine Turreff, born July 29th, 1832. 
Parents, Wm. Turroff, iron founder, York, 
end Mary Turreff. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Eintoul, Aug. 26th, 1832. 

Jane Allan, born July 16th, 1832. Par 
ents, William Allan, ilmilder, York, and 
Eleanor Allan. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, Sept. 23rd, 1832. 

Ann Maria Ford, born July 23rd, 1832. 
Parents, Robert Ford, builder, York, and 
Mary Ford. Officiating minister, Wm. Rin 
toul, Sept. 27th, 1832. 

Jane McGiliivray, born Sept. 21st, 1832. 
Parents, Robert McGiliivray, shoemaker, 
York, a.nd .lane McGiliivray. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Riiitoul, Oct. 3rd, 1832., 

William Littey, born March 1st, 1832. 
Parents, Thomas Littey, shoeanaker, Duke 
treet, York, and Helen Robertson. pf- 
flclnting minister, Wm. Rintoul, Oct. 14th, 
1832. 

John Oliver Kidd, born April 17th, 1882. 
Parents, James Kidd, labourer. York, and 
Catherine Kidd. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, Got. 17th, 1832. 

Margaret Worrest Dunn, born Sept. 22nd, 
1832. Parents, John Dunn, blacksmith, 
York, ajid Allison Dunn. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. Rintoul, Oct. 21st, 1832, 

Jane Fraser, Worn Oct. 21st, 1832. Par 
ents, David Fraser, gardener, lately from 
Rossshire, Scotland, and Christina Wallace. 
Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, Oct. 28, 
1832. 

James Preston born Oct. 6th 1832. Par 
ents, O. Preston, shoemaker, York, and| J. 
Preston. Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, 
Oct. 28th, 1832. 

James Bowman, born Sept. 28th, 1832. 
Pnrenti, Robert Bowman, merchant, Yonge 
Itreet, York, and Elizabeth Bowman. Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, Oct. 31st, 
18-32. 

William McLean, born Aug. 1st, 1832. 



Parents, William McLean, painter, York, and 
Susanna Jane McLean. Officiating minister, 
Wm* Rintoul, Nov. 7th, 1832. 

Duncan Stewart, born May 14th, 1832. 
Parent*. Alex. Stewart, house carpenter, 
York, and 1 Anna Maria Stewart. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, Nov. 7th, 1832. 

Abraham Rowaoid, born Oct. 27th, 1832. 
Parents, Abram Ro!wand, house carpenter. 
YorK, and Jane Thomson. Officiating niin- 
tflter, Wm. Rintonil, Nov. 21st, 1832. 

Prances Ann Ross, born Sept. 4th, 1832. 
Parents, John Ross, merchant, York, and 
Alice Ross. Officiating minister, Wm. Rin 
toul, Nov. 30th, 1832. 

Davis Niren, born Oct. 21st, 1832. Par 
ents, Andrew Niven, labourer, York, and 
Oraigie Nivuii. pt ficiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, Dec. 9th, 1832. 

Silas Mclntosh, born Aug. 25, 1832. Par- 
ents, Chas. Mclntosh, shipowner, County 
York, and Oiroiine M. Mclntosh. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, Dec. 2oth. 

Johni Brandcr, born Oct. 16th, 1832. Par 
ents, John Brauder, blacksmith, Township 
of Pickering, and Ann Mackie* Officiating 
minister, Win. Riiitoul, Fab. 9th, 1833. 

Jane Beggs, born Dec. 31st, 1832. Par 
ents, William Beggs, farmer, Township of 
Whitby, and Catherine Beggs. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, Feb. 14th, 1833. 

James Thompson, born Feb. 4th, 1833. 
Parents, Andrew Thompson, late sergeant 
FT, M. 79th Regiment, and Helen Thompson. 
Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, Feb. 15. 
1833. 

John Ross, born Feb. 9th, 1833. Parents, 
Donald Ross, emigrant, from Rossshire, Scot 
land, and Caroline McGregor. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, Feb. 24th, 1833. 

Thomas Hossack, born Jan. 26th, 18:!3. 
Parents, Alexander Hossack, emigrant, from 
Rosshire, Scotland, and Betsy McDonald. Of 
ficiating- minister, Wm. Rintwul, Feb. 28th, 
1833. 

Robert Gunn, born Jan. 18th, 1833. Par 
ents, Adam Gunn, blacksmith. Lot street, 
and Jane Gordon. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, March 20th, 1833. 
i Johm Wilson Young, born Sept. 17, 1832. 
Parents, James Young, farmer, Ohiiigua- 
oousv, and Janet Young. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. Rintoul, March llth, 1833. 

Sarah Ferguson, born July 17th, 1832. 
Parents, Arch. Ferguson, farmer in the. 
Township of , and Sarah Ferguson. (Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, March 18 
1833. 

James Oarfr&e. Parents, Thoa. Garfrae* 
i gentleman, York, and Margaret Jane Oar- 
! frae. Officiating minuter, Wm. Rintoul, 
i March 20th, 1833. 

John Maltman, born Feb. IGth, 1838. 
Parents, Joseph Maltman, cabinetmaker* 
. York, and Grace Maltman. Officiating min- 
Ister, Wm. Rintoul, March 24th, 1838. 

Margaret Kerr, born Feb. 9th, 1838. Par* 
ents, William Kerr, joiner, York, and Mar 
garet Kerr. Officiating minister, Wm. Rin 
toul, March 27th, 1833. 

Henry Gray, born Jan. 22nd, 1833. Par 
ents, John Gray, carpenter, Macaulay Town, 
rind Elizabeth Gray. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul, April 14th, 1833. 

Robert Stewart, born Jan. 24th, 1888. 
Parents, Robert Stewart, carpenter, March 
street, and Elizabeth Stewart. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, April 17th, 1833. 

John Forrest, born March 26th, 1838, 



134 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Parents, John Forrest, now deceased, emi 
grated from tho Parish of Hutton, Scot- 
tojid, and Elizabeth Forrest. Officiating min- 
.Iflter, Wm. Kintoul, April 19 th.^ 1833. 

Hugh Matheso>n, born Dec. 9th, 1832. 
Pare tits, Goo. Matheson, emigrant from 
Sutherla.ndsh.iro, proceeding to Dunwick, and 
Jean Matheson. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Bintoul, April 19th, 1833. 

Margaret Jane Rintoul, born Jan. 1, 1833. 
Parents, Wm. Rintoul, minister of St. An 
drew s Church, and 0. Rintoul. .Officiating 
minister, Wm. McAllister, May 10th, 1833. 

M u-v Fairbanks- Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, May llth, 1833. 

Mary McPherso-n, born April 28th, 1833. 
Parents, John McPherson, shoemaker, on his 
way to West Flamborough, and Margaret 
Guan. Officiating minister, Win. Riutoul, 
May 22nd, 1833. 

Alexander Mcl horson, born May 16, 1832. 
Parents, Andrew McFherson, farmer, town 
ship of Mariposa, and Mary McPherson. Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, Juno 8th, 
1833. 

Margaret Elizabeth McDonald, born Nov. 
18th, 1832. Parents, Andrew McDonald, 
merchant, Whitby, and Mary Louisa McDon 
ald. Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, 
Aug. 29th, 1833. 

Hannah Brown, sorn Oct. 9, 1832. Parr- 
eats, Joseph Brown, miller, in the Town- 
hip of Etobicoke, and Mary Brown. Offici 
ating minister, Wm. Rintoul, Aug. 31, 1833. 

Alla.ii McDougall, bom July 22nd, 1833. 
Parents, Alex, McDougall, emigrant from 
Olu, Scotland, and Catherine McEachern, 
Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, Sept. 9, 
1833. \ 

Margaret Kinnard, born July 9th,- 1833. 
Parents, Alex. Kinnard, carpenter, York, 
and Jean Nair. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, Sept. 22nd, 1833. 

Mary Paterson, born July 2nd, 1833. 
Parents, Donald J*aterson, labourer, emi 
grant, from. Killean. Argyleshire, and Kath 
arine Campbell. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Bintoul, Sept. 22nd, 1833. 

James Robert Gillespie, born Sept. 8th, 
1833. Parents, Robert Gillespie, merchant, 
and Caroline M. Gillespie. Officiating minis- 
teter, Wm. Rintoul, Sept. 23rd, 1833. 

Flora Ann Mclntyre, born Aug. 31, 1833. 
Parents, Arch. Mclntyre, sailor, Yorkv and 
Mary Mclntyre. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintouil, Oct. 1st, 1833. 

Margaret Reid, born June 10th, 1833. 
Parents, James Reid, farmer, Gore o_f To 
ronto, and Margaret Dickie. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, Oct. 6th, 1833. 

Jesse Wii.it, born Sept. 13th, 1833. Par 
ents, James Wait, carpenter, Lot street, 
York, find Margaret Wait. Officiating min 
ister, Win. Rintoul, Oct. 20th, 1833. 

Christina Gifford, born Aug. 3rd, 1833. 
Officiating minister, Win. Rintoul, Oct. 24, 
1833. 

David McGregor, born Sept. 27th, 1833. 
Parents, John McGregor, farmer, Township 
of York, and Margaret Lushman. Officiat 
ing minister, Wm. Rintoul, Oct. 28th, 1833. 

Donald Smith, born Oct. 8th, 1833. Par 
ents, Malcolm Smith, farmer, Township 1 of 
York, and Graco Blue. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul, Oct. 29th, 1833. 

Carolina Maria Burnham, born July 1st, 
1833. Parents, Silas Burnham, merchant, 
and Clarissa J. Burnham. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. Rintoul, Nov. 1st, 1833. 



Donald Fletcher, born April 30th, 1833. 
Parents, Angus Fletcher, carpenter and wag- 
p-oiimaker, Yonge street, and Catherine 
Curry. Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul, 
Nov. 6th, 1833. 

Johni Hamilton, born May 5th, 1833. Par 
ents, W. Hamilton, storekeeper, and Eliza 
Hamilton. Officiating minister, Wm. Rin 
toul, Oct. 30th, 1833. 

William Clark and Catherine Clark, born 

Nov. 27th, 1833. Parents, William/ Clark, 

recently from Croy, InvernoSdhlre, X. B., 

! nnd Elizabeth Oiark. Officiating minister, 

Wm. Rintoul, Nov. 29th, 1833., 

Geroge Farrics, born Sept. 24th, 1833. 
Parents, Win. Parries, carpenter, Newg-ato 
street, and Betsv Farries. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. Rintoul, Feb. 5th, 1834. 

Wm. Jeffrey Robinson, born Jan. 20th, 
1834. Parents, Geo. Robinson, carpenter, 
Palace street, and Ellen Robinson. Officiat 
ing minister, Wm. Kintoul, Feb. 27, 1834. 
Elizabeth Blackley, born Jan. 27th, 1834. 
Parents, Wm. Blackley, farmer, Toronto, 
an< 4 Sarah Hunter. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, Feb. 24th, 1834. 

Thumbs Thomson Conolly, born Dec. 2nd, 
1832. Parents, Thomas Oonoly, bricklayer, 
and Betty Sally Thomson. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. Hintoul, March 5th. 1834. 

Malcolm McMartin, born Jan. 29th, 1834. 
Parents, Alex. McMartin, Martintown, Glen, 
garry, an 1 Mary McMartin. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. Rintoul, March 7th, i 1834. 

Eliza Maria McDojiald, born June 20th, 
1834. Parents, Alex. McDoaiald, carpenter, 
and Catherine Wilson. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul, March 9th, 1834. 

Mary Campbell, born Dec. 9th, 1833. 
Parents, Alex. Campbell, mortar labourer, 
I and Helen Campbell. Officiating- minister, 
! Wm. Rintoul, March 13th, 1834. 

Mary Emma Hickley, born Feb. 20, 1834. 
Parent Hugh Hickley. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rintoul, March 13th, 1834. 

Ann Lawrie, born June 21st, 1834. Par- 
I ents, John Lawrie, farmer, Township of 
! York, and Isabella Lawrie. Officiating min- 
i ister, Wm. Rintoul, July llth, 1834. 

Margaret Lawrie, born Sept. 15th, 1833. 
Parents, John Lawrie, farmer, Township of 
< York, and Isabella Lawrie. Officiating min- 
i ister, Wm. Rintoul, Jan. 30th, 1834. 

William Bra/ak^ Tborn Feb. 16th, 1834. 
Parents, John Brack, husbandman, and Jane 
Wanless. Officiating minister, Win. Rintoul, 
May 6th, 1834. 

Ann Beattie, born March 21st, 1834. 
j Parents, William Beattie, carpenter, and 
1 Janet Hodgert. Officiating minister, Wm. 
Rintoul, May 6th, 1834. 

William Turreff, born April 20th, 1834. 
; Parents, Wiliam Turreff, moulder, and Mary 
Fleming. Officiating minister, Wm. Rintoul. 
May 12th, 1834. 

Margaret Gartshore, born March 22nd, 
; 1834. Prents, John Gartshore, millwright, 
! Toronto, nd Marv Mitchell. Officiating 
minister, Wm. Rintoul, May llth, 1834. 
Isabella Cow, born April 10th, 1834. Par 
ents, John Cow, farmer. Township* of York, 
and Helen Hunter. Officiating minister, 
Wm. Rlntoul, May 26th, 1834^ 

William Ronnie, born Sept. 1st, 1834. 
Parents, Alex. Rennie, baker, City of To 
ronto, and Catherine Rennie. Officiating 
minister, W. T. Le*ch, Sept. 1st, 1834. 

John Strange, born Aug. 30, 1834. Par 
ents, J. M. Strange, and Margaret Strange. 






LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



135 



Officiating minister, W. T. Leach, Sept. 9th, 
1834. 

James Rutherford, born Sept. 8, 1834. 
Parents, Alex. Rutherford, carpenter, and 
Mary McKech.nio. Officiating- minister, Dun 
can McMillan, Oct. 24th, 1834. 

Mary Oalland, burn Nov. 9th, 1834. Par 
ents, Jehu Oallaud and Jean Johnston. Of 
ficiating minister, Henry Gordon. 

Thomas Oarfrae, born Nov. 9th, 1834. 
Parents, Hugh Oarfrae, gentleman, and Anjn 
Oarfrae. Officiating minister, Henry Gordon. 

Mary Sample, born Aug. 14, 1834. Par 
ents, Robert Sample, carpenter, and, Mary 
Porteous. Officiating minister, Robert Mc- 
Gibb. 

Robert Shaw. Parents, George Shaw, car 
penter, Toronto, and Louisa .Jackson. Of 
ficiating minister, Robert McGibb, Jan. 25, 
1835. 

Agnes Shaw. Parents, Andrew Shaw, car 
penter, Toronto, and Janet Gillespie, Of 
ficiating minister, John Bayne. 

Sarah Gillespie. Parents, Arch. Gillespie, 
farm servant, York. Township, and Agnes 
Buchanan. Officiating minister, John Baytae. 

James Kerr, born Feb. 8th, 1835. Par 
ents, William Kerr, carpenter, Toronto, 
and Mary Ann Sprotil. Officiating minister, 
John Bay-no, March 29th, 1835. 

Elizabeth Marshall, born Feb. il, 1835. 
Parents, Robert Marshall, butcher, and 
Elizabeth Riddell. Officiating minister, John 
Bayne, April 5th, 1835. 

Margaret Blain, born March 15, 1835. 
Parents, William. Blain, shoemaker, Toronto, 
and Elspeth Pirie, Officiating minister, John 
Bayne, April 30th, 1835. 

Helen Wilson, born April 5th, 1835. Par- 
euts, Jainos Wilson, carpenter, Toronto, and 
Helen Key. Officiating minister, John 
Bayne, May 24th, 1835. 

Hector McLeod and David McLeodt aped 
one year am; ( a half. Parents, George Mo- 
Lead, farmer, Vaughan., and Mrs, McLeod. 
Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, July 2, 



. 

Agnes Kureman Moir, born June 25th, 
1835. Parents, George Moir, labourer, Mil. 
ford. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach 
July 10th, 1835. 

Agnes Gray, born July 8th, 1835. Par 
ents, John Gray, carpenter, Toronto, and 
Elizabeth Potter. Officiating minister, Wm 
T. Leach, Aug. 17th, 183o. 

David Ramsay Forbes, born Oct. 2nd, 
1834. Parents, James Forbes, Toronto, and 
Mrs. Forbes. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Aug. 20th. 

Eliza. Ramsay, born Sept. 28th, 18.35. 
Parent, David Ramsay, Toronto. Officiat 
ing minisfer, Wm. T. Leach, Aug. 20! h. 

James McHardy, born Aug., 18 35 4 Par 
ents, Gpoj-ge McHaTffy, Toronto, and Mar 
garet Marshall. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leach, pet. 4th, 1835. 

Jane Smart, born Sept. 20, 1835. Par 
ents, Al^x. Smart, shoemaker, and Marv 
Smart. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Oct. 4th, 1835. 

Christina Telfrr, born June 23rd, 1835. 
Parents, Andrnw Telfer, carpenter, and 
Mary Telfer. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Oct. 4th, 1835. 

Angus Fletcher, bi>rn Aug. 25th, 1835 
Parent, Angus Fletcher, carpenter, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach 
JSme 24th, 1835. 

Jeaaie MilUi- Lawrie, born Aug. 31, 1835. 



Parents, Richard Lawrie, storekeeper, To 
ronto, nnd Margaret Millar. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. T. Leaoh, Oct. 4th, 1835. 

Barbara Gunn, born Dec. 20th, 1834. 
Parent, Ada.ni Gunn, Toronto. Officiating 1 
minister, Wm. T. Leaoh, Aug. 31st, 1835. 

Wm. Mitchell Thorn, born June 28th, 
1835. Parent, William Thorn, Toronto. Of 
ficiating minister, Win. T. Leach, Aug. 23, 
1&35. 

Adam Blake, born (Feb. 24, 1835. Par 
ents, James Blake, blacksmith, Toronto, and 
Jane Wood. Minister, Wm. T. Leaoh. 

Robert Smith, born Dec. 5, 1835. Par 
ents, Malcolm Smith, farmer, Township 1 of 
Toronto, and Grace Blue. Officiating/ min 
ister, Wm. T. Leach, Dec. 18th, 1835. 

Elizabeth Amelia McDonald, born Nov. 
19, 1835. Parents, John McDonald, sur 
veyor, and Elizabeth Amelia Mitchell. Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, Dec. 17, 
18 35. 

Margaret- Hunter, born Oct. 8th, 1835. 
Parents, Hugh Hunter, Oity of Toronto, 
and Ann Kerr. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Dec. 25th, 1835. 

Margaret Smith, born Oct. 18th, 1&35. 
Parents, Arch. Smith, Oity of Toronto, and 
Barbara Macalm. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leach, Jan. 15th, 1836. 

Helen Mackenzie, born March 1st, 1835. 
Parent, John Mackenzie, farmer, Markham. 
Officiating minister, Wm. McNaughton, 
Jan. 24th, 1836. 

Mary Jane Torrance, born Dec. 4, 1835. 
Parents, John Torrance, Toronto, and Har 
riet Torraoice. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Jan. 7th, 1836. 

Helen Riddell, born Dec. 26, 1836. Parw 
ents, Andrew Riddell, farmer, Vaughan, and 
Betsy Archer. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leaoh, Feb. 26, 3836. 

Charles Robinson and Elizabeth Robinson, 
born April 20th, 1836. Parents. George 
Robinson, Toronto, and Ellen Robinson. 
Officiating- minister, Wm. T. Leach, May 
8th, 1836. 

Isabella McNiven, born March 21, 1836. 
Parents, John IMcNiven, blacksmith, To 
ronto, and Mary Stewart. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. T. Leach, March 25th, 1836. 

John Keith, born November, 1835. Par 
ent, Duncan Keith, labourer, Toronto^ Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, April 7th, 
1836. 

John Taylor, born Oct. 17th, 1835. Par 
ents, John Taylor, labourer, Toronto, and 
Flora MacdonaUl. Officint i"ff minister, Wm. 
T. Leach, April 23rd, 1836. 

Alexander D ewar, born July 17, 1836. 
Parent, David Dowar, Toronto. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leach, July 28th, 1835. 

Donald Ourrie, born May 1, 1836. Par 
ents, Arch. Ourrio, Township of Toronto, 
nnd Mary Keith. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leach, Dec. 10th, 1836. 

John Harvey, born April 14th, 1837. 
Parents, Robert Harvey, Toronto, and Ellen 
Harvoy. O fi i ting minister, Wm. T, Leach 
Jan. 19th, 1838. 

Elizabeth O. Leach, born Sept. 24, 1836. 
Parents, Wm. Turnbull Leaoh, minister of 
the Gospel, and Jessie Skirving. .pfficiat- 
intr minister, Henry Gordon, Oct. 24, 1836. 

D-avid Xichnll, born Nov. 12, 1836. Par 
ents, David Nichnll, tailor, Toronto, and 
Racnol Govino. Officiating minister, Wm, 
T. Leach, Don. llth, 1836. 

Robert Bell, born Sept. 14th, 1836. Par- 



13G 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



ents, William Boll, farmer. York Township, 
and Sarah Bell. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leach, Deo. llth, 1836. * 

Isa-bella Kennaird, boxn Auk ^13, Jo. 

Parents, Alex. Keamaird, carpenter, Toronto, 
and Jean Vair. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Lea,eh, Oct. 16th, 1836. 

Catherine McGregor, born Sept. 19, 1835. 
Parent, Alex. McGregor, innkeeper, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Dec. 25th, 1836. 

Jean Wilson, born Deo. 13, 1836. Par 
ents, James Wilson, carpenter, Toronto, and 
Ellen Wilson, Officiating minister, Wm^ T. 



po 18^(5 PHIV 

K)U8 it ll J->C11 L/U1** kJ^ffc- S-lOt -LOO\J ^^ 

ents, John Bell, lawyer, Toronto, and Cath 
erine Bell. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Jan. 4th, 1837. i 

Margaret Fleming, born Oct. 
Parents, James Fleming, seedsman, Toronto, 
and M-.irgaret Gedded. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T. Leacih, Jan. 8th. 1837. 

Barbara Duncan, born May k 1887. and 
Isabella Duncan, born Aug. 30th, ib. 

Parents, James D uncan, farmer, Toronto, 
end Margaret Duncan. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T. Leacih, Jan. 2nd, 1837. 

Elizabeth Rankin Donn, born Jan. ] .th, 
Pa-rent, John Donn, blacksmith, Toronto. 
Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, Jan. 

Hannah Middlemist, born Oct., 1836. Par 
ents, Henry Middlemist, Toronto, and Dor 
othy Middlemist. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leach, Aug. 6th, 1837. 

Nancy Reid, born Feb. 26, 1836. Par 
ents, Arch. Reid, carpenter, Toronto, and 
Jonnot McKechnie. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T. Leaoh, IFeb. 26th, 1837. 

Elizabeth Graham Thompson, born July 
31st 1837. Parent, James Thompson. To 
ronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
AUJT. 17th, 1837. 

William MoKown., born March 17- 3Hi *f- 
Parent, William McKown, Toronto. Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, Feb. 22, 

18137. 

Eliza Jane Turner, born Dec. 7th, 18-36. 
Parent, John Turner, Toronto. Officiatr.ig 
minister, Wm. T. Leaoh, Feb. l!2nd, ] 37. 

Robert Stewart, born March 18th, 1837. 
Parents, Alex. Stewart, carpenter. To- 
rooLto, and Anna Maria Stewart Officiatmtr 
minister, Wm. T. Leaoh, March 28th, 1837. 

Mary Jane Torranoe, born tteo. *, ies. 
Parents, John Torrance, Toronto, and Har 
riot Torrance. Officiating minister, Wm. 1. 
Le*oh, April 20th, 1837. 

Vletori* Ann Warburton, born July] 6th, 
1837 Parents, John Cameron, cashier of 
Bank of Toronto, and Rosa M. Cameron. 
Officiating Minister, Wm. T. Leach, July 
i, 1837. 



UJUlIlt B *- J-J* * *- T ~ 

Parent, Ricftiard Lawrie, Toronto. 

ating minister, Duncan Macaulay, March 

B 1837 

Catherine M. MdKnight, born April 1st, 
1837. Parent, James McKnight, merchant, 
Toronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leaoh, May 18th, 1837. 

Arthur Coulson, born March 31, \o d -- 
Parents, Samuel Ooulson, Toronto, and Mary 
OovJson. Officiating minister, Wm. T. ; 
Leach, April 80th, 1837. I 

Catherine J. McLean, born Dec. 22, 18. 
Parent, Alex. McLean, Toronto. Officiat- 



ing minister, Wm. T, Leach, June 30, 1837. 
Mary Hodgson, born March 3, 18.37. Par 
ents, Joseph Hodgson, merchant, Toronto, 
and Elizabeth Hodgson. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. T. Leaoh, March 12th, 1837. 

Isabella Younle, T)orn Sept. 17th, 1837. 
Parents, John Younie, Toronto, and Mar 
garet Weir. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, May 1st, 1837. 

John Shaw, born May 13th, 18-37. Par 
ents, George Shaw, Toronto, and Louisa 
Shaw. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
June 25th, 1837. 

Mary McGregor, born April 20th, 1837. 
Parent, Alex. McGregor, innkeeper, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Sept. 10th, 18137. 

Eliza Telfer, born July 6th, 1837. Par 
ents, Andrew Telfer, Toronto, and Mary 
Telt er. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Sept. 10th, 1837. 

Mary Gillespio. barn April 12th, 1837. 
Parents, Archibald Gillespie, Toronto, and 
Agnes Buchanan. Officiating minister, Win. 
T. Leaoh, Aug. 27th, 1837. 

William Wallace, born Sept. 17, 1837. 
Parents, John Wallace, blacksmith, 
Vaughan, and Mary McArthur. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leaoh, Oct. 20th, 1837. 
Joseph Brown, born Aug. 23rd, 1836. 
Parents, Joseph Brownt, miller, E tobi- 
coke, and Mary Brown. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T. Leaoh. Oct. 28th, 1837. 

Elizabeth Moir, born Aug. 6th, 1837. 
Parents, George Moir. Toronto, and Agnes 
Petrie. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Lech, 
Aug. 20th 1837. 

John Henry Mulholland. born Nov. 27, 
1837. Parents, Jas. MTilholland, Toronto, 
and Margaret Mulholland. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. T. Leach, Dec. 18th, 1837. 
I Henry Jos. Bell, born Dec. 13, 1837. 
Parents, John Bell, lawyer, Toronto, and 
i Catherine Rutherford. Officiating minie- 
i ter, Wm. T. Leach, Dec. 15th, 1837. 

Isabella Turner, born Xov. 27th, 1827. 
Parents, John Turner, Toronto, and Jajie 
Turner. Officiiting minister, Wm. T. Leaoh, 
Deo. 25th, 1837. 

Nancy McLeod, born Sept. 12th, 1827. 
Parents, Duncan McLeod, Toronto, and 
Nancy flVIcArthur. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leaoh, Jan. 19th, 1838. 

Jane Morrison, born Sept. 27th, Iod7. 
Parent, Daniel Morrison, carpenter, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Jan. 1st, 1838. 

John Eastwood, born July 5th, .S<57. 
Parent, John Eastwood, Torontoy Officiat 
ing minister, Wm. T Leach, Jan. 1, 1838. 
Francis McLaughlin, barn May, 10, 1888. 
Parents, Charles McLaughlin, Toronto,, and 
Elizabeth McLaughlin. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T. Leaoh, July 19th, 1838. _ 

Catherine Monro, born Sept. 2O, 1837. 
Parents, Alexander Monro, Toronto, and 
Margaret McLaughlin. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T. Leaoh, Oot. 2nd, 1838. 

Mary Taylor, bora March 12th, lotfS. 
Parents, Dugald Taylor, shoemaker, To 
ronto, and Catherine MacKellor. Officiat 
ing minister, Wm. T. Leach, May 2. 1838. 
John Thomas Robert McKay, born March 
31st, 1838. Parents, Alex. McKay, mer- 
cha-nt, and Rosetta Louisa Hamilton. Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, June 24. 

Elizabeth Stewart, born Feb. 4, 1839. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



137 



Parents, Alex. Stewart, carpenter, To 
ronto, and Clara Maria Hicox. Officiating 
minister, Win. T. Leaah, July Otli, 1842. 

i William Mc-Beath, born July 5th, 1839. 
Parents, Won. McBeath, private 93rd High 
landers, and Catherine Sinclair. Officiat 
ing minister, Wtn. T. Leach, July 28, 1839. 

David W. Wilkinson, born< May 16, 1839. 
Parents, John W. Wilkinson, labourer, To 
ronto, and Lucinda Allan. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. T. Leach, Oct. 31st, 1839. 

Sarah Amos, born July! 29th, 1838. Par 
ents, S. Amos, Commissariat Oti ice, Toronto, 
:>nd (Sarah Bloor. Officiating minister, Wm. , 
T. Leaoh, Nov. 22nd, 1838. 

Mark Danley, born NOV.J 3, 1835. Par 
ents, John Danley, farmer, Toronto, and 
Jane Brack. Officiating- minister. Win. T. ; 
Leach. Dec. 28th, 1838. 

John Ohas. Maadoucll, born Sept. loth, : 

1837. Parents, Duncan Macdouell, mer- 
ahant, Toronto, and Maria Charles. Of- 
finiating minister, Wm. T. Teach, Jan. 1st, 
1838. 

Elizabeth Ann Henderson, born Jan. 20th, 

1838. Parent, Hugh Renders jn, innkeeper, 
Toronto, Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, March 20th, 1838. 

John Mackay, born March 21st, 1838. 
Parents, Angus Mackay, Toronto, and Jane 
Mackay. Officiating minister, Win. T. Leach, 
March" 20th, 1838. 

Jane McDougall, born Jany 2Gth, 1838. 
Parents, Daniel McDougall, Toronto, and 
Mary Ann McDongall. Officiating minister, 
WVm. T. Leach, April 5th, 1838. 

Isabella Marshall, born Augv 2Gth, 1837. 
Parents, Robert Marshall, carpenter, To 
ronto, s.nd Elizabeth Marshall. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leaoh,, March 8, 1838. 

Wm. Purkiss Stewart, born Feb. 17, 1838. 
Parents, Robert Stewart, carpenter, To 
ronto, ami Elizabeth Stewart. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leach, Oct. 20, 1838. 

James Waldie McCallu/m, born Nov. 2nd, 
1838. Parents, Jamos McCallum, Toronto, 
Officiating minister, Wrn. T. Loach, Oct. 
20th, 1838. 

John Grant, born July 19, 1838. Par 
ents, John Grant, Toronto, and Margaret 
Tobin. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Nov. 1st, 1838. 

iWm. Workman, born Feb. 27th, 1830. 
Parents, Joseph Workman .merchant, To 
ronto, and E. Wiasnidge, Officiating minis 
ter. Wm. T. Leaoh, Jan. 1st, 1839. 

Fred. Michael Workman, bora April 3rd, 
1838. Parents, Jos. Workman, merchant, 
Toronto, and E. Wasnidge. Oificiating min 
ister, Wm. T. Leah, Jan. 1st, 1839. 

Alicia Ann Veitch, born April 17, 1839. 
Parent, David Veitch, sergeant 93rd High 
landers. Officiating minuter, Wm. T. Leach, 
April 27th, 1839. 

John Newton, born Mayi 4, 1839. Par 
ents, James New ton, carpenter, Vonge st., 

and Wilkie. Officiating 1 minister, Wm. 

T. Leach, June 20th, 1839. 

John Mulloy, born Sept. 12th, 1839. 
Parent, John Mulloy, Richmond Hill. Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, June 20, 
1839. 

Jane Kinnaird, born April iGth, 1839. 
Parents, Alex. Kinnaird, carpenter, To 
ronto, and Jane Vair. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. T. Loaoh, May 2Oth, 1839. 

Alex. Ohas. Robertson, bor^ Auril 12th, 
1839. Parents, Wm. Robertson, farmer, 
Etobicoke, aad Ann Cameron. Officiating 



minister, Wm. T. Loacfij Mny 21st, 18<39. 
William Larmout, born Feb. 2nd, 1839. 
Parents, Ane^us Larmout, farmer, Etobicoke* 
and Janet MaaNiven. Officiating minister, 
,Wm. T. Leaoh, Mas 2t1st 1839. 

James Geddes, bora Nov. 28, 1839. Par 
ents, Henry Geddes, Toronto ,uivi Helen 
Armstrong. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Dec. 9th, 1839., 

.William Grant, born March 6th, 3639. 
Parents, John Grant, Toronto, and Mar 
garet Grant. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Dec. 9th, 1839, 

Ma.ry Elizabeth ,-mith, born Aug. llth, 
1838." Parent, James smith, merchant, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Dec. 20th, 1839. 

Fru-ucis Qhrishulin, bora April 11, 1839. 
Parents, David Chrisholm, Toronto Town 
ship, and Rachel MacDonald. (Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leach,; July 1st, 1839. 

Mary McNiel Henderson, born Oct. 7th, 
1839. Parent, Hugh Henderson, innkeeper, 
Toronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Doc. 8th, 1839. 

Ann Hannah, born June 22nd, 1839. 
Parents, Hugh Hannah, Pickering, and Jane 
Thorn. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Oct. 20th, 1839. 

Mary Margaret McClure and William 
Thmmas McOlure, both born May 19, 1839. 
Parents, Robt. McOlure, merchant, Toronto, 

and Campbell, Officiating minister, 

Wm. T. Leach, Nov. 3Oth, 1839. 

Jas. Fred, smith Macdonell, born Aug. 
17th, 1839. Parents, Duinoan Macdonell. 
merchant, Toronto, and Maria Charles, Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, O^t. 1st, 
1839. 

John Hamilton, born Nov. 17th, 1839. 
Parents, isamucl Hamilton, Toronto, and 
Jane Stewart. Orticiating minister. Wm. T. 
Leach, Ja.n. 14th, 1840. 

Georgo Mackay, born Jan. 3, 1840. Par 
ent, Murdoch Mackay, 93rd Highlanders, 
Toronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Feb. 20th, 1840. 

Elizabeth Clementina Campbell, born Jan. 

12th, 1840. Parents, John Campbell, O. ir i 

Highlanders, and Barbara Taylor. Officiat- 

: ing minister, Wm. T. Leach, Jan. 18, 1840. 

Catherine Harriot Cameron, born Dec. 29, 

1839. Parents, John Cameron, cashier 

Bank, and ROM i M . Cameron. Offioiaan:_r 

minister, Wm. T. Leach, Feb., 1840. 

Alex. Mo.BeA.n, born March 4th, 1840. 
Parents, Wm. MoBean, Toronto, and Janet 
Mol^msrhlin. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, March llth, 1840. 

Clarissa Louisa Bell, bortx Jan. 9, 1&40. 

Parents, John Bel!, lawyer, Toronto, and 

Catherine Rutherford. Officiating minister, 

Win. T. Leach, March 10th, 1840. 

John Goodale, born Dec. 20, 1839. Par- 

ents, John Goodale, Toronto, and Hay. 

Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, March 
, 15th, 1840. 

Sutherland, born Feb. o, 1840. Par 
ents, Kenneth fcutherlaiid, merchant, To~ 
ronto, and Malita Rains. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. T. Leach, March 20th, 1840. 

Isabella Sutherland, born March 8, 1840. 
; Parents, Hugh fatherland, Toronto, and 
Chrifltina Gordon. Officiating minister, Wm. 
: T. Leach, April 1 i, 1840. 

David John Logan, bom May 17, 1840. 
Parents, Richard Louraji, Toronto, and Jane 
Ann Birmingham. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leach. June 21st, 1840. 



138 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



James Ferrah, born May 14, 1840. Par 
ents, John FerraJi, confectioner, Toronto), 
iwidi Margaret Dickson. Officiating minister, 

IWm. T. Lea-oh, June ^^A 3 ; 84 ^^ IQ-T 
Robert Milliga.n, born Oct. 14th, lOdl 
Parents, Arthur Milligan, Toronto, and Jane 
HalLey. Officiating minister, Wni. T. Leach, 
July 13th, 1840. \ 

Hugn Oarfrae Dicksom, born July 2bth, 
1840 Parents, Dickson, baker, To 
ronto, and Oarfrae. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. T. Leaoh, Aug. 3rd, 1840. 

George Milligan, born June) 13th, 1840. 
Parents, Arthur Milligan. Toronto, and Jane 
Halley. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 

Jane Robert, born May 4, 1840. Par 
ents, James Robert, Toronto, and Janet 
Gorrie. Officiating minister, Won. T. Leach, 
Aug. 3rd, 1840 1 . 

Frederic Arthur Gunn-., born Aug. 17 tn, 
1840. Parents, Peter Gunn, 93rd High 
landers, and Mary Launan, Toronto. Offi 
ciating minister, Wm. T,. Leach, Aug. 30th, 

Adam Shannon, born Sept. oth, 1830; 
James Maoomb Shaumnon, born, April ^nd, 
1834, and Robert Shannon, born *eb. 1st, 
1840. Parents, James Shannon, Toronto, 
shoemaker, and Margaret Shannon. Offi 
ciating minister, Wm. T\ Leach, Aug. 30, 

"Henry William Stranger, born July 15th, 
1840. Parents, Wmi Stranger, Toronto, 
and Mary Petrie. Officiating minister, Wm . 
T. Leach, Aug. 4th, 1840. 

Marv Jane McLaughlin, born June 4th, 
1840." Parents, Ohas. McLaughlin, Toron 
to, and Elizabeth Mcdeary. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. T. Leach, Oct. 11th, 18*0. 

Alex. Duff .Sinclair, born March 1, lo^m. 
Parents, George Sinclair, Toronto, and Isa 
bella Sinclair. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, May 18th, 1R40. . 

Christina Catherine Craig, born Aug. dl>, 
1840. Parents, Mark Craig, Toronto, and 
Margaret McFarlane. Officiating minister, 
Wm. It Leech, Oct. 17th. 1840. 

James Frederic Smith, born Nov. 6, 3 UJk 
Parent, James Smith, merchant, Toronto, 
Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, Nov. 
10th, 1840. . 

Jno. Cockburn Gourdhouse, born Junei 4, 
1835. Parents, Wm. Gourdhouse, farmer, 
Toronto, and Elizabeth Allan. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leach, Nov. 17, 1840. 

Janet Sinclair Grant, born April 14th, 
1840. Parents, David Gco. O" 1 . 
ronto, and Rachel McKechnie. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leach, Nov. ITtb, 184O. 

Jfeniiah Gunn, born Oct. 9t, 1840 Par 
ents, lAUohlin Gunn, tailor, Toronto, and 
Isabella Gray. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 



jj^_l,o \ . YL_, 1 llil U.MJ u\ju. AA / " .. J-t> .LOO S7. 

ents, " Al-x. Miitland, merchant, Toronto, 
and Helen Skirving. Officiating minister, 
Win. T. Leach, July 15th, 1839. 

Margaret Wardlaw Skirving Maitland, 
borif April 5th, 1841. Parents, Alex. 
Maitland, Toronto, and Helen Skirving. Of 
ficiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, June 12, 

Alex. McGregor, born Nov. 13th, 1840. 
Parents, Alx. McGregor, Toronto, and 
Catherine McGro<?or. Officiating minister, 
WTO. T. Leach, Juno 12th, 1841. 

Charles Frazer, born Feb. 13th, 1841. 
Parents. Charles Frazer, Toronto, and Janet 



Paton. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Feb. 23rd, 1841. 

Jessie Hopkirk, born Dec. 30th, 1840. 
Parents, James Hopkirk, Advocate, Toronto, 
and Jeasie Farquharson Bardie. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T- Leach, Jan. 1st, 1841. 

James Kerr, born Nov. 17, 1840. Par- 
I ents, James Kerr, Toronto, and Janet Wil- 
1 son. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Feb. 27th, 1841. 

Eliza Ann Mulholland, born Oct. 1 1 , l 
: Parent, James Mulholland, shoemaker, To- 
; ronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
I Jan. 12th, 1841. 

George Scott McConkey. Parents, Thomas 
McCankey, Toronto, and Elizabeth Crowder. 
Officiating minister, Wm. T,. Leach. 

Kobert Lamont Stewart, born Feb. 19th, 
I 1840. Parents, Robert Stewart, carpenter, 
: Toronto, and Elizabeth Purkiss. Officia.t- 
! ing minister, Wm. T. Leach, Feb. 19th, 
1841. 

Isaa o Buchanan Bicket, born March 2(7, 
1841. Parents, James Bicket, Toronto, and 
Jane Leckie. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, April, 1841. 

Alex. Erskine Williamson, born March zb, 
1841. Parents, Wm. Williamson, clerk, and 
Margaret Erskine. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leach, -June 3rd, 1841. 

Alex. Ohrisholm, born April 20th, 1841. 

Parents, Donald Ohrisholm, farmer, Toronto 

Township, and Rachel Macdonell. Officiat- 

i ing minister, Wm. T. Leaoh, June 28th, 

Margaret Henderson, born Aug. 31st, 
1841. Parent, Hugh Henderson, innkeeper, 
Toronto, Officiating minister, Wm. TJ. 
Leach, Sept. 1st, 1841, 

George Dickson, born Nov. 7th, 1840u 
Parent, George Dickson, merchant, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Sept. 10th, 1841. 

Eliza Christina MacDonald, born July 13, 
18 41. Parents, Daniel MacDonald, Toronto, 
and Elizabeth MacDonald. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. T. Leach, Sept. 13th, 1841. 

Donald Bain, born Aug. 2, 1841. Parents, 
John Bain, Toronto, and Marjl Ross. Offi 
ciating minister, Wm. T. Leach, Sept. 16th, 
1841. 

Jas. Archibald Chapman, born Sept. 13th, 
1841. Parents, Frederick Chapman, clerk, 
Toronto, and Mary Hamilton. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leach, Oct. 10th, 1841. 

[William McPherson, born Oct. 3, 1841. 
Parents, William McPhersom, 93rd High 
landers, and Elizabeth McPherson. Officiat 
ing minister, Win. IV Leach, Oct. 4, 1841. 

Mary Elizabeth Bell, barn Oct. 31, 1841> 
Parents, John Bell, lawyer, Toronto, and 
Catherine Rutherford. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T. Leach, Dec., 1841. 

Archibald McBride, born Sept. 11, 1841. 
Parents. Neil McBride, Toronto, and Ann 
Gilmdre. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Oct. 10th, 1841. 

Walter Teller Kidd, born Feb. 2nd, 1840 ; 
Victoria Mary Kidd, born Aug. 23rd, 1837. 
Parents, John Kidd, Toronto, and Jessie 
Denham. Officiating minister, Win. T. 
Leaoh, Dec., 1841. 

James Henry Hickman, born Oct. 2IJna, 
1840. Parents, James Hickman, Toronto, 
and Oatherino Taylor. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T, Leach, Dec. 5th, 1841. 

Euphemia Catherine Kidd, born Sept. 44, 
i 1839. Parents, John Kidd, Toronto, and 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



139 



Jessie Denham. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leaoh, Dec., 1841. 

George Sinclair Munton, born Oct. 17th, 
1841. Parents, George Munton, labourer, 
Toronto. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leaoh, Jan. 3rd, 1842. 

Isabella Stranger, born Deo. 10th, 1841. 
Parents, William Stranger, Toronto, and 
Mary Petrie. Officiating minister, Wm; T. 
Leach, Jan. IQth, 1842. 

Mary Ann Wiard, born Oct. 5th, 1841. 
Pa rends., David Ward, Toronto, and Ann 
Anderson. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leaoh, Jan. 10th, 1842. 

Donald Sinclair McLeaA. born Oct. 3rd, 

1841. Parents, An^us McLean, Toronto, 
and Margaret Henderson. Officiating minis 
ter, Wm. T. Leach, Jan. 25th, 1842. 

John Ford, born Dec. 8th, 1841. Par 
ents, James Ford, Royal Artillery, Toronto, 
and Jane Simmons Gardiner. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leaoh, Jan. 27th, 1842. 

Helen Geddes, born Dec. 12, 1841. Par 
ent, Andrew Geddes, Toronto. Officiating 
minister, Feb. 8th, 1843. 

James Grant, born Oct, 26, 1841. Par 
ents, John Grant, Toronto, and Margaret 
Grunt. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
Feb. 8th, 1842. 

Margaret Sutherland Gilbertson, born Jan. 
30th, 1842. Parents, Henry Gilbertson, 
Toronto, and Ann Webster. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. T. Leaoh, Feb. llth, 1842. 

sn,rah Stewart, born Nov. 1st, 1840 ; 
Oh;is. Lament Stewart, born June 4, 1842. 
Parents, Alex. Stewart, carpenter, Toronto, 
and Anna Maria Hicox. Officiating( minis 
ter, Wm. T. Leach, July IGth, 1842. 

Janet Oassie Campbell, born Feb. 18th, 

1842. Parents, John Campbell, 93rd High 
landers, and Barbara Taylor. Officiating 
(minister, Wm. T Leach, Feb. 21st, 1842. 

Marion Goodale, born Dec. 8, 1841. Par 
ents, John Goodale, Toronto, and^ -- Hay. 
Officiating minister, Win. T. Leach, March 
5th, 1842. 

John Buchanan Cameron, born Dec 1st, 

1841. Parents, John Cau.eron. cashier of 
bank, and Rosa N. Cameron. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leacto, March* 16, 1842. 

Stephen Boaden Scot, born Feb. 8, 1842. 
Parents, Wm. Rose Scot, Toronto, and 
Mary Ann Boaden. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T. Leach, April 7th, 1842. 

Henry Leach Henderson, born Jan. 3rd, 

1842. Parents, Wm. Henderson, merchant, 
Toronto, and Wilhelmina Monro Sinclair. 
Officiating minister, Wm. T*. Leach, March, 
1842. 

Matilda Maria Lincoln, born Oct. 13, 
1840. Parents, Wmv Alfred Lincoln, To 
ronto, and Sophia England. Officiating min 
ister, Wm. T. Leach, April 24th, 1842. 

Robert MoKean, born April 26th. 1842,. 
Parents, Robert McKean, 93rd Highland 
ers, Toronto, and Jane Russel. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leach, Mas 1st, 1842. 

Catherine Ferguson, born April 21, 1842. 
Parents, John Ferguson, Toronto, and Jean 
McEchren. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, May 26th, 1842. 

William Murray, born May 9, 1842. Par 
ents, James Murray, Toronto, and Ann Reid. 
Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leaoh, May 21, 



Alex. Macdonell, born Sept. 12th, 1841. 
Parents, Duncan Macdonell, merchant, To 
ronto, and Maria Charles. Officiating min- 
toter, Wm. T- Leach, May. 30th, 1842. 



George Montgomerie, born June 12, 1842. 
Parents, Donald Montgomerie, Toronto, and 
Ann Campbell. Officiating minister, Wm. 
T. Leach. June 22nd, 1842. 

Mary Ralston, born Nov. 27, 1841. Par- 
! ents, James Ralston, Toronto, and Jane 
i Craig. Officiating minister, Wm. T. Leach, 
j July 3rd, 1842. 

Duncan Stewart, born May 4th, 1842. 
Parent, Robert Stewart, Toronto. Officiat 
ing minister, Wm. T. Leach, July 2t>, 1842. 

George Lesslie, born April 3rd, 1842. 
Parents, George Lesslie, merchant, Toronto, 

and Davis. Officiating minister, Wm. 

T. Leach, July 2nd, 1842. 

Ann Ooulson, born Dec. 3, 1839. Par- 
| ents, Samuel Coulson, Toronto, and Mary, 
Kennedy. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
i Leach, Sept. 5th, 1842 . 

Elizabeth Sutherland, born Aug. 27th, 
1842. Parents, James Sutherland, Toronto, 
and Elizabeth ftwanton. Officiating minister, 
Wm. T. Leach, Sept. 17th, 1842. 

William Addisoi Bicket. born Sept. 8th, 
1842. Parents, James Bicket, Toronto, and 
Jane Leckie. Officiating minister, Wm. T. 
Leach, Nov., 1842 . 

Eliza Veitch, born July 31, 1842. Par 
ents, David Veitch, sergeant 93rd High 
landers, and Mary Murphy. Officiating- min 
ister, Wm. T. Leach, Aug. 4lh, 1842. 

Marion McGlahan, born July 25, 1842. 
| Parents, James McGlnshari, merchant, To 
ronto, and Mary McMicking. Officiating 
minister, Wm. T. Leach, Oct. 13th, 1842. 

Mary Isabella Oves, born Oct. 8, 18421. 
Parents, James Ovos, 93rd Highlanders, and 
Charlotte Jeffers. Officiating minister, John 
| Barclay, Dec. llth, 1842. 

Alexander Oal, born Nov. 8, 1842. Par 
ents, George Oal, sergeant, 93rd Highland- 
; ers, and Elizabeth Reynolds. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Dec. llth, 1842. 

Mary Stalker, born Aug. 19th, 1842. 
Parents, Robert Stalker, 93rd Highland 
ers, and Emily Hannah. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Dec. llth, 1842. 

Paul Campbell. Parents, Donald Camp 
bell, saddler, Toronto, and Jane Hay. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 18, 
1842. 

William Barclay McMurrioh, born Nov. 1, 
1842. Parents, John McMurrich, merchant, 
Toronto, and Janet Dickson. Officiating, 
minister, John Barclay, Dec. 18th, 1842. 

George Doughtie, Parents, James Dough- 
tie, 93rd Highlanders, and Hannah Payne. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Deo. 19, 
i 1842. 

William Crighton. Parents, George Crigh- 
i ton, corporal, 93rd Highlanders, and Isa 
bella Winchester. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Dec. 19th, 1842. 

Hugh John McNeille, born Aug. 19th, 
1842. Parents, Hugh McNeille, tavern 
keeper, Toronto, and Eliza Hutchison. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Deo. 22nd, 
1842. 

Jessie Anne Clarice McKay, born Sept. 
14th. Parents, George McKay, Toronto, 
and Janet Gibson. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Deo. 25th, 1842. 

Sarah McLachlan, born Oct. 14th, 1842k 
Parents, James McLachlan, 93rd High 
landers, and Sarah O Neill. Officiating- min 
ister, John Barclay, Deo. 25th, 1842. 

Margaret Williamson, born Nov. llth, 
1842. Parents, Donald Williamson, ser 
geant, 93rd Highlanders, and Maroela Ser- 



140 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



vice. Officiating- minister, John Barclay, 
Dec. 25th, 1842. 

Eliza Jessie Williamson, born Nov. 29th, 
1842. Parents, Win. Williamson, Toronto, 
find Margaret Hrskinu. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Jan. 2nd, 1843. 

Peter Moffatt White, Sept. 14th, 1842. 
Parents, Robert White, Toronto, and Anne 
Henderson. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Jan. Gth, 1843,. 

George Campbell, born July 27, 1842. 
Parents, William Campbell, Toronto, and 
Eli/aboth Parker. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Jan. Gth, 1843. 

Frances Elizabeth Amelia McDonald. Par 
ents, Donald McDonald, Toronto, and Fran 
ces McDonald. Officiating- minister, John 
Barclay. Jan. 17th, 1843. 

Alexander Christie, born Jan. 0, 184-2. 
Parents, James Christie, sergeant-major, 
93rd Highlanders, and Mary Anne Thomp 
son. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Jan. 22nd, 1843. 

Mary Amelia Alexander, born Aug. 13th, 

1842. Parents, James Alexander, private, 
93rd Highlanders, and Winifred t-<?<lon. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Jan. 22nd, 
18*3. 

Alexander Nisbet, born Nov. 25th, 1842. 
Parents, Francis Nisbet, Toronto, and Chris 
tian Smith. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Jan. 28th, 1843. 

Richard Welsh Lavvrie, born Jan. Gth, 

1843. Parents, Richard Lawrie, Toronto, 
and Margaret Miller. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Feb. 5th, 1843. 

Isabella Anno Ronnie, born Sept. 1, 1842. 
Parents, Alex. Rennio, Toronto, and Cath 
erine Graham. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Feb. Cth, 1843. 

William Fraser, uom .opt. 2, 1842. Par 
ents, Donald <Fraser, 93rd Highlanders, and 
Zillah Elliot. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Feb. 12th, 1843. 

James Pollock, born June 29, 1842. Far- 
ents, Robert Pollock, 93rd Highlanders, and 
Mary Brady. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Feb. 12th, 1843. 

Janet Augusta Rogers, born Nov. 2i8th, 
1842. Parents, Joseph Rogers, merchant, 
Toronto, and Janet Bastedo. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, March 1, 1843* 

William Henry Hepburn. Parents, Peter 
Hepburn, 93rd Highlanders, and Maria 
Hughes. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, March 5th, 1.843. 

Frederick Augustus McKay, born Nov. 13, 
1842. Parents, Alex.. McKay, merchant, 
Toronto, au.d Rofcetta McKay. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, March 5th, 1843. 

Andrew Clarke, Dorn Feb. 10th, 1843. 
Parents, Andrew Olarke, sergeant, 93rd 
Highlanders, and Anne Smith. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, March 19, 1843. 

John Marr Gray, born Dec. 29th, 1842. 
Parents, George Gray, private, 93rd High 
landers, and Elizabeth S. Gaston. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, March 19, 1843. 

Margaret Beaston, born Feb. 14, 1843. 
Parents, Boswell Beaston, private, 93rd 
Highlanders, and Jane Porter. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, March 19, 1843. 

Walter Henderson McFarlane, born Dec. 
23rd, 1842. Parents, Walter McFarlane, 
merchant, Toronto, and Louisa Henderson. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, March 
20th, 1843. 

William Munro, born March 12th, 1843. 



Parents, William Munro, sergeant, 93rd" 
Highlanders, and Marianna Challaghan. Of- 
fi -iating minister, John Barclay, April 13th, 
1843. 

WiJlimina Murray, born March 3rd, 1843. 
Parents, William Murray, corporal, 93rd 
Highlanders, and Margaret McDonald. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, April 13, 
1 o 4. 3 

Robert Cameron, born March 25th, 1843. 
Parents, Kenneth Cameron, carpenter, To 
ronto, and Isabella Logan. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, April 19th, 1843. 

James Henry Sutherland, born Jan. 25, 
1843. Parents, James B. Sutherland, mer 
chant, Toronto, and Eva Sophia Raines. Of- 
j ficiating minister, John Barclay, April 23, 
I 1843. 

Ellen Gunn, born April 9, 1842. Parents, 
! George Gunn, corporal, 93rd Highlanders, 
and Mary Waters. Officiating minister, John 
. Barclay, April 2ith, 1843. 

Susan Jam; McFariano, born Dec. 5th, 
1842. Parents, John McFarlane, Toronto, 
and Catherine I. Douglas. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, April 25th, 1843. 

Robert Campbell, born March 4th, 1843. 
Parent*, Donald Campbel 1 , blacksmith, To- 
ro iito, and Anne Campbell. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, April i^Jih, 1843. 

Jane Oorbett, born Feb. 15th, 1843. 
Parents, Angus Oorbett, colour-sergeant, 
93rd Highlanders, and Jane Thomson. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, April ii<>, 
; 1843. 

James Lang, born April 18th. Parents. 
I John Lang, private, 93rd Highlanders, and 
I Mary McQuillan. Officiating minister, John 

Barclay, April 26th, 1843. 
] Mary Anne Hutton, born April, 25, 1843. 
; Parents, Peter Hutton, 93rd Highlanders, 
and Mary Anne Hannah. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, May 3rd, 1843. 

Mary Forster, born Feb. 17th, 1843. 
j Parents, Walter Forster, carpenter, To- 
j ronto, and Mary M. Wield. Officiating min- 
; ister, John Barclay, May 7th, 184-3. 

Catherine Gibb, born Feb. 15th, 1843. 
Parents, Charles Gibb, engineer, Toronto, 
and Eliza shillinglaw. Officiating minister, 
i John Barclay, May 7th, 1843. 

Margaret Spence Kennedy, born March 
{ 15th, 1843. Parents, John" Kennedy, iner- 
| chant, Toronto, and Agnes Craig. Officiat- 
i ilia minister, John Barclay, May 7, 1843 . 

James Shaw, born April G, 1843- Par 
ents, James Shaw, merchant, Toronto, and 
Jane McGrogor. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, May 7th, 1843. 

j John Henderson, born Feb. 12th, 1843. 
I Parents, William Henderson, merchant, To 
ronto, and Wilhelmina Monro. Officiating- 
minister, John Barclay, May 9th, 1843- 

Anne Marshal, born May 15th, 1842. 
Parents, John Balfour, Toronto, and Bar 
bara Hume. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, May llth, 1843. 

Margaret McDonald, born May 4th, 1843. 
Parents, Alex. McDonald, 93rd Highland 
ers, and Jean Sheay. Officiating 1 minister, 
John Barclay, May 17th, 1843. 

John Matthew Mair, born March 19th, 
1843. Parents, George Mair, 93rd High 
landers, and Anne Jeffers. Officiating 1 min 
ister, John Barclay, May 17th, 1843, 

James Mulholland, born April 14 1843. 
Parents, James Mulholland, shoemaker, To- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 141 



ronto, and Margaret McKee. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, May 21st, 1843^ 



Mary Badger, born Aug. 30, 1843. Par 
ents, Aaron Badger, Toronto, and Jane 



Alexander Austin, born April 18, 1843. Connor. Officiating- minister, John Bar- 
Parents, John Austin, 93rd Highlanders, and clay, Sept. 10, 1843. 

Julia Cowan. Officiating minister, John Bar- I George William Logan, born Sept. 2nd, 
clay, June 4th, 1843. i 1843. Parents, William Logan, Toronto, 

Elizabeth Finlayson, born May 21, 1843. and Martha Tobin. Officiating, minister, 



Parents, Norman Finlayson, 93rd Highland 
ers, &nd Matilda Ohrisholm. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, June 6th, 1843. 

Frederick McPherson, born May 21, 1843. 
Parents, William McPherson, 93rd High 
landers. Officiating taiinister, John Barclay, 
June 6th, 1843. 

John Skirving Maitland, born April 4th, 
1843. Parents, Alex. Maitland, Toronto, 
and Helen Skirving. Officiating minister, 



John Barclay, Sept. 24th, 1843(. 

Mary Margaret, born Oct. 10th, 1840 ; 
Christina, born Dec. 25th, 1842. Parents, 
George Robinson, Toronto, and Ellen Mu- 
nen. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Sept. 24th, 1843. 

Archibald Alexander Riddell, borii Deo. 10, 
Parents, John Riddell, Aberdeenshire, Scot 
land, and Margaret Oochrane. Officiating 1 
minister, John Barclay, Sept. 25th, 1843. 



John Barclay, June 18th, 1843. Charles James Riddell, born Sept. 10th, 

Georgina Herrick Smith, born Septj 19th, 1843. Parents, Arch. Alex. Riddell, printer, 

1842. Parents, James F. Smith, banker, Toronto, and Ann Devlin. Officiating mln- 

Toronto, and Mary JSanford. Officiating ister, John Barclay, Sept. 25th, 1843 1 . 

minister, John Barclay, June 20, 1843. Mary Jane McOre adie, born Oct. 22nd, 

James Wesley Trotter Henderson, born ig43. Parents, Wm. McCreadie, Newgate 

June 28th, 1843. Parents, Hugh Hender- gtreet, Toronto, and Mary Ann Preston. 

son, Toronto, and Margaret Jane Trotter, officiating minister, John Barclay, Nov. 7, 

Officiating minister, John Barclay, June 1843. 

25th, 1843. Thomas Smith, born July 3, 1843. Par- 
Delia Cameron McOlure, born Dec. 29, i 0n t s , Thomas Smith, shoemaker, Toronto, 

1842. Parents, Robert McClure, auc- and Mary Gaw. Officiating minister, John 
tloneer, Toronto, and Delia McOlure. Of- Barclay, Nov. 7th, 1843. 

ficiating minister, John Barclay, June 29, i Robert McDonald, born July 21st, 1843. 

1843. Parents, Daniel McDonald, carpenter, To- 
James Henry Poison, born Feb. 29 ,1843. i ronto, and Elizabeth McJXmalJu OMciat- 

Parents, Angus Poison, Engineer office, To- iixg . minister, John Barclay, Nov. 7, 1843. 

ronto, and Sarah Pennicott. Officiating mm- , Sophia Wray, born April 8th, 1840 ; 

ister, John Barclay, July 5th, 1843. | Alexander Wray, born Jan. 7th, 1841 ; 

Jane McDonald, born June 23rd. Par- Agnen Wray, born Oct. 25th, 1843. Par 
ents, James McDonald and Mary, Ann Duly, erits, George Wray. carpenter, Toronto, and 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, July 5, Margaret Miles. Officiating minister, John 
1843. Barclay, Nov. 10th, 1843. 

Christopher Todd Brown McConkey, born ja,mes Thomson, born Aug. loth, 1843*. 

July 7th, 1843. Parents, Thomas Me- p are n.^, Aivus Thomson, seaman, Toronto, 

Conkey, confectioner, Toronto, and Eliza- and M*rgare~t McNeil. Officiating minister, 

beth Brown. Officiating minister, John Bar- John R arc lay, Nov. llth, 1843. 

clay, July llth, 1843. Alm Sutherland, bom Nov. 6, 1843. Par- 

Da.niel Frazer, born Nov. 3rd, 1843. entSj Robert Sutherland, Church street, 

Parents, Rhoderick Frazer, Toronto, and Toronto, and Mary Ann Sutherland. Of- 

EUzabeth McLean. Officiating minister, f j c j a ting minister, John Barclay, Nov. 24th, 

John Barclay, July 15th, 1843. 1843 

Murdoch McGillivray, born Nov. 1, 1842v j oh n Brown, born Sept. 14, 1843. Par- 
Parents, Donald McGillivray, labourer, Lot entSj , j!U , 10 . s Brown, shoemaker, Toronto, 
street, Toronto, and Nancy McDonald. Of- ^j Jane McCartney. Officiating minister, 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, July 18, John Barclay, Dec. 2nd, 1843. 

" "Catherine Margaret Henderson, born Dec. Isabella Smith, born Sept. 13th, 1843. 
13th, 1842. Parents, William Henderson, Parents, Alexander Smith, hair dm 
lute of 93rd Highlanders, and Jane McGill King street, Toronto,. and Margaret Robert- 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, July 24, 8 n - i tic \^\ n / minister > John B "rclay, 
1843 Dec. 9th, 1843. 
Helen Millis Macdonald, born Nov. 13th, , 2*? m Alexander Frazer, born July 21, 

1842. Parents, Alex. Macdonald, aucJ 1843. Brents, Donald frazer jailor, To- 
tioneer, Toronto and Mary Stuart Douglas, ronto, and Margaret McSbennan. Officiat- 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Aug. 7, ln ff minister, John Barclay, Dec. 13, 1 

1843. i John Johnston, born Oct. 31st, 1843. 
Ann Moore Brown. Parent, Goo. Brown, Parents, James Johnston, carpenter, 

Elizabeth street, Toronto. Officiating min- ronto, and Jane Elizabeth Getchell, Of- 

ister, John Barclay, Aug. 13th, 184 X ficiating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 14th, 

Duncan Aitken, born June 16th, 1843 ; 1843. 

James Aitken, born Jan. 28th, 184.,. Par- Hector Sinclair Robertson, born Sept. 27, 

ents, Thomas Aitken, mason, Toronto, and 1843. Parents, John Robt-rtson, merchant, 

Christina Hunter. Officiating ministers, Toronto, and Margaret Sinclair. Officiat- 

John Barclay, Aug. 20th ; W. T. Loach, inn minister, John Barclay, Dec. 21, 1843. 

Feb., 1841. Elizabeth McKenzie, born Aug. 22, 18431 

Mary Maria Macdonald, born March 24, Parents, Win. McKenzie, Etobicoke, and 

1843. Parents, William Macdonald, Lieut. Janet Poison. Officiating minister, John 

Adjutant, 9"ru Highlanders, and Jessie Mac- Barclay, Jan. 4th, 1844^. 

donald. Officiating minister, John Barclay, , Christina Elizabeth Scott, born Nov. 14, 

Aug. 30th, 1843>. 1ft43. Parents. William Ross Scott. Mim- 



142 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



too, and Mary Boaden. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Jan. 8th, 1844,. 

Jans Milligan, born Nov. 19, 1843. Par 
ents, Frederick Milligan, Shepherd street, 
Toronto, and Margaret Jane Howman. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Jan. 23, 
1844. 

Georg-o Ferrier Bostwick, born Jan, 22nd, 
1843. Parents, George Bostwick, Toronto, 
and Margaret A. Cruickshank. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Jan. 22nd, 1844\ 

Caroline Bishop, born Jan. 7th, 1843-. 
Parents, John Bishop, Toronto, and Chris 
tina Bishop. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Jan. 22nd, 1844. 

Mary Jane Cuthbcrtson, born Sept. 12, 
1843. Parents, John Outhbertson, teacher, 
Toronto, and Jane Outhbertson. Officiat 
ing minister. John Barclay, Jan, 29, 1844. 

John King, born Sept. 15, 1843. Par 
ents, John King (deceased), Toronto ,and 
Christina MeDougall. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Feb. 1st, 1844. 

Neil Duncan McArthur, born Nov. 6th, 
1843. Parents, Peter McArthur, elder St. 
Andrew s Church, and Catherine McCallum. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Feb. 2, 
1844. 

Christian Gordon, born Jan. 24th, 1844. 
Parent, Wm. Gordon, captain of steamer 
Toronto. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Feb. 7th, 1844:. 

Isaac Lewis .stronger, born Oct. 30, 184S. 
Parents, William Petrie, fisherman, Penin 
sula, and Mary Petrie. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Feb. 10th, 1844i, 

James Moir, born Sept. 18, 1843:. Par 
ents, George Moir, near York Mills, and 
Agnes Petrie. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Feb. 18th, 1844J. 

Iladdin Turreff, born Jan. 30th, 1844. 
Parents, Wm. Turreff, Toronto, and Eliza- 
beth McNeill. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay. March 7th, 1844. 

John Calvin Macintosh, born Oct. 10th, 

1843. Parents, Angus Macintosh, mer 
chant, Toronto, and Sarah Hampson. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, March. 10, 
1844. 

James John G>JJin, born Jan. 10, 1844, 
Parents, Alexander Guiin, Toronto, and 
Magdalene Renny. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, March 28th, 1844. 

John Dixnn, born Aug. 2nd, 1844. Par 
ents, James Dixon, Toronto, and Catherine 
Oarfrae. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, April, <5th, 1844. 

Duncan Ferland Macdonell, born Jan. 16, 

1844. Parents, Duncan Macdonell, mer 
chant, Toronto, and Maria Charles. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, April 12, 
1844. 

Isabella Thomson, born on profession of 
the faith. Parent, Charles Thomson, Sum 
mer Ili l. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, 1844. 

Janet O .ezie, born Dec. 13, 1832 ; Mary 
Jane Oie/.ic, born July 11, 1835. Parent, 
George Ctezie, carpenter, Toronto. Offici 
ating minister. John Barclay, April 13th, 
1844. 

Alexander Morrison, born Nov. 25, 1843. 
Parents, John Morr son, Toronto, and Cath 
erine Connelly. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, April 21st, 1844. 

Mary Louisa Macfarlane, born Dec. 20th, 
1848. Parents, Walter Macfarlane, mer 
chant, Toronto, and Louisa Henderson. Of- 



i ficiatinr minister, John Barclay, April 18, 
I 1844. 

Peter Toronto Buchanan. Parents, Isaac 
Buchanan, merchant, Toronto, and Agnes 
Jmrvie. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
June 16th, 1844. 

Mary McMillan, born May 24th, 1844. 
Parents, Ewen McMillan, Port Credit, and 
Mary Campbell. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Aug. 1st, 1844. 

William McBride, born June 2nd, 1844. 
Pare-nts, Nici McBrido, engineer, Toronto, 
and Ann GiLmour. Officiating minister, John 
fiarclay, Aug. 2nd, 1844. 

Klenora Kennedy, born June 9th, 1844. 
Parents, Daniel Kennedy, Spadina avenue, 
Toronto, and Margaret Times. Officiating- 
minister, John Barclay, Aug. 9th, 18447. 

Agnes Ann Bicket, born March 10 th, 
1844. Parents, James Bicket, clerk, To- 
Aronto, and Jane Leckip. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Sept. 4th, 1844. 

Robert Goodal, born May 8, 1844. Par- 
I ents, John Goodal, engineer, Toronto, and 
i Elizabeth Hay. Officiating- minister, John 
I Barclay, Sept. 9th, 1844. 

Donald Forbes, born Sept. Gth, 1844. 
Parents, William Forbes, labourer, Dundas 
street, and Ann Cameron. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Nov. 22nd, 1844. 

Mary Anne Black, born Nov. 5th ,1844. 
Parents, David Black, emigrant ,on, his way 
to Woolwich, and Ann Milne. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Dec. 8th, 1844. 

Robert Stedman McClure. Parents, Rob 
ert McOlure, auctioneer, Toronto. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Jan. 13, 18451 

William Re-nnie, born Nov. 19th, 1844* 
Parents, Alexander Rennie, Toronto, and 
Catherine Graham. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Jan. 23rd, 184-5). 

William John Smith, born Jan. 30, 1845 . 
Parents, James Smith and Elizabeth At 
kinson. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Jan. 31st, 1845t. 

Grace Smith, Feb Feb. 2, 1845,. Par 
ents, Malcolm Smith, labourer, near York 
; Mills, and Grace Blue. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Feb. 15th, 1845. 

Stevenson Milligan, born NOT. 19, 1844f 

! Parents, John Miiligan, farmer, 2nd con- 

[ cession East York Township, and Rosina 

Hogg. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 

Feb. 17th, 1845, 

Roeetta Shaw, born Jan.. 0, 1845. Par- 
| ents, Alexander Shaw, labourer, near To- 
; ronto, and Mary Ohrisholm. Officiating min- 
i ister, John Barclay, March, 1845. 

James Gilbertson, born Feb. 4th, 1845). 
Parents, Henry Gilbertson, carpenter, To 
ronto, and Ann Webster. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, April 10th, 1845. 

Kenneth Frederick, born March 4, 1845. 
Parents, John Cameron, ommercial Bank, 
Toronto, and Rosa Mary Rogers. Officiat 
ing- minister, John Barclay, May 4, 1845. 

Molita Christina, born Jan. 13, 1845. 
Parents, Kenneth Sutherland, merchant, 
Toronto, and Melita Raines. Officiating 1 
minister, John Barclay, May llth, H845-. 

Jane Helen Janet, born Nov. 7th, 1844. 
Parents., Donald McDonald, Canda Co. s of 
fice, Toronto, and Frances McDonald. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, May 14, 

Isabella Louisa, born Jan. 22nd, 1845. 
Parents, Isaac O. Gilmor, merchant, To 
ronto, and Janet Kerr. Officiating minis 
ter. John Barclay, June 22nd, 1845. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



143 



Margaret Brise, born May 15th, 1845. 
Parents. Francis Brise, carter, Toronto, and 
Elizabeth Murphy. Officiating- minister, 
John Barclay, July 14th, 1845 . 

Arthur Milliga-n, born May 24th, 1845. 

Parents, John Bowman, Toronto, and 

Milligan. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
July 21st, 1845. 

Stewart Wallace, born "Feb. 27th, 1845). 
Parents, Edward Wallace, Toronto, and 
Hannah Gaw. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, July 16th. 1845. 

[Frederick Augustus, born Nov. 13, 1842i 
Parents, Alexander McKay, Toronto, and 
Rozetta L. McKay. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, June, 1845. 

William Robert OhLsholm. born June 28, 
1842 ; Emma Ann Ohisholm, born Fept. 
21(, 1844. Parents, George K. Chis- 
holm, Oakville, and Isabella Land. Baptized 
Oct. 24th, 1842, and July 17th, 1845, by 
Robert Murray. 

James Duncan MoNab, born April 2nd, 
1845. Parents, Duncan McNab, Argyle 
Hotel,, Toronto, and Mary Ann Donald. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Sept. 15, 
1845. 

Alexander James Robertson, born June 
26th, 1845. Parents, John Robertson, 
merchant, Toronto, and Margaret Sinclair. 
Officiating minister, John Burclay, S.>pt. 28.. 

William Oarfrae Campbell, born July 26, 
1845. Parents, Stedman B. Campbell, bar 
rister, Toronto, and Rebecca Carfrae. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 26, 
1845. 

Henry Hill Maulson, born Sept. 5, 1845. 
Parents, John Maulson, accountant, To 
ronto, and Ellen Hill. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Oct. 14th, 1845^ 

William Fulton, born Oct. 19, 1845 . Par 
ents, John Fulton, Toronto, and Maria 
Stagg. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Nov. 6th, 1845. 

Margaret Kerr, born Oct. 25th, 1845. 
Parents, Angus Kerr, seaman, Toronto, and 
Margaret McKenzie. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Nov. 14th, 1845. 

[Mary Ann Coulter, born March 1, 1845. 
Parents, John Coulter, Toronto, and Agnes 
Miller. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Jan. 25th, 1846. 

William McKee, born Dec. 8, 1845. Par 
ents, Hamilton McKee, Toronto, and Eleanor 
McOormick. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Jan. 25th, 1846 . 

John Madole, born July 21, 1845. Par 
ents, Nathaniel Madole, seaman, Toronto, 
and Mary Best. Officiating minister, John 
Baxclay, Jan. 30th, 1846. 

Mary Frazer Macdonell, born Sept. 19, 
1845. Parents, Duncan Macdonell, mer 
chant, Toronto, and Maria Charles. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, January, 
1846. 

Mary Ann Mclntosh, born Aug. 13th, 
1845. Parents, Robert Mclntosh, cooper, 
at Humber, and Elizabeth Brims. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Feb. 3rd, 1846. 

Anna Maria Ourrie, born July 2nd, 1845. 
Parents, Walter Ourrie and Maria Bowes. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Feb. 6, 
1846. 

Robert Simple, born Nov. 28, 1845. Par 
ents, John Simple, plasterer, and Martha 
Blair. Officiating minister, Blakely Mona- 
Chan; p e b. 7th, 1846. 

Robert Donald, born Oct. 18th. 1845. 
Parents, James Andrew Donald, Toronto, 



! and Maria Shearer. Officiating minister, 
I John Barclay, 1846. 

David Smith, born March 21st, 1846. 
Parents, Alexander Smith, Toronto, and 
Margaret Robertson. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, April 26th, 1846. 

Mary Ann Benson, born Jan. 31, 3 846. 
Parents, Robert Benson, Toronto, and 
Mary Clerk. April 26th, 1846. 

Louisa Jane Crooks, born March 13, 1846. 
Barents, Robert P. Crooks, barriscr, To 
ronto, and Louisa Fishor. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, June 5th, 1846. 

George James Robertson, born Aug. 15, 
1845. Parent, George Robertson, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Oct. 18th, 1846. 

Janet Balmer, born Jan. 25, 1846. Par 
ents, Robert Balmer, merchant, Oakville, 
and Elizabeth Rebecca Ferry. Officiating 
minister, Robert Murray, July 9th, 1846. 

James Chambers Patterson, born Sapt. 25,. 
1843. Parents, David Patterson, carpen- 
I ter, O.ikvilla, and Agnes Griggs. Officiating 
minister, Robert Murray, July 9, 1846. 

Robert Pattersoui, born Feb. 8th, 1846. 
Parents, Daviu Patterson, carpeiiler, Oak- 
vMa, and Agnos Griggs. Officiating minis 
ter, Robert Murray, July 9th, 1846. 
) .Susan Sophia Ix>tiiner, born Aug. 19th, 
! 184G. Parents, Edward Lotimer, Toronto, 
and Janet Monnsey. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Sept. 30th, 1846. 

Joseph Nelson, born Feb. 8th, 1846. 
Parents, Thomas Nelson and Margaret Nel 
son. Officiating minister, John Barolay, 
Dec. 7th, 1846. 

Matilda Paterson Russell, born Doc. 26 
1845. Parents, William Russell, Owen 
Sound, and EJizabeth Richards<on. (Officiatj- 
ing- minister, John Barclay, Dec. 31, 1846. 

John Milligan, born Sept. 12th, 1846. 
Parents, Frederick Milligan, Toronto, and 
Margaret Jane Bowman. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Dec. 20th, 1840. 

Marion Donaldson, born July 7th, 1846 
Parents, James Donaldson, mechanic, ana 
Mary Morrison, Toronto. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, March 21st, 1847. 

Margaret Jane Bowman, born March 1, 
1847. Parents, John Bowman, Toronto* 

and Milligan. Officiating minislter, 

John Barclay, April 25th, 1847. 

Christiana McNeil, born Feb. 1st, 1847. 
Parents, Duncan McNeil, Toronto, and Hugh 
McNeil. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, April 25th, 1847. 

Sarah Robina Black, born Jan. 20th, 
1836, Parents, George Black, Toronto, 

and Garside. Officiating minister, 

John Barclay, Feb. 2nd, 1847. 

Duncan McBayne, born Sept. 15, 1846. 
Parents, John McBayne, Toronto, and Mary 
Fisher. Officiating minister, John Barolay, 
June 10th, 1847. 

Margaret Smith, born April 10th, 1847. 
Parents, David Smith, Toronto, and Ame 
lia Miwiro. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, July 7th, 1847. 

Edward Wallace, born April 28rd, 1847. 
Parents, Edward Wallace, Toronto, and 
Hannah Gaw. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, July 24th, 1847. 

Jane, Kerr, born March 13th, 1847. Par 
ents, Angus Kerr, Toronto, and Margaret 
MoKenzie. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, July 22nd, 1847. 

Mary Catherine Morrison, born May 7, 



144 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



184G . Parents, An-us Morrison, barrister, 

fund Gilmor. Officiating minister, John 

Barclay, Aug. 5th, 1847. 

Nora Turner Sutherland, born Dec. 19, 

1846. Parents, K. M. Sutherland, mer- 
eShamt, Toronto. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Aug. 8th, 1847. 

Eli Stroniger, born March 22nd, 1847. 
Parents, William Stronger, fishermen, To 
ronto, and Mary Petrie. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Aug. 15th, 1847. 

Matilda Robinson, born March 19, 1846. 
Parents, Ezekiel Robinson, Toronto, and 
Frances Ann Paterson. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Aug. 19th, 1847. 

Arm Robertson, born July 20th, 1847. 
Parents, John Robertson, merchant, To 
ronto, and Margaret Sinclair. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Sept. 24lh, 1847. 

Mary Caroline Augusta, born May 2nd, 

1847. Parents, Donald Macdonald, clerk, 
Toronto, and Frances Macdonald. Officiat 
ing- minister, John Barclay, Oct. 11, 1847. 

JThomaa John Alexander Rutley, born Sept. 
14th, 1847. Parents, Thomas Iluiley, To 
ronto, and Margaret McGregor. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Nov. 1st, 1847. 

Agnes McEie, born Sept. 20, 1847. Par 
ents, Hamilton McKie, Toronto, and Eleanor 
MtOormick. Officiating minister, John Bar- 
clay, Nov. 14th, 1847. 

.Roderick William McNeil, born May 3rd, 

1847. Parent, Roderick McNeil, Toronto. 
Officiating- minister, John Barclay, Nov. 15, 

1847. 

Isabella McKay, born Oct. 5, 1847. Par 
ents, Thomas McKay, 8th con., Lanark, 
Perth, and Isabella McDonald. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Deo. 9th, 1847. 

Hugh Ross, born Dec. 2, 1847. Parents, 
Donald Ttoss, Park, near the Don, Toronto, 
and Catherine Noon. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Jan. 6th, 1848. 

Elizabeth Madole, born Dec. 7th, 1847. 
Parents, Nathaniel Madole, seaman, To 
ronto, and Mary Best. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Feb. 27th, 1848. 

Robertson. Parent, Robertson, 

Victoria, si., Toronto. Officiating minister, 
John Ha relay, March, 1848. 

Wi lia,in Booth McClannan, born April 5, 

1848. Parents, Alexander McClannan, To 
ronto, and Margaret Jane Booth. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, May 10, 1848. 

John Donald Kay, born Feb. 29th, 1848. 
Parents, William Kay, late of 93rd High 
landers, and Isabella McNab. Officiating- 
minister, John Barclay, May llth, 1848. 

John Christian Maulson, born Dec. 10th, 
1817. Parents, John Maulson, Toronto, and 
E.lon Hill. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, April 10th, 1848. 

John Oajnpbell McArthur, born Feb. 19, 
1848. Parents, John McArthur, Rob Roy 
Hotel, and Catherine Morrison. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, June 5, 1848. 

Mary Jane Anderson, born March 25th, 
1848. Parents, William Anderson (deceas 
ed), and Margaret Anderson. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, June 10th. 1848. 

Sarah Eugeflie Leighton, born Dec. 5, 
1847. ParofltJ, David S. Leighton, sur 
geon, Toronto, and Jane Eugenie Bailie. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, June 19, 
1848. 

Eliza Rose Ann Douglas, born Nov. 5th, 
1847. Parents, James Douglas, painter, To 
ronto, and Margaret McAdam. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, July 5th, 1S48. 



Marie Louise Gilmor. Parent, Isaac O. 
Gilmor, merchant, Toronto. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Sept. 1848. 

John Stewart, born Aug. 9, 1848. Par 
ents, John Stewart and Margaret Johnson. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 15, 

Mary Donald, born Aug. 17th, 1848. 
Parents, James Donald and Marion Shearer. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 15, 
1848. 

Ellen MoCance, born Aug. 31st, 1848. 
Parents, James McCanoe, -York Township, 
and Ann Coiiron. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Nov. Gth, 1848. 

John Stewart Weller, born April 10, 1848. 
Parents, William Weller, Cobourg, and Mar 
garet Weller. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Nov. 17th, 1848. 

Hugh Froze r, born Aug. 17th, 1848. 
Parents, Hugh Frazer, gardener, Don 
Bridge. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Dec. 3Lst, 1848. 

Malcolm MctFayden. Parents, John Mc- 
Fayden, Toronto, and Margaret Gillespie. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Deo. 3, 
1848. 

Catherine Butler, born Sept. 18, 1848. 
Parents, John Jackson Butler, Toronto, and 
Elizabeth McShantion. Officiating minister, 
Johm Barclay, Dec. 31st, 1848. 

John Alex. McNeil, born Sept. 30, 1848. 
Parents, Roderick McNeil, Oukville, and 
Emily McNeil. Official ing- minister, John 
Barclay, Dec. 19th, 1848. 

Alexander Murdoch, born Oct. 18, 1848. 
Parents, John Murdoch, pilot, Toronto, and 
Janet Gorrie. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay. Dec. 31st, 1848. 

Henry Pent, born Nov. 2, 1848. Parents, 
Henry Pent, Newmarket, and Mary Nesbit. 
O ficiating- minister, John Barclay, Jan. 28, 
184,9. 

Sarah Antoinette, born Nov. 30th, 1848. 
Parents, G-orge Bell, Newmarket, and M;iry 
Bell. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Jan. 28th, 184 .). 

Mirah Delilah Kelloy, born Nov. 22. 1848. 
Parent, James J. Kelloy, tavern keeper, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Feb. Gth, 1849. 

Kenneth Archer, Florence Oauitield, born 
Sept. 25th, 1848. Parents, K. M. Suther 
land, merchant, Toronto, and Eva Raines. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Feb. 18, 
1849. 

Archibald McNeil, born June 5th, 1848. 
Paren/ts, Malcolm McNeil, carpentrr, Thorn- 
hill, and Catherine Cameron. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Feb. 25th, 1849. 

Elizabeth Hay, born Jan. 28th, 1849. 
Parents. Robert Hay, cabinetmaker, To 
ronto, and Mary Dutilop. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Feb. 28th, 1849. 

Jane Robertson, born Feb. 8, 1849. Par 
ent, John Robertson, carpenter. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, April 29, 1849. 

Robert Harrison Reid, born March 31st, 
1849. Parent, Joseph Reid, pensioner. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, April 29, 
1849. 

Born April, 1849. Parent, Hugh McNeil, 
Half-way House, Front st., Toronto. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, April 23, 
1849. 

Francis James Brise, born July 19, 1848. 
Parents, Francis Brise (deceased), and Eliza 
Briso. O ficiating minister, Juku Barclay, 
May Gth, 1849. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



145 



James Lcckle Bioket, born Sept. 20, 1847. 
Parents, James Kickot. late bookkeeper to 
Buchanan & Co., and Jane I.eckie. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, May 14, 184J. 

Arthur Milligan, born Feb. 4th, IB^y. 
Parent, Frederick Milligau, laveru keeper, 
Toronto. Officiating minister, John Barctay, 



. Nov. 15, 1848. Parents, 

Peter Morgan, Toronto, and -- Forteous. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, June 
6th, 1849. 

Georgoi Hugh McDonnell, born Feb. 3 th, 
1849. Parents, Duncan McDonnell, mer 
chant, Toronto, and Maria Charles. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, June, 1849. 

James Jardino, born Nov. 2, 1848. Par 
ents, Arbuckle Jardine, Toronto, and 
Elizabeth Farn4l. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, 28th June, 1849. 

Angus Gilmor Morrison,, born Feb. 21st, 
1849- Parents, Angus Morrison, barnsteer, 
an d -- Gilmor. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, July, 1849. 

James Arthur Milligan, born May 28th, 
1849. Parents, Alexander Milligan. To- 
ronto a,nd Sarah Hill. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay. July 22nd, 1849. 

John Bosthwick, born Sopt. 2nd, 1849. 
Parents, Hugh J. Bosthwick, master of 
Grammar School, Newmarket, and Marion 
Taylor. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Sept. 7th, 1850. 

Sarah Lamout, born July 16, 1849. Par 
ents, Robert Lamout, March st., Toronto, 
and Ja-ne McDowall. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay Aug. IGth, 1849. 

Mary Matthews, born April 19th, 1819. 
Parents, John Matthews, March street, To 
ronto, and Elizabeth Matthews. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Aug. IGth, 1849. 

Alexander Tytler, born Nov. 18th, 1849. 
Parents, Alex. Tytler, Queon st., Toronto, 
and Sophia Eastou. Officiating minister, 
John, Barclay, Aug. 19th, 1849. 

(Margaret Taylor, born pot. 29th, 1848. 
Parents, John " Taylor, Alice st., Toronto, 
and Jane Macclonald. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Aug. 27th, 1849. 

Elizabeth Hemphill, born Oct. 3, 1843 ; 
George Henry, born Aug. 31st, 1845 ; 
William, born Dec. 22nd, 1847 ; Mary Ann 
born Aug. 28th, 1849. Parents, John 
Hemphill, officer in H. M. Custom House, 
Toronto, and Mary Ann HemphUl. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Oct. 15th, 1849. 

Richard Charles Rutley, born Aug. 27, 
1849. Parents, Thomas Rutloy, Toronto, 
and Margaret Rutley. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Oot. 21st, 1849. 

John MoFayden. Parents, John McFay- 
den, Oaladonia Inn, Yonge st., and Mar 
garet Gillcspie. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Nov. 4th, 1849. 

Alexander George Duffus, born Aug. 30, 
1849. Parents, James Duffus, mechanic, 
Toronto, and Ann Fresh. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Dec. 2nd, 1849. 

Adelaide Edith Sophia, born Oct. 2, 1849. 
Parent, Donald Macdonald, clerk, Toronto. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Feb. 5, 
18oO. 

Robert McOormick, born Nov. 29, 1849. 
Parents, John McOormick, Toronto, and 
Mary Anne Hearst. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Feb. 18th, 1850. 

Nathaniel, born Feb., 1850. Parents, 
Nathaniel Madole, Toronto, and Mary Ma- 



dole. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Feb. 20th, 1850. 

Agnes Margaret Starke, born Feb. 24, 
185O. Parents, Alexander Scarke, me 
chanic, Toronto, and Agnes Starke. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, March 8, 
1850. 

Charles Robert Robertson, born Nov. 8, 

1849. Parents, John Robertson, merchant, 
Toronto, and Margaret Sinclair. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, March 12th, 1850. 

Rosa McNab, born April 19th, 1849. 
Parents, Duncan McNab, Toronto, and Mary 
Ann MoNab. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, March 31st, 1850. 

John Ewart Mitchell, born March 6th, 

1850. Parents, Robert Mitchell, Toronto, 
and Jane Ritchio. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, June 6th, 1850. 

John Howett Maulson, born Nov. 26th, 

1849. Parents, John Maulson, Toronto, and 
Sarah Hill. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, May 1st, 1850. 

Isabella Eliza, born June 3rd, 1850. 
Parent, Peter Lown, engineer. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, June 10th, 1850. 

Maria Janei Young, born April 17, 1850. 
Parents, John Younsr, 87 Elizabeth street, 
Toronto, and Mary Jane Smith. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, June 23rd, 1850. 

Christina Anne McNiel, born Feb. 19th, 

1850. Parents, Roderick McNiel, Oakville, 
and Emma McNiel. Officiating- minister, 
John Barclay, June 20th, 1850. 

Bunella Jans Dickson, born Jan. 81, 1850. 
Parents, George P. Dickson, Elgin Mills, 
Richmond Hill, and Isabella Thomson. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, July 3rd, 
18BO. 

Margaret Brown, born May 17th, 1850. 
Parents, Robert Brown and Christina Brown. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, June 25, 
1850. 

Isabella Bowman, born June 28th, 1850. 
Parents, John Bowman, Toronto, and Fran 
ces Milligan. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, July 22nd, 1850u 

Colin Ferrie Strong, born June 25, 1850. 
Parents, Struthera Strong, Government 
Board of Works, and Janet Ferrie. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Aug. 9, 1850. 

Margaret Jane McKie, born Aug. 4, 1849. 
Parents, Hamilton McKie, Edward st., To 
ronto, and Eleanor McOormick. Officiat 
ing 1 minister, John Barclay, Aug. 13, 1850. 

Oeorge Bradshaw Riddell, born Dec. 3rd, 

1849. Parents, Joseph Riddell, printer, To 
ronto, and Elizabeth Riddell. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Aug. loth, 1850. 

William Alexander Dunlop, born Aug. 
17, 1850. Parents, Thomas Dunlop, tailor 
Toronto, and Margaret Rutherford Thorn*- 
son. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Aug. 27th, 1850. 

William Jardine, born Feb. 28th, 1850. 
Parents, Arbuckle Jardine, Queen st., To 
ronto, and Elizabeth Farrell, Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Aug. 27th, 1850. 

Jane Matilda Thomson, born April 25th, 

1850. Parents, Hugh Thomson, Louisa St., 
Toronto, and Mary McOarlie. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Aug. 25th, 1850. 

William John Blair, born April 16, 1850. 
Parents, John Blair, keeper Court House, 
Toronto, and Mary Boyd. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Sept. 1st, 1850. 

Robert Hay, born Aug. 9, 1850. Par 
ents, Robert Hay, cabinetmaker, Toronto, 
and Mary Dunlop. Officiating minister. 



lid 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



| John Barclay, Sept. 8th, 1850. 

John Bosthwick, born Sept. 2nd, 1849. 
Parents, Hugh J. Bosthwick, teacher, in 
Newmarket, and Marion Taylor. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Sept. 7, 1850. 

Ellen McLaughlan, born Sept. 29, 1850. 
Parents, Sergt. John McLaughlan, 71st 
Regt., Res. Bat., Toronto, and Ellen Day. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 15, 
1850. 

Peter Morgan, born Aug. 4, 1850. Par 
ents, Peter Morgan, inspector, Toronto, and 

Porteous. Officiating minister, John 

Barclay, Oct. 30th, 1850. 

Julia Adeline, born Oct. 5, 1850. Par 
ents, John Innes, Toronto, and Julia Oaff- 
rey. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Nov. 3rd, 1850. 

Elizabeth Dobbin, born Feb. 25th, 1849. 
Parents, John Dobbin, carpenter, Toronto, 
and Elizabeth Kent. Officiating minister, 
John liarclay, Nov. Oth, 1850. 

Isabella Jane Leitch, born Oct. 2, 18oO. 
Parents, Robert Leicch, private, 71st Regt., 
To: onto Garrison, and Sarah McPherson. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Nov. 21st, 
1850. 

John Jamieson Henderson, born Oct. 29, 
1849. Parents, Thomas Henderson and 
Marearet Jamioson. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Nov. 23th, 1850. 

Emily Caroline Morrison. Parents, Angus 

Morrison, barrister, Toronto, and Gil- 

inor. Officiating- minister, John Barclay, 
John Hat clay, Dec. 30th, 1850. 

John ITmvcutt Maulson, born Nov. 26th, 
1849. Parents. .John Maulsori, accountant, 
Toronto, and Helen Hill. Orficiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, May Isi, 1850. 

Isabella Eliza Low, born June 3rd, 18oO. 
Parent, Low, engineer, Toronto. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, June 10th, 
1850. 

Agnes Boyd, born June 15th, 1850. Par 
ent, Jam^s Boyd. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Nov. llth, 1850. 

Ellen Steven, born Sept. 19, 1850. Par 
ent, William Steven, carter, Toronto. Of 
ficiating mininister, John Barclay, Oct. 21, 
1850. 

Jessie Scott, born Oct. 11, 1850. Par 
ent, Colour-S rprt. Alex. Scott, 71st Hd. 
Lt. Infantry. Oficiating mminister, John 
Barclay, Nov. 12th, 1850. 

Robert Lamb Bain, born Oct. 23, 1850. 
P.i rents. Private Wm. Bain, 71st Hd. Lt. 
Infantry, and Margaret Bain. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Nov. 24, 1850. 

Twin daughters. Parents, S. B. Campbell, 
barrister, Toronto, and Rebecca Oarfrae. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay. 

Isabella Watson, born Dec. 12th, 1849. 
Parents, Jonathan Watson, leather mer 
chant, Toronto, and Ann Mackintosh. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Nov. 24, 
18501. 

Alexander, born Sept. 30, 1843 ; Rob 
ert Simpson Jamieson, born Oct. 5, 1845 ; 
Donald Daniel, born May 3rd, 1849. Par 
ents, George Manson, gardener Toronto, 
and Ann Sinclair. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, July 2<Hh, 1849. 

Catherine Monro, born Sept. 25, 1860. 
Parents, John Mwnro, calinotmaker, To 
ronto, and Mary McR&e. Officiating minis- 
ister, John Barclay, Jan. 20ih, 1851. 

James Donald, born April 17th, 1851. 
Parents, James Donald, Toronto, and Maria 



Shearer. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, May 4th, 1851. 

Malcolm, born Jan. 5th, 1848 ; John, 
born April 10th, 1849 ; Donald, born Feb. 
1st, 1851. Parents, John McFayden, tav 
ern-keeper, Toronto, and Margaret Gilles- 
pie. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
May 5th, 1851. 

Elizabeth Thomson, born Dec. 2, 1850. 
Patents, James Thomson, Toronto, and 
Catherine Ross. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Feb. 9th, 1851. 

James Parker, born Deo. 27th, 1850. 
Parents, Charles Parker, Toronto, and Jane 
Crawford. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Jan. 27th, 3851. 

Eveline Wilhelmina, born Aug. 15, 1849. 
Parents, Thomas McConkey, confectioner, 
Toronto, and Elizabeth McConkey. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, June 27, 1851. 

Ellen Jackson, born Sept. 10, 1850. Par 
ent, John Jackson. Toronto. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, June 29 ih, 1851. 

Ann Anderson, born May 2Gth, 1851. 
Parents, Alex. Anderson. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, June 2Uth, 1851. 

James Smith, born Feb. 23rd, 1851 ; 
Alexander Smith, born Feb. 23, 1851. Par 
ents, James Smith, carter, Toronto, and 
Elizabeth Atkinson. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, July 2/Jth, 1851. 

Catherine Oockrane, born June 21, 1851. 
Parents, James Oochranc, mason, Toronto, 
and Margaret Cochrane. OTficiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Aug. 17th, 1851. 

Rebecca, born April 22nd, 1851. Parents, 
Alex. Mclntyre, 71st Hd. Lt. Infantry, 2nd 
Batt, and Ann Hurst. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Aug. 20th, 1851. 

Flora Macdonalu, liorn March H5, 1851. 
Parents, Malcolm Galbraith. of Darlington, 
residing at Toronto, and Isabella Macdon- 
ald. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
1851. 

George Frame, born Aug. 16th, 1851. 
Parents, Walter Frame, 2nd Batt. 71st H. 
M. Infantry, and Elizabeth Fram, . Offici 
ating minister, John Barclay, Aug. 20th, 
1851. 

David Gibson, born Aug. 24th, 1851. 
Parents, William Gibson, saddler, Toronto. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Aug. 29, 
1851. 

Maria Reid, born June 11, 1850. Par 
ents, Joseph Reid, pensioner, Toronto, and 
Isabella A. Harrison. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Sept. 9ch, 1851. 

Archibald McNab, born Aug. 29. 1851. 
Parents, John McNab and Janet McDonald. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 12, 
1851. 

James McNeill, born Aug. 24th, 1851. 
Parents, John McNeill, molester, Toronto, 
and Margaret Lee. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Oct. 22nd, 1851. 

Helen Robertson, born Oct. 24th, 1851. 
Parents, George McKay, Sergt.-MaJor 2nd 
Batt., 71st Hd. Lt. Infantry, and Elizabeth 
McKechnie. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Oct. 30th, 1851. 

Elizabeth, born July 18tb, 1849. Par 
ents, Alexander Murdoch, Sergt. 2nd Batt. 
71st Hd. Lt. Infantry, and Margaret Mur 
doch. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Sept. 2nd, 1851. 

Ellen Jane, born Aug. SO, 1851. Par 
ents, William Tindal. 71si Infantry, 2nd 
Batt., and Ellen Watson. Officiating mlnU- 
ter, John Barclay, Sept. 2nd, 1851. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Robert, born Oct. 24th, 1851. Parents, 
Robert Mitchell, Toronto, and Jane Ritchie. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Nov. 3, 
1651. 

Charles Robert, borii May 22ud, 1851 
Parents, John T. Longee, cabinetmaker, To 
ronto, and Mary, Longee. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Nov. 80th, 1851. 

Mary Margaret, born Sept. 16th, 1851. 
Parent, Frederick Milligan, tavern-keeper, 
Toronto, Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Dc. oth, 1851. 

Louisa Maria Exshaw, born Dec. 8, 1851. 
Parent, Surgt. Murdoch, Bandmaster 2nd 
Batt., 71st Hd. Infantry. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Jan. 13th, 1852. 

Sophia Fowler, born May 12th, 1851. 
Parents, Alexander Fowler, dentist, Toronto, 
and Sophia Fowler. Officiating- minister, 
John rarolay, Jan. 28th, 1852. 

Archibald Duncanson, born Oct. 14, 1851. 
Parents, Arch. Duncanson, Toronto, and 
Margaret Macdonald. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Jan, 28th, 1852. 

James McBurney, born July 17th, 1851. 
Parents, Samuel MoBurney and Anne Jant 
Hughes. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Feb. 2nd, 1852. 

John Miiligan, born Jan. 5, 1852. Parent, 
John Bowman, bar-keeper, Wellington Hotel, 
Toronto. O Delating minister, John Barclay, 
March 15th, 1852. 

Ann, born Jan. 18th, 1852. Parents, 
Malcolm McNeil and Catherine McNeil. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, March 15, 
1852. 

James Alex. John, born Oct. 17, 1851. 
Parent, Donald Macdonald, Canada Oo. Of 
fice, Toronto. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, March 21st, 1852. 

Kate Frazer, born Jan. 2, 1852. Parent, 
Matthew Drummond, clerk, University Bur 
sar s office. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, March 2:-5rd, 1852. 

Hugh George, born Jan. .">, 1852. Par 
ents, Roderick McNeil, Oakrille, and Emma 
McNeill. Officiating- minister, John .bar- 
clay, April 29th, 1852. 

Orlando John, born Deo. 22, 1851. Par 
ents, William Donnell, 2nd Batt., 71st Hd. 
Lt. Infantry, and Joanna Donnell. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, March 23rd, 
Too 

James Frankum, born Feb. 25th, 1852. 
Parents, John Frankum, Sergt., 2nd Batt., 
71st Infantry, and Jane Frankum. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, March 23rd, 



Agnes, born Feb. 2nd, 1852. Parents, 
James McArthur, 2nd Batt. 71st, and Mary 
McArthur. Officiating- miniiter, John Bar 
clay, March 23rd, 1852. 

James Hughes, born July 17th, 1851. 
Parents, Samuel Hughes, Toronto, and Ann 
Jane Hughes. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Feb. 2nd, 1832. 

Thomas Robert, born May 20th, 1851. 
Parents, Thomas Pollock, private, 7lst Hd. 
Lt. Infantry, and Jane Pollock. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, March 25, 1852. 

Sarah Ann, born June 24, 1852. Par- 
f ts, John Jackson and Elizabeth Jackson, 
mln kter, John Barclay, Aug-. 29, 



Elizabeth, born Dec. 1G, 1852. Parents, 
Geoffrey Hornby and Elizabeth Hornby. Of- 



ficiating minister, John Barclay, Jan. 21, 
1851. 

Jane Anne, born July 16, 1843 : John 
Charles, bonn Jan. 23rd, 1846 ; William 
James, born Jan. 23rd, 185O. Parents, 
Duncan Forbes, builder, and Jane Furze. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Feb. 4 r 
1851. 

Emily Martha, born Jan. 21st, 1851. 
Parents, Alex. Milligan, Toronto, ana S*rab< 
Hill. Officiating minister, John Barclay,- 
March 4th, 1851. 

David, born Jan. 10th, 1852. Parents,, 
David Nixon, Toronto, and Margaret Nixon. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, S ; ;pt. 15, 
1852. 

George Edward, born Aug. 17th, 1852. 
Parents, Thomas Rutley, Toronto, and Mar-- 
garet Rutley. Officiating minister, John. 
Barclay, Oct. iCHh, 185^. 

James, born Aug. 24th, 1852. Parents, 
John McNeil and Margaret McNeil. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 22, 
1852. 

William Alexander, born July 5th, 1852. 
Parents, Robert Sutherland, Toronto, and 
Eliza Sutherland. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Oct. 2Gth, 1852, 

Christian Marion, born Oct. 18, 18 ;">!.. 
Parent, William McKechney, Toronto. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Nov. 1, 
1852. 

Robert Harrison, born Oct. 15th, 1852, 
Parents, Alex. Mitchell, Sargt. 71st Regt., 
Toronto, and Sarah Mitchell. Officiating- 
minister, John Barclay, Nov. 10th, 1852. 

Margaret, born Nov. 18th, 1851. Par 
ents, Joseph Reid., Toronto, and Isabella 
Ann Reid. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Nov. Kith, 38.~)2. 

Frances. Parent, Peter Morgan, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Nov., 1852. 

Mary Margaret, born Nov. 4th, 1852. 
Parent, John Low, Toronto. Officiating* 
minister, John Barclay, Dec. 2nd, 1852. 

Victoria Matilda, born May 24th, 1850 ; 
[slay Alexander John, born Sept. 20th, 
1852. Parents, Duncan McNab, Arrvli 
Hotel, Toronto, and Mary Ann McNab. Of 
ficiating minister, Donald Munro. 

Charlotte Sophia, bora Oct. 30, 1852. 
Parents, William Robertson and Charlotte- 
Emily Robertson. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Deo. 3rd, 1852. 

Margaret, born Sept. 22, 1852. Par 
ents, John McLaughlan, late Sergt. 7lst 
Regt., and Ellen McLaughlan. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Deo. 15th, 1852. 

Eva Katuertne, born Oct. 8th, 1852. Par 
ents, Kenneth M. Sutherland, Toronto, and 
Eva Sutherland. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, April 14th, 1852. 

William Alexander, born Feb. 5th, 1852, 
Parents, Alexander Milligan, Toronto, anef 
Sarah Milligan. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, April 18th. 1852. 

Elizabeth, born Jan. 29th, 1858. Par 
ents, George Gooderham and Catherine- 
Gooderham. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, April 20tb, 1853. 

John, born Dc. 17th, 1853. Parents, 
Archibald Duncanson and Margaret Dun 
canson. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
April 20th, 1853. 

Mary, born April 26th, 1853. Parents, 



148 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Thomas McQueou and Mary Anno McQueen. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, April 
29th, 1853. 

Caroline Maria, born March 1853. Par- 
<ents, Andrew Drunimond and Louisa Drum- 
mond. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
May 7th, 1853. 

Sarah, born April 5th, 1853. Parents, 
.Joseph Reid and Isabella Reid. Officiat- 
tag minister, John Barclay, Juno 13, 1853. 

Margaret Mary Louisa, born Nov. 19th, 
1852. Parents, John Ritchey, merchant, 
^Toronto, and Elizabeth Ritchey. Officiat- 
iing minister, John Barclay, June 30, 1853. 

William John, born April 18th, 1853. 
Parents, George P. Dickson and Isabella 
Dickson. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
July 5th, 1853. 

Elizabeth, born Nov. 12th, 1852. Par 
ents, Hugh Mathieson, Toronto, and Janet 
JMathieson. Officiating minister, John Bar- 
clay, Nov. 12th, 1853. 

Alfred Alexander, born May 8th, 1853. 
^Parents, William Jones, mason, and Mar 
garet Jones. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, July 12th, 1853. 

Roderick, born Aug. 15th. Parents, Hugh 
McNeill and Anne McNeill. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Aug. 24th, 1853. 

William Hutchison,, born May ? -< 1853. 
Parents, Roderick McNiell and Emma Mo- 
Niell. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
-Aug. 24th, 1853. 

Elizabeth Joan, born Sept. 2nd, 1853. 
Parents, Thomas Alexander McLean and 
J?anny McLean. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Oct. 3rd, 1853. 

Anne Maria, born July 26, 1853. Par 
ents, James Dlxon and Catherine Dixon. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Sept. 
18th, 1853. 

Elizabeth, born, June 18, 1853. Par 
ents, Georgo Scott and Elizabeth Scott. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 9th, 
1853. 

John, born March 28th, 1851 ; Jane, 
born Feb. 20th, 1853. Parents, George 
Duffus, Toronto, and Ann Duffus. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, June 21, 1853. 

Emma, born June 5th, 1853 ; Margaret, 
born Nov. 2(>th, 1851. Parents, James 
Uuffus, Toronto, and Anne Duffus. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, June 21, 1853. 

iWilliam, born Aug. 9th, 1853. Parents, 
John Leitch and Agnes Leitch. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Out. 9th, 1853. 

Victoria, born April 13, 1853. Parents, 
Andrew Poulds and Janet Foulds. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Oct. 24, 1853. 

Joanna Laura Dick, born June 3rd, 1853. 
Parents, Stedman Campbell, barrister, To 
ronto, and Rebecca Qampbell. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Nov. 3rd, 1853. 

(Francis William, born Aug. 6th, 1852. 
Parent, William Steven. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Nov. 6th, 1853. 

Alexander, born Aug. 3rd, 1853. Par 
ents, John McNab, and Janet McNab. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Nov. 10, 
1.853. 

William, born Nov. 23rd, 1853. Parents, 
William Turner and Jane Turner. Offielat- 
in~ minister, John Barclay, Nov. "3, 1 8. 

Manfred John, born Sept. 15th, 1852. 
Parents, John Smith and Rebecca Smith. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Deo. 27, 
1853. 

Samuel, born Nov. 10th, 1853. Parents, 
O>avid Duff and Margaret Duff. Officiat 



ing minister, John, Barclay, Deo. 30, 1853. 

James Drummond, born Dec. 18th, 1853. 
Parents, Alexander Drummond, Toronto, and 
Ellen Anderson. Olficiating minister, John 
Barclay, Jan. 30th, 1854. 

Robert James, born Nov. 12th, 1853. 
Parents, John Murdoch, Toronto, and Janey 
Forey. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Feb. 13th, 1854. 

Robert Miller Inglis, born Jan. 20, 1854. 
Parents, liuss_l Inglis, Wellington Hotel, 
and Jane Bell. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, March 24th, 1854. 

Frederick Arthur, born Jan. 31, 1854. 
Parents, Frederick Milligau, tavernkeeper, 
Toronto. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
April 18th, 1854. 

Frederick William. Charles, born Jan. 24, 
1854. Parents, Donald McDonald, Toronto. 
Officiating- minister, John Barclay, June 
25th, 1851. 

Margaret Wright, born Feb. 12, 1854. 
Parents, John Wright, R. C. Rifles, Gar 
rison, Toronto, and Mary Anne Wright. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, June 25, 
1854. 

Ronald Dingwall, born Dec. 24th, 1853. 
Parents, Al -x. Ding-wall, tavernkeeper, To 
ronto, and Flora Dingwall. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, dune 27th, 1854. 

James Frame, born July llth, 1854. 
Parents, Janies Frame, Edward St., Toronto, 
and Elizabeth Frame. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, July 29th, 1854. 

Mary Jane McArthur, born May 12th, 
1854. Parents, James McArthur, Toronto, 
and Mary McArthur. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay. Sept. 23rd, 1854. 

JFarquhar McLachlan, born Sept. 10th, 
1854. Parents, Peter McLachlan, black 
smith, Toronto, and Jessie MoLachlan. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 7th, 
1854. 

Henrietta McWheeny, born Aug. 21et, 
1854. Parents, Henry McWheeny, R. O. 
Rifles, Garrison,, Toronto, and Elizabeth Mc 
Wheeny. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Sept. 17th, 1854. 

Sarah Kelly, born July 29, 1854. Par 
ent, William Kolly, R. C. Rifles, Garrison To 
ronto. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Sept. 17th, 1854. 

Robert Barclay Coulson, born July 1st, 
1850 ; Elizabeth Coulson, born Nov. 19, 
1854. Parent, Samuel Ooulson (deceased). 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 
10th, 1854. 

Harriet Jane Gooderham, born Sept. 17, 
1854. Parents, George Gooderham, 1st 
con., Scarboro , and Catherine Gooderham. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 
22nd, 1854. 

John Eastwood Nesbit, born Oct. 7, 1854. 
Parents, Thomas Nesbit, carpenter, To 
ronto, and Mariah Nesbit. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Jan. 7th, 1855. 

Robert Fraser Drummond, born Aug. 21, 
1854. Parents, Andrew Druiminond, To 
ronto, and Louisa Drummond. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Jan. 27th, 1855. 

William Frederick Rutley, born March 
23rd, 1855. Parent, Thomas Rutley, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
April 8th, 1855. 

John Hay, born Nov. 19th, 1854. Par 
ents, Robert Hay, cabinetmaker, Toronto, 
and Mary Hay. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Feb. 13th, 1855. 

Meredith Melvin Morgan, born Deo. 8th, 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



149 



1854. Parent, Peter Morgan, Toronto. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, April 27, 
1855. 

Janet Christie, born Feb .llth, 1855. 
Parents, James Olir s.ie, Toronto, and Mary 
Anne Christie. O.. dating minister, John 
Barclay, April 22nd, Ift55. 

Mary Maltby Carruthers, born March 6th, 

1855. Parents, E. M. Oarruthers, Toronto, 
and Annie Oarruthers. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, June 7th, 1855. 

Alexander Stewart, born Jan. 30, 1855. 
Parents, Matthew Stewart, Toronto, and Isa 
bella Stewart. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, April 15th, 1855. 

Annie Leslie, born March llth, 1855. 
Parents, James Leslie. Toronto, teamster, 
and Margaret Leslie. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, June 29th, 1855. 

David Alex. McPhorson. Parent, William 
MoPherson, Toronto. Officiating minister. 
John Barclay, April 15th, 1855. 

Ellen McDonald Craig, born Nov. 23rd, 
1854. Parents, Mark P. Craig, tavern- 
ke"per, Toronto, and Margaret McFarlane. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, March 
llth, 1855. 

Alfred Doig, born March IGth, 1855. 
Parents, Andrew Doig and Anne Doig. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, April 27, 
1855. 

John Alex. Scott, born Dec. 30th, 1854. 
Parents, John Scott., Jailer, Toronto, and 
Jane McDougall. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay. March 19th, 1855. 

Arthur Ryerson McDonald, born March 
27(h, 18" 5. Parent, Donald McDonald, To 
ronto. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
July 2<>th, 1855. 

Jane Scott Provan, born July 1st, 1854. 
Parents, Robert Provan, confectioner, To 
ronto, and Geoffrey Hannah. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Aug. 2(Hh, 1855. 

Jane Buchanan, born July 23rd, 1854. 
Parents, Al .\. Buchanan and Jane McLach- 
Inn. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Au-. -!<,th, 18."5. 

Rose Agii -s Barclay, born Aug. 13, 1855. 
Parents, John Cameron, banker, Toronto, 
and Rosa Ganiproii. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Oct. 21st, 1855. 

Isiibdla .Jan- t Dickson, born July 9th, 
18" 5. Parents, George P. Dickson, Elgin 
Mills, Yonge st., and Isabella Thomson. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 24, 
1 8 l "> 5 . i 

Duncan McNiell, born Oct. 31st, 1854. 
Parents, Hugh McNiell, Toronto, and Ann 
McNiell. Officiating minister, John Barclay. 
Oct. 25th, 1855. 

Emma Alicia Robertson, born Oct. 30th, 
1853. Parents, William Robertson and 
Charlotte Hood. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Oct. 30th, 1855. 
Elizabeth Thomson Stevens, born July 15, 
855. Parents, William Stevens and Mary 
Ann Stev,->ns. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Nov. 4th, 1855. 

George Hutchinson McNiell, born March 
22nd, 1855. Parents, Roderick McNiell and 
Erania McNiell. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Nov. 9th, 1855. 

William Howard Sinclair, born Aug. 25, 
855. Parents, Hugh Sinclair, Custom IIoiiso 
ifficer, Toronto, and Janet McDonald. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Oct. 7th, 
1855. 
Marion Miller Campbell, born July 8th, 



1855. Parents, John Campbell and Jane- 
Miller. Officiating minister, John Barclay* 
Oct. 7th, 1855. 

Stewart Drummond, born Nov. 9th, 1855.. 
Parents, James Druonmond, basket maker,. 
Toronto, and Janet Begg. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Dec. 4th, 1855. 

Mary Anne Duffus, born Jan. 13, 1855. 
Parents, James Duffus, mechanic, Toronto,. 
and Anne Trush. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Dec. 9th, 1855. 

William Robert Gerrie, born Nov. 2nd,. 
1855. Parent, William Gerrie, Etobicoke. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 22, 
1855. 

Isabella Maria McLean, born July 8th 
1855. Parents, Thomas A. McLean, To 
ronto, and Kanny McLean. Officiating min 
ister. John Barclay, Jan. 12th, 1856. 

George Anderson, born Nov. 25th, 1855. 
Parents, William Anderson, bootmaker, To 
ronto, and Anne Milne. Officiating minister* 
John Barclay, Jan. 13th, 18w<>. 

Jane Hall Bowman, born June 27, 1855. 
Parents, John Bowman, Toronto, and Fran 
ces Milligan. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Jan. 13th, 185(5. 

Mary Jane Milligan, born Oct. 25, 1855. 
Parents, Al<;x. Milligan, Toronto, and Sarah. 
Hill. Officiating minister, John Barclay,. 
Jan. 13th, 1850. 

Charles Hugh Mathieson, born May 9th, 
1855. Parent, Hugh Mathieson, Toronto. 
Officiating minister, John BarcUty, Jan. 23,. 
1856. 

Annie Velenna McConkey, born Jan. 7th,. 
1854. Parents, Thomas McOonkey, cinfec- 
tioner, and Elizabeth O. Brown. Officiating- 
minister, John Barclay, Jan. 7th, 1850. 

Walter Drysdakv McConkey, born Feb. 7, 

i 1856. Parents, Thomas McConkey, confec- 

! tioner, Toronto, and Elizabeth O. Brown,. 

Officiating minister, John Barclay, Jan. 7, 

1856. 

William Robertson Gow, born Doc. 24, 

1854. Parents, Thomas Gow, Toronto, and 
Beatrice Robertson. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Feb. 10th, 1856. 

Mary Annie McDonald, born Jan. 12th, 
185(5. Parents, Angus McDonald, Toronto, 
and Ellen McLaughlan. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Feb. 10th, 18,")(i. 

MauLsonL. Parents, John Maulson, ac 
countant, Toronto, and E .len Hill. Officiat 
ing 1 minister, John Barclay, Feb. 1<>, 18o6. 

Thomas Mathieson, born Oct. 1st, 1855. 
Parents, Angus Mathieson, druggist, To 
ronto, and Margaret Grant. Officiating mln- 
| ister, John Barclay, April 7th, 185U. 

Arthur Murdoch, born April 12th, 1830. 
: Parents, John Murdoch, seaman, Toronto* 
I and Janet Tom. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, April 21st, 1856. 

Margaret Annie Drnmrnond, born April 
15th., "1856. Parents, Matthew Drummond, 
clerk, Toronto, and Eliza Ann Wilkinson. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, May 8, 
185/6. 
John Douglas Blackwood, born July 28,. 

1855. Parents, Robert Blackwood, Toronto, 
and Susan Blackwood. Officiating minister, 

1 John Barclay, May 21st, 1856. 

John Stewart Blackwood Douglas, born 
Feb. 17th. 1855. Parents, John Douglas, 
Toronto, and Clara Wheeler.. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, May 21st, 1856. 
David Turnbull Letham, born Feb. 27th,. 
1 8>50 P;i remits, Joht Le>tham, Toronto, and" 



150 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Jane Cook Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, May 25th, 185G. 

Janet Farnie, born Nov. 18, 1854. Par 
ents, George Fernie, Toronto, and Ellen Mo 
CQush. Officiating 1 minister, John Barclay, 
May 2t5th, 1856. 

Margaret Jane Monro, born April 8th, 
1856. Paren,ts, William Monro, Toronto, 
and Isabella McKenzie. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, June 4th, 1856. 

(Mary Jane Orr, born July 18th, 1856. 
Parents, Andrew Orr, Toronto, and Isabella 
Orr. Officiating minister, I. Gordon, Oct. 
19th, 1856. 

Georgina Walker Paterson, born Aug. 8, 
1856. Parents, John Pateraon, Toronto, and 
Elizabeth Walker. Officiating minister, Rev. 
I. Gordon, Oct. 19th, 1856. 

Matthew Whiting Alexander, born Aug. 
17th, 1850. Parents, James Alexanider, 
wine merchant, Toronto., and Elizabeth 
Scott. Officiating- minister, Dr. Alton, of 
Scotland, Sept. 30th, 1856. 

Robert Mansfield Milligan, born May 29, 
1850. Parents, Joseph Milligan, Toronto, 
and Lilias. Mansfield. Officiating minister, 
Rev. I. Jennings, 1856. 

Margaret Laughlin Scott, born Sept. 27, 
1856. Parents, John B. Scott, Toronto, 
and Jane McDwugall. Officiating minister, 
John Brown, Oct., 185(1. 

Mary Ronnie, born Oct. 20th, 1856. Par 
ents, Robert Rennie, slater, Toronto, and 
Ellen Berry. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Dec. 14th, 18<56. 

Jane Milligan, born Sept. 22nd, 1856. 
Parents, Frederick Milligan, tavernkeeper, 
Toronto, and Margaret Bowman. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Dec. 22, 1856. 

Jane Ohisholm Buchanan, born June 25th, 

1856. Parents, James Buchanan, printer, 
Toronto, and Christina Shankland. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclaj, Dec. 29, 1856. 

Hugh Alexander Dunn Drummond, born 
Sept. 22nd, 1856. Parents, Andrew Drum 
mond, Toronto, and Louisa Drummond. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Jan. 8th, 
1857. 

Eliza Jane Ross, born Aug. 2.5th, 1856. 
Parent, Donald Ross, James St. East, To 
ronto, Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Jan. 22nd, 1857. 

Alexander Scott, born Nov. 1st, 1856. 
Parent, Alic? Scott (unmarried), Toronto. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Jan. 29, 
1857. 

James Turnbull, born Aug. 14th, 1856. 
Parents, David Turnbull, Toronto, and Mina 
Ballentine. Officiating minister, John Bar- , 
clay, Feb. 23rd, 1857. 

John Aitken, born Feb. 26th, 1857. Par- ; 
ents, William AiMcon, baker, Toronto, and : 
Anne Chapman. Officiating minister, John ! 
Barclay, March 29th, 1857. 

Charles Grant Rutley, born Jan. 30th, ; 

1857. Parents. Thomas Rutley, Toronto, 
and Margaret McGregor. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, March 29th, 1857. 

James Gray Kirkland, born Sept. llth, 
1850. Parents, Ja-mes Kirkland, Toronto, 
and Janet Gray. Officiating minister, March 
29th, 1857. 

Charles Morris, born Oct. 7th, 1856. 
Parents, George Morris, blacksmith, To 
ronto, and Mary Murray. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, March 29th, 1857. 

Edith Jessi : Kate Clark, born Nov. 1st, 
18.".0. Parents. Thomas MoLr-od Clark. To 



ronto, and Jessie McKay. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, April 5th, 1857. 

William Bowmaker, born April 1st, 18(57. 
Parents, Robert Bowmaker, Toronto, and 
Mary Wood. Officiating minister, John Bar- 
Barclay, April 15th, 1867. 

Mary Louisa Melville, born Feb. 8, 1857. 
Parents, John Melville, Toronto, and Mar 
garet Mclntyre. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, April 26th, 1857. 

George Simpson Cameron, born March 25, 
1857. Parents, Angus Cameron, banker, 
Toronto, and Fanny Simpson. Officiating 
! minister, John Barclay, April 30, 1857. 

James Michie Farquharson, born July 29, 
1857. Parents, James JFe-rquharson, Toronto, 
an 1 Mary Farquharson. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, May 21st, 1857. 

James Leslie, born March llth, 1857. 
Parents, James Leslie, Toronto, and Mar 
garet L3sLL>. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, May 21st, 1857. 

Matthew Stewart, born Oct. 5th, 1856. 
Parents, Matthew Stewart, Toronto, and 
Isabella Stewart. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, May 24th, 1857. 

Elizabeth Duncan Handyside, born April 
13th, 1857. Parents, John Handyside, To 
ronto, and) Jane Ddck. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, June 7th, 1857. 

Thomas William Sutherland, born Feb. 28, 
1857. Parents, Rob >rl Sutherland, Toronto, 
and Eliza Middleton. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Aug. 25th, 1857. 

Sophia Cameron Clark, born June 29th, 
1857. Parents, John Clark, Toronto, and 
Catherine Clark. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Aug. 25th, 1857. 

Thomas Richard McDonald, born July 26, 
1857. Parents, Niel McDonald, Toronto, 
Martha Pooley. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Aug. 28th, 1857. 

James Scott, born Aug. 23rd, 1857. 
Parents, Henry Scott, Toronto, and Mary 
Gorrio. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Sept. 16th, 1857. 

Elizabeth Hay, born Aug. 24th, 1857. 
Parents, Robert Hay, cabinetmaker. To 
ronto, andi Mary Dunlop. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Sept. 24th, 1857. 

John Miller. Parent, Robert S. Miller, 
merchant, Toronto. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Oct. 8th, 1857. 

Arthur Christie, born Sept. llth, 1857. 
Parents, James Christie, late Sergt. -Major, 
Toronto, an^l Mary Anne Thomson. Offi^iat- 
lag minister, John Barclay, Oct. llth, 1857. 

Thomas Neilson, born April loth, 1857. 
Parents, James Neilson, Toronto, and Isa 
bella Rhans. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Oct. 26th, 1857. 

Elizabeth, born Aug. 8th, 1857. Par 
ents, Angus McDonald, R. O. Rifles, and 
Ellen McDonald. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Nov. 1st, 1857. 

Eliza Jane McCandlish, born Nov. 14th, 
1857. Parents, Samuel McCandlish, To 
ronto, and Mary Paisley. Officiating minis 
ter, John Barclay, Dec. 7th, 1857. 

George Nelson, born Sept. 29th, 1867. 
Parents, George Nelson, R. O. Rifles Regt., 
Toronto, and Mary Barry. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Dec. 13th, 1857. 

Margaret McIFYiyden, born Nov. 14th, 
18">7. Parents, Lachlan MoFayden, mariner, 
Toronto, and Elizabeth McGinnes. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Dec. 29, 1857. 

William George Anderson, born JVor, 9tb, 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 151 



1857. Parents, George Anderson, Toronto, Officiating- minister, John Barclay, Dec. 13, 
and Anne McDougall. Officiating- minister, 1858. 

John Barclay, Feb. 22nd, 1858. i John Hamilton Ewart, born June 3rd, 

Agnes Anne Mathers, born Jan. 20th, , 1858. Parents, George Ewart, merchant, 

1858. Parent, John Mathers, merchant, To- i Toronto, and Agnes Rogers. Officiating 
ronto. Officiating minister, John Barclay, minister, John Barclay, Dec. 21st, 1858. 
Feb. 18th, 1858. Ann Dunbar Farquharson, born July 16, 

James Paterson, born June 19th, 1858. j 1858. Parents, James Farquharson, car- 
Parents, John Paterson, York street, To- penter* Toronto, and Mary Farquharson. 



ronto, and Elizabeth Walker. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, July 25th, 1858. 

Thomas Kirkland, born March 23, 1858. 
Parents, James Kirkland, baker, Toronto, 
and Janet Gray. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, June 13th, 1858. 

Duncan McDougall, born March 19th, 
1858. Parents, Alex. Duncan McDougall, 
barrister, and Catherine Dugusta McDougall. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, March 



OfHciating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 27, 
18o8. 

Anne Wilson Drummond, born Oct. 2!nd, 
1858. Parents, Matthew Druimmond, clerk, 
Toronto, and Eliza Jane Druirnimond. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 27, 
looo, 

Charles John Moncrieff, born June 9th, 
1858. Parents, Robert Moncrieff, Toronto, 
and Elizabeth MoK-nzle. Officiating minis- 



19th, 18o8. ! ter, John Barclay, Jan. 2nd, 1859. 

Emily Montague McLean, born Nov. Anthony Ellis," born Oct. 3Oth, 1858. 

18o7. Parents Allan IS McL ? an, Toronto, Parents J Andrew Orr, carpenter, Toronto. 
and Isabella McLean Otf.eiatmg minister, ^ i 8abfllla , O!T . officiating minister. John 
John Barclay July 10th, 1858. Barclay, Jan. 2nd, 1859. 

Elizabeth McPhcrson, born Jan. 1858. Jamos Mt>rto , n Dxummond, born July 2,5, 
Parents William McPhorson, Toronto,. and 1838 . Parents, . Andrew Drurnmond, 7 T?- 
Margaret McPhereooi. Officiating minister, | ronto> and Louis0 Adelaide Druimmoi ; d . of . 

mlnister 



Parents Thomas McLean, Toronto, and i sabel i a Scott . bom Deo . 25t h, 1858. 

E an ^ M ^f an oo i^i S-H* mmister> John ! Parents, John Scott, tailor, Toronto, and 

Barclay, Aug. 22nd, 18o8. j Jano Scott . officiating minister, John Bar- 

Norman Hutcheson McNcill, born Nov. 3, ! clay, Feb. 13th, 1859. 




John Angus Mathieson, born May 31st, Barclay, Feb. 13th, 1859. 

Parents Hugh Mathioson, merchant, ; rhomas Frederick Renilson, born Dec. 
Toronto, and Janet Mathieson. Officiating Dec . 1(;th) 1858 . p arMt t s , John Renilson, 
master, John .Barclay Sept. 3rd 18o8 tall Toro , ntO) and Isabell a R^m^n. of : 

George Norns, born Aug. 3rd 1858. fi cia ti n , ? minister, John Barclay., Feb. 13, 
Parents, George Norris. blacksmith, To- ! 135.9 

i ZV Tnhn ^"Ji.^TO ^ol ^iT-s 111111 I Archibald McPadyen, boen June 17th, 
ister, John Barclay, Sopt. 12th, 18o8. 1858 Parents, John McFadyen, tavern! 

Charles Norris, born Oct. 7th, 185G, | keeper, and Margaret Gillespie. Officiat- 
Parents, Geopge Norris, blacksmith, To- | in? minister, John Barclay, March 7th, 
ronto, and Mary Murray. Officiating min- j 1859. 
ister, John Barclay, Sept. 12th, 1858^ Francis Edward Macdonald, born Nov. 8th, 

1858. Parent, Hon. Donald McDonald, M. 

L. C., Toronto. Officiating minister, John 



Robert Innes, born Feb. Cth, 1857. Par 
ents, Robort Innes and Alice Innes. Officiat 
ing minister, J. n. McKcrral, for J. Bar 
clay. 



Barclay, March 27th, 18C9. 

Marion Aitken,. born Jan. 12th, 18"59 : 



Elizabeth Nelson, born June Gth, 1858. Isabella Aitken., born Jan. 7th, 1859. Par- 
Parents, Jfwnes Nelson, Toronto, and Isa- ents, Jam^s Aitken, Toronto, ani Sarah Wal- 
belld Pharos. Officiating minister, John I-;;-. OfficiatiiLg minister, John Barclay, 10th 
Barclay, Oct. llth, 3858. April, 1859. f 

John Bain Brown, born Sept^ 28, 1858. Susan Robertson, born Jan. 4th, 1859. 



Parents, James Brown, baker, Toronto, and 
Jane Malcolm. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Oct. 28th, 1858. 

Isabella Bowman, born Jan. 27th, 1857 ; 
Samuel Thomson Bowman, Oct. 8th. 1858. 



Parents, Charles O. Robertson, 145 Beech 
St., Toronto, and Mary O. Morris. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, June 6th, 1859. 
Maria Isabel Thorburn, born May 29th, 
1859. Parents, James Thorburn, M. D., 



Parents, John Bowman, of Express Ob., To- physician, Toronto, and Jane MoTavish. ON 

ronto, and Frances Milligan. Official in? f Seizing minister, John Barclay, June 10th, 

minister, John Barclay, Dec. 13th, 1858. 185,9. 

Lilias Dianua Mansfield M llhran, born O"t. Eliza Caroline Gilmor, born Jan. 23rd, 

27th, 1858. Parents, Joseph Milligan, York 1859. Parents, Isaac C. Gilmor, merchant, 

street, Toronto, and Lilias Diana Milligan. Toronto, and Jessie K^rr. Officiating- min- 

f\et: !._____. - . _ . *-J _ i- 1 -w . -* ^ ti_ -* r>r /\ 



OfHciating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 13, 



fPj-ederick Arthur Milligan, born Oct. 1st, 



ister, John Barclay, June 17th, 18-59. 

William Mitchell Miller, born May 4th, 
1859. Parents, Robert S. Miller, mer- 



^ Q O """O 7- >^vy_a.i_*ut^* Jb * t^ *i *, UJ AWV^ *r^Jl V fcj. 1.TAI1AAW1- J nllilC.! ~ 

o.)H. Parents, Alexander Milligan, Cam- i chant, Toronto, and Eliza Miller. Officiat- 
SSSi street, Toronto, and Sarah Milligan. j ing minister, John Barclay, July 10, 1859. 
omciatin,g minister, John Barclay, Dec. 13, j Elizabeth Emma Leldlaw, born April 15, 

1859. Parents, George Laidlaw, Toronto. 

etsy Stevenson Mansfield Milligan. born and Ann Middleton. Officiating minister, 
June ,1th, 1857. Parents, William Milligan, John Barclay, July 10th, 1859. 
Tork street, Toronto, and Betsy Milligan. John Watson, born June 14th, 1859. 



152 LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Parents, James Watson, bank clerk, Toronto, Mary Ameil Steele. Officiating minister, 

and Jessie Jolly. Officiating minister, John John Barclay, June 17th, 1800. 
Barclay, July 12th, 1859. Elizabeth Walker Paterson, born April 

wameron. Parents, Angus Cameron* 29th, 1860. Parents, John Paterson, To- 

hanker, Toronto, and Fanny Ga.meron. Of- ronto, and Elizabeth Paterson. Officiating 

ficiatiug minister, John Barclay, Oct. 27th, minister, John Barclay, June 17th, 1860. 
1859. George Henderson Sinclair, born April 29, 

Robert Stephen Oarruthers, born July 1800. Parents, Hugh Sinclair, Ousto-ms, To- 

29th, 1859. Parent, E, M. Owruthers, for- ronto, and Janet MoDouald. Officiating min- 

wardor, Toronto. Officiating minister, John Uter, John Barclay, June 18th, 1860. 
.Barclay, Oct. 30th, 1S59. Archibald MdFadyen and Allan McFadyen, 

Patterson. Parents, James Patterson, twins, born July 18th, 1U59. Parents, 

merchant, Toronto, and Jans Strachan. Of- Lachlan MclFadyen, Toronto, and Elizabeth 

ficiatin* minister, John Barclay, Nov. 6th, Mclnnee. Officiating minister, John Bar- 

185-9* clay, June 25th, I860. 

Mary Clark, born June 27th, 1859. Par- William. Alfred Joseph Gordon McDonald, 

ents, John Olark, Toronto, and Catherine bora June 3rd, <1800,. Parent, Hon. Donald 

Cameron. Officiating minister, John Barclay, McDonald, M. L. O., Toronto. Officiating 

Nov. 28th, 1859. minister, John Barclay, July 4th, I860.. 

Thomas William Hay, born July 21, 18 59. Margaret Sinchair Cathcart, born Nov. 
Parents, Robert Hay, cabinetmaker, To- 13th, 1859. Parents, James Oathcart, To 
ronto, and Mary Dunlo>p. Officiating min- ronto, and Catherine Sinclair. Officiating 
iater, John Barclay, Dec. 13th, 1859. minister, John Barclay, Sept. 17th, 1860. 

Jessie Anora Forbes, born March 2nd, Archibald Duncan McLean, born Oct. 23, 
1853. Parents, Duncan Forbes, builder, To- 1859. Parents, Thomas A. McLesn, To 
ronto, and Jane Furze. Officiating minister, ronto, and Fanny McLean. Officiating mln- 
John Barclay,, Dec. 14th. 1859. ister, John Barclay. Sept. 30th, 1800. 

Elizabeth Scott Alexander, born Dec., David Aitken. Parents, James Aitken, To- 
1859. Parents, James Alexander, wine mer- ronto, and Sarah Aitken. Officiating minis- 
chant, and Elizabeth Soott. Officiating min- ter, John Barclay, Nov. llth, 1860. 
later, John Barclay, Dec. 29th. 1859. Ellen Charlotte Thomson FairbaJrn, born 

Jane Rennie, born Nov. 5th, 1859. Par- Oct. 30th, 1860. Parents, Thomas Fair- 
en ts, Robert Rennie, Toronto, and Ellen bairn, boilermaker, Toronto, and Mary Ste- 
Berry. Officiating minister, John Barclay, venson. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Jan. 2nd, 1860. j>e C . 2nd, 1800. 

Annabella Bowman. Milligan, born Nov. JonT1 Farquharson, born Deo. 4th, 1860. 

18th, 1859. Parents, Frederick Milligan, Parents, James Farquharson, Toronto, and 

tavornkeeper, Toronto, and Margaret Jane Mary Farquharson. Officiating minister, 

Bowman. Officiating minister, John Barclay, j hn Barclay, Dec. 15th, 1860. 
Jan. 30th, 1860. [Margaret Mclntyre, born Sept. 6, 1860. 

Mary Elizabeth Milligan, born May 3rd, Parents, Andreew Mclntyre, Toronto, and 

1859. Parents, Robert John Milligan, To- Janet Mclntyre. Officiating niinister, John 
ronto, and Rebecca Atkinson. Officiating Barclay, Jan. 3rd, 1801. 

minister, John Bare-Lay, Jan. 30th, 1860. Jane Sproat Watson, born Dec. 1, 1860. 

Elizabeth Jane McDonald, born Feb. 3rd, Parents, James Watson, clerk, Bank of B. 

1800. Parents, Neil McDonald, private, R. N. A., Toronto. Parents, John Barclay, Deo. 

O. Rifles, and Martha McDonald. Officiat- 30th, 1860. 
Ing minister, John Barclay, March 12, 1800. Sarah Annie Morrison, born Oct. 22nd, 

John Farquhar Burnett, born Dec. 10th, 1800. Parents, oJhn Morrison, 35 Centre 

1858. Parents, John Burnett, Toronto, and street, Toronto, and Mary Morrison. Of- 

Mary Farquhar. Officiating minister, John fieiating minister, John Barclay, Jan. 21st, 

Baiclny, Much 12th, 1800. I860.. 

Agnes Harriet Womyss, born Feb. 20th, Jessie Whyte Findlay, born Sept. 28th, 

1800. Parents, Charles Caput Wemyss, 1800. Parents, John Findlay, farmer. King- 

clerk, Toronto, and Agnes Hogg. Officiating B to.n road, and Elizabeth Findlny. Officiating 

minister, John Barclay, April 1st, 1800. minister, John Barclay, Feb. 3rd, 1801. 

John Scott Hyslnp, born Jan. 28, 1800. Robert Mars Smith, born Oct. 23rd, 1859. 

Parents, Robor 1 Hyslop, Toronto, and Oath- Parents, James Smith, Duchess street, and 

Bribe Hy.lop. Officiating minister, John Bar- Elizabeth Atkinson. Officiatiner minister, 

clay, April 1st, 1800. John Barclay, March 18th, 1801. 

John Anderson, born Jan. 23rd, 1800. Margaret Ruth McDonald, born Oct. 2nd, 

Parents, George Anderson and Anne Ander- 1800. Parents, George McDonald, R. O. 

son. Officiating Minister, John Barclay, 1st Rifles, Toronto Garrison, and Mary McDon- 

Aprll, 1860. aid. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 

Elizabeth Agnes Smith, born April 3rd, March 20th. 1801. 

1860. Parents, William I. Smith, Water- Johanna Mills, born Oct. 12th, I860. Par- 
works, Toronto, and Apnes K >rr. Officiat- ents, Charles Mills. R. 0. Rifles, Toronto 
in-R- minister, John Barclay, May 17, 1800. Garrison, and Elizabeth Mills. Officiating 

Davi 1 John Andrew Gl-ndinninir, born Deo. minister, John Barclay, March 20th, 1801. 
10th, 1850. Parents, Robert Wilson Glen- James Alexander Scott, born Jan. 4th, 

dinning, printer, Toronto, and Jane Me- 1801. Parents. John Scott, Toronto, and 

Lean. Officiating minister, John Barclay, Ja.n Scott. Officiating minister, John Bar- 

Jurwj 12th, 1800. clay, March 3lst, 1861. 

Charles Edward McPherson, born Jan. 5th, John Renilson, born Feb. 17th, 1861. Par- 

1800. Parents, Edward McPherson, Toronto, nn.ts, John Rpiiilson, Toronto, and Isabella 

mnd Catherine McPherson. Officiating min- Reiiilson. Officiating minister, John Par- 

ister, John Barclay, Juno 17th, 1800. ely. M-rr-li "1 1 > 

Mary Milcah Steele, born April 11, 1860, Robert Sutherland, born March 2nd, 18o9. 

Parents. John Gussins Steele, Toronto, and Parents, Robert Sutherland, Toronto, and 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



153 



Middleton. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, April 3rd, 1801. 

Parents, Matthew Druinniond, clerk, Bur- 
ar s Office, 0-nd Eliza Ann Drumunond. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, April 29, 
1861. 

Archibald Kirkland, born May 21, 1860. 
Parents, Jam s Kirkland (deceased), Toronto, 
and Janet Gray. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, May 27th, 1861. 

Jane Elizabeth Watson, born 1861. Par 
ent, William. Watson, Toronto. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, June 9th, 1861. 

Margaret C^miel Bur ness Paterson, born 
July 29th, 161 ; William Ameron Pater- 
son, born July 31st, 1859 ; Jane Anne 
Burneaj Paterson, born Feb. 27th, 1860. 
Parents, James Paterson, storekeeper, To 
ronto, and Jane Strachan. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, July 14th, 1861. 

Ann! i Hay, born May 31st, 1861. Par- 
eats, Robert Hay, cabinetmaker, Toronto, 
and Elizabeth D-uulop. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, July 18th, 1801. 

Andrew Joseph Bowman, born Aug. 12. 
Parents, John Bowman, Express Agent, and 
Frances Milligan. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Aug. 13th, 1801. 

iHrugh Savage, born Aug. 31st, 1861. 
Parents, John Savage,, St. Patrick street, 
Toronto, and Catherine Trehy. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Oct. 18th, 1861. 

Jessie Barton Ma-theson, born Dec. 31st, 

1860. Parents, Hugh Matheson, Toronto, 
and Janet dezie. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Deo. 10th, 1861. 

James Henderson, born June 17th, 1844; 
William Henderson, bora June 17th, 1848 ; 
Wilhelmina Sinclair Henderson, born Jan. 
31st, 1851 ; Margaret Henderson, born 
March 31st, 1852 ; David Henderson, born 
Sept. 8th, 1857 ; Christopher Monro Hen 
derson, born Dec. 12th, 1800. Parent, Wil 
liam Henderson, merchant, Toronto. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Dec., 1861. 

Edwin Reginald McDonald, born June 6, 

1801. Parent, Hon. Donald McDonald, M. 
~L. O. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Dieo. 25th, 1801. 

Christina Victoria Hood, born Aug. 9th, 

1861. Parents, Charles Hood, engineer, To 
ronto, and Janet Oockburn. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Dec. 29th, 1861. 

Jossio Denholm Arthurs, born Jan. 30th, 

1802. Parents, William Arthur, merchant, 
Toronto, and Catherine Kidd. Officiating! 
minister, John Barclay, May 18th, 18G2. 

Robert Kendrick Oathcart, born Nov. 13, 
3861. Parents, James Oathcart, Toronto, 
and Oatherino Sinclair. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, July 3rd, 1862. 

Sarah McFayden, born AU/J. 16th, 1861. 
Parents, Lachlan MdFadyen, Teraulay St., 
Toronto, and Elizabeth McFaxlyen. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, July 17th, 1862. 

Ellen Anderson, born May 18, 1862. Par 
ents, George Anderson, Trinity lane, To 
ronto, and Anne Anderson. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Aug. 3rd, 1862. 

William John Smith, born July 8th, 1862. 
Parents, William W. Smith. Water- works, 
Toronto, and Agnes Kerr. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Aug. 6th, 1862. 

Charlotte Christie, born June 7th, 1862. 
Parents, J&jnes Christie, late Sergt. -Major 
93rd Regt., and Mary Anne Christie. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Aug. 10, 
180 2. 

Margaret Jane Watson, born Sept. 29th, 



1862. Parents, James Watson, clerk Bank 
B. N. A., and Jessie Jolly. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Oct. 19th, 1862. 

Robert Provan, born March 24th, 1861. 
Parents, Robert Pro van, confectioner, To 
ronto, and Geofroy Hannah. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Nov. 9th, 1862. 

Frances Sarah Gregor. Parent, Charles 
Gregor, merchant, Toronto. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, Nov. 16th, 1862. 

William John Logan. Parents, Gilbert 
Logan, Toronto, and Grace Gallow. Officiat 
ing minister. John Barclay, Nov. 23, 1862. 

Grace Gallow, born Jan. 18th, 1859 ; Wil 
liam Charles Gnllow, born Oct. 17th, 1861. 
Parents, William Gallow, Toronto, and Cath 
erine Galiow. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Nov. 23rd, 1802. 

Ellen Thomson Smith, born May 9th, 1862. 
Parents, William (Smith, No. 7, In ftrd oon. 
east, York Mills, and Isabella Smith* Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, Nov. 24th, 
1802. 

Jessie Brown, born July 22, 1862. Par 
ents, Jarnos Brown, late Sergt. 71st H. L. 
f., Toronto, and Elizabeth Oswald. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, May 3rd, 1863. 

Thomas Steele, born March 20th, 1863. 
Parents, John Oussons Steele, Elizabeth St., 
Toronto, and Mary Annie Robinson. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, May 3rd, 1863. 

Catherine Paterson, born April 17th,. 
1803. Parents, James Paterson, store 
keeper, Toronto, and Jane Strachan. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, July 26, 
180:3. 

James Charles McDougall, born July 16, 
1803. Parents, Alex. D. McDougall, bar 
rister, and Catherine Augusta. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Sept. 19th, 1863. 

James Aitken, born June 30th, 1863. 
Parents, Ja.rn.es Aitken, 115 Beverley st., 
Toronto, and Sarah Aitken. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Sept. 2U, 3 803. 

Elizabeth Dunn Fimllay, born July 3rd, 

1863. Parents, John Findlay, farmer, and 
Elizabeth Dunn. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Oct. 4th, 1803. 

Henrietta Manson, born Feb. 3rd, 1863. 
Parent, Georgina Manson (unmarried). Bap 
tized by instruction of Session. Officiating 
minister, Jobn Barclay, Nov. 25th, 1803. 

William James Watson, born Sept. 28th,- 
1802. Parents, William Wat sou, . Airncs st., 
Toronto, and Catherine Watson. Officiating 1 
minister, John Barclay, Dec. Oth, Itt03. 

Frances Elizabeth Bowman, born Nov. 29, 
18G2. Parents, John Bowman, Toronto, and 
Frances Bowman. Officiating minister, John 
Bowman, Dec. 17th, 1803. 

Williaan Bruce Higgingbothatn, born Dec. 
3rd, 1803. Parents, William Higgingbotham, 
Toronto, and Eliza Higgingbotham. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Feb. 18. 1864. 

William Francis Steven born Nov. 15th, 
1863. Parents, William Steven, Sajrer st., 
Toronto, and Mary Anno Steven. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, March 3rd, 1864. 

Albert Edward Sweeney, born Aug. 31st, 
1863. Parents, William Sweeney, in U. S. 
army, and Jane Sweeney. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, April 19th, 1864. 

Joan Cameron McLean, born Nov. 6, 1863; 
Mary McPherson McLean, born July 14th, 
1861. Parents, Thomas McLean, Toronto, 
and Fanny McLean. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, May 30tb, 1864. Rev. Mr. 
Brouphal, for John Barclay, July 14, 1862.. 

Amy Gait Oassels, born April 8th, 1864~ 



154 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Parents, Robert Oassols, banker, Toronto, 
and Mary Oassels. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, June 23rd, 1804. 

Frederick Arthur Bowman Milligan, born 
April 12th, 1804. Parents, Frederick Mil 
ligan, Toronto, and Margaret Jane Milligan. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, July 11, 
CL864. 

Peter Andrew Campbell, born June 10, 

1804. Parents, Peter Campbell, Kingston, 
and Elizabeth Wilson. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, July 15th, 1804. 

John MdFadyen, born Oct. 17th, 1863. 
Parents, Lachlan MdFadyen, Toronto, and 
Elizabeth McFadyen. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Jan. 16th, 1865. 

Francis Logan, born Dec. 26th, 1864. 
Parents, Gilbert Logan, Sayer st., Toronto, 
and Jane Callow. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Feb. 26th, 1865. 

Sarah Ann Mathesou, born Nov. 22nd, 

1803. Parents, Hugh Matheson, Toronto, 
and Janet Clezie. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, April 23rd, 1865. 

James David Thorburn. Parents, James 
Thorburn, V M.D., and Jane McTavish. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, May, 1865. 

Kenneth Gordon Watson, bora Feb. 23rd, 
1805 ; Arthur William Walson, born Feb. 
23;-d, 1805. Parents, James Watson, clerk, 
Bank B. N. A., and Jessie Walson. OffJcia - 
ing minister, John Barclay, Maj 28, 1865. 

William Pringk;, borii March 7th. 13(15. 
Parents, Jam<;s Pringle, insurance inspector, 
Yorkville, and Margaret Pringle. Officiat 
ing minister, John ijarfl iy, uu,. _ x_,...J. 

John Thomas Douthwaite, born May 27, 

1805. Parents, Thomas Douthwaite, To 
ronto, and Annie Douthwaite. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, July 2nd, 1805. 

William Frederick Arthurs, born May 31, 
1805. Parents, William Arthurs, merchant, 
.and Buphemia Catherine Arthurs. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, July 17, 1865. 

Ali-:on O .iVer R3nTon, born Ma.v -3, 1805. 
Parents, John Renilson, Teraulay St., To 
ronto, and Isabella Renilson. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, July 23rd, 1865. 

Olara N-ewcoimbo Douglas, born April 10, 
18(>5. Parents, Rev. James Struthers Doug- 
las, Toronto, and Anne Maria Orate. Of 
ficiating- minister, John Barclay, Aug. 4, 
ISO S. 

William Thomas Timpson, born March 2, 
1805. Parents, William Timpson, Louisa St., 
Toronto, and Charlotte Timpson. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Aug. 25, 1865. 

Margaret Alexander Simpson McDougall, 
liorn Aug. 3rd, 1865. Parents, Alexander 
McDougall, barrister, and Catherine Au 
gusta McDougall. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Sept. 8th, 1805. 

Isabella Wake-man Evans, born May 21, 
1805. Parents, Edward W. Evans, merchant, 
of Owen Sound, and Margaret P. Sinclair. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Sept. 
13th, 1865. 

(Frederick William Pratt, born Dec. 20, 

1804. Parents, William Pratt, Toronto, and 
Selina Sturzaker. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Sept. 17th, 1865. 

William Percy Tyrwhitt, born July 31, 
1865. Parents, Thomas Grahame, Vaug-han, 
and Margaret Elizabeth Tyrwhitt. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Out. 9, 1805. 

Adam Brown, born Feb. 10, 1865. Par 
ents, Jami"S JJrown, /Toronto, and Jana Mal 
colm. Officiating minister, John Barclav, 
Nov. 23rd, 1865. 



Donald MoLelsh, born Sept. 14th, 1865. 
Parents. Donald McLeash, S. S. 4th Brigade, 
Royal Artillery. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Deo. 18th, 1865. 

Alfred James Perry, born July 1st, 1865. 
Parents, Charles Perry, Toronto, and Mary 
Perry. Officiating minister, John Barclay, 
Deo. 21st, 1866. 

Lyttleton Oassels, born Aug. 30th, 186i5. 
Parents, Robert Oassels, banker, Toronto, 
and Mary Oassels. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Jan. 1st, 1866. 

George Edward, born Nov. 6th, 1860 
James William, born (Feb. 15th, 1862 
Katharine Mary, born Oct. 12th, 1863 . 
Joseph Howe Laidlaw, born June 27, 1865. 
Parents, George Laidlaw, forwarder, To 
ronto, and Ann Middleton. Officiating min 
ister, John. Barclay. Jan., 18,6 6. 

Alexander Bouller, born Nov. 9th, 1865. 
Parents, Edward Bouller, Royal Artillery, 
and Isabella Bouller. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Jan. 29th, 1866. 

Elizabeth McfPadyen, born Sept. 6, 1865. 
Parents, Lachlan MdFadyen, Toronto, and 
Elizabeth McFadyen. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, iFeb. 12th, 1866. 

Mary Scott, born March 4, 1866. Par 
ents, H?nry Scott, Duchess st., Toronto, and 
Margaret Scott. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, March 18th, 1866. 

Anna Maria. Steele, born Feb. 17th, 1865. 
Parents, John Oasson Steel, Toronto, and 
Mary Ameil Robinson. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay April 1st, 1866. 

Katherine Maud McLean, born Jan. 6th, 
1806. Parents, Thomas A. McLean, barris 
ter, Toronto, and Fanny McLean. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, May 20, 1806. 

(Mary Hill, born March 4th, 1806. Par 
ents, Henry Hill and Margaret Hill. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, March 18, 
1806. 

Katherine Maud McLennan, Parents, Thos. 
McLennan and Fanny McLennnn. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, May 2,0th, 1866. 
Helen Arthurs. Parent, George Arthurs, 
merchant, Toronto. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, .July 31st, 1806. 

John Alexander Paterson. Parents, James 
Paterson, storekeeper, Toronto. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, Oct. 14th, 1866. 

Honry Thomas Prlaglj, born Aug. 8, 1866. 
Parents, James Pringle, Toronto, and Mar 
garet Forbes. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Nov. 5th, 3866. 

Miles Mclnines Smith, born Aug. 19th, 
1866. Parents, William Henry Smith, 17th 
Regt., and Catherine Anne Smith. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, Dec. 11, 1806. 

Helen Wynn Mathers, born Aug. 28th, 
1806. Parents, John Mathers, merchant, 
Brampton, and Mary Anne Mathers, Of- 
fociating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 9th, 
180-6. 

Sarah Anne Rooney, born Feb. 21, 1867. 
Parents, S^rgt. Thomas Rooney,, R. A., To 
ronto Garrison, and Catherine Rooney. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, March 18, 
1807. 

Margaret Jane Hunter, Dec. 6th, 1866. 
Parents, Robert Hunter, carpenter, Tem 
perance st., and Mary Ann Hunter. Officiat 
ing minister, John Barclay, 7th April, 1867. 
Bessie McMnrchy, born July 27th, 1865 ; 
John Campbell, born Jan. 2, 1867. Par 
ent, Archibn.11 McMurchy, teacher, Toronto 
Grammar School. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, April 19th, 1867. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



155 



Marj Elizabeth Gregor, born Jan. 26th, 

1806. Parents, Charles Gregor, merchant, 
now of Kingston, and Charlotte Gregor. Of 
ficiating minister, John Barclay, April 27, 
1867. 

Evelina GOTO, born May 26th, 1867. Par 
ents, Edward Gove, gunner, R. A. F. Bat 
tery, and Ann Gove. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, June 26th, 1867. 

William Arthur Perry, Ada Barclay Perry, 
born April 27th, 1867. Parents, Charles 
Perry, JarvLa at., Toronto, and Mary Perry. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, June 27, 
1867. 

McDonald, born June 7th. 1866. Par 
ents Roderick McDonald, Toronto, and Cath 
erine McDonald. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, July 4th, 18(57. 

Clara McPherson, born Dec. 28th, 1865. 
Parents, Edward McPhorson, Yonge St., To 
ronto, and Catherine McPherson. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay, July 27th, 1807, 

Joseph Henry Scott, born Sept. 9, 1807. 
Parents, Henry Scott, wharfinger, Toronto, 
and Margaret Scott. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Nov. 25th, 1867. 

Mary Margaret Logan, born Oct. 10th, 
18(57. Parents, Gilbert Logan, engineer, 
Grand Trunk, Toronto, and Grace Gallow. 
Officiating minister, John Barclay, Dec. 15, 
1867. 

Charles Arthur, born July 27th, 1857 ; 
Thomas Bennett, born Jan. 20th, 1860 ; 
Helen Bennett, born Oct. 24th, 1864 ; 
Elizabeth Jane Bennett, born Oat. 17th, 

1807. Parent, Bennett, confectioner, 

Toronto. Officiating minister, John Bar 
clay, Jan. 12th, 1868. 

John Mouusey LaUmer, born Dec. 16th, 
1867. Parents. Jam. is Mouns^y Latimsr, To 
ronto, and Dmily Jane Latimor. Officiating 
minister, John Barclay. Jan. 22nd, 1808. 

Thomas Brown, .born Jan. 4, 1808. Par 
ents, William Brown, conp>>ral, 17th Rog-t., 
and S:i.rah Brown. Officiating minister, John 
Barclay, Jan. 28th, 1S08. 

Jan Hope Reynoldson, born Nov. 26th, 
1807- Parents, John Reynoldson, clothier, 
and Isabella Fenwick. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, Feb. 19th, 1868. 

Marsraret Alice Reid, born Feb. 25, 1868. 
Parents, John Reid, H. M. 17th Regt. of 
Foot, and Anne Reid. Officiating minister, 
John Barclay, March 20th, 18i68. 

William H-?nry Smith, born Aug. 15. 1867. 
Parents, William Htnry Smith, band, 17th 
Regt.. and Catherine Ann. Officiating min 
ister, John Barclay, April 9th, 1808. 

Bertha Higgins, born July 20th, 1808- 
Parents, Samuel Higgins, 107 York St., To- 
ronto. and Anne Higgins. Officiating- minis 
ter, J hn Barclay, Aug. 10th, 18G8. 



The following is the record of the 
various marriages entered in the re 
cords of St. Andrews church until the 
(termination of Dr. Barclay s pastor 
ate: 

Ford and Ponton At York, the twentieth 
aav of August, one thousandi eight hundred 
and thirty-one, were married bv special li 
cense, Robert Ford, of th town of York 
rmchelor, and Mary Ponton, of the sarno 
place, spinster, by "me, Wm. Rintoul, min 
ister of St. Andrew s Church. York. Wit- 
Jiesses, Wm. Monro. John Maitland. 

Strange arid Ewart At York, the first d>v 



! of September, one thousand eight hundred 
and thirty-one, were married by special li 
cense, Jaones M. Strange, of the town of 
York, in the Homo District, widower, and 
Margaret Ewart, of the same place, spin 
ster, by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister of St. 
Andrew s Church, York. This marriage was 
solemnized between us, James M. Strange 
and Margaret Ewart in the presence of u, 
Williaiu Ware, Jane Macgibbon. 

West and Hayes At York, the\ 1st day of 
| September, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-one year, were married by special li 
cense, Isaac West, of the town of York, fn 
the Home District, bachelor, and Margaret 
Hayes, of the same place, spinster, by me, 
Wm. Rintoul, minister. This marriage was 
solemnized between us, Isaac West and Mar 
garet Hayes, in the presence of us, James 
Blackwell and James Taylor. 

Sloan and Williams At York, the 30th 
j September, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-one year, were married, after due pro 
clamation of banns, Thomas Sloan, teacher, 
; of the township of Scarborough, bachelor, 
I and Margaret Williamson, of this town, spin- 
j ster, by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This 
! marriage was solemnized between us. Thomas 
] Sloan and Margaret Williamson. Witnesses, 
I Thomas Smith and James Neil. 

Munro and Munro At York, the third day 
i of October, one thousand eight hundred and 
1 thirty-one year, were married, after pro 
clamation of banns, Alexander Munro, pri 
vate in II. M. 79th Regiment of Foot, 
bachelor, and Mary Munro, of this town, 
spinster, by me, Win. Rintoul, minister. This 
marriage was solemnized between us, Alex 
ander Munro and M;iry Munro, in th^ pres 
ence of us, Donald MoLeod and Donald Ross. 
Brunsdon ana i!ridgev>ood- At York, ihe 
i "26th day of December, one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-onu year, were married 
i by special license, Thomas Brunsdon, of the 
township of York, bachelor, and Mary Ann 
BHdgewood, of the same township, spinster, 
by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This mar 
riage was solemnized between \us, Thomas 
Brunsdon and Mary Ann Bridgewood. Wit 
ness -s, Daniel II. Mayne, Mos. Muyne. 

Johnson and Keller At York, the nine 
teenth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-two year, were married 
by special license, Lawrence Johnson, of the 
township of Tay, in the Home District, 
bachelor, and Sarah Kller, of tho town of 
York, widow, by me, Win. Ri tto >1 mi -ist^r. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
Lawrence Johnson, Sarah Keil r. Witnesses, 
George Ross, Clara Sarah Ross. 

ClinkuJibroO iner and Anderson At York 
i the twenty-fourth day of January, eighteen 
hundred and thirty-two year, were married 
i by special license, Charles Clinkunbroomer, 
: of this town, bachelor, and Hannah Ander- 
; on, of the sain place, spinster, by me, 
j Win. Rintoul, minister. Thi? marriage was 
I solemnized between us, Charles Clinkun- 
i hronmer, Hannahi Anderson. Witnesses, John 
; An e: son, Jam s Doyle. 

Charles Clinkunbroomer, a watch- 

j maker, was a well known man in York. 

i The name has been spelt in various 

ways, and appears originally to have 

been Klenkenbruiner. 

Logan and Lieth At York, the twenty- 
eighth day of January, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-two year, "were married by special li- 



156 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



oense, Donald Logan, of the township of 
Thorah, bachelor, and Margaret Lieth, of 
the same place, spinster, by me, Wm. Rin- 
toul, minister. This marriage was solemn 
ized between us, Donald Logan, Margaret 
Lieth, in the presence of Hugh Morrison, 
Jane Mncgibbon. 

McLellan and Curry At York, the twenty- 
first day of February, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three year, were married by special 
license, Dug-aid McLellan. of Chinguaconsy, 
bachelor, to Ann Ourry, of Toronto, spin- 
eter, by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This 
marriage was solemnized between us, Du- 
gald McLellan, Ann Ourry, in the presence 
of M. McLellan, Duncan McLellan. 

Kinnear and Callaghan At York, the 
twenty-third day of February, eighteen hun 
dred and thirty-two, were married by special 
license, George Kinnear, of this town, bache 
lor, and Jane Callaghan, of the same place, 
spinster, bv me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. 
This m/irriage was solemnized between us, 
George Kinnear, Jar.e Callaghan, in the pres 
ence of William Reid, John Stevenson. 

Fisher and Reynolds At York, the twenty- 
sixth day of Miarch, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-two year, were married by special li 
cense, Moses Fisher, of the township of 
Whitby, widower, and Margaret Reynolds, 
of the township of York, spinster, by me, 
Wm. Rintoul. This marriage was solemn 
ized between us, Moses Fisher, Margaret 
Reynolds, in the presence of William Jackes, 
Jr., Blaisdel Bostlet. 

Sloane and McConnell At York, the 27th 
day of ;March, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
two years, were married by special license, 
John George Sloane, of the township of 
West Gwillimbury, bachelor, and Maria Mc 
Connell, of the same township, spinster, by ! 
me, Win. Rintoul. This marriage was sol- 
omnizSd between us, John G. Sloane, Maria 
McConnell, in the presence of Sarah McCon- : 
nell, Jane Macgibbon. 

Drummond and Beaton At York, the third 
day of April, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
two years, were married by license, James 
Drumanond, of tho township of Vaughan, 
bachelor, and Catherine Beaton, of the same 
place, spinster, by me, William Rintoul. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
James Drummond, Catherine Beaton, in the 
presence of Rowland Betty, Rachel Mci- 
Donald. 

deasor and Anderson At York, April 3rd, 
1832 vears, were married, after proclama- 
tionv of banns in St. Andrew s Church. John 
Oreasor, bachelor., and Margaret Anderson, 
spinster, by me, Win. Rintoul, minister. , 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
John Creasor, Margaret Anderson, in the 
presence of Ann MciPherson. 

Mitchael and McLeod At York, the 18th 
day of April, eighteen hundred aiul Ihirty- 
two. were married by license, Hugh Mitchael, 
of Kingston, Midland District, bachelor, and 
Jane McLeod, of this town, spinster, by 
me, Wm. Rintoul. This marriag ; was sol 
emnized between us, Hugh MHchael, Jane 
McLeod, in the presence of Alexander Mc 
Gregor, Janet Morrison. 

Butcher and fcagonAt York, the tenth 
day of June, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
two year, were married, after due publica 
tion of banns, Williivm |t,ur.c?T- . of this 
town, bachelor, and Catherine Eagon, also 
of this town, spinster, by me, Wm. RintouL 



This marriage was solemnized between us, 
William Butcher, Catherine Eagon, In the 
presence of Jumes Graham, Mary Graham. 

Gibson and Sewell At York, the Itith 
day of June, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
two years, were married by license, Thomas 
Gibson, of the township of Toronto, widower, 
and Elizabeth Sewell, of the same township, 
spinster, by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. 
This marriage was solr-mnized between us, 
Thomas Gibson, Elizabeth Sewell. in the 
presence of Matthew Miller, Matthew Gray. 

Cheyne and B&ird. At York, the third 
day of July, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
two years, were married, after due pro 
clamation of banns, Thomas Cheyne, bache 
lor, and Isabella Baird, spinster, both of 
this town, by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
Thomas Cheyne,, Isabella Baird. Witnesses, 
Thomas Graham, William Knox. 

Glen and Taylor At York, the 18th day 
of July, eighteen hundred and thirty-two 
years, were married by license, James Glen, 
sergeant in the 79th Regt., bachelor, and 
Hannah Taylor, of the township of Toronto, 
spinster, by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
James Glen, Hannah Taylor. Witnesses, 
Thomas Glen, Miary Taylor. 

McAllister and McGibbon At York, the 
13th day of August, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-two years, were married by license, 
William McAllister, minister, of Lanark, in 
the district of Bathurst, bachelor, and Jane 
McGibbon, of the Town of York, spinster, by 
me, Wm. Rintoul. This marriage was sol 
emnized between us, William McAlister, Jane 
McGibbon. Witnesses, J. Buchanan, Delia 
M cOonnell. 

William McAllister, here referred to, 
was OD<J of the clergy of the Church of 
Scotland in Canada, an earnest man 
and devoted worker. 

McDonald and Sutherland At York, the 
31st day of August, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-two year, were married by license, 
John McDonald, of the township of York, 
bachelor, and Janet Sutherland, of the same 
place, spinster, by me, Win. Rintoul. This 
marriage was solemnized between us, John 
McDonald, Janet Sutherland, in the pres 
ence of James McDonald, John Barclay. 

Nlchol and Poole At York, the seventh 
day of September, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-two years, were married by license, 
RobeVt Nichol, of the township of Me- 
donte, widower, and Elizabeth Poole, of the 
township of West Gwillimbury, widow., by 
me, Wm. Rintoul. This marriage was sol 
emnized between us, Robert Nichol, Eliza 
beth Poole. Witnesses, Graham Moonhead, 
William Birkbeck. 

Cameron and Buchanan At York, the 
twenty-second day of September, eighteen 
Kindred and thirty-two year, were muirried 
bv license, MaicoLm Cameron, of the town 
ship of Oro, Home district, bachelor, and 
Agnes Buchanan, of the same township, 
spinster, by me, Wm. Rintoul. This mar 
riage was solemnized between us, Malcolm 
Cameron, Agnes Buchanan. Witnesses, Rob 
ert Miller, John Harvie. 

Pickiner an^ 1 McGiVivrav At York, th" s-o- 
ond day of October, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-two, were married, after due publi 
cation of banns, Robert Picking, soldier in 
H. M. 79th Itect., and Margaret McGilli- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



157 



, of this town, spinster, by me. Win. 
Rintoul. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us. Robert Picking, Margaret Mc- 
GilliYray. Witness, John Montache. 

Balfour and Gordon At York, the eleventh 
dayof October, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
two, were married by license, James Balfour, 
private in H. M. 79th Regt., and Eli 
Gordon, of the township of York, spinster, 
by me, Wm. Rintoul. This marriage was 
solemnized between us, James Balfour, Eliza 
Gordon. Witnesses, D. Mackay, Matilda, Mc- 
dord. 

[Mclntyre and Mclntyre At York, the! fif 
teenth day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-two year, were mar 
ried by license, Archibald Mclntyre, bache 
lor, and Mary Mclntyro, spinster, both of 
York, by me, Wm. Rintoul. This marriage 
was solemnized between us, Archibald Mc 
lntyre, Mary Mclntyre. Witnesses, John 
Thompson, William Syme. 

Black and Garside At York, tho. fifteenth 
day of November, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-two; **re married by license, George 
Black, of th#, *wn of York, bachelor, and 
Sarah Ann Gurside, of the! same place, spin 
ster, by ma, Wm. Rintoul. This marriage 
was solemnized between us, George Black, 
Sarah Garside, in the presence of George 
Garside, Robert Baard, 

Kdwards and Trust At York, the 27th 
day of November, eighteen hundred and 
and thirty-two years, were married, after 
proclamation of banns, William II. Edwards, 
bachelor, and Catherine Trust, spinster, both 
both, of the town of York, by me, Wm. Rin 
toul, minister. This marriage was solemn 
ized between us, William H.< Edwards, Cath 
erine, Trust, in the presence of William Mc- 
Ivor, Sarah Butler. 

Robinson and Nunan At York, the first 
day of December, one thousand eight hun 
dred and t hirty-two years, were married by 
license, George Robinson, bachelor, and Ellen 
Nunan, spinster, both of this town, by ane, 
Wm. Rintoul, minister. This marriage) was 
solemnized between us, George Robinson, 
Ellen Nunan, in the presence of us, Jeffrey 
Nunan, Mary Dounderson. 

Druirr.mond and McDougald At York, the 
twelfth day of December, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-two years, were married by li 
cense-, Daniel Drummo-nd, of Brock, in the 
Rome district, bachelor, and Mary Mc 
Dougald, of Vaughan, spinster, by me, Wm. 
Rintoul, minister. This marriage was sol 
emnized between us, Daniel Drummond, Mary 
McDougald, in the presence of M. J. Mc- 
Cord, Jane Smart. 

Rutherford and McKechnie At York, the 
twenty-first day of December, eighteen hun 
dred and thirty-two years, were married by 
license, Alexander Rutherford, bachelor, and 
Mary McKechnie, spinster, both of York, 
by ine, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This mar 
riage was solemnized between us, Alexander 
Rutherford, M*ry McKxshnie, in the pres 
ence of us, Alex, McGregor, Arch. Mc 
Kechnie. 

Lane and McCarthy At York, the 27th 
dav of December, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-two, were married by license, Thomas 
Lane, of ths township of Vaughan, bache- 
lo,\ and Eleanor McCarthy, of the town- 
hip of Markham, spinster, by mo, Wm. Rin 
toul. This marriage was lol-Hnnized between 
us, Thomas Lame, Eleanor McCarthy, in the 



presence of us, Wm. Lane, Peter Lane, Wil- 
liaru Heapey. 

Lindsay and Stinson At York, the fourty 
day of January, one thousand eight hundred 
and thirty-three, were married by license, 
William Lindsay, bachelor, and Letitia SUn- 
son, spinster, both of this town, by me, Wm. 
Rintoul, minister. This marriage was sol 
emnized between us, Wm. Lindsay, Letitia 
Stinson, in the presence of Susan Bright, 
Thomas Griffith. 

B ready and Manning At York on the 
llth January, eighteen hundred, and thirty- 
three, were married by license, Andrew 
Bready, of the township of Darlington, bache 
lor, and Arabella Manning, spinster, by me, 
Wm. Rintoul, Minister. This marriage was 
solemnized between us, Andrew Bready, Ara 
bella Manning, in the presence of us, J. 
Ginty, Mary Aon Ginty. 

Boyd and McCallum At York, on the six- 
tee-nth day of January, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-three years, were married by li 
cense, John Boyd, of the town of York, 
bachelor, and Margaret McOallum, of the 
town of Hamilton, spinster, by me, Wm. 
Rintoul, minister. This marriage was sol 
emnized between us, John Boyd, M-u-grret 
McCallum, in the presence of Mary Ann 
Young, Wm. Lawrie, Charles McNally. 

McGilvray and McKinnon At York, the 
seventeenth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and thirty-three years, were 
married by license, Neil McGilvray, of ihe 
township of Vaughan, bachelor, and Mary 
McKinnon, of the same township, spinster, 
by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This mar 
riage was solammized between us, Xeil Mc 
Gilvray, Mary McKinnon, in the presence of 
Charles Black, Charles McKinnon. 

McLean and McDonald At York, tho 23rd 
day of January, one thousand eight hundred 
and thirty-threa, were married by license, 
John McLean, of the township of Vaughan, 
bachelor, and Flora McDonald, of tho same 
township, spinster, by me, Wm. Rintoul, 
minister. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, John McLean, Flora McDonald, in 
the presence of Clara Bart, Mary Campbell. 

Ormond and Curry At York, the ninth day 
of February, one thousand eight hundred 
and thirty-threa, wore married by. license, 
William O moJid, of this town, bachelor, and 
Isabella Curry, of the township of York, 
spinster, by ma, Wm. Rintoul, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
Wm. Ormond, Isabella Curry, in the pres 
ence of us, Arch. McKechnie, Robt. Rich 
ardson. 

Richardson and McMillan At York, the 
eighteenth day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and thirty-three years, were 
married by license, Robert Richardson, 
bachelor, and Janet McMillan, spinster, both 
of this town, by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
Robert Richardson, Janet McMillan, In the 
presence of us, W. H. Wynn, Wm. Story. 

Campbell and McKechnie At York, ihe 
twenty-first day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and thirty-three years, 
wer emarried by license, Alexander Camp 
bell, of tho town of York, bachelor, and 
Helen McKechnie, of the wane place, spinster, 
by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This mar 
riage was solemnized between UB, Alexander 
Campbell, H~len McKechnie, in the presence 
of Robert Ki-ntz, Martha McK)3ohnie. 

McKay and Sammona At York, the 22nd 



158 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



day of February, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three, were married by license, Ken 
neth McKay, bachelor, and Caroline Mun- 
iDons, spinster, both of this town, by me. 
Win. Rintoul, Minister. This marriage was 
solairuiizwl between us, Kenneth McKay, 
Caroline Sammons, in the presence of Jamea 
Rogerson, Mary dark. 

McLennan and ttell At York, the twenty- 
fourth day of February, eighteen hundred 
*nd thirty-three years, were married by li 
cense, Donald MoLennan, of the town of 
Victoria, London District, bachelor, and 
Jean Bell, of the same place, spinster, by me, 
Wm. Rintoul, Minister. This marriage was 
solemnized between us, Donald McLennan, 
Jeiin Bell, in the presence of Martha Bell, 
C. J. Bell. 

Melntosh and Ferguson At York, the 
twelfth day of March, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married by li 
cense, John Mclntosh, widower, and Ellen 
Ferguson, widow, both of this town, by me, 
Wm. Rintoul, Minister. This marriage was 
solemnized between us, John Mclntosh, Ellen 
Ferguson, in the presence of Peter Baxter, 
Thomas Elliott. 

Line and Patton At York, the fourteenth 
day of March, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
three years, were married by license, John 
Line, of tho township of Vaughau, bache 
lor, and Mary Patton, of Georgina, spinster, 
by one, Wm." Khiioul, minister. This mar 
riage was solemnized between us, John Line, 
Mary Patton, in the presence of Niel Pat- 
ton, Walter Thomson. 

Scott and McPhwsan At York, the four 
teenth day of March, eighteen, hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married by license, 
Walter Scott, bachelor, and Anne McPhen- 
son, spinster., both of this town, by me, 
Wm. Rintoul, Minister. This marriage was 
solemnized between us, Walter Scott, Anne 
McPherson. Witnesses, Williatm Sheftiifer, 
Thomas Arden. 

Patrick and McKechnLe At York, the f.onir- 
teeath day o-f March, eighteen* hundred and 
t3itr,ty-three years, were married by li 
cense, James Patrick, bachelor, and Flora 
McKechnie, spinster, berth of this town, 
by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This mar 
riage was solemnized between us, James Pat- 
rick, end Flora McKechnie, in the presence j 
of John MoBftaohft Louisa Montach. 

Parries and Tfay At York the twenty- | 
sixth day of March, eighteen hundred and j 
thirty-three, were married, after due pro 
clamation of banns, William Parries, bache 
lor, and Betsy Hay, spinster, both of this 
town, by me, Wm. RintouJ, minister. This 
marriage was solemnized between us, Wil 
liam Farries, Betsy Hay, in the presence of 
Thomas Bay, John Shaw. 

Eraser and X,ieth At York, the twenty- 
seventh day of March, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married by license, 
Ronald iBVaser and Mary Lieth, pinttier, 
both of the township of Thorah, by me, I 
Wm. Binteul, Minister. This marriage was j 
.solemnized between us, Ronald Fraser, Mary 
Lieth, in the presence of John Urqniuart, 
John Qunn. 

M^Cellum and Blew At York, the 18th 
dy of April, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
three years, were married by license, Peter 
jMcCallum, bachelor, and Mary Blew, spin 
ster, both of the townahipl of York, by me, 
Rintoul, Minister. This marriage was 



(solemnized between us, Peter McCalhira, 
Mary Blew, in the presence of Williajn Blew, 
William Campbell. 

Hunt and Phillips At York, thel fifth day 
of May, eighteen hundred and thirty-three, 
were married, after due publication of banns, 
Jesse Hunt, bachelor, and Mary Ann Phil 
lips, both of this town,, toy me, Wm. Rintoul, 
minister. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, Jesse Hunt, Mary Ann Phillips, in 
the presence of Robjert Johnson, Philam 
Dearal. 

Allen and Brown At York, the tenth day 
of May, eighteen hundred and thirty-three 
years, were married by license, David Allen, 
bachelor, and Margaret Brown, spinster, 
both of the town of York, by me,, Wm. 
Rintoul, minister. This marriage was sol 
emnized between us, David Allen, Margarns 
Birown, in the presence of Samuel Pla,tt, 
John Mason. 

Beattie and Hudgert At York the 7th 
day of June, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
three years, were married by license, Wil 
liam Besattie and Janet Hu^jeort, both of 
this town, by me, Wm. H, ^toul, minister. 
This marriage "was solemnized between us, 
William Beattie, Janet Budgert, in the pres 
ence of James Creightoa, Thomas Andern. 

Thorn and Mitchell At York, the twenty- 
fourth day of June, eighteen hundred and 
thirty three, .were married by license, Wil 
liam Thorn, bachelor, and Agnes Mitchell, 
spinster, both of the township of York, 
by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This mar 
riage was i-olemnizod between us, William 
Thorn, Agnes Mitchell, in the presence 
of John Thorn, John Ross. 

Sutherland and Sutherland At York, the 
twenty-ninth day of June, eighteen hun 
dred and thirty-three years, were married 
by license, Hector Sutherland, bachelor, 
and Mary Sutherland, spinster, both of this 
town, by me. Wm. Rintoul, minister. This 
marriage was solemnized betwdon us, Hector 
Sutherland, Mury Sutherland, in the pres 
ence of John McKay, Robert Ross. 

Shaw and Jackson At York, the fifth 
day of July, eighteen hundred and thirtyr 
three years, were married by license, George 
Shaw, bachelor, and Louisa Jackson, spin 
ster, both of this town, by me. V in. Rintoul, 
minister. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, George Shaw, Louisa Jackson, in 
the presence of John Kendrick, John Shaw. 

Jobnstou and Rainilton At York, the 
ninth day of July, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married by license, 
James Johnston, bachelor, and Georgina 
Hamilton, spinster, both of this town, 
by me, Wm. Rintpul, minister. This mar 
riage w*s solemnized between us, James 
Johnston, Georgina Hamilton, in the pres 
ence of Robert Ross, James Dioksou. 

Beekman and McOord At York, the 
eighteenth day of July, eighteen hund.red 
and thirty-three years, wer married by 
license, Robert Beekman, of Montreal, 
bachelor, and Matilda McOord, of this town, 
spinster, by me. Wm. Rintoul, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between ua, 
Ro bert Beekman, Matilda McOord. in the 
presence of James Beatty, G. Rintoul. 

Wataan and Short At York the 18th 
iday of July, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
three years, were married, after due pro 
clamation of banns, Thomas Watson, bache 
lor, and Margaret Short, ipinster, both of 
this town, by me. Wm. Rintoul, minister. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



159 



This marriage was solemnized between us, 
Thomas Watson, Margaret Short, in the 
presence of Willia^n Campbell, Sarah Wil 
kinson, 

Thomson and Smart At York the four 
teenth day of August, eighteen hundred, and 
thirty-throe, were mai "led, after due pub 
lication of banns, Alexander Thomson, of 
the township of Ki .i^j, bachelor, and Ann 
Henrietta Smart, of this town, spinster^ 
6y me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This mar 
riage was solnmnized between us, Alexander 
Thomson, Ann Smart, In the pretence of 
Ajidrew Row a no, James Grantles. 

Hamilton and Hill At York, the fourth 
day of September, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married by li 
cense, Jam; "Hamilton, bachelor, and 
Elizabeth Hill, spinster, both of this town, 
by me, Wm. Rintpul, minister. This mar 
riage was solemnized between us, James 
Hamilton, Eliza Hill, in the presence of 
John MoGibbon, Harry Sawyer. 

McLean and Deptford At York, the 1st 
day of October, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three years, were marrisd by license, 
William McLean, bachelor, and Jane Dept 
ford, spinster, both of the township of 
York, by me, Win. Rintoul, minister, in the 
presence of Johm Hill, John Flanagan. 

Abrams and Morrison At York, the 9th 
clay of October, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married by license, 
John Abrams, of the township of Toronto, 
baoiioior, a.nd Janet Morrison, of this town, 
spinster, by me, Win. Itintoul, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
John Abrams, Janet Morrison, in the pres 
ence of Daniel Morrison, Geo. Harrison. 

Llringstaa and Thompson At York, the 
twelfth iiay of October, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-three years, were married by li 
cense, Niel Livingston, widower, and Mar 
garet Thompson, sphister, both of this 
Town, by me. Wm. Rintoul, minister. This 
marriage was solemnized between us, Niel 
Livingston, Margaret Thompson, in the 
presence of Wm. Campbell, John Donovan. 

Bowie and Graham -At York, the 13th 
day of October, eighteen hundred. and 
thirty-three, were married by certificate 
of banns having been published, William 
Bowie, bachelor, and Ann Graham, spinster, 
both of this town, by mo, Wm. Rintoull, 
minister. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, Wlllion) Bowie, Ann Graham, in 
the presence of Ilanry Locker, Ed. Grant. 

Oarruthers and Grant At York, the 25th 
day of October, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married by license, 
John Carmthen,, of tho township of Mark- 
ham, bachelor, and Margaret KUiott, of 
the town of York, spinster, by me, Wm. 
Rintoul, minister This marriage was sol 
emnized between us, John Oarruthers, Mar 
garet Elliott, in the presence of Jos. E. 
Morrison, M. Ersklne. 

Aires and Ross At York, the 25th day 
of October, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married, after due 
publication of banns, James Alves, bache 
lor, and Ellen Ross, spinster, both of this 
town, by me, Win. Rintoul, minister. This 
marriage was solemnized between us, James 
Aires, Helen Rasa, in the presence of Hugh 
Carmichael, John Smith. 

Mitchell and Smart- At York, the 7th 
dy of Norember, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married, after due 
publication of banns, William Mitchell. 



bachelor, and Euphernia Smart, spinster*,, 
both of this town, by mo. Win. Rintoulu 
minister. This marriago was solemnized 
between us, William Mitchell, Euphemia 
Smart, in the presence of Duncan McMil- 
la;n, Clara Smart. 

McK.iy and Baxter At York, the 9th 
day of November, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-three years, were married, after 
due publication of banns, Finlay McKay,, 
bachelor, a.nd Janet Baxter, spinster, uoth 
of this town, by me, Wm. Rintoul, minis 
ter. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, Finlay McKay, Janet Baxter, in 
the presence of Hugh Hunter, Duncum 
Shiaw. 

Bell and Smart At York, the 29th day 
of Noveanbr, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
three years, were married, after due pub 
lication of banns, John Bell, bachelor, and 
Isabella Smart, spinster, both of this town, 
by me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. This mar 
riage was solemnized between us, John BeLl, 
Isabella Smart, in the presence of William 
Bell, John Erskinew 

Gillespie and Buchanan At York, the 
10th day of December, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-three vears, were married, after 
due proclamation of banns, Archibald Gil 
lespie, bachelor, and Agnes Buchanan,, 
spinster, both of the town of York, by me^ 
Wm. Rintoul, Minister. This marriage was 
sole,mnized between us, Archibald Gillespie, 
Agnes Buchanan, in the presence of Dun 
can .Sinclair, Arch. Reid. 

O Reilly and Stevens- At York, the 16th 
day of Deeamiber, eighteen hundred and 
t!hirty j three yeurs, were married by license. 
William p Reillv, widower, of Oakrilla. in 
the district of Gorev and Harriet Isabella 
Stevens, of the township of Toronto, in 
the Home District spinster, by me, Wm. 
Rintoui, minister. This marriage- was sol- 
epnnized between us, William O Reilly, Isa 
bella Stevens, in the presence of David 
Botsford, Mary Botsford, 

Thompson and ParkerAt York, the 1st 
duty of January, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-four j ear, were married by license, 
James Thompson, bachelor, and Ann 
Parker, spiniter, both of the town of York* 
by me. Wm. Rintoul, minister. This mfar- 
riage was solemnized between us, James 
Thompson, Ann Parker, in the presence 
of James Adams, George Bell. 

Barnett and Fox -At York, the 4th day 
of January, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
four, were marriod bv license, Darid Bar 
nett, bachelor, and Elizabeth Fox, spin 
ster, both of this township, by me, Wm. 
Rintoul, minister. This marriage was sol 
emnized between us Darid Barnett, Eliza 
beth Fox, in the presence of Robert Mans 
field, William Kox. 

McMartin and Carlyte At York, tb 
14th day of January, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-four year, were married by license, 
Alexander McMartin, of the township of 
Charlotteni>ur,gh, in the Eastern District, 
tvadhelor, and Mary Carljle, of this town, 
spinster, bv me, Win. Rintoul, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
Alexander McMartin, Mary Carlyle, in the 
presence of F. Berry, Margaret Ourry. 

McKeohnde and Stewart At York, (the 
17th day of January, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-four, were mrriad by license, 
Archibald MoKechnio, bachelor, and Mary 
Stewart, spinster, both of this town, by 
me, Wm. Rintoul, minister. Ihis 



160 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



riage was solemnized between us, Archi- 
Ixald MuKechnie, Mary Stewart, in the 
presence of Hu,g$i Hunter,. John Urquhart. 
Bell and Smith At York, the 2th day 
of February, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
four, were married after de proclama 
tion of banns, William Bell, bachelor, and 
Eliza Smith, spinster, both of thia town* 
by me. Win. Riutoul, minister. This amr- 
riage was solemnized between us, William 
Bell, Eliza Smith,, in the presence of Jo.hn 
. Wm. Blata. 



Gartshore and Mitchell At York, the 
7th day of March, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-four, were married by license, John 
dirtshore, bachelor, and Mary Mitchell, 
spinster, both of this city, by mei, Wm. 
Rintoul, minister. This raarriaige was sol 
emnized between us, John Gartshore, Mary 
Mitche.ll., in the presence of Andrew Mit 
chell, John Oullen. 

This is the last marriage in the 
town of York celebrated by Mr. Rin 
toul. The next ceremony was in 
York no longer but the city of To 
ronto. 

Middlamist and Dods-Toronto, thte 8,th 
day of April, eighteen hundred and thirty- 
four year, were "married* after due procla 
mation of banns, Henry Middtemist, bache 
lor, and Dorothy Dods, spinster, both of 
this city, by me, \vm. Rintoul, n.inistjer. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
Henry MiddL3ii\ist, Dorothy Dods, in the 
presence of Geor.se Dods, John Armstrong. 

Munro and MoKenzie Toronto, the 9th 
day of April, were married by (license. 
David Munro, bachelor, and. Isabella Mc- 
Kenzie, spinster, both of the township of 
Markham, by me. Win. Rintoul, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
David Munro, Isabella McKeuzie, in the 
presence of David McKenzie, John Mc- 
Konizie.. 

Elson and Siiapson Toronto, the 22nd 
day of April, eig-hteen hundred and thirty- 
four year, were married by license, Wil 
liam Bison, of this city, oacLteilor,, and 
Charlotte Simpson, of the same, spinstef, 
by me, W.*n. Rintoul, minister. This mar 
riage was solemnized between us, William 
Elson, Charlotte Simpson, in the presence 
of JohJi Smithier, John Cook. 

Buohan and Tackot Toronto, April 30th, 
eighteen hundred and thirty-four year, 
were married by license, John Btihcan, of 
this city, bacnolor, and Christina Taoket v 
of the same place, spinster, by me, Wm. 
Rintoul, minister. Thij marriage was sol 
emnized between us. Joha Buchan, Chris 
tina Tacket, in tbc picsauct, of John 
Pretty, William Xewbiy:tjiin;f. 

This was the last marriage in con 
nection with St. Andrew s church at 
which Mr. Rintoul officiated. He re 
signed the pastorate at the same time 
and was at once succeeded by the Rev. 
Wm. T. Leach. 

Hods-son and Smart Toronto, February 
8th, 183<> year, were marriedi, after regu 
lar proclamation, Mr. Michael Hodgson, 
bachelor, and Jane Smart, both of To 
ronto, by ma, Wm. T. Learh, minister. The 
above marriage was solemnized in the 
presence of usu Won* Lowaisbrou^ h, John 



Bell, witnesses, and between ua, Michael 
Hodgson, Jane Smart, parties. 

Tod and Butler At Toronto, on the 7th 
day of September, one thousand eight hun 
dred and thirty-five, were married by li 
cense, Andrew Tod, Esq., of Toronto, and 
Elizabeth Butler, of same place, by me, Wm. 
T. Leach. Andrew Tod, Elizabeth Butler, 
parties ; Thomas Taylor, Peter Brown, wit 
nesses. 

Memo. In this registry the autographs 
of the parties are not given, but they are 
given as to the parties and witnesses, and 
so recorded in the office of the Clerk of 
the Peace. York Mills, 29th Dec., 18,32. 
William T. Leach. 

Thompson and Ca-mpwell City of To 
ronto, the sixteenth day of December, 
eighteen hundred and thirty-five years, 
were married by license, Charle; Thompson, 
widower, of the township of York, Home 
District, and Lucretia Campbell, city of 
Toronto, by me, William T. Leach, minis 
ter. This marriage was solemnized between 
us, Charles Thompson, Lucretia W. Camp 
bell. Witnesses, Marshall S. Bidwell, W. 
Rose. 

Marshall S. BidweJY was the well- 
known Canadian politician, whose 
doings are so intimately connected 
with the history of Upper Canada, 
1830-38. 

Bell H.nd Rutherford City of Toronto, 
j the thirty-first diay of Decean.ber, eighteen 
1 humdred nnd thirty-five years, were mar- 
! rted by license, and with special consent of 
| the mother and executor of Catherine 
Rutherford, John Bell, Esq., bachelor, and 
the said Catherine Rutherford, both of 
the city of Toronto, br me, Win. T. Leecbj, 
minister. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, John Bell, Catherine Rutherford, 
in the presence of Thomas Bell, executor ; 
Don. Ross, Robert Bell Miller. 

The following memo, refers to the 
foregoing marriage. It is a unique in 
stance of a legal document being en 
tered in a church register. 

Toronto, 30th December, 1836. 
In compliance with the conditions and 
provisions contained in the last will and tes- 
tarne-nt of the within named Robert Ruth 
erford, so far as regards the settlement 
and provisions therein made respecting the 
yearly income of the within named Catfh- 
orine Rutherford, we, the undersigned!, the 
mother and executor of the said Catherine 
Rutherford do consent to the solemnisation 
of the said marriage within mentioned, in 
order to entitle her, the said Gathering 
Rutherford, to the yearly income settled 
upon her, the said Catherine Rutherford, by 
her late father. 

Mary Rutherford. 

Robert Oathcart, Executor. 

Patersom rnd Hyslop City of Toronto, 
the 22nd day of Jauary, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-six, were married by license, 
James Paterson, of the city of Toronto, 
and Agnes Hyslop, of the city of Toronto, 
by me, William Leach, minister. This mar 
riage was solemnized between us, James 
Paterson, Agnes I/yslop, in the presence of 
Russel Inglis, Jeremiah Iredale. 

Lauder and Brown City of Toronto, the 
sixteenth day of February, eighteen hun 
dred and thirty-six, were married by Ji- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



161 



cense, John Lander, of the city of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Catherine Brown, of Rich 
mond Hill, on Yonge street, by met. Win. 
Leach, minister. This marriag-e was sol 
emnized between us, John Lauder, Cather 
ine Brown, in the presence of George Peters, 
Walter Preston. 

McNeil and Hutchinson City of Toronto, 
2t>th day of February, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-six jear, were married by li 
cense, Hugh McNeil, bachelor, of the city 
of Toronto, and Eliza Hutchinson, spin 
ster, city of Toronto, by me, Win. T. Leach, 
minister. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, Hugh McNeil, Eliza Hutchioson., 
In the presence of Wm* Hutchinson, HujjUi 
Hunter. 

Rose and Wilson The city of Toronto, 
the first day of March, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-six, were married by license, 
Walter Rose, of this city, widower^ a.nd 
Ellen Wilson, of the same place, widow of 
the late John Wilson, quartermaster 70th 
Regt., deceased, Ly me, Wm. T. Leach, 
minister. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, Walter Rose., Ellen Wilson* in 
the presence of Thomas Carfrae, Charles 
Thompson,. 

Groat and Grant City of Toronto, the 
twenty-fifth day of April, eighteen hun 
dred and thirty-six, were married by li 
cense, W. William Groat, of the township of 
Markham, and Margaret Grant, of the same 
township, by me, Wm. Leach, minister. This 
marriage was solemnized between us, Wil 
liam Groat, Margaret Grant, in the pres 
ence of John Davis, Peter Grant. 

Wilkie and Patterson City of Toronto, 
twenty-first day of July, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-six, were married by license, 
Nie-1 Wilkie, of the township of Kinig. 
bachelor, aoid Isabella Patterson, of the 
township of White-church, spinster, by me, 
William Leach, minister. This marriage was 
solonrnized between us, Niel Wilkie, Isa 
bella. Patterson, in the presence of Thomas 
McMinty, James McLean. 

McCready and D-algrish-At the city of 
Toronto, on the fourth day of January, 
eighteen hundred and thirty-seven, William 
McCro-.idy, of the City of Toronto, wid 
ower, and Maria Dalgrish, wido|\v of the late 
Andrew Dalgrish. sergeant of 79th Regt., 
deceased, were married by me, Wm. Loach, 
minister. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, William McCready, Maria Dal- 
grish, in the presence of J&ftnes Murray, 
Peter MoNauyrhton. 

McKemzie and Younie- At the City of 
Toronto, on the fourth day of January, 
eighteen hundred aud thirty-seven, James 
McKeozte, of the City of Toronto, and 
Rachel Younio, spinster, of the same place, 
were married by license, by mo, Wm. Leach, 
minister. This marriage was solemnized be 
tween us, James McKenzie, Rachel Younie, 
in the presence of James White, Peter Mc- 
Kenzle. 

Holland and Dean At Toronto, the first 
day of August, eighteen hundred and 
thirty-six, were married by license, Samuel 
Holland, of Ccbourg, Newcastle District, 
bachelor, and Mary Dean, of the City of 
Toronto, widow of the late William Dean, of 
Ootourg, by me. Wm. Leach, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
Samuel Holland, Mary Dean, in the pres 
ence of Wm. Coultern, Robt. Harrison. 

Fraser and Mcishenick At Toronto, the 



tenth day of November, eighteen hundred 
and thirty-six, were married by license, 
Donald Fraser, of the township of York. 
a-nd Margaret McShenick, of the same place, 
spinster, by me, William Leach., minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between ua, 
Donald Fraser, Margaret Mc&henick, in the 
presence of James Tolmic, David Hill. 

Harper and Green At Toronto on tb 
twe>nty-socand day of June, eighteen hun 
dred and thirty-seven, William dmcan 
Harper, of the City of Toronto, bachelor^ 
and Isabella Graen, of the same place, 
widow of Miciiael Green, of th County 
of Leitrim,, Ireland* were by license mar 
ried by me, Wm. Leach. This raarriagi* 
was soleminlzed between us, William Dun 
can Harper, Isabella Green. 

G-orddn and Gorha.m At Newmarket on 
the seventh day of Septesntber, eighteen 
hundred a-nd thirty-seven, were married, 
the Rev. Henry Gordon, minister of the 
Preslbyterian Church of Canada in connec 
tion with the Church of Scotland, of Gan- 
an-oque, Johns town District, Upper Canada, 
bachelor, and Narcissa Gorham,, of the 
township of Whitechurch, spinster, by me, 
William Leach, minister. This marriage 
was solemnized between us, Narcissa Gor 
ham., Henry Gordon, in the presence of 
John J. Botsford. E. Gorham, N. Gorham. 

At Toronto, on the fifteenth day of Oc 
tober, one thousand eight hundred and 
I thirty-six year, were married by license, 
William Burnham, Bsq., of Port Hope, and 
Susan Bastedo, of Toronto, spinster, by me, 
William T. Leach, minister. This marriage- 
was solemnized between us, Susanah Bas 
tedo, Wm. Bumham, and in the presence 
of us. George Burnham, Joseph Rogersi, Jr. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-seventh day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-six, were married by license, Duncan 
M"Leod, of the city of Toronto, bachelor,, 
and Anne McArthur, of the township of 
Toronto., by mo, Wm. T. Leach, minis-terj 
This marriage was solemnized between us. 
Duncan McLeod, Anne McArthur, and in 
the presence of us, Hugh Henderson, Thos. 
McMurchy. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-ninth day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty -six, were married after proclamation, 
Mr. Robert Hodgson. Chinguaoousy, bache 
lor, and Miss Agues Smart, of Toronto^ 
spinster, by me, William T. Leaohi, minister. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
Robert Hodgson, Agnes Smart, and in the 
presence of us, Thomas Smart, Thomas 
McMurchy. 

At Toromito, the twenty-ninth day of 
August, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-six, John Sommeraet, of the town 
ship of Ilnnisfil, bachelor, and Margareft 
Flertcher, of the city of Toronto, were by 
license married by me, William T. Leacb. 
This marriage was solemnized between us, 
John Somimerset, Margaret Fletcher, and 
in the presence of UF* {Tho-mas Gray, Jojm 
Gray. 

At the city of Toronto, on the eiglhthi . 
of November, one thousand eight hundred 
and thirty-six, were married by license, 
Alexander Maitland, of the city of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Helen Serving, of th town 
ship of Etobicoko, daughter of the late 
Joihn Skirving, of the said township, farmer, 
doceasod. by me, Wm. T. Leach, minister. 
This marriage was soloinnized between us, 
Alexander Maitland, Helen Skirving, and itt 



162 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



the presence 1 of us, John Maitland, William 
Munro, Patrick A. Gibson. 

At Toronto, on the sixteenth day of No 
vember, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eix, were married by license, John 
^hewan, City of Toronto, bachelor/, and 
Ja.no Thompson, of the saane place, spin- 
eter, daughter of Hamilton Thompson, of 
tin Olty of Toronto, by in, William T. 
Leaoh, minister. This marriage was duly 
solemnized between us, John Shewan, Jane 
Thompsoni, and In the presence of ua, John 
Glltespie, Georg-e Barron, Hamilton Thorn- 
eon. 

At Toronto, the sixth day of October, 
one thousand eight hundred and thirtyt- 
eix, John MdKeohnie, bachelor, of the 
township of Toronto, and Catherine Me- 
Ilrae, of the Olty of Toronto, were by li 
cense married by me, Win. T. Leach, min - 
iater. This marriage was duly solemnized 
between us, Johm McKechnie, Catherine 
Mellnae, and to the presence of ua, Wm, 
Hutchlneon, James Turver. 

At the Oity of Toronto, on the foui*- 
teenitfli of November, one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-six, were married by li 
cense, Hu,g(h Henderson, of the City of 
Toronto, bachelor. and Margaret Jane 
Wotter. of same place, spinster, by me, 
William T. Leach, minister. This mar 
riage was duly solemnized between us, Hugh 
Henderson, Margaret Jane Wotter, and in 
the presence of us, W. W. Gedd, Herlry 
Thomas. 

At the Olty of Toronto, on the second 
dayof May, one thousand eight hundred 
a.nd thirty-seven, were married by license, 
William Towns, bachelor, of the township 
of Markham, and Hannah Smith, of tha 
same township, spinster, by me, William 
T. Leach. This marriage was duly sol 
emnized between us, William Towns, Han 
nah Smith, andi in the presence of us, John 
Fair Fenwick, Andrew Smith. 

At tho City of Toroato, on thousand 
eight hundred and thirty-seven, were mar 
ried by license, Mr. Angus McKay, of tha 
Citj of Toronto, bachelor, a>nd Jan Mur 
ray, of same place, spinster, by m, Wil 
liam T. Leach, minister. This marria,gie 
was duly solemnized between us, Angus 
McKay, Jane Murray, and in the presence of 
us, John McKay, Adam Gunn,. 

At tiw> City of Toronto, on the ninei- 
teenth day of May, one thousand eight 
hwndred and thirty-seven, were married by 
license, Mr. John Goodale, of the town of 
Niagara, bachelor, and Elizabeth Ferris, 
of tho City of Toronto, widow of the late 
William Ferris, o-f Toronto, by me, William 
T. Leach, minister. This marr iage was duly 
solemnized between us, John Goodale, Eliza 
beth Ferris, and in the presence of us, 
Robert Hay, Thomao White. 

At th<? City of Toromto, on the tweiity- 
Beoonid day of June one thousand eig^t 
hundred and thirty-seven, Sidney Smit,h 
Hamilton, of the City of Toronto, bache 
lor, and Anno Ooiiltbard, of the same place,, 
spinster, daughter of tho widow Coulthard, 
of the towmehip of Markham,, were by li- | 
oe*we roiarried by me, William T. Lea^fji, j 
mtoiater. This marriage has been duly 
solenMiized between us, Sidney S. Hamilton 
Arao Coulthard. and In the presence of 
us, G. S. Norton, R. Swezer Hamilton, P. 
Shaver. 

At tho City of Toronto, on the eighth 
diay of July, one thouaasid eight hundred 



and thirty-seven, were married by license,. 
Thomas Nagle, of the City of Toronto, wid 
ower, and Elizabeth Brown, of the town 
ship of Erin, in the District of Gore, spin 
ster, by me, William T. Leach,, miniate* 1 . 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Thomas Nagle, Elizabeth Brown, 
and In the presence of Robert Todd, John 
Nagle. 

At the City of Toronto, on the thir 
teenth day of July, one thousand eigtit 
hundred and thirty-seven, were married 
by license, Alexander Macflcay, of the City 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Rosetta Louisa 
Hamilton, of the same place, spinster, by 
me, William T. Leach, minister. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Alexander Mackay, Roeetta L. Ham 
ilton, and in the presence of us, W. Rose, 
Robert Beard. 

At the Oity of Toronto, on the twentyr- 
first day of August, one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty -seven, were married 
by license, George Lathrup Norton, of the 
City of Toronto, bachelor, and Caroline 
Ferrier, of the same place, spinster, by 
me, William T. Leach, minister. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
G. L. Norton, Caroline Cruickshank Fer 
rier, and in the presence of us, George 
Bostwick, Amos Hortoa, William Scott. 

At the Olty of Toronto, on the ninth 
of September, one thousand eighl hundred 
and thirty-seven, were married by procla 
mation, John Taylor, of the City of To 
ronto, bachelor, aiad Alicia Bryson, of the 
same place, spinster, by me, William T. 
Leach, minister. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, John Taylor, 
Alicia Bryson, and in the presence of us, 
Peter McArthur, Hugh Bryson. 

At the Oity of Toronto, on the six 
teenth day of Ootober, one thousand eicfit 
hundred and thirty-seven, were married 
by license, George Halliday, of the town 
ship of York, and Janet HosstnirgSi, ,of 
same place, by me, William T. Leachu min 
ister. This miarriajge has been duly ooi- 
em;ndzed between us, George IlaMiday, Janet 
Hosstmrgh, aaa in tho picsonos of us, Thos. 
McBeath, David Hill. 

At tho City of Toronto, on the nino- 
teenth day of October, one thousand eigtht 
hni-ndred and thirty-seven, were married by 
license, Thomas Atkinson, of the township 
of Etobieoke, bachelor, and Bertha Kidd, 
of samo place, spinster, by me, William T. 
Loach. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized betweou us, Thomas Atkins>n, 
Berth-a Kidd, aind in the presence, of ua, 
William Suter, George Marshall. 

At the Oity of Toronto, on the nine- 
teentli day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and ftiirtv-sevon, were married by 
license, William Graham, of Newnarhet^, 
bachelor, aod Mary Anne Flewell, of the 
township of Uxbridgc, sninster, by me* 
William T. Leach, minister. This marriago 
has been duly solemnized between us, Wil 
l-lam Graham, Mary Anne Fteweil, and in 
the presence of us, J. W. Walsh, Jojhn 
Flewell. 

At tho Oity of Toronto, o the twentyt- 
fourth day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-<seven, were married by 
license, Jamas Rose, of Newmarket, bache 
lor, and Margwet Connelly, of the same- 
place, spinster, by me, William T. Leach. 
Thia marriage has been duly solemnized be- 
tweon ua, James Rose, Margaret Connelly!, 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



163 



and In the presence of us, John S&ndenoiv 
Darid Roes. 

At the City of Toronto, on the twenty** 
eighth day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-seren, were married by 
license, Kiel McPhaden. of the townibip 
of Brook, bachelor, and Mary McLean, of 
the same place, spinster, by me-, William T. 
Leach. This marriage lias bean (July sol 
emnized between ve, Niel D. McPhaden, 
Mary McLeaoi, and In the presence of Peter 
MoArth-ur. 

At the City of Toronto, on the thirty- 
Tirst of October, ne thousand eight hun 
dred and thirty-eeven, were married, Archi 
bald McDounll, bachelor, of the City of 
Itoronto, and Christina McTaggart. of the 
same place, by liceni , by me, William T- 
Leanb. Thifi marriag-e has been diuly sol 
emnized between -ua, Archibald McDou.gwll, 
Chriaty McTaggart, a,nd in the presence of 
us, Duncan M. Land. Niel Graham* 

At the City ctf Toronto, on the twenty- 
ninth of Decetober, one thousand oig,ht 
hundred and thirty-seven, were married 
by license, Archibald Graham, of Thorah, 
bachelor, and Nancy McLeod, of the New 
castle district, spinster, by me, William T. 
Leaeb. This marriage has beein duly sol 
emnized between us, Arch. Graham, Nancy 
McLeod, and in the presence of us, Hugh 
McLeod, Hugto Cameron. 

At Toronto, on the thirtieth day of De 
cember, oine thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, David Smith, 
of Toronto, widower, and Mary McNeil, of 
the same place, by me,, William T. Leach. 
This marriag-e has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, David Smith, Mary McNeil, and in 
the presence o-f us, Peter McArthur, Dr. 
Ran kin. 

At Toronto, on the tenth day of July, 
o.ne tho usumd edarht hundred and forty, 
were married by license, Samuel McMorran, 
of the to-win of Niagara, bachelor, and 
Mary Lawless, uf the sam-e place, spinster", 
by me, William Tw Leach. ThLi marriage 
has been dMly solemnized between us, Sam 
uel McMorran, Mary Lawless, and in the 
presence) of us, John Short, Henry Lawless. 
At Toronto, on the tenth da-y of July, 
one thousaind eight, hundred and forty, 
were married by license, William Isaac 
Creadie, of Toronto, and Mary Anne Pres 
ton, of same place, by me, Wm. T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be- 
tweon us, William Isaac Creadie, Mary> Anne 
Preston, in th presence of John Biddteli, 
William McCreadie. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-seventh of 
November, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, James King), 
of Ktobiooke, and Jane Ennis, of same 
pi a^e, by me., William T. Leach. This mar- 
rt<-go has been d-uly solemnized between us, 
Samuel King-, Jane EanLs, and in the pres 
ence of us, James Thompson, John Ennis. 

At Toronto, on the second February, one 
thousand eight hundred and thirty-eight, 
were married by license, Joseph Smith, of 
Hamilton, bachelor, and Sarah Faruley, of 
the same ptooe, spinster, by me, William T. 
Leach. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Joseph Smith, Sarah 
Flaruley, aocl to the presence of us, Robert 
Muirhead, Johm Wesley, Samuel Rogetrsi 

At Toronto, on the eighth day of Fobru- 
a^y, one thousand el-g-ht hundred and thirty- 
lg ht, were married by licens, George Mr- 
fadden, ot Vaughan, bachelor, and Eleanor 



Joyce, ccf tbe township of Yortc, by mefc 
Wm. T. Leach. This nuwriage was diuly sol 
emnized between u, Georgia MdFaddn 
Eleanior Joyce, and in the presence of us 
Alex. McFaddein, John McAuley. 

At Toronto, on the fifteenth day of Feb 
ruary, ne thousand eafrht hundred and 
thirty-eig-ht, were married by license, John 
Robteon Urquhart, of Hamilton, bachelor, 
and Eliza Quinlan, of U. Canada, spinster* 
by me, William T. Leach. This marriage 
toaa been duly soleminized between us, J. R. 
Urqubart, Eliza Quinlan. and in the pres 
ence o fue, H. McLennan, John Sweeney. 

At Toronto, OBI the twenty-eighth day of 
February, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eight, were married by license, Alex 
ander Sutherland, Holland Landing, and 
Catherine Gunn, West Gwillimbury, by me, 
Wil!iam T. Leach. This marriage was duly 
solemnized between us, Alepcander Suther 
land, Catheirine Gunn, and in the presence 
of ua, Angrus Gunn, John Sutherland. 

At Toronto, the secoad day of March, 
one thousand eig-*it hundred and thirty r 
eight, were married by license, Charles Gibb, 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Eliza Shilling-law, 
of the same place, -widow, by me William T. 
Leacn. This marriage has been tiuly solemn 
ized between us, Charles Gibb, Eliza Shil- 
liniglaw, and in the presence of us, John, 
Leys, Robert Gibb. 

At Toronto on the eighth day of March, 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty-eight, 
wre married bv license, John Walsh, New 
market, bachelor, and Lydia Davis, of same 
place, widow, by me, William T. Leach. This 
(marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, John Walsh, Lydia Walsh, and in th* 
presence of ua, Charles Gorhaan, J. R. 
Sutherland. \ 

At Toronto, the sixteenth day of March, 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty-eight, 
were married by license, James DLxori, of 
the City of Toronto, widower, and Cather 
ine Carfrae, of same place, spinster by me,.. 
William T. Leach. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, James Dixon, 
Catherine Carfrae, and in the presence- 
of us, Robert Carfrae, William Bell. 

At Toronto, on the seventeenth day of 
April, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eight, were married by license, 
Thomas Robson, of Chinguacousy, bachelor, 
and- Janet Gibson Sheirs, by me, William T- 
Leach. This marriage has beela duly sol 
emnized between us, Thomas Robson, Janet 
Gibson Shiers, and in the presence of James 
Archer, Adam Spars. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-seventh day 
of April, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eight, were married by license, Geo. 
Dods of Toronto, bachelor, and Sarah Cook, 
of same place, spinster, bv me, William T. 
Leach. This ma.rrriage has been duly soW 
emnized between us, George Dod*v Sarah 
Cook, and in the presence of ust, Jaber Baber,. 
John Armstrong, Susanne Beith. 

At Toronto, on the third day of May* 
one thousand eight hundred and thirtyW 
eight, were married by proclamation of 
banns, James Oleland, of Toronto, and Eliza 
beth Paton, of same place, by me, William 
T. Leach. This marriage has been duly 
solamnized between us, James Cleland, Eliza* 
beth Paton, and in the presence of ua. Rob- 
art Hay, John Glen. 

At Toronto, on the seventh day of May, 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
eight, were married by proclamation* 



164 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



John. McCebn-an, of Sunnydale, bachelor, 
and Christina Pettigrew, of Toronto, spin 
ster, by me, William T, Leach. This mar- 
riajpe has been duly solemnized between us, 
John McGetman, Christina Pettyfre>w., and 
In the presence of us, John Ross. Arch. Reid. 
At Toronto, on thte 22nd day of May, 
on thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
eigbt, were married by license, Thomas 
tfp-m&n Muiock, Esq., M.D., of Newmarket, 
widower, and Mary Oawthra, of the samte 
place, spinster, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween us, T. H. Mulock, Mary Cawthra, and 
In the presence of us, Arthur Armistronfg 1 , 
Capt. R. P., John Mulo-cfc, Lieut. R. For- 
esto*. 

Dr. Muiock was father of the Hon. 
William Muiock, M. P., Postmaster- 
General of tbe Dominion of Canada in 
the Laurier administration. He settled 
in Newmarket in 1838, and some little 
time later removed to Bond Head, 
where he practised until his death in 
1847. His widow survived him for many 
years, dying in Los Angeles, California, 
December 29th, 1882. Mrs. Muiock was 
a daughter of John Cawthra, of New 
market, who was member for Simcoe 
county in the Provincial Parliament of 
Upper Canada in 1839. One of the wit 
nesses to the marriage, Captain Arthur 
Armstrong, was a prominent resident 
in Lloydtown, Ont., where his son, also 
Arth-ur Armstrong, now resides (1899). 

At Toronto, on the twenty-third day of 
May, oue thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
ight, were married by license, Michael 
Tighe. towns-hip of Toronto, widower, and 
Harriet McCo.y, Toronto,, spinster, by me, 
Williaan T. Leach. This marriage has been 
<luly solemnized between us, Michael Tighe, 
Harriet McCoy, and in the presence of us, 
Angus McKay, Edward Batter. 

At Toronto, the fifteenth day of June, 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
eight, were married by license, Archibald 
Shannon, of the City of Toronto, bacher- 
lotr, and Margaret Morrison, of the same 
place, spinster, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage htu> l-oen duly solemnized be 
tween us, Arch. Shannon., Margaret Mor 
rison, and in the presence of us, Geo. Boyd, 
James Tolmie. Daniel Morrison, Robert Mc- 
Arthur. 

At Toronto on the nineteenth of June, 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
eight, ware inarrir-d b} license, Hugh Olan- 
dinen, of the City o>f Toronto, bacheior, 
nd Mary Dixon, of th same place, spinster-, 
by m, William T. Leach. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, Hugh 
Clandinen, Mary Dixoa, and in the pres 
ence of us. Robert Garfrae,, Charles Mac- 
Donald. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-sixth day of 
September, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eight, were married by license, 
Tboroas Aitken, of Toronto,, and Christina 
Hunter, of sume place, by me, William T. 
Leach. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Thomas Aitken, Chris 
tina, Hunter, and in the presence of us, 
Ptr McArthur, Henry Bragg. 



At Toronto, on tbe 10th day of July, 
were married by license, John Martin, of 
township of York, and Janet Blue, o{ same 
place, by me, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Martin, Janet Blue, and in thw pres 
ence of us, Peter McCallum. Agnes Blue. 

At Toronto, on the twelfth day of 
July, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eight, were married by license, Hugh 
Murray, of the township of York), bachef- 
lor, and Mary McViekar, of the sa.me place, 
spinster, by me, Wm. T. Leach, This mar 
riage has been dulv solemnized between us, 
Hugh Murray, Mary McViekar, and in the 
presence of us, Archibald McViekar, Michael 
Murray. 

At Toronto, on the fourteenth day of 
July, on* thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eight, were married by license, Mur 
doch McKenzie, of tbe city of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Margaret Aitken, of the same 
place, spinster, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized 
between us, Murdoch McKenzia, Margaret 
tAitken, and in the presence of usj, James 
McKean, R. Aitken. 

At Toronto, on the fourteenth day of 
July, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eight, were married by license, David 
Clark, of Dundas, of Gore District, bache 
lor, and Maria Perry, of the town of Pick- 
eirlng, by ine, William T. Leach. This mait- 
riage was solftmoiized between us, David 
Clark, Maria Perry, and in the presence of 
us, Thomas F. Rankin, John Berry. 

At Toronto on the eighth of October, one 
thousand eight hundred and thirty-ei^ht, 
were married bv license, William Moore, of 
the city of Toronto, and Catherine Shackel- 
f ord, of same place, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage ha* been duly solemnized 
between us ,W uUntii Moone;, Catherine 
Shackelford, <and in the presenco of us, 
James Johnson* John McWilliams. 

At Toronto, on the eleventh day of Oc 
tober, one .thousand eJ^rht hundred and 
thirty-eight, were married by license, Wil 
liam Hardy, of the township of York,, and 
Jane Tarrett, of Vaughan, by me, William 
T. Leach. This marriage has been sol 
emnized between us, William Hardy, Jane 
Tarrrett, and in the presence of us, Marma- 
i duke Tarrett, Robert Hardy. 

At rorontoi, on the twelfth day of Oc 
tober, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eight, were rmvrrLe-d by Iicon.se, Wil 
liam Bedl, of Paronto, and Helen Bain, of 
same place, by me, William T. Loach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnlzod between 
! ua, William Bell, Helen Bain, and in the 
presence of us, J*mog Homing, Jas. Dixon. 
At Torontct on the twelfth day of Oc 
tober, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-eig bt, were rwwried by licence. W51- 
| liam HalL of the township of Maryborough, 
j and Helen MoCaUom, of the city o-f Toronto, 
| by itiiB, Williaan TI. Leach. This marriago 
has been solannmizeck between us, William 
; Hall, HeJen MoOallutri and in the presence 
of ua, John Boyd. Duncan McPherson. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-seventh day 

of Nove,m(beir, one thou&njid eight hundred 

and thirty-oight, were nwuried by license, 

i Joseph Dorneo of the township of Mark- 

barm, and Nancy Stockdate, of the same 

r^ifw, by me, William T. Leach. Thus mar- 

ri<a.gn has been du?y solemnized between URI, 

Joseph Dooear, Nancy Stoclcdale, :\nd in the 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



165 



presence of us, Emmanuel Dorier, Peter Mc- 
Airthur. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-ninth day or 
Noyeimber,, oiie thousand eight hundred and 
thirty -eight, were married by license, James 
Altffander, of Toronto, aud Sarah Mary 
Scott, of Toronto, by me, William T. Leach, 
This marriage has been duty solemnized 
between us, James Alexander, Sarah Mary 
Scott, and in the- presence of MA James 
Atefuwiden, Kobert Bingb.in.. 

At Toronto, on the thirteenth day of 
December, one thxwisaiul eight hundred and 
thirty- eight, were married by license, Arch 
ibald Mclntyra, of the township of Eldon, 
ad Catherine Koitb, Toronto, spinster, by 
me, Williaon T. Leach. nd in the presence 
of us, William Me Arthur, Arch. Reid. 

At Toronto, on fchc thirty-first day of 
December, one thousand eight hundred ana 
1hirty-eight, were married by license, Geo. 
(Forbes, of Toronto, widower, and Margaret 
Edjtr, of sa,rrue place, spinster, by me, Wil- 
Mm T. Leach,. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between ua. Goo. Forbes, 
Maj-garet Edjer, and in the presence of us, 
Winiaim Forbes johai Carrigan. 

At Toronto on th ) first day of January, 
eighteen hundred an<l thirty -nine, were mar 
ried by Bcenso, Mr. Ja-uies Y-oung*, of 
Whitbv,, and Isabella Hobiiee, widow, of the 
same, place, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
u& James Youiiig, Isabeila Young, arid in 
th pretence of us, vVm. Richardson, George 
Wet. 

At Toronto, on the third da,r of Janu 
ary, one thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
nine, were married by license, Daniel Mc- 
Viear, of Vaughaiii, o-nA Mary Ar.iniO-ur, of 
eeuma pla.ce, by me, William T. Lt-ach. This 
marriage has been duiy eoieinnized between 
ua, Danie 1 McV : c*r. Mary Armour, and in 
the presence of us, Duncan McOallum, Alex 
ander Armour. 

At Toronto, on the th rd day of Janu 
ary, one thousand oight hundred and thirty- 
riiDe, were uiflrried by license, John John 
ston, of Toronto, nd Jennett Kelly, of the 
etune place, by nit, William T. Loach. This 
mwria.ga ha* been duly solemnized between 
ua, John Johnston, Jennett Kelly, and In 
the prfi-ence of ua, John Webb, R. Smith. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-fourth day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were married by license, Wil 
liam Ro> of the township of York, and 
Ann McKenhnie., orf the c>ty of Toronto^ 
by ma, William T|. Le*oh. This marriage 
bo* been duly solemnized between us, Wm. 
Rose, Ann MoKockniet and in the presence 
of ua, Walter Rose. Robert Creighton. 

At Toronto, on the eighth day of Janu 
ary, one thousand tight hundred and thirty- 
ntaa, were nxuricd by license. William Ber 
tram, York Mills, and Ellen Gates, of same 
plAoe, by me. William T. Lach. This marf- 
rtace hM been duly solemnized between us, 
William Bertram, Ellen. Gates, and in the 
presence of us, James Hogg, Edward Burn. 

At Toronto, on the seyenteenth day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty -nine, were married by license, An 
drew Wilson and Isabella Bain, both of To 
ronto* by me. William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between ut\ 
Andrew Wilson., Isabella Bam, and in the 
presence of ua, Wm,. Bell, James Fleming. 

At Torontot, on the tenth dfcy of Feb- 
ruary, one thousand eight hundred ar^d 



thirty-nina, were married by license, George 
Stairs Brown and Sarab Howe Austin, both 
of the city of Toronto,, hy me, William T. 
Leach. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, George Stairs Urown,, 
Sarah Howe Austin, and in the presence of 
usi, John Sterner, Robert Austin, Gro 
ford Ridout. 

At TorontOb on the eighteenth day of 
February, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were married by license, Wil 
liam Williamson, of Newmarket, and Mar 
ga.ret Ersikine, of Toronto, by me, William. 
T. Leach. This marriage has been duly- 
duly solemnized between us, Wm. Williamson* 
M. Ejnskina, and in the presence of us; John 
Erskine, Angus Bhie, John Erskine. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-eighth day of 
February, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were married by proclamation, 
Andrew Bell and Margaret Oarradicob the 
former of Toronto, the latter from Esque- 
sing, by me, Williann T. Lea on. This mar 
riage has been duty solemnized between uau 
Andirew Bell, Margaret Oarradioe* and in 
the presence o-f us, Thomas Scott, John P 
Fenwiak. 

At Toronto, on the eighth day of Marclu 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
nine, were married by license, Mr. James 
Bioket and Miss Jane Leckie,, both of the 
city of Toix>ntoi, by irne, William T. Leach. 
This meurriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Ja-mea Bioket, Jane Leckie, and 
in the presence of us, Walter MacfarlaneV 
Will Mitchell. 

At Toronto, on, the thirteenth day of 
Maxoli, ne thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were married: by license. Jo 
seph Fell, surgj&oni, of Erin, and Din*h 
Stuckey, of same pk)<ce, widow, by me, Wil 
liam. T. Leach. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, Joseph Fell. 
Dinah Stuokey, and in the presence of us,. 
TJhomas Oraig, G. M. Poet. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-first day of 
May, one thous^ajui eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were miarried by license, Don 
ald) Pleater, of Toronto, and Mary Fahy, of 
same place, spinster, by me, William T. 
Leach. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between UA Donald Pleater, Mary 
Fahy, and in the presence of ua. Daniel 
Fahy, Joseph Clarke. 

At Toronto, on the thirtieth day of May. 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nifne. 
were married by noenae, James Nash, of To 
ronto, widower, and Li Ilia. Jane Latimer, 
of some place widow, by me, William TL 
Leach. This marriage has been duly ol- 
emnized between us. Jamea Nash. Lillia 
Jane Latiimer, and in the presence of u4L 
John Oonnel, Peter MoArthur. 

At Toronto, on the eighth d*j *f July, 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, 
were married by proclamation^ Donald 
Sutherland^ 93rd Highlanders; and Eliza 
beth M. Lawrence, Falmouth, England, by 
me, William T. Leach. This marriage wa* 
duly solemnized between us, D. Sutberland 
Elizabeth Lawrence, and in the presence- 
of ua< W. Macdonald, Adjt. 93rd Highland- 
era, John Boyd, 

At Toronto on the eighth day of July r 
one thousand eight hundred and thirty-ntae. 
were married by license, Donald McRinnon, 
of Brock, and Mary Beaton, of Vaugban, 
by me. William T. Leach. This marria^te 
has been dulv solemnized between us, Donald 



166 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



McKinnon, Mary Beaton, and in the pres- 
en.ce: of us-, James Harris. 

At Toronto., on the nineteenth day of 
-July, one thousand eight hundred and 
-thirty-nine, were married) by license, Wil 
liam McDowall, and Joanne Berlin, both of 
Toronto, by me, William T. Leach. This 
nmrriage has been dub" solemnized be 
tween us, William McDowell, Joanne Bergin, 
nd In the presence of ua, Wini. Parker, Wil 
liam Purdie. 

At Scarborough, the twenty-third of 
July, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were married by license, An 
drew Bertram, o>f Scarborough), and Mar- 
.iparet Glendinniiyf, of same place, by me, 
William T. Leach. This marriage has been 
tulv solemnizjd between us, Andrew Ber- 
trann, Margaret GLendlnning, and in the 
presence of us, James Little, Arch Glendin- 
ing. 

At Toronto, the third day of Augus tk 
<on thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine, 
were inferried by Kcesase, Robert Kirk, of 
Toronto, an<L Christina Mactionahy, of same 
place, by me, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Robert Kirk, Christina Machonahy, and in 
the presence of us, Wittiam Duncan, (P. 
Blokeretaif. 

At Toronto/, on the fifth day of Sep 
tember, one thousand, eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were mpurried by license, John 
Reid, corporal in 9<3ird Regiment of Foot, 
*uid Anne Henderaonu of Toronto, by me, 
William T. Leach. Thfa marriage has been 
dulv solemnized between ua, John Reid, cor 
poral. Anne Hen-djarson. and i|n the pres 
ence; of us, James Henderson, Thomas Grif 
fiths. Sergeant 93rd. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-ninth day of 
September, one thousand- eight hundred and 
thirtv-nine, were married!, after regular 
course of procWmation, William Hey ward, 
of Toronto, and; Jane Moss, of same place, 
oVa>u|fhter of Thomas Moss, by me, William 
T. Leaoh. This marriage has been duly 
eolanmized between us, William Heyward, 
Jane- Moss, an.d in the presence of us 1 , Peter 
McArthur, Jotm Pickering. 

At Torontok on, the first day of Oc 
tober, one .thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine,, were married by license, Geo. 
Porsyth, of Dummer, widower, and Elspeth 
Young, of the township of Dumfries, by me, 
William T,. Leaoh. This marriage waa duly 
.solemnized between us,, George Porsyth, El- 
peth Young, and in the presence of us, John 
Farr Fenwick, Alex. Stewart. 

At Toronto* on the fourteenth day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, wero married by license, Alex 
ander C alder, of Thorah, and Jane Gunn, 
of Toronto, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
use, Alexander Calder, Jane Gunn, and in 
the pre&emce of u4 John Gunn, Thofmas 
Nes-bet. 

At Toronto, on the fifth day of Vovem- 
ber, one thousand teiffht hundred and 
thirty-nine, were mcwrriedl. after due pro 
clamation, Jamee Logan, and Alexa Urqu- 
trt, both of Tbronto, by me, William T. 
Leaoh. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, James Logan, Alexa 
Urquhart , a.nd in th presence of us, John 
Ridden, Thomas RanldB. 

At Toronto, on the eleventh day of No 
vember, one thousand! eight hundred and 



thirty-nine, were married by license, Rob 
ert Bruce, of Toronto, and Mary Anns 
Shuter, same place, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriagv has been (July solemnized be 
tween us,, Robert Bruce, Maa-y Anne Shuter, 
and in the presence of ua, Robert Lieth, 
Adam, Poteen. 

At Toronto, ota the twenty-seteond day 
of NoTOtatoeT, one thouaand eight hundred 
and thirty-nanei, were married by license, 
William Taylon, of Albion), and Margaret 
Johnson* of same place, by me, William T. 
Leach. ThLs marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, William Taylor, Mar 
garet Taylor, and in the presence of us, 
James Johnson, Richard Bradley. 

At Toronto!, on the eighteenth day of 
NoTember, one thousand eight hundred and 
thJrty-nineb were nuarriedl by license, James 
Ores, private odt the 9i3rd Refit., and Char 
lotte Jeffera, of Totronito, by me, William 
T. Leach. This n^a-rriag-e has been duly 
solemnized between us,, .James Ores, Char 
lotte Jefferg, and in the presence of us, 
Henry Gethlnitson, Alex. Stewart. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-first day of 
November, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were married by license, John 
Booth,, of Scarborough, and Sarah Anne 
Secor, of the same place, by me, William T h 
Leach. This iiLarriage has been duly sol 
emnized between usj, John Booth, Sarah 
Anma Seooir, and! in the presence of us, Jo 
seph Secoir, Isaac Stoner. 

At Toronto, on the fourth day of 
Deceimber,, one thousandl eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were (married by license, Robert 
KeoT, ol Toronto* and Mary Anne Kent 
Henderson, of siima placei by me, William 
T. Leach. This .marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Mary Anne Hender 
son,, Robert Kerr, and in the presence of 
us, Wm, Henderson, George Michie, John 
MioLearu 

At Toronto, on the nineteenth day of 
Detccf-nber, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were married by license, Charles 
Burtoti Wiilard and Ang-elique Chagnion, 
both of Toronto, by mo, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has teen duly solemnized be 
tween us, Charles B. Wiilard, Angeiique 
ClLflignion, and in Iho presence of us, Geo. 
B. Wiilard, J. W. Brent, Geo. B. Holland. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-fourth day of 
Decetntoer, one thousand 1 eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were married by license, J*saac 
Co lTiinbus, Norway Village Kingston roads 
and Susan Aflhbridge, of the township of 
York, by me, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has oeen dulv solemnized between us, 
Isaac Columbus, Susan Ashbridgev and in 
the presence of ua, Isaac Ashbridge, Jona 
than Ashbridgei. 

The Ashbridges mentioned in this 
entry were of the well-known family 
of York, after whom Ashbridge s Bay 
is named. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-oaventh day ot 
Deeejmiber, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty-nine, were married by license, Charles 
Boyle,, township o.f Flamboro West, and 
Martha Lotham of Toronto, by me, Wil 
liam T. Leach. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, Charles Boyle, 
Martha. Lotham. and in the presence of us, 
William Whitelaw, Mark P. Craig. 

At Toronto, on the twenty -seventh day of 
December, one thousand eight hundred and 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



167 



thirty-nine, were married by license, Thomas 
Langster, of Toronto, arid Margaret Brown, 
of same plaw, by iue>, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween -as, Thomjas Langsten Margaret 
Brown, and in the presence of us, Henry Gil- 
bertson, James Oves. 

At Toronto, oil the thirty-first day of 
December, one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty^iina, were married by license, Wil 
liam Grier Scott, oJ Toronto, and Margaret 
Teirs of CooksviHc, by nie Wm. T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, William Q. Scott, Margaret Scott, 
end in the presence of us, J. Mclnez, Alexan 
der Torrance. 

At Toronto, on the twentieth day of 
January, on thousand* eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, Henry 
Quantz, of the township of Markham, and 
Mina Spies, of same place, by me, William 
T. Leach. This marriagie hiie been duly 
solemnized, between us, Henry Quantzl, Wil- 
hellmla Spies, and! in the presence of us, 
John Quantz, Louis Spies. 

At Toronto, on the- twenty-eighth day of 
January, one thousand, eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license., Austin Spaul, 
of Ghin.guacoiLsy, and Agnes McGee, of To 
ronto., the Gore, by raw, Wi liam T. Leach. 
Tils marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween ua, Austin Spaul, Agues McGiee, and 
in the presence of us, SViHiam Dent, John 
Clarkson. 

At Toronto, ou the twenty-ninth day of 
January, one thousand* eight hundred and 
forty, were married by kicense. Thomas 
Smith, of Scarboro , and Elizabeth Springer, 
of sa.me place, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Thos. Smith, Elizabeth Springer, 
and in the presenoo of us, Jaines Gibsoi<, 
Walter Miller. 

At Toronto, on. the third day of Feb 
ruary, one thousand eteht hundred and 
forty, were married by license, John Thom- 
eotiB of Scarboro 11 , and Alvira Cornell, of 
the sajne place, bv me, William T. Loach. 
This marriage- has been duly solemnized be- 
tewen us John Thomson, Elvira Cornell, 
end! in f,ho presence of us, Peter McArthur. 
Hiram CorneS. 

At Torontou on the tenth day of Feb 
ruary, one thousand 1 eight hundred and 
forty, were inarriod by license, Andrew 
Bfcur, of tho township of Albion, and Fanny 
Henry., of the sanne place, by me, William T. 
Leach. This marriage ha.s been duly sol 
emnized between us, Andrew Blair, Fanny 
Henry, and in tho presence oif us, Francis 
Duiite, Thcwnas Walker. 

At Tiorontoi, on the seventeenth dny of 
March, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by proclamation,, James 
Rosa, of the 9:3.rd Highlaiiders. and Mary 
Jane Mitche-I, daughter of Charles Mitchell, 
of the to-wiLbiiio of Waterloo, both residents 
at present in this city, by me, Wm. T. Leach 
This marriage- has been duly solemnized be 
tween, us, J. Ross, Mary Jane Mitchel, and 
in. the presence of us, Angus Corbett, Peter 
T?ergtison,. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-fourth day of 
March, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, John David 
son and Soaan Jeffers, both of the city of 
Toronto, by mo, William T. Leach. Thus 
incbrriage has been duly solemnized between 
xu, John. Davidson, Susan Jeffe-ra, and in tho 



presence of ua, Alex. Stewart, Hohn Stew 
art. 

At Markhaum, on the twenty-sixth day of 
March, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, Archibald 
Hugh Fenwick and Barbara Anne Lothamt 
both of Markhamt, by me Wm. T. Leaoh. 
This marriage has been dtuly solemnized be 
tween us, A. H. Fenwick, Barbara Anne 
Lptham. and Ln the presence of us, George- 
Pinglei, George Galloway. 

At Toronto, on the twentieth day of 
March, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, Walter Rose, 
Esquire, and Mass Nura Dorothea Flains, 
both of Toronto, by me* William T. Leaoh. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween usi, Walter Rose, Nura Dorothea 
Rains, and in the presence of us, John H. 
Dunn,, Thomas Carfrae. 

At Toronto* on the sixth day of April, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty, were 
married by proclamation, David Lightheart, 
and Mary Jane Ferras,, both of the town 
ship of Toronito. by me, William T. Leaich. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, David Lig hit he-art, Mary Jane 
Ferras, ajwi in the presence of us, Adam. 
Hill, John Stephens.. 

At Toronto, on tho fourteenth day of 
April, one thousand, eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, Daniel Keii- 
nedy and Margaret Tims, bath ot the city 
of Toronto, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Daniel Kennedy, Ma,rgaret Tiiua, and in 
the presanice of us, Hugh McLean, Adam 
Pulsao. 

At Toronto, on the twentieth day of 
April, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by proclamation, John 
Drury, of Scarborough, and Margaret Allis, 
of same place, by me, William T- Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, John Drury Margaret Allis, and 
in the presence of us, Joseph Hawkins, Don* 
aid McLean. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-eighth day of 
Aprn, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by proclamation., Henry 
Ila.ll and Elizabeth Linnen, both of To- 
ronto. by roe, William T. Leach. This mar-< 
riage has been duly solemnized between ua., 
Henry ItaJi, Elizabeth Lininen, and in tha 
presence of us, Joseph Swallow, Wm. Horton. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-third day of 
May, on thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by License, Michael Rey- 
iiioMs, late of Quebec, and Jane Monroe, also 
late of Quebec, by ,me., William T. Leach. 
This marriage ha been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Micluuel Reynolds, Jane Monroe, 
and in the presence of us, H. W. SoobieU 
John Vinca. 

At Toronto on the fifth day of June, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty, 
wane jnturried by licenae, James Storey, of 
the township of St. Vincent, widower and 
Essay Tree, of thei to-wn of Barrio, by mie, 
WiUia-mi T. Leeoh. This marriage has been 
duly soleHHiized betwweu us, James Storey, 
Essay Tree, and in the presence of uat, Simon 
Fisher, James Drummond. 

Tboae ar to certify that at Toronto* 
on the tweiLty-thir4 dav of June, one thou 
sand eigtot hnndred and forty, were mar 
ried by license, Wltltom Russell* of the town 
ship of York, and Uleairor Cargo, of the 
city of Toronto, by one, William T. Leach. 



168 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween us, WillLaan Rusaal. Eleanor Cargo, 
end. in the presence of us, James Sinclair. 
John. McArthur. 

These tue to certify that at Toronto on 
the sixth da-y of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty, Alfred Payne of To 
ronto, and Philippine Bullock,, of Toronto, 
were, after due proolaiuationk married by 
ine, William T. Lieach. This marriage has 
been duly soiLetmnized between us, Alfred 
Payne, PbilippLne Bullock, and in the pres- 
en.ce of ua. Thomas F. Kan kin, Donald Mo- 
Lean. 

At Tforonlo on the twentieth day ot 
July, on thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were mwriod by lioease, Jos. Jones, 
Jr M and Mary An-ne Lawrencev both ol 
Home District, bjr me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Jcseoh Jones, jr., Mary Anne Law 
rence, and in the presence of us, Thomas F. 
Rankin, George Lawrence. 

(At Toronto, on the twenty-third day of 
July, one thousand eight hundred and forty, 
were married by license, George Bostwick, 
of Toronto, and Margaret Cruickshank Per- 
rier, of name place, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween, "up, George Bostwick, Margaret C. 
Ferrier, and in the presence of ua, William 
It cifcs, J. MoMorrich. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-fourth day< of 
July, one thousand er/ht hundred and forty , 
were married by license, Hugh Martin, of 
OukTillo, and Anne McGregor, of the City 
of Toronto, by me., William T. Leach. 
fhis marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween ins, Hugh Martin, Anne McGregor, 
and in the presence of us, George Wrayt 
William Sharp. 

At Toro-nito, on the twenty-ninth day of 
Ju ;.-, one thousand eight hundred and forty, 
were married by license,, Daniel AllaK, of 
the township of Torojito, and Agnes Mc 
Queen,, of the Gort of Toron-to, by me, 
William T. Leach. This marriage lias been 
duly solemnized between us* Darid Allan, 
Agnes McQueen,, and in the presence of us, 
James McQueen, John AllaJi. 

At Toronto, on the fourth day of Au 
gust, one thousand eight hundred and forty, 
were married by license,, Robert Peebles 
and Rebecca Fulton* both of Toronto, by 
me,, William T. Lea-ch. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us-, Robert 
Peebles, Rebecca Fulton* and in the pres 
ence of Thoinae Parks. 

At Toronto, on the fourth day of Au 
gust, one thousand eight hundred and forty, 
were married by Hewnee* William Guy, of. 
Toronto, and Eilyras WUlson, of same place, 
by me, Wm. T. Leeeh. Witnesses, Frurrie 
Keylor, William Lllley. 

Note The two registrations on this page 
were elsewhere recorded and thence copied 
for registration in the office of the Clerk 
of the Peace, where they my be found 
when required. WHliaan T. Leach. York 
Mills, 29tn December, 18*42. 

At Toronto, on the tenth day of Septem 
ber, one thousand eight hundred and forty, 
were married by licence, James Boof Suther 
land, and Bra Sophia Raina. by me, William 
T. Leach. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between ua,, J. B. Sutherland, 
iEva S. Rains, nd in the presence of us> 
Wm. ROBS., Win. Campbell, Robert MeOlure. 

At Toronto, on the twenty -eighth day of 



September, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, John Willcie, 
of Richmond Hill, and Elizabeth Trotter), 
of the city of Toronto, widow, by, me, Wil 
liam T. Leach. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us* John Wilkto, 
Elizabeth Trotter, and in the presence of 
ue Peter McArthur, John Laing, Martha 



At Toronto, on the tenth day of Octo 
ber, one thousand eight hundred and forty, 
were married by license. John Shaw, of 
the city of Toronto, and Charlotte Browne, 
of same place, by me, William TV Leach. 
Thisi marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, John H. Shaw, Charlotte Browne, 
ami in the presence* of us A. Browne, Hugh 
Henderson. 

At Toronto, on the twency-first day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, wers married by license, John Mask- 
rey, of the city of Toronto, and Mary Ward- 
rope, of same place, by me, Wm. T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, John Maskrey, Mary Wardrope, 
and in the presence of us, John Maclntyret 
James Murphy, Anne Harris, Hannah Dunn, 
John MacMurchy. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-second day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, John Mc- 
Laughlin, of Toronito, and Christina Anne 
Curry, of the Upland of Tila. by me, Wil 
liam T. I. each. Thie marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, John McLiiug h- 
lini, Christina Anne Curry, and in the pres 
ence of us, Thomas Aitken, Arch. Reid. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-sixth day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred und 
forty, were married by proclamation., An 
drew Hermieton. of Toronto, and Christian 
Lang, by me.. William T. Leach. Thisj mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
A. Hermiston, Christian Lang, and in the 
presence of us. Thomas Jeays, James Thom 
son. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-serenth day of 
October, 0111 thouaajui eight hundred and 
forty, were married by proclamation, John 
Allaini, of Toronto township, and Margaret 
Adams, of same place, by mo, Wm. T. Leach. 
i This, marriage 1ms been, duly solemnized be 
tween las, John Allavi. Margaret Adams, 
a.Tiii jn *the presence of us* John Platts 
John Watts. 

At Toronito. on the tenth day of No- 
Tember, one thou&and eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, Peter Mc 
Arthur., of Toronto, and Catherine Mc- 
Callum, of seme place, by mo, Win. T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Peter McArthur. Catherine Me- 
Callum, and to the presence of us* John 
SoinerTllle, John McOalhnn. 

At Toronto, on the twelfth day of No- 
rember, one thoueJLud eight hundred and 
forty, were married by ttcertte, Archibald 
McPhadden., of Jfottwa**ga. bachelor, and 
Sarah McMurpihy, of Ohlcu*confiy, spin 
ster, by me, William T. I^emch. This mar- 
rjage has been, solemnized between us, 
Archibald McPbAddeoib Sarmh McMurphy. 

At Toronto, OK the twentieth day of 
NoTember, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, Thomas Qn- 
nis of EXobicokc, ad Mary Anne Thomp 
son* of same place, by me, Wm. T. Leash. 
Thia marriage ls bewi duly solemnized be 
tween us, Thomas Bnnis, Mary Anne Thomp- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



169 



sotu, and in the* presence of us, Samuel Kins, 
Andrew E.nnis. 

At Toronito,, on the twenty-first day of 
December, oiiib thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by licen.se, Jeremia.li 
Curtin* Toronto, and Anne Dye, of same 
place, by ma, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage was solemnized between us, Jeremiah 
Ourtin, Anne Dye, and in the presence of 
us, John Ilealy, Bryaji Tierney. 

At Qucenston, oil the twenty-sixth day 
of November, one thousand eight hundred 
and forty, weremarried by license, James 
Sinclair, of Richmond Hill, Home District, 
and Amelia Staynor, of Queeriston, Niagara 
District, by me, William T. .Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, James Sinclair, Jr., Amelia Mary Stay 
ner, and in the presence of us, George P. 
Dickson, James Porteous. 

At Toronto, on the seventeenth day of 
December, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, James Hick- 
man, of Toronto, and Catherine Taylor, of 
same place, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, James Hickman, Catharine /Taylor, and 
in the presence of us, Thomas Sadler, Archi 
bald Taylor. 

At Toronto, on the thirtieth day of De 
cember, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty, were married by license, David Smith, 
of Toronto, and Mary McNiel, of same place, 
by me, William T. Leach. This marriage 
has been solemnized between us, Mary Mc 
Niel, David Smith, and in the presence of 
ua, Peter McArthur, Robert O Rook. 

At Toronto, on the thirteenth day of Jan 
uary, one thousand eight hundred and forty 
one, were married by license, Samuel Ter- 
mery, of Home District, and Charlotte Craw 
ford, of same township, by me, William T. 
Leach. This marriage has neen duly sol 
emnized between us. Samuel Termery, Char 
lotte Crawford, and in the presence of us, 
James Bell. Thomas Willing. 

At Toronto, on the fourteenth day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, Robert 
Angus, of the town of London, merchant, 
and Charlotte Wright, of Toronto, by me, 
William T. Leach. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, Robert Angus, 
Charlotte Wright, and in the presence of 
us, Walter Macfarlane, John Ritchey. 

At Toronto, on the fifteenth day of Janu 
ary, one thousand eight hundred and forty- 
one, were married by license, Daniel Orr, of 
Toronto, and Belinda Culligan, of same 
place, by me, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Daniel Orr, Belinda Culligan, and in the 
presence of us, James Orr, William Hunter. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-first day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, Robert 
McKcnzio, of Toronto, and Jane Russel, of 
samo place, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Robert McKenzie, Jane Itu.ssel, and in 
the presence of us, H. Eagleson, G. Turney. 

At Toronto, on the second day of Febru 
ary, one thousand eight hundred and forty- 
one, were married by license, Jame* Gordon, 
of the township of Pickering, and Annie 
Dunn, of Toronto, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized br>- 
tween us. James Gordon, Aane Dunn, :ui 1 



in the presence of us. Win. Bailey, James 
Shannon. 

At Toronto, on the tlvrd day of February, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-one, 
were married by license, Edward Pearson, 
of Chinguaconsy, and Klizabcth Hansell, of 
same place, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage ha^ been dn ;- solemnized between 
us, Edward Pearson, Elizabeth Hansell, and 
in the presence of us, Thomas Buttery, 
Robert Horly. 

At Toronto, on the fourt of February, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-one, 
wore married by license, James Patton, and 
Margaret McCarter, by me, William T. Leach 
James Patton, Margaret McCarter, parties; 
P- - A. Peon, Joseph William Cook, wit 
nesses. 

O.i Tuesday;, the ninth day of Febru 
ary, one thousand eight hundred and forty- 
one, at Ttoroato, were married by license, 
James Turner, of Tjoronto, and Mar.e-aret 
Grey, of same place, by me, Wm. T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, James Turner, Margaret Gray, 
and in the presence o-f us. John Ada,mson, 
David York. W. T. Leach. 

On Tuesday,, the ninth day of Febru 
ary. o>ne thousand eight hundred and forty- 
one, at Toronto, were married by license, 
Robert Lenox, of Toronto, and Nancy Ho- 
sackj of same place, by me, Wm. T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween UB, Robert Lenox,, Nancy Hosack, 
and in the presence of us, William Hunter, 
Alexander Torrance. 

At Toronto, on the sixteenth day of 
February, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, Elijah 
E twell, of TJxbridge, and Eliza Graham, of 
the city of Toronto, by me. Win. T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween, us, Elijah Etwell, Eliza Graham, and 
in the presence of us, David McKay, John 
McCoy. 

At Toronto, on the eighteenth day of 
February, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, wero married by license, John 
Campbell, of East Gwillimbury, and Effy 
Sinclair, of the city of Toronto), by me, 
William T. Leach. This marriaje has been 
duly solemnized between us, John Campbell, 
Effy ^inclair, a.ud in the presence o f us. 
Arch. McMillan,, Arch. Keid. 

At Toronto, on the sixteenth day of 
March, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, John 
Biro-ess, of the township of Toronto, and 
Mary Ramaitfei, Gore ot Toronto, by me, 
William T. Leach. This marriage hs been 
duly solemnized between us,, John Birgess, 
Mary Ramaye, and in the presence of ue, 
Jameis F<mith,, Peter McArthur. 

At Toronto, on the thirty -first day of 
March, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, Charles 
Thompson, of Toronto, and Catherine Mc- 
Kimnon* of same place, by me, William T. 
Leach. This marriage has been duly sol- 
emivized between ufi, Charles Thompson, 
Catherine McKirmon,, and in the presence 
of UB, Charles M .Quarry, Peter McArthur. 

At Toronto, on the twtenty-dixth day of 
April, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, viore married by license, Robert 
Elliott, of "Toronto, and Margaret Anne 
McLean,, of same place by me, William T. 
Leach. Thte marriage Las been duly sol 
emnized between UB. Robert Elliott, Mar- 



170 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



.jfaret Anme McLean, and in the presence of 
us, John McMurchy, James Bart. 

At Toronto, on the eleventh day of 
May, one thousand eiffht hundred and 
forty-one, were married by proclamation, 
John II. Sutamerfield, of Markham, and 
Eiiphamia Hag-ermant of same place, by me, 
William T. Leach, This marriage has been 
duJy solemnized between us, John H. Sum- 
merfield, Euiphemia Hagerman, and In the 
presence of Henry Hagerman, William H. 
Slulmmerfield. 

At Toronto*, on the fourteenth day of 
June, one thousand eisjht hundred and 
forty-one were married by license, James 
Pa-ddoru, widower, and A.g-nes Orriia, both of 
Toro-nito, by me, William T. Leach. This 
rn.arria.tre has beon duly solemnized between 
lie, James Paddon, AgTies Orrim, and in the 
presence of us, James Baker, George Arm- 
.sltrong. 

At Toronto, on the seventeenth day of 
July, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty O ne, were married by license, Joseph 
Newlovei, of the township of Toronto, and 
Eliza Owen,, of Chinguacousy, by me, Wil 
liam T. Leach. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, Joseph Newlove, 
Eliza Owenp,, an/d in the presence of us, 
Jolm Newlove, Joseph Wilson. 

At Toronto, oxi the seventeenth day of 
July, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one., were married by proclamation, 
Thomas Donaldson, private of the 9.3rd 
Highlanders, and Sarah Faith Gaithwhite, 
of Toronto, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Thomas Donaldson, Sarah Faith Gaith 
white. and in the presence of us, William 
Campbell, David Mozier. 

At jToronto, on the sixth day of 
August, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty -one, were married by license, and with 
lea-vie of the coanmaiiidiiMj officer of his 
regiment, Kennr-th Cameron, sergeant of the 
93rd Highlanders, and Mary Murray, of the 
city of Toronto, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly soJemnized be 
tween lie,, Kenneth Cameron, Mary Murray, 
and in the presence of us, James Walker, 
Anguts Corbett. 

At Toronto, on the twentyisixth day of 
August, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were marriod by license, Nicholas 
Dehart, of Pickering, and Jane Collins, of 
same place, widow of Thomas Collins, by me, 
W T iiliam T. Leach. This marriage was sol 
emnized between uis Nicholas Dehart, Jane 
Collins, and in the presence of us, William 
Boddy, Matthew Smith. 

At Toronto, on the ninth day of 
August, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one*, were married by license, Henry 
Lambert Brisban* Bayloy, and Mary Mar 
garet Rogem, both of Toronto, by me, 
William T. Loach. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, H. Lambert 
Bayley, Mary M. Rogers, and in the pres 
ence of us., David B. Rogers, Joseph Rogers, 
J < f-: ph R o g era, J r . 

At Toronto., on the thirty-first day of 
August, cnie thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, William 
John Hall, of Whitby, and Jant Blair, of 
same place, by mo, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
ufc, Wm .J. Hall, Ja.net Blair, and in the 
presence of us. Benjamin Eastwood, Robert 
Hall. 

At Toronto, on the thirty-first day of 



August, ome thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by proclamation, 
Robert McKean, of Toronto, and Jane Rus- 
sel, of same place, by me, William T, Leach. 
This marriage has been solemnized between 
us, R. McKo-.m, J&tie Ruasel, and in the pres 
ence of us, George Cosser, William Keith. 

At Toronto, on the third day of Sep 
tember, one thousand eigrht hundred and 
forty-one, were married bj licence, Donald 
Campbell, of Toronto, and Jane Hay, of 
same place, by me, William \T.. Leach. This 
marriage has beon duly solemnized between 
us, Donald Campbell, Jane Hay. and in the 
presence of us, A. Baltenach. Robert Hay, 
Dugald Huniter. 

At Toronto., oin the llth day of Se[p- 
tember, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one^ were married by license, Thomas 
Farlow and Martha Duxui, by me William 
T Leach. This marriage lias been solemn 
ized between us, Thomas Farlow, Martha 
Dunn,, and in the presence of us. William 
Lancy, Robert Alderdiag. 

At Toronto, on the fifteenth day of 
September, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-oine, were married by license, Donald 
Fraser, of Tpr onto, and Zillah Elliott, of 
same place, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us., Donald Fraser, Zilla-h Elliott, and in the 
presence of usi Ja&nes McLachlan, Hugh 
McLean. 

At. Toronto, on the twentieth day of 
September, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, Ser 
geant James Turney,, of the 67th Regi 
ment, an.d Elizabeth Ewart, of Toronto, 
by me, William T!. Leach. This marriage 
has been solemnized between us, James Tur 
ney, Elizabeth Ewart, and in the presence 
of uiSi, R. Sutherland;, James Thomson. 

At Torontoi, on the twentieth day of 
September, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-onei, were married by license, Kiel 
Wilkinson, of the township of Clark, and 
Elizabeth McNiel, of Toronto, by me, Wil 
liam r. Leach. This marriage lias been 
duly solemnized between us, Nell Wilkinson, 
Elizabeth McN iei, a.md in the presence of 
us, John MacMurchy, Peter McArthur. 

At Toronto, on the second day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married t>y license, William 
Bell, of the townBhi.p of Whitby, and Isa 
bella McCulloch,, of Darlington, by me, Wil 
liam T. Leach. Tlite marriage has been 
duly sotemnized between us,, William Bell, 
Isabella McCulioch, aind in the presence of 
us, George Chandler. Charles Tildon. 

At Toroimto, on the fourteenth day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, Joseph 
Barnes, of Clarke, and Caroline Downs, 
widow, of same place, by me, William 
Leach. This marria,ge has been duly sol 
emnized between UK. Joseph Barnes, Caro 
line Downii, and iu the presence of us, 
Peter A. McArthur, John Marshall. 

At Toron/to, on the twenty-third day of 
October, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, William 
Basil Hamilton, of PenetangTiishene, and 
Mary Wasnidge, of Toronto, by me, Wil 
liam T. Leach. This marriage nas been 
duly solemnized between us, W. B. Hamilton, 
Mary Wasnid.g, and in the presence of us, 
Joe, O. Morrison, J. Shnmonsi, Joseph Work 
man. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



171 



AM Toronto, on the first day of 
.November, one tnousand eight hundred and 
forty -one. vere married by licence, Norris 
Davfci, of Whitby, and Isabella Williamson, 
of same place, by ma, William T, Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
UA. Norris Davis, Isabella Williamson, and in 
the prasance of us. 0. Siblay, G. M. Gait. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-sixth day of 
November, one thousand eig-ht hundred and 
forty-one, were married by licence, Robert 
Hunter, of Toronto, and Ellen Ovens, of 
the township of Toronto, by me, William 
T, Leach. Thiis marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Robert Hunter, 
Ellen Ovems, and in the presence of us, 
Jofoin, Robertson, Alex. C. MoOoll. 

<tA Toronto, on. rhe first day of 
November, one thousand eig-ht hundred and 
forty-one^ weio married by license, Charles 
Stewart, of Niag-ara. and .Sarah Wilkinson, 
of Toronto, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has bean duly solemnized between 
w, Charles Stewart, Sarah Wilkinson, and 
In the presence of us, Alex. Grant, Thomas 
Key. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-ninth day of 
November, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, Daniel 
Arnot, of Clarke township, a.nd Jane Fyfe, 
of Toronto, bv me. William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Daniel Amot. Jane Fyfe, and in the 
presence of us, Duncan Arnot, William Ben 
son. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-first day of 
December, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by proclamation, 
Doinala Corbet, of Piekerhwj, and Betsy Sin 
clair, of Toronto, by me, William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Donald Corbet, Betsy Sinclair, 
and in the presence of us, Alexander Wad- 
dell, William Sinclair. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-third day of 
December, one thoucand eight hundred and 
forty-one, were married by license, Charles 
Edward Romatae, oi Trafalgar, and Mary 
Ann Trotter, of Toronto, by me, William 
T. Leach. This marriage has beetn, duly 
solemnized between us, Charles Edward Ro- 
maine, Mary Ann Trotter, and in the pres 
ence of us, Wm. P. Romaine, John H. Shaw, 

At Toronto, on the thirty-firs* day of 
December, one thousand eig-ht hundred and 
forty-owe, were married by license, David 
McBeath, of Scarborough, and Elizabeth 
Scott, of the same place, bv me, William T. 
Leach. Thte marriasra has been duly sol 
emnized between us, David McBeath, Eliza 
beth Scott, and in. the presence of us, Jas. 
Campbell, Bard Campbell. 

At Toronto, on the fourth day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by license, William 
Johnaon, of Ghinguacousy, and M.ary Helen 
Plaxton, of aame place, by me, William T. 
Leach. This marriage haa been duly sol 
emnized between U6, William Johnson, Mary 
Helen Plaxtcxn, and In the presence of ue 
John Plaxton. Nathaniel Wood. 

A,t fTorotito, on the fifth day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
fottjr-two, were married by license, Hugh 
Campbell, of the Gtore of Toronto, and 
Elizabeth Mxoni o<f scume place, by me, 
William T. Leach. This marriage has bean 
duly solemnized between uf, Hufh Campbell. 
Nixon* abd in the presence of 



ua, Eliza Bell, Hemry Bell, Jobn Cumber- 

lanxl. 

At Toronto, on the eleventh day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by license, William 
Henderson, of Toronto, and Jane (McGill, 
of same place, by me, William T.. Leaqfh. 
This marriage has been, solemnized between 
us, William Henderson, Jane McGill, and in 
the preeence of us* James McDonald, 
Stephen Clark. 

At TorotnitQ, on the twentieth day of 
January, one thousand eierht hundred and 
forty-two., were married by license, Samuel 
Steen, and Susannah Burwell, both of the 
city of Tforoinito, Home District, by me, 
William T. Leach. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us Samuel Steen, 
Susannah Burwell, and in the presence of 
us, Thomas Sloan, Ronies Henry. 

At Toromitoi on the twentieth day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by licence, John 
Morrison,, of Eldon, and Catherine Conlev, 
of Caledo ru, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, John Morrison, Catherine Conley, and 
In. the presence of us, Antj-us Thomson, Arch. 
Conley. 

At Toronto, on the ninth day of 
February, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-o;ne, were married by license, An^us 
McLeod,, of Chin.suacouisy, and Christir^i 
Olunis, by me, William T- Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Ainrrus McLeod. Christina Clunis, and in the 
presence of us, Hu ffh Oarmichael, Hugh 
Hutn,ter. 

At Toronto, on the twelfth day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by license, Donald 
McMurphy. of Chinguacoosy, and Margaret 
j McLntyreu of the township of York, by me, 
William T. Leach. This marriag-e has been 
solemmized between us, Donald McMurphy, 
Margareft Mclntyre, and in the presence 
of us, John Arderson, John Hamilton. 

At Toromto, on the thirteenth day of 
January, one thoustind eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by license, William 
McKay, of West Gwillimbury, and Cather 
ine Gunsa, of same place-, by me, William T. 
Leach. This marriatr-e has been duly sol 
emmized between us, William McKay, Cath 
erine Gunn, and jn the presence of us, 
Alexander McKay, John Campbell. 

At Toronto, on tho fourteenth day of 
January, one thousand eignt hundred and 
forty-two, were married by license, William 
Starret, of ChingnJacouey, and Sarah Anne 
Martini, of same place, by me, William TL 
Leach. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, William Starret, Sarah 
Anne Martin, and In the presence of ua> 
Alex. MoGreffor, Robert Oarmichael. 

At Toronto, on the thirteenth day of 
February, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by licence, Edward 
Charletotni, of the township of York, and 
Mary Mill)3, of the same place, by me, 
William T. Leach. This marriage haa been 
solemnized between us, Edward Charleton, 
Mary Millp. and In the presence of ui, 
John Belli. John MiacMurcliy.- 

At Toromto. on the twenty-first day of 
February, one thousand eig-ht hundred and 
forty-two, were married by proclamation, 
Christopher Patterson and Anna Mitchell, 
by me, William T, Leach. This marriatgw 



172 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



has boon duly solemnized between us, Chris 
topher Patterson, Anne Mitchell, and in 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
the presence of us, Thoums Ormiston, Tim 
othy O Dae. 

At Toronto, on the tenth day of March, 
were married by license, Sergt. William 
Monro, 93rd Highlanders, and Mary Ann 
Callaghaaik, both of Tomato, by me, Wm. T. j 
Leach. Thite marriage has been duly sol- ] 
emnized between us, William Mo-nro, Mary j 
Annie- Callusghan, arid in the presence of us, 
Samuel Cuthbertson* John Ooner. 

At Toronto, on the twenty-second day of 
February, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by license, John 
Bishop, of Toronto, and Christina Ferrier, 
of same place,, by me, William T. Leacn. 
This marriage has been solemnized between 
us, John Bishop, Jr., Christina Ferrier, and 
In, the presence of us, David Maitland, David 
Pateraotu 

At Toronto, on the twenty-fourth day of 
March, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by proclamation., 
Private William Pettigrew,, of the 43rd Re 
giment, and LouLse Tighe,, of Toronto, by 
me,, William T. Leach. Thus marria-re has 
been duly solemnizod between uc, William 
Pettigrew, Louisa, Tighe, and in the pres 
ence of ufe, Jo-soph Harrison, William Ma- 
Guire. 

At Toronto, on the ninth day of May, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by license, Serg-t. Peter Fer 
guson, of Toronto, and Susan Falls, of same 
place, by me, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Peter Ferguson, Susan Falls,, and in the 
presence of us, J. McDonald. W. W. Robert. 

At Toronto, on the fourth day of May, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by license, Gottlob White, of 
M-arkhain, and Elizabeth Stive wrj. of same 
place, by me,, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Gottlob White, Elizabeth Stiver, nd in the 
presence of ust John Goe frithaim, Robert 
Ferror. 

At Toronto, on the sxith day of June, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by license. Joseph Wood, of 
Qshawa. Whitby, and Agnes Haig, of same 
place* by me, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Joseph Wood. Agnes Haig, and in the pres 
ence of us, Fras. Primrose, John Rawlinson. 

At Toronto, on the ninth day of June,, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by proclamation-, Henry Jonea, 
Hind Mary Jane Butler, both of the city of 
Toronto, by me, William T. Leach. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Henry Jones, Mary Jane Butler, and in 
the presence of us, James Good, D. Mo- 
DonelL Allan. McDonell. 

At Toronto, on the tenth day of June, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by proclamation* Peter Nis-- 
bet, Pickerlnc, aibd Janet Muir of Toronto, 
by me. William T, Leach. This jnarria&e 
has been duly solemnized between u, Peter 
Nisbet, Jajoet Muir, ajwl in the presence of 
us, Joseph Muir. John DunJbar. 

At Toronto, on the fifteenth day of June. 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by license. George McCallum, 
of Toronto, and Jane Sangster, of the same 
place, by me. William T. Leach. This mar- 



riage has been duly solemnized between u, 
George McCallum. Jane Sangster, and in th& 
presence of us* Robert Denniston, William 
Heigh torn. 

At Toronto, on the 24th day of June, 
one thousa-nd eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by licence, John W&gg., of 
Scarboro , and Anne Jones, of the same 
place, by me. William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
John, Wagg, Anne Jones, and in the pres 
ence of us, James Jones, jr., B. Bates. 

At Toronto, on the first day of July,, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by license, Hugh McFadyen, of 
Toronto, and Jane Ovens, of the same 
p acei, by me, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Hugh MciFadye tii, Jane Ovenis, and in the 
presence of us Jafmes McDonald, Robert 
Den tiiston. i 

At Toronto, on the 19th day of July, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by license,, William Parker, of 
Toronto, and Caroline Scott, of the same 
place, by me. William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Willinm Parker, Caroline Scott, and in the 
presence of ust, Michael McM.an.uft, Robert 
Ferral. 

At Toronto, on the eighth day of August, 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by license. William McKenzie, 
of Toronto,, and Jessie Rolsori ,of the same 
place, by me, William T. Leach. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
William McKenzle. Jessie Rolson, and in the 
presence of us., Angus Poison, Thos. Jones. 

At Toronto, on the 27th day of July 1 , 
one thousand eight hundred and forty-two, 
were married by license,, James Lee Mc- 
Leod of Btobicoke, anid Mary Hodgson, of 
the same place, by me, William T,. Leach. 
This marriage has been solemnized between 
tween us James L. McLeod, Mary Hodgson, 
and in the presence of us, W. W. Gilliet 
Thomas Elliot. 

At Toronto, on the nineteenth day of 
September, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by license, Angus 
Thomsoni. of Puslinch. and Margaret Mc- 
Xivea, of Toronto, by me, Wm. T. Leach. 
This marriage has been solemnized between 
UB Angus Thomson, Margaret McNiven, 
and in the presence of us. Donald McLean, 
William McBeain. 

At Toronto, on the third day of 
September, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by license, John 
McCulloch, of Ohinguacousy, and Mary Eliza 
Ferguson,, of the same place, by me, Wm. T. 
Leach. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, John McCulloch, Mary 
Elliza Ferguson., and in the presence of ua. 
S. Culsoan George Ferguson. 

At Toronto, on the twentieth day of 
September, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by license, David 
MaitlaJid, of Toronltot and Jane Paterson, 
of the same place, by me. William T. Leach. 
This marriage has been, solemnized between 
us. David Maitlatvd, Jane Paterson, and in 
the presence of us. Clark Maitland, William 

Moruo. 

At Toronto, on the third day of 
September, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-two, were married by licence, John 
Jardine. of Puelinch and Margaret Mo- 
Naughton, of Toronto, by me, Wm. T. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



173 



Leach. Thip marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between ue, John .Tardine, Mary 
McNaAiffhton, and in the presence of us, 
Thomas McMurchy, Aler. McGregor. 

At Toronto, on the ninth day of Septem 
ber, one thousand eight hundred and lorty- 
two, were married by license, Peter Hambly, 
of Pickering, and Anne Wilson, of Toronto, 
by me, William T. Leach. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, Peter 
Hambly, Anne Wilson, and in the presence 
of us, Robert Gibson, James Wilson. 

At Toronto, on this the twelfth day of 
January, one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-three, were married by license, John 
Geddes, widower, of Gore, to the Home Dis 
trict, Toronto, and Mary Dark, widow, of 
the same place, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, John Geddis, Mary Dark. Stanus Dan- 
iell, John D. Daniell, witnesses. 

Brown and Little At Toronto, on the 
fifth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by 
license, Joseph Brown, of Toronto, bachelor, 
an-d Agnes Little, also of Toronto, spinster, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Joseph 
Brown, Agnes Little, and in the presence of 
us, John Brown, David Barnfather. 

Geddis and Dark At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by 
license, John Geddis, widower, of Gore, in 
the Home District, Toronto, and Mary Dark, 
widow, of the same place, by me John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, John Geddis, Mary Dark, 
and. In the presence of us, Stanners Daniell, 
John D. Daniell. 

McLean and McDonald At Toronto, on 
the sixteenth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license, J)onald McLean, of the town 
ship of Markham, bachelor, and Mary Mc 
Donald, spinster, of the township of Mari- 
posa, by toe, John Barclay. This rharriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, Don 
ald McLean, Mary McDonald, and in the 
presence of uo, James McLean, Ken. Mc- 
Oaskill. 

McNab and Donald At Toronto, on the 
first day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by 
license, Duncan McNab, of Toronto, bach 
elor, and Mary Ann Donald, o* the same 
place, spinster, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Duncan McNab, Mary Ann Donald, and 
te the presence of us, James Stitt, James 
Livingston. 

Carmichael and Moffatt At Toronto, on 
the ninth daiy of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by 
license, Hugh Oarmichael, of Toronto, wid 
ower, and Jane Moffatt, of the same place, 
spinster, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Hugh Carmlchael, Janet Moffatt, and in 
the presence of us, William Jamieson, Peter 
Moffatt. 

McArthur and Campbell At Toronto, on 
the twenty-fourth day of March, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-three, were 
married by license, John McArthur, bach 
elor, and Jannett Campbell, spinster, both 
of the townehip of Ohinguacoust, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
olemnized between us, John McArthur, 



Jannett Campbell, and in the presence of 
us, Thomas Elliot, John Martin. 

Witherspones and Little At Toronto, on 
the thirteenth day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty three, were married 
by license, Peter Witherspones, of the town 
ship of Vaughan, widower, and Anne Jane 
Little, of the township of York, spinster, 
j by me, John Barclay. This marriage was 
duly solemnized between us, Peter Wither 
spones, Anne Jane Little, and in the pre 
sence of us, Joseph Biers, Jesso Paterson, 

White and Rowen At Toronto, on the 
seventeenth day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license, Robert White, bachelor, and 
Elizabeth Ro<wen, spinster, both of the town 
ship of York, in the home district, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage was duly 
solemnized between lis, Robert White, Eliz 
abeth Rowen, and in the presence of us, Dun 
can McNabb, James Donald. 

Ourrie and Currie At Toronto, on the se 
venteenth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married, after 
publication of banns, Lauchlan Currie of tie 
township of Chinguacousy, and Flora Cur 
rie, of Toronto, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage was duly solemnized between us, 
Lauchlan Currie, Flora Currie, and in the 
presence of us, Donald McLean, Duncan 
Currie. 

Armstrong and Madill At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by 
license, Henry Armstrong and Hannah Ma- 
dill, both of the city of Toronto. This mar 
riage was duly solemnized between Us, 
Henry Armstrong, Hannah Madill, and in 
the presence of us, James Smith, Margaret 
Tierney. 

Smith and Parker At Toronto, on the 
eleventh day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by 
license. Sir William Smith, of Eardistan 
House, Worcestershire, England, Baronet, 
bachelor, and Susan Parker, of Toronto, 
spinster, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage was duly solemnized between us, Wil 
liam Smith, Susan Parker, and in the pre 
sence of us, H. Parker, M. Parker. 

Sheldon and Bell At Toronto, on the 
first day of June, one thousand eight hun 
dred and forty-three, were married by li 
cense, Edward Sheldon, widower, of the 
township of Gwillimbury West, and Mar 
garet Bell, of the city of Toronto, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage was duly 
solemnized between us, Edward Sheldon, 
Margaret Bell, and in the presence of us, 
John Fenwick, John Kerr. 

McKenzie and Gunn At Toronto, the 
tenth day of Jusie* onetaousandi eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by. 
license, William McKenzie, bachelor, of the 
township of Zorra, and Jessie Gunn, widow, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage was 
duly solemnized between us,, William. Mc 
Kenzie, Jessie Ginia, and In the presence of 
us. Henry Duffin, Jos. Barclay. 

Ardagh and Macdonald At Toronto, on 
the fifteenth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license, William Ardag-h, bachelor, 
and Ellen Macdonald, spinster, both of the 
city of Toronto, by me. John Barclay. This 
marriage was duly solemnized between us, 
Wi!liam Ardagh, Ellen Macdonald, and in the 





174 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



presence of ua, John. Cameron* John Mac- 
donald, John Meredith. 

Strathy and Cowan At Toronto, on the 
eeTenlteeaith day off June* one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were married 
by license, John Strathy, bachelor, and 
Siieanmah Eliza-beth Gowaii, spinster, both 
of the city of Toronto, l>y me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been solemnized between 
ufi. John Strathy, Elizabeth Gowan, and 
to the presence of ua, J. W. Brown, Clyde 
B. Gowan. 

Roblto and Younle At Toronto, on the 
twenty -first day of June* one thousand 
eight hundred and fortv-throe, were mar 
ried by license, James Roblm, of the town 
ship * Wbitby, bachelor, and Margaret 
Yoiinie, of the township of Darlington, 
spinster, by me. John Barclay. This mar 
riage was duly soleaiwiizea between us, Jaa. 
Roblini. Margaret Younie, and in the pres 
ence ofus, Henry Dafflin, James Barclay. 

Kenny and MoCreadie At Toronto, on 
the fourth day of Julr, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license. Heary Kenny and Elizabeth 
MoCreadte, both of the city of Toronto, 
by mei, John Barclay. This marriage was 
doily solemnized between us, Henry Kenny, 
Elizabeth McCreadie, aad in the presence 
o>f us., George Reynolds, Wm.. McCreadie. 

Stewart and McNaughton At Toronto on 
the seventh day of July, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license, William Stewart, bachelor, 
and Catherine McNaUvghton, spinster, both 
of the city of Toronto, by me,, John Bar- 
clav. This marriajje >vas duly solemnized 
between us, William Stewart, Catherine Mc- 
Naughtonu and in the presence of us, Jo 
seph Johnson,, David Henderson, 

Hamill and Hamilton At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of July, one thousand eight hun 
dred and forty-three, were married by li 
cense, Henry Hamill, bachelor and Eliza- 
bath Hamilton, spinster, both of the city 
of Toronto, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage was duly solemnized between us, Henry 
Hamill, Elizabeth Hamilton, and in the pre 
sence of us, Isaac Hamill, Robert MoKee 
Moore. 

Reymann and Keefer At Toronto on the 
eleventh day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by 
license, Michael Roymann, bachelor, of the 
township of Vaughan, and Catharine Kcf- 
fer, of the same place, spinster, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage was duly solemn 
ized between us, Michael Reymann, Catha 
rine Keffer, an>d in the presence of us, Isaac 
Puterburgh, Peter Keffer. 

Birse and Murphy At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, wore married by 
license, Francis Birse, bachelor, and Eliza- 
bath Murphy, spinster, both of the city of 
Toronto, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage was duly solemnized between us, Fran 
cis Birse, Elizabeth Murphy, and in the pro- 
sen.ce of us, James Smith, Eliza Cross. 

White and Fawcett At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of July, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license, Thomas White, of the town 
ship of Scarborough, bachelor, and Marv 
Fawcett, of the same place, spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage was duty 
solemnized between us, Thomas White, Mary 
Fawcett, and In the presence of us, Chris. 
"Wilkinson, William Fawcett. 



Dale and Kennedy At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by 
license, George Dale, of the city of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Sarah Anne Kennedy, of the 
township of Trafalgar, spinster, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage was duly solemn 
ized between us, George Dale, Sarah Anne 
Kennedy, and in the presence of us, John 
Reeves, Ruth Reeves. 

Thompson and Rankine At Toronto, on. 
the fifth day of August, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married, af 
ter proclamation of Banns, William Thomp 
son and Jane Rankine, .spinster, both of the 
city of Toronto, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage was duly solemnized between us, 
William Thompson, Jane Rankine, and in 
the presence of us, Jane Keachie, Catha 
rine McMaster. 

Scott and Candy At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of August, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, were married by 
license, James Scott, of the city of Mont- 
treal, bachelor, and Eliza Candy, of the city 
of Toronto, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage was duly solemnized between 
us, James Scott, Eliza Candy, and in the 
presence of us, L. B. Campbell, Robert Mc- 
Olure. 

Stewart and Wilkinson At Toronto, on 
the thirtieth day of August, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license, Donald Stewart, of the town 
ship of Reach, in the Home District, bache 
lor, and Agnes Wilkinson, of the township 
of Clarke, In the district of Newcastle, spin 
ster. This marriage was duly solemnized 
between us, Donald Stewart, Agnes Wilkin 
son, and in the presence of us, Alex. Mc 
Gregor, Arch. Wilkinson. 

Reid and Beaton At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of September.ono thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license, William Reid, of the city of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Beaton, of 
the township of Caledon,. spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage was duly sol 
emnized between us, William ReidX Mary 
Beaton., and in the presence of us, Alex. 
McGregor, Donald Beaton. 

Dickie and Wheeler At Toronto* on the 
sixth day of October,, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three,, were mar 
ried by license, John Dickie, of the town 
ship of Whit by, bachelor, and Lucinda 
Wheeler, of tho same place, spinster, by me,. 
John Barclay. This marriage was duly sol 
emnized between us, John Dickie, Lucinda 
Wheeler, and In the presence of us, Joseph. 
Huggins, M. S. Stone. 

Ross and SommcrviJle At Toronto, on 
the sixth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three* in virtue 
of a license under the hand of His ESccel- 
le.nicy the Governor, were married, Hugh 
Ross, bachelor, and Mary Sommerville, spin 
ster, both of Toronto, by mo, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been solemnized between 
us, Hugh Ross. Mary So miner vl Me.- and in the 
presence of us, James Leslie, Christiana 
Notamerville. 

Thain and Oxenham At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of October,, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-three, after regnlar pro 
clamation of ban.nis, John Thaiti, bachelor, 
fund Mary Anne Oxenham, spinster, both 
of the city of Toronto, were married by the 
undersigned, John Barclay. This marriage 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



175 



was duly solemnized between us, John Thain, 
Mary Anne Oxerkhami, and in the presence 
of us. James .Seabrigrht. Catherine Tolmey. 

Hooey and MoDonald At Toronto, on the 
sixteenth dajr of October, one thousand 
eifi-ht hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license, John Hooey, of the township 
of Cobourg, bachelor, and Elizabeth McDon 
ald, of the same placet, spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage was duly sol 
emnized bet wean ua, John Hooey, Elizabeth 
McDonald, and in the presence of us, Peter 
McArthur, Peter Brown. 

Mighton wvi Mundell At Toronto, on the 
seventeenth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, were mar 
ried by licence, Joseph Migliton, of the 
townehip of Markhauiu bachelor, and 
Eleanor Mundell, of the township of Pick 
ering, spinster, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage was duly solemnized between us, 
Joseph Mi^htoBk Eleanor Mundell, and in 
the presence of us, Samuel Mig-hton, Jane 
Mundell. 

Davidson and Nicholson At Toronto, on 
the twenty-third day of October, one thou 
sand eicrht bundlred and forty-three, after 
regular proclamation of bating., Thomas 
Davidson,, of the towns-hip of Esquesin,?, I 
bachelor, anid Marv Nicholson,, of Toronto, ! 
spinster, were married by me, John Barclay. I 
This marriage has been, solemnized between I 
us, Thomas Davidson* Mary Nicholson, and 
in the presence of us, M. Shawan. Lena 
Shewaio. 

Milfer and Gaw At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fifth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and fortv-three., after regu 
lar proclamation of haiios, Henry Miller, 
bachelor, amd Anne Gaw, spinster, both of 
Toronto, were married by me, John Barclay. 
This marria.^-e has boon solemnized between 
us, Henry Miller, Anne Gaw, and in tho pres 
ence of us, Thomas Smith, Hannah Gaw. 

Glen and Wilson At Toronto, on the 
thirty-first day of October^, one thousand 
ei^ ht huindre 1 and forty-three, were mar 
ried by license*, William Glenv of Owen 
Sound, in the Home District, bachelor, and 
Janet Wilson, of the city of Toronto, spin 
ster, by me* John Barclay. This marria, ,ie 
was duly solemnized between us, William 
Glen, Janet Wilson, and in the presence of 
us., Walter Grier, Henry Yoiwi,r. 

Finding- an.4 Murray At Toronto, on the 
fourteenth day of Noveenber one thousand 
eig-ht hiwidred amd forty-three, were mar 
ried by license, Pa-trick Pinlay, of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Isabella. Murray,, of the same 
place* spinster, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage was duly solemnized between us, 
Patrick Findlay, Isabella Murray, and in 
the presence of u* John Herbert Jack 
son, Ellea Hamilton. 

Stewart and Miller At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of November, one thou 
sand eig-ht hundred and forty-three, were 
married bv license, J rimes Stewart, of Rich- ! 
mond Hill, \n the Homo District, bachelor, 
and Isabella Millor, of the city of Toronto, 
spinster, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage was solemnize. ! between us, James 
Stewart, Isabella Miller, and in the r>resence 
of ue, Robert Lindsay, George B. Wyllle. 

Stark and Gibb At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fourth day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-three, were 
married by license, William Duncanson 
Stark, of the town- of Oakville, in the Gore 



District, bachelor, and Agnes Gibb, of the- 
township of York, spinster, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage was duly solemniz 
ed between us, William Duncanson Stark, 
Agnes GiVb, and in the presence of us, Geo. 
Little, Peter Brown. 

Davidson and Wilson At Toronto, on the 
twentieth day of December, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-three, James Dav 
idson, bachelor, Toronto, and Margaret W1V-- 
son, widow, also of Toronto, were after re 
gular proclamation of Banns, married by 
me, John Barclay. ThLs marriage was duly 
solemnized between us, Thomas Davidson, 
Margaret Wilson, and in the presence of U8 
Archibald Taylor, Olivia McMichael. 

Ivey and Stoddart At Toronto, on the- 
twenty-ninth day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-three, were- 
married by license, Hugh Ivey, of the town 
ship of Etobicoke, bachelor, and Mary Stod 
dart, of the township of Toronto, widow,- 
by me, John Barclay. Thia marriage was 
solemnized between us, Hugh Ivey, Mary 
Stodrln-rt, ami in the presence of us, Wil 
liam .TnVn -on, Adam P eratt. 

McMillen and McKechanie At Toronto, 
on) the fourth day of January, one thousand 
eigrhi hundred and forty-four, were mar- 
rio 1 by license, Neil McMillen, of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Anne McKechanie, also of 
Toronto, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage was duly solemnized between 
us, Neil McMillen, Anne McKechanie, and 
in the presence of us, Thomas Aitken, Alex 
ander McFarlane. 

Livingston and Livingston At Toronto, 
on the twelfth day of January, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-four, were- 
irtarried by license, James Livingston, bache 
lor, and Mary Livingston, spritister, both 
of thecity of Toronto, by me, "John Barclay. 
This marriage was solemnized between us,. 
James Livingston, Mary Livingston, and in 
the presence of us, William Williamson, 
Hannah Eastwood. 

Blain and Broderick At the township of 
York, on the seventeenth day of January, 
one thousand eight hundre 1 and forty-four, 
were married by license, Isaac Blain, of the 
city of Toronto, and Margaret Broderick, 
of the township of York, spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage was duly- 
solemnized between us, Isaac Blain, Mar 
garet Broderick, and in the presence of us, 
George Blain, William Devenish. 

Martin and Moore At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-four, after regu 
lar proclamation of Banns, James Martin, 
bachelor, and Mary Moore, spinster, both 
of iToronto, were married by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage was duly solemnized 
between us, James Martin, Mary Moore, 
and in the presence of us, James Dodson, 
Stephen Tufts, 

Scott and Wilson At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of February, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, William Scott, widower, and Cath 
arine Wilson, spinster, both of the village 
of Sydenham, in the Home District, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage was duly 
solemnized between us, Wm. Scott, Oath- 
arien Wilson, and in the presence of us, 
Donald Ohrisholm, Helen Ohrisholm. 

Henery and Sutherland At Toronto, on 
the fifteenth day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-four, after 



176 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



regular proclamation of Banns, Len Elipha- 
let Henery, of the township of Scarborough, 
bachelor, and Isabella Sutherland, of To 
ronto, spinster, were married by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage was duly solemnized 
between us, Len Eliphalet Henery, Isabella 
Sutherland, and in the presence of us, Don 
ald Sutherland, Francis Armstrong. 

Sinclair and Sinclair At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of February, one thou- 
eand eight hundred and forty-four, were 
married by license. Peter Sinclair, of the 
township of Ghinguacoucsy, bachelor, and 
Sarah Sinclair, of the township of Galedon, 
spinster, daughter of John Sinclair, Yoe- 
man, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
was duly solemnized between us, Peter Sin 
clair, Sarah Sinclair, and in the presence of 
us, John "Campbell, Duncan Ourrie. 

Hamilton and Graham At Toronto, on 
the fourth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, Robert Hamilton, of the township 
of Esquezing, bachelor, and Ann Graham, 
of the township of Toronto, spinster, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage was duly 
solemnized between us, Robert Hamilton, 
Ann Graham, and in the presence of us, John 
Lumly, Sophia Buchanan. 

Bowman and Milligan At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of March, one thousand eight 
humired and forty-four, were married by 
license, John Bowman, bachelor, and Frances 
Milligan, spinster, both of the city of To 
ronto, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
was duly solemnized between us, John Bow 
man, Frances Miiligan, and in the presence 
of us, Joseph Bird, Margaret Hutchinson. 
Wallace and Gaw At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-four, were married 
by license, Edward Wallace, bachelor, and 
Hannah Gaw. spinster, both of Toronto, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, Edward Wal 
lace. Hannah Gaw, and in the presence of 
us, John McGovern, Elizabeth Gaw. 

Tobin and Brown At Toronto, on the 
twenty-foiKth Uav of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-four, after pro 
clamation of Banns, William Tobin and 
Diana Sonhia Brown, spinster, both of To 
ronto, were married by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, William Tobin, Diana Sophia 
Brown, and in the presence of us, Andrew 
McMurphie, Mary Tobin. 

Scobie and McLeod At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-four, were married 
by license, Hugh Scobie, bachelor, of the 
city of Toronto, and Justina McLeod, spin 
ster, daughter of the late Oapt. Angus M"- 
Leod, of Dingwall, Scotland, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been uiuy 
solemnized between us, Hugh Scobie, Jus 
tina MoLeod, and in the presence of us, Geo. 
Donohan, Zettie Kidd. 

McLennan and Kendrick At Toronto, on 
the thirteenth day of May, one thousand 
ight hundred and forty-four, were mar 
ried by license, Charles McLennan, bachelor, 
and Sarah Kendrick, spinster, daiighter of 
George Brydges Rodnqy Kendrick, all of 
Toronto, by me, John liarclay. This mar 
riage was duly solemnized between us, 
Charles McLennan, Sarah Kendrick, and in 
the presence of us, W. Sommersett, William 
Nere Hunt. 



Davis and Lennon At Toronto, on the 
fourteenth day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, Francis Davis, bachelor, and Mar 
garet Lennon, spinster, both of the city of 
Toronto, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Francis Davis, Margaret Lennon, and in 
the presence of us, Edward Wallace, Thomas 
NeiLson. , 

McOonnell and Harper At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
by license, James McOonnell, bachelor, of 
the township of Beach, and Elizabeth Har 
per, of the city of Toronto, spionster, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly soLemnized between us, James McOon 
nell, Elizabeth Harper, and in the presence 
of us, James Robinson, Eliza Dobson. 

Murdoch and Whitehead At Toronto, on 
the \fourth day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, William Murdoch, of the township 
of Chinguacousy, bachelor, and Margaret 
Whitehead, of the township of Toronto, 
spinster, daughter of Thomas Whitehead, 
of said township, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage was duly solemnized between us, 
Win. Murdoch, Margaret Whitehead, and 
in the presence of us, Thos. Whitehead, jr., 
Anna Laird. 

Higgins and Miller At Toronto, on the 
fifth day of June, one thousand eight hun 
dred and forty-four, were married by license, 
William Higgins, of the city of Toronto, 
widower, and Marion Miller, spinster, daugh 
ter of John Miller, of the same place, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized becween us, Win. Higgins, Marion 
Miller, and 5n the presence of us, A. P. Wal 
ton, John Miller. 

Jones and Irish At Toronto, on the nine 
teenth day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, James Jones, the younger, of the 
township of Scarborough, widower, and 
Elizabeth Irish, of the same place, spinster, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, James 
Jones, Elizabeth Irish, and in the presence 
of us, William Jones, Elizabeth Stephens. 

Whitehead and Chester At Toronto, on 
the twenty-fifth flay of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-four, were married 
by license, William Whitehead, bachelor, and 
Mary Ann Chester, spinster, both of the 
township of Toronto, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, William Whitehead, Mary Ann 
Chester, land in the presence of us, William 
Read, Thos. Whitehead, jr. 

McPhatter and Blue At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of Jxily, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, James McPhatter, bachelor, of th 
townshm of Puslinch, in the District of Gore, 
and Margaret Blue, of Barrie, spinster, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, James Mc 
Phatter. Margaret Blue, and in the pres 
ence of us, Angus Blue, Donald Bine. 

Gotea and McGilvray At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by li 
cense, Francis Gotea, of Sydenham, bache 
lor, and Flora McGilvray, of the same place, 
spinster, daughter of Alexander McGilvray, 
of the township of Oaledon, by me, John 



LANDMAKKS OF TORONTO. 



177 



Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Francis Gotea, Flora 
McGilvray, and in the presence of Us, John 
Jones, Edward Stinson. 

Hotson and Miller At Toronto, on the 
second day of August, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, James Hotson, of the town of Ham 
ilton, bachelor, and Helen Millar, spinster, 
otf thefcity of Toronto, by mo, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, James Hotson, Helen Millar, and 
in the presence of us, John Milligan, Walter 
Foster. 

Sutherland and Mathieaon At Toronto, on 
the third day of August, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, William Sutherland, of the town 
ship of West Gwillimbury, bachelor, and 
Mary Mathieson, of the township of York, 
pinster, daughter of the late George Ma 
thieson, of thetownship of Thorah, by me, 
-John Barolay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, William Sutherland, 
Mary Mathieson, and in the presence of us, 
Christopher Hester, Neil Beaton. 

Rider and Fox At Toronto, onthe four 
teenth day of August, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, Adam Rider, of the township of 
Vaughan, bachelor, and Jane Fox, of the j 
same place, spinster, by me, John Barclay. I 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be- i 
tween us, Adam Rider. Jane Fox, and in the I 
jwesence of us, Jeremiah Fox, Peter Mish- 
ler. 

Campbell and Carfrae At Toronto, on the j 
third day of September, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
Ucense, Stedman Baldwin Campbell, bache 
lor, and Rebecca Oarfrae, spinster, daugh 
ter of the late Thomas Carirae, Esq., by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, S. B. Camp 
bell, Rebecca Oarfrae, and in the presence 
of us, James Patton, Wm. Campbell. 

Fraser and Melville At Toronto, on the 
fourth day of September, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, Donald Fraser, of Larnbton, in the 
Home District, bachelor, ant! Elizabeth Mel 
ville, of the township of York, spinster, by | 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been I 
duly solemnized between us, Donald Fraser, I 
Elizabeth Melville. Anna Laird. 

Dickson and Thompson At Summerhill, | 
Yonge street, on the first day of October, j 
* one thousand eight hundred and forty-four, I 
were married by license, George Pennie i 
Dickson., of the City of Montreal, bache- ! 
lor, and Isabella Thompson, spinster, j 
daughter of Charles Thompson, Esq., of Sum 
merhill, township of York, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, George P. Dickson, 
Isabella Thompson, and in the presence of 
us, J. W. Allison, S. B. Campbell. 

_ Brydon and Hogg- At York Mills, on the 
eighth day of October, one thousand eight ; 
hundred and forty-four, were married bv 
license, William Brydon, of the township j 
of King, widower, and Elizabeth Hog-g, of I 
thetownship of York, widow, by me, John j 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly i 
solemnized between us, William Brydon, Eli 
zabeth Hogg, and in the presence of us, John 
Hogo-. Alex. Gibb. 

Noble and McQnarrle-At Toronto on the 
seventeenth day of October, onethousand 



eight hundred and forty-four, were mar 
ried by license, Joseph Noble, bachelor, an 4 
Sarah McQuarrie, spinster, daughter of 
Lauchlin McQirarrie, all of the township of 
Vaughan, by mo, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between Us, 
Joseph Noble, Sarah McQuarrie, and in the 
presence of us, John McQuarrie, Harvey C. 
MoQuarrie. 

Murray and Millet At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-four, were married 
by license, Thomas Murray, of the township 
of Chinguacpusy, bachelor, and Sarah Mil 
let, of the city of Toronto, spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Thomas Murray, 
Sarah Millet, and in the presence of us, Rob 
ert M. Ritchie, Ellen Ritchie. 

Brewer and Hisey At Toronto, on the 
twenty-second day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-four, wore married 
by license, Silvester Brewer, of the township 
of Scarborough, bachelor, and Anna Hisey, 
ofthetownshjp of Markham, spinster, daugh 
ter of the late Joseph Hisey, of the same 
place, deceased, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Silvester Brewer, Anna Hisey, and in 
the presence of us, Christopher Spirce, Moses 
Zuisgun. 

Maulson and Hill At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fourth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-four, were married 
by license, John Maulson, of St. Catharines, 
bachelor, (and fallen Hill, of the city of To 
ronto, spinster, daughter of the late Samuel 
Hill, of *.he same place, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, J. Maulson, E. Hill, and in the 
presence of Us, D. Christie, Jos. Workman. 

Glendinning and Louds At Toronto, on 
the twenty-fifth day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-four, were 
married bv license, James Glendinning, wid 
ower, and Barbara Louds, of the same -place, 
widow of James Louds, deceased, by me, 
John Barclav. This marriage has been duly 
performed between us, James Glendinning, 
Barbara Louds, and in the nresence of us, 
Jane Flaherty, Edward O Neill. 

Wilson and Fleming At Toronto, on the 
fifth day of November, one thousand eight 
hundred, and forty-four, were married by 
license, John Wilson, of the township of Dar 
lington, bachelor, and Margaret Finlay, 
spinster, daughter of Richard Finlay, of 
thetownship of Markham, by me, Jolm Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly .vdomniz- 
ed between us, John Wilson, Margaret Fin- 
lay, and in the presence of us, George Platt, 
Howard Wiseman. 

Ilirikson and Conct--At Toronto, on the 
sixth day of November, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-four, were married by 
license, Daniel Hinkson, of the township of 
Whit by, bachelor, and Mary Conet, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of the late 
Thomas Oonet, of Darlington, deceased, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, Daniel Hink 
son, Mary C >not, and in the presence of us, 
John McKenzie, Anna Laird. 

Henderson and .Watson At Toronto, on 
the twenty-second day of November, one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-four, were 
married by license, Robert Henderson, bache 
lor, and Francos Watson, spinster, daughter 
of James Watson, all of the township of 



178 



LAJNDMARJiS OF TORONTO. 



Vaughan, by me, John Barclay^ This mar 
riage has beoa duly solemnized between us, 
Robert Henderson, Frances Watson, and in 
the presence of us, .James Watson, Robert 
Thompson. 

Gordon and Farke At Toronto, on the 
twentv-ninth day of November, ono thou 
sand eight hundred and fortv-four, were 
married bv license., Samuel Gordon, bachelor, 
and Hannah Parke, spinster, daughter of 
Thomas Parko, all of the township of Pick 
ering, bv mo, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, Samuel 
Gordon, Hannah Parke, and in the presence 
of us, William Bailey, Thomas Parke. 

Kerr and McKensie At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of November, one thou- 
sandeight hundred and forty-four, were mar 
ried by license, Angus Kerr, of the city 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Margaret McKen- 
zie, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of the late Robert MeKcenzie, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Angus Kerr, Mar 
garet McKenzie, and in the presence of us, 
Donald Fraser, David Hutchison. 

Cant and Rogers At Toronto, on the 
eleventh day of December, one thousand 
eight hundred andforty-four, were married 
by license, George Oant, of the city of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth Rogers, spin 
ster, daughter of Joseph Rogers, of the 
said city, Tjy me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
George Cant, Elizabeth Rogers, and in the 
presence of us, Edward Oant, John Rogers. 

Oosepli and Fullerton At Toronto, on the 
eleventh day of December, one thousand 
eight hundred and fortv-foar, were married 
by license, Henry Abraham Joseph, of the 
city of Toronto, bachelor, and Matilda Ful- i 
lerton, of the same place, spinster, daugh- ! 
tier of Robert Fullorton, of the town of Lon 
don, O. *W., by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Henry A. Josenh, Matilda Fullerton, and 
in the presence of us, George Patterson, 
Ann MoCullougrh. 

Winchester and Stewart At Toronto, on 
the third day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-five, were married 
by license, Alexander Winchester, widow 
er, and Janet Stewart, spinster, both of 
thecity of Toronto, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solwranized be 
tween us, Alexander Winchester, Janet 
Stewart, and Jnthe presence of us, Bruce 
Mitchell, John Spettinwort. 

Molntosh and Campbell At Toronto, on 
the twenty-first day of January, one thou 
sand eiffbt. hundred and forty-four, were 
married by license, William Mclntosh, of 
the township of Caledon, bachelor, and Mary 
Oamfpbell, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of (Dun-can Campbell, of the said town- 
ehip, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, Wil 
liam Mclntosh, Mary Campbell, and in the 
presence of iis, John McAuley, John Camp 
bell. 

Lang and Wolfe At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of January, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-five, were mar 
ried by license, Abraham Lang, of the town 
ship of Etobicoke, bachelor, and Louisa 
WAlfe, of Lambton, spinster, daughter of 
John Wolfe, Innkeeper, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, Abraham Lang, Louisa 



Wofle, and in th> presence of us, Henry 
Jfulljamea* Mary Wolfe. 

Allen and Hervey At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of February, oue thousand 
ight hundred and forty-five, were married 
by license, Joseph Allen, of the same place, 
widow of the late Nicholas Hervey, of the 
said city, deceased ,by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Joseph Allan, Mary Hervey, and 
in the presence of us, John Bond, Catherine 
Bond. 

Cameron: and McLaren At Toronto, on 
the twenty-eighth day of February, one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-five, were 
married by license, John Cameron, of the 
township of Oaledon, bachelor, and Mary 
McLaren, of .he same place, spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, John Cameron, Mary 
McLaren, and in the presence of us, Alex. 
McLaren, Duncan McNabb. 

Taylor and )ieli At Toronto. on the 
eleventh day of March, ono thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, were married by 
license, Malcom Taylor, of thetownship of 
King, bachelor, and Jane Bell, of the same 
place, spinster, daughter of Hugh Bell, of 
the said township, bv me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Malcom Taylor, Jane Bell, and 
in the presence of us, William Bell, John 
Taylor. 

Lorimer and Haining At Toronto, onthe 
thirteenth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, were married by 
license, Samuel Lorimer, of the city of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Janet Haining. <>f the 
township of Vaughan, spinster, daughter of 
William Haining, of tho county of Dumfries, 
Scotland, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Samuel Lorimer, Janet Haining, and in the 
presence of us, John J. Hogerson, James 
Walker. 

Smith and White At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and fortv-five, were married by 
license, Jacob Smith, bachelor, and Eliza 
beth White, spinster, daughter of John 
White, all of the township of Vaughan, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized botween us, Jacob Smith, 
Elizabeth White, and in the presence of us, 
Thomas White, John Smith, jr. 

Holmes and Miller At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, wero married by 
license, Samuel Holmes, of the township 
of Markham, bachelor, and Sophia Miller, 
of tho same place, spinster, daughter of 
George Miller, of the said township, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Samuel Holmes, So 
phia Miller, b.ad in tho presence of us, Wil 
liam Clarke. 

Harvey and Ducket At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, were married by 
license, James Harvey, bachelor, and Mar 
garet Ducket, spinster, both of tho citv of 
Toronto, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been <iul solemnized between us, 
James Harvev, Margtrot Ducket, and in 
the presence of us, Daniel Doiioson, Jean 
Nesbett. 

Fortter and Murrav At Toronto, on the 
twentieth dav of Juno, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, were married by 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



179 



license, Charles Forlier, bachelor, and Mar- 
fwet Murray, spinster, both ol Port Credit, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been dulv solemnized between us, Charles 
Fortier, Margaret Murray, and in the pres 
ence of us, George Humphrey, Elizabeth 
Haines. 

Robertson and Love At Toronto, on the 
twenty-sixth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-five, wero married 
bv license, John Robertson, of the city 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Jane Love, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of George 
Lo\e, of Dublin, Ireland, bv n, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between Us, John Robertson, Jane Love, 
and, ia the presence of us, George Oant, Hugh 
Miller. 

Morris and McSpadding At Toronto, on 
the first day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and fortv-tive, were married by 
license, Joseph Morris, of Galedon, bache 
lor, and Martha Anne McSpadding, of the 
sametownship, spinster, bv mo, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been, duly solemn 
ized between \is, Joseph Morris, Martha Mo 
Spadden, and in tlie presence of us, John 
Hughes, William Jones. 

McOoll and McOoll At Toronto, on the 
second day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, were married by 
license, Alexander McOoll, bachelor, and 
Catherine McColl, spinster, daughter of 
ArcchibaUl McCoil, all of thetownship of 
Oaledon, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage ha-s been duly solemnized between us, 
Alexander McOoll. Catherine McOoll, and 
in the presence of us, Archibald McOoll. 

Shewaji and Latnghtotn At Toronto, on 
the sixteenth day of July, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-five, were mar 
ried, after regular proclamation of banns, 
Magnus Shewan, bachelor, and Jane Laugh- 
ton, spinster, both of Toronto, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Magnus Shewan, Jane 
LaughtoxL, a.nd in the presence of us, Alex. 
Dingwall, Alexander Allan. 

T<nylor and Greis At Toronto, on the 
sixteenth day of July, one thousand eight 
htmdred arid forty-five, were married by 
license, Archibald Taylor, of the city o* 
Toronto, bachelor, and Jane Greig, of the 
township of Pickering, spinster, daughter 
of John. GreLg, of the same place, by me, 
Johin, Barclay. Tits marriage has been duly 
olemnized between us, Arch. Taylor. Jne 
Greig, and la the presence o< us, W. Groig, 
James Greig. 

Sawdcm aoiri Palkner At Toronto, on the 
seventeenth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five* were married by 
license, George Sawdorv. of the city of To 
ronto, widower, and Keziah Falkner, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of John 
Falkner, of Hamilton, by me, John Barclay. 
This tmarriage has been duly solemnized 
between, ua, George Saw don, Keziah Palk 
ner, and in the preseooe cut us, Andrew Bell, 
Anna Laird. 

Kirk ajid Munro At Toronto on the 
twenty-fourth day of Julfr .one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-flye. were married 
by license, Robert Kirk, of the city of To 
ronto, widower, and Robina Mwnro, of the 
eame place, by met, Johai Barclay. This 
marriage has bean duly solemnized between 
a* Robert Kirk, Robina M-unro, <a,nd in the 
of us. Jamas Tully. Thomas Smith. 



McFaul and Wallace At Toronto, on the 
twenity-fifth day of Ju\v, o-ne thousand 
eight hundred and forty-five, were mar 
ried by license, Daniel McFaul, bachelor, 
and Agnes Wallace, spinster, both of the 
city of Toronitot, by me. John, Barclay. This 
marria.se has been, duly solemnized between 
us, Dantel McPaul, A/jnee WalUoe, and to 
the presence of us, Edward Wallace, Mary 
Robinson. 

Allies amd Blackley At Toronto, on the 
twenty -ninth day of Julta one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-five, were mar 
ried, after proclamation of banns, Henry 
Allies, of Scarboro , bachelor, and Eliza 
beth Blackley, spinster, also 1 of Scarboro*, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between ua, Henry Allies,, 
Elizabeth Blackley, and in the presence of 
us, Thomas Armstrong. Laura Armstrong. 

Billin/Vs and Wilson At Toronto, on the- 
thirty-first day of Julfr, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, were married by 
licence, Elkaaah Billings, of Bytown, to 
the Dalhc-usie District, bachelor, and Helen 
Walker Wilson, of the city of Toronto, spin 
ster, daughter of the late Andrew Wilson* 
of Trafalgar, by me, John. Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, ELkamah Billin,gs, Helen Walker Wilson, 
and in the presence of us. Arch. Leith, 
Robert Gladstone Dalton. 

Martin, and. Burns At Toronto, on th* 
fourteenth day of Aujgust, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-five, were mar 
ried by license, Ankrim Martin, bachelor, 
anid Marion Burns, gpinster, daughter of 
Robert Burns, all of the township of Pick 
ering, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnised between u>, An- 
krim, Marion, Burne, and in the presence} of 
us, Johu Martin, Sarah Taylor. 

Feigntner and Bradley At Toronto, on 
the t welf th day of September, one thousand; 
eight b/umdred and forty-five, wre mar 
ried by license, Joseph Feightner, of the 
township of Vaughan, bachelor, and Anne 
Bradley, of the same place., spinster, daugh 
ter of .James Bradley, of the county of 
Tyrone, Ireland, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been, duly solemnized between 
ua, Joseph Feightner. Acne Bradley, and 
in the presence ofo*. Edward Brown. Wil 
liam Walker. 

MeCritnmon and FargtMon At Toronto, on 
the thirteaoth day of September, one UJOTJ- 
eand eight hundred and forty-five, were 
married by license. Hector McCrimmon, of 
the township of Maxiposa, bachelor, aad 
Christy Fergusosh of Tpronio. spinster, by 
me. John Barclay. Tfeis marriage has beem 
duly sotamotaed between UA, Hector McCrim- 
mofflk Christy FerguMO. and in the pres 
ence of ua Wm. McLeod. Rodarlok MAA- 
Lencian. 

Fyfe and Kemptoa At Toroato, on the 
sixteenth day of SfeptembeF, on thontmnd 
eight himrired and forty-five, were mar 
ried by license. Henry Johnson Fyfe, of the 
township of York, widower, and BUzabeth. 
Kempton. of tbe city 6f Toronto, spinster, 
daughter of Thomas Kerapton of the same- 
place, by me. Jonn, Barclay. This marriage 
has bean, duly solemnized between us. Henry 
Johjiso-n Fyfe, Elizabeth Kempton. and in 
the presence of us, William A, MeBuraey, 
Cornelius Van Nostrand. 

M.cCaJlum and Cairns At Toronto, on th* 
t \varuty-fou-rth day of September, one tbou- 



180 



LANDMAKKS OF TORONTO. 



*atbd eight humdred and forty-five, were | 
married by license, Donald McCallum,. bache 
lor, aind Afiines Cairns, spinster, daughter 
of John Cairns, all of the township of 
King 1 , by me. John Barclay. This marriage 
has been, duly solemnized between us, Don 
ald VcCallum, Aim or Agnes Oairns, and 
in the presence of us, John McOallum. Wil- 
llam. Oairns. 

Holdotn, ajid Morrison At Toronto, on the 
twen.ty-iseve nth day of September, one 
thousand edjht hundred and forty-five, were ; 
married by lieemfe, John Rose Hoi don, of i 
the town, of Hamilton,, bachelor, a.nd Eliza- ! 
beth Morrison* of Toronto, spinster, daugh 
ter of the late Hugh MorrLsom, of the same | 
place, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
baa boen duly solemnized between us, John 
Rose Holdoni. Elizabeth Morrison, and in 
the presence of us. Joseph Bloor, Janet Mor 
rison,. 

McGregor and Buchanan At Toronto, on 
the seventh day of October, one thousand 
eig-ht huiadred and fortv-five, after regu 
lar proclamation of barms, John McGregor, 
bachelor, aand Jane Buchanan, spinster, both 
of Toronto* were united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marria^ e- has been duly 
.solemnized between us, John McGregor, Jane 
Buchanan, aind in the piesence of us, Wil- 
liam Lamon.t, Elizabeth McGregor. 

Gibb and Moir At Toronto, on the tenth 
day of October, one thousand eight hundred i 
and forty-five, were married by license, John 
Gibb., of the township of York, bachelor, 
and Mary Ann Moir, of the slame place, 
aroinsteir, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Gibb, Mary Ann Moir, and in the 
presence of us, W. D. Stark, William J. 
Mackenzie. 

McMichael and McBride At Toronto, on 
the fifteenth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-fire, were married 
by license, DaTld McMichael, of the town 
ship of Trafalgar, bachelor, and Jane Mc 
Bride, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of the late James McBride, Esq., deceased, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, David Mc 
Michael. Jane McBride, and in the presence 
f us, Mary S, McBride, Elizabeth FitzGib- 
bon. 

French and Curry At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-five, were mar 
ried by license, Thomas French, of the city 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Sarah Ourry, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of Alex 
ander Ourry, of the township of Ohingua- 
cousy, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, Thos. 
French, Sarah Ourry, and in the presence 
of us, D. Hunter, James Scott. 

McNair and McCallum At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-five, were married 
by license, James McNair, of the township 
of Vaughan, bachelor, and Margaret Mc- 
Oalluin, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of the late Niel McCallum, of Argyle- 
hir, Scotland, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, James McNair, Margaret McCallum, and 
tn the presence of us, John McOallum, John 
McNair. 

Burnett and Stoner At Toronto, on the 
third day of November, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty -five, were married by li 



cense, James Burnett, bachelor, and Hannah 
Stoner, spinster, daughter of James Stouer, 
all of the township of Pickering, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, James Burnett, 
Hannah Stoner, and in the presence of us, 
Samuel Burell, Catherine Stoner. 

Gray and Wilkinson At Toronto, on the 
third day of November, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, were married by li 
cense, Hugh Gray, of the town of Niagara, 
bachelor, and Jane Wilkinson, of the city 
of Toronto, by me, Joku Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Hugu Gray, Jane Wilkinson, and in the 
presence of us, J. Bain, M. Slater. 

Mcliieavy and McLean At Toronto, on 
the fourteenth day of November, one thou- 
sandeight hundred and forty -five, were mar 
ried by license, Alexander Mcilroavy, of the 
township of the Reach, bachelor, and Jem 
ima McLean, of Toronto, spinster, daugh 
ter of Neil McLean, of the township of 
Erin, by ine, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, Alex- 
anCer Mcllreavy, Jemima McLean, and in 
the presence of us, Robert MoArthur, Di- 
anna McLeod. 

Longfield and Stonehouse At Toronto, on 
the tenth day of December, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-five, were married 
by license, William Loiigfield, bachelor, and 
Klizabeth Stonehouse, spinster, daughter of 
the late David Stonehouse, deceased, all of 
the township of Scarboro, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, William Loiigfield, Eliza 
beth Stonehouse, and in the presence of us, 
William Stonehouse, Sophia Chapman. 

Wright and Banks At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of December, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, were married by li 
cense, John Wright, of the ejty of Toron 
to, bachelor, and Susannah Banks, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of John 
Banks, ofthe county of Tyrone, Ireland, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, John Wright, 
Susannah Banks, and iuthe presence of us, 
Mark Burgess, William Archfield. 

Barnfather and Underwood At Toronto, 
on the nineteenth day of December, one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-five, were 
married by license, David Barnfathcr, of the 
city of Toronto, bachelor, and Catherine 
Underwood, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of Arch. Underwood, of Scarboro, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, David 
Barnfather, Catherine Underwood, and in 
the presence of us, M. Burgess, Charles Bell. 

Parsons aind Lo-aghurst At Toronto, on 
the twenty-sixth day of December, one 
thousand ei^ht hundred aoid forty-five, 
were married by license, George Parsons, of 
the township of York, widower, and Caro 
line Longhurst, of the same (place, spinster, 
daughter of Joseph Louxghurst, of the said 
township, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been, duly solemnized between us, 
George Parsons, Caroline Longhurst, ana 
im the presence of us, Anna Laird, Mar 
garet Ellis. 

Dobbin and Dack At Toronto, on the 
fifth day of January,, one thousand eitrht 
hundred and forty-six, were married by li 
cense, Joseph Dobbin, bachelor, and Cath 
erine Dack, spinster, both of Toronto, by 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



181 



me. Johai Barclay. This marriage has been 
dnily solemnized between us Joseph Dob 
bin. Catherine Dack, and in the presence of 
ua. Daniel McKellar, Ann Heron. 

Prescott and Atkins At Tloronto, on !the 
twelfth day of January, one thousand eight 
htmdred and forty-six, were married, after 
regular proclamation, of banns, James Pres 
cott, bachelor, and Mary Atkins, spinster, 
both of Toronto, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has beeni duly solemnized be 
tween, us. James Prescott, Mary Atkins, and 
In the presence of us, John Prescott, Ma 
tilda Prescott. 

Cairns and MV-Kellar At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-six, were mar 
ried by license, William Oairnsi, of the town 
ship of Vaujrhatik bachelor, and Margaret 
McKellar, of Kinc, spinster, daughter of 
James McKellar, of the said township of 
King-, by me, John Ba.rclay. This marriage 
has been, duly solemnized between us, Wil 
liam, Cainns, Margaret McKellar, and in the 
presence of us, John Cairns, Peter McKellar. 

Croftoa and Devlin At Toronto, on the 
twenty -fourth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-six, were married 
by license>, Joseph Cvoftoni, of the township 
of Markhajn. bachelor, and Anne Devlin, 
of the city of Toronto., wktow of the late 
John. Devlin, of the said city, deceased, by 
mo John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized, between us. Joseph Crofton, 
An.ne Devlia, nn,d in the presence of us, 
Alex. Brown., Eliza.beth Wciselether. 

Mun.ro and McLaucphlin At Toronto, on 
the thirty-first day of Jan.uar^, one thou 
sand eigiht hur.i.lred and forty-six, tfere mar 
ried by liren.se, l>onal 1 Monro, bachelor, 
aaid Catherine Mclaughlin, of the same 
township of Oriilia, spinster, da.n.ghter of 
the late Alex. M<cLaUhli(H of Scotland, 
by me, Joh.ii. Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly ."oJemiiized between us, Donald 
M Uinro, Catherine Mcl.fiughlin, and in the 
p:-esen--e f IPS, Robert Kirk, Win. Cape. 

Keith fi.TvI M<-Dioiuigall At Toronto, on 
the s/->ventvr!.th, day n-f Febru-ary, one thou 
sand eight hu-n/lire 1 n.nd forty-six, were mar 
ried by licenise, Neil Keaith, of Chingrua 
cotisy, bachelor, a.iid Flora McDougall, of 
Esquesiir.i_ "- spinster, da.ughter o-f the late 
Do3aioa,n McDo-rigall, of the feland ofSlvye., 
Scotland, by me, John Barclay. This mar- 
ri ige has beon, duly solemnized between us, 
Neil Kea.th, Flora McDou^fill, and in the 
P f, : c,:i"0 of us. ALex. Fletcher, Edward 
Carney. 

McDougall a.n 1 McMull<vr At Toronto, on 
the twenty-sixth day of February, one Ihou- 
Ramd eight liundred and forty-six, were mar- 
riel by license, John MicDtoug-all, of the 
township of Mariposa, bachelor, and Bar 
bara MruVfulJeini of the city of Toronto, 
spinster, daughter of James McMullen, of 
Ileach, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
hns been, duly solemnized between us, John 
McDougall, Barbara McMullenu and in the 
jrresence of us., Niel McDougall, Mary 



Armstroine- wid Wright At Toronto, on 
the fourth day of March,, oae thousKuid 
eigrht hundred ajid forty-six, were mar 
ried by licen.se, A (Vim Armstrong-, bach 
elor, anid Miary WrifAt, spinster, d?vug-hter 
<rf Hutet Wriffht. a3l of the township of 
Scarboro , by met John, Barclay. This mar- 
ris has been, duly otemiiized between us, 



Adam Armstrong, Mary Wright, and In 
preseevce ot ust, Fraiuses Armstrotig, Jaa. 
Keniedv. 

McNeil aaiid Uutchlnaon At Tloronto, on 
the sixth day of March, one thousand 
eiffht hundred and forty six, were married 
by license* Roderick McNelU of the town 
ship of Trafalgar, bachelor, amid Kimna 
Hu tchineoTi, of the city of Toronto, spinster, 
by me. John, Barclay. This marriage b.M 
been, duly solemnized between us, Roderick 
McNeil, E/mma HutchinsoiK and in the pre 
sence of Mfli, Wan. Hutchinaon. Neil Mfco- 
I>eTi. f 

Wright and fThomas At Toronto, on th 
twenty-fourth day *>f Mwrcih, one thou- 
wwwl eijrh t hund;red and forty-six, after re- 
fi-ular proclamation of banns, James Wright 
! bachelor, aiwl Eliza Thomas, widow of the 
i late Joluti Thomas, were married by me 
John, Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
fiolcm>rtiized between u, James Wrigrht, 
i Eliza Thom-asi, and in the presence of tw, 
George Pew, ,Mary Pew. 

McArthur atwl Campbell At Toronto, on 
the twe,n,ty -seventh day of March, one thou- 
en-nd eight hundred and forty-six, were mar 
ried by license, Peter McArthur, of Gale- 
don* bachelor, and Mary Campbell, of Tor 
onto, spinster, daughter of Win. Campbell, 
of Argyllshire, iSootlund, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriaige has beeni duly solemn 
ized bet ween us, Peter McArthur, Mary 
Campbell, a! in, the presence of us, Lauch- 
lin Ourrie, Malcolm McArthur. 

Whitehead a;n.d Gardiner--At Toro-nto, on 
the thirty-first day of March, oine thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-six, were 
married by license* Thomas Whitehead, the 
yoainiger, of Brampton township of Chiii- 
e-uacousy, bachelor, and Mary Gardiner, of 
the wame towinship, spinster, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has beni duly 
solemnized between us Th,omas Whitehead, 
Mary Gardiner, and in the presence o i f us, 
W.m. Gardiner, .Margaret Irwin. 

Martia and McKenzie At Toronto, on the 

I eiirhteenth day of Mny, O4ie thousand eight 
hundred and forty-six, were married by 
lii ense. Bernard M -irti: 1 ^ o t the city of Tor 
onto, widower, suid Mr;raret McKenzie, of 
the same place,, widevr of William McKenzie, 
lute of Peterborough, deceased, by me, John 
Barclay. ThLs marriage has been, diily 
sole-nMuzed between "us., Bernard M irtin, 
Margaret McKenzie, and in the presence 
of us* James Scott, Eliza Scott. 

Wise atnd iMisihler At Toronto, on the 
tweriity-eighth d^iy of M- My 1 , one thouso<nd 
ei p ht hiiind.red -and forti -^ix, were mar 
ried by lice.twe, Adam. Wise, of the town 
ship of Vawrhank bachelor^ and Eve Mi sh 
ier, of the same place* spinster, dauighter 
of the late D.nael Mi.hl&r, of the said 
township, Jecea9ed, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween us,. Adam Wi.so, Eve Mishler, and! in 
the presence of us, Edward Garratj Joseph 

1 Snifler. 

1 EJlivtt a-nd Park- At Toronto, on the 
* \venty-ninth day of M^jr. one thousand 

j ei"hit humdred auid fo-rty-ix. were mar 
ried by license, Hugh Elliott, of the 
township of .Scarboro , widower, and Geor 
gian Park, of the same place, spinster, 
d.fiwhter of the hi to William. Park, of Dnm- 
frleahlre, Scotla.m;^ by me, John Barclay. 

! This marriiwe li: .s beon duly soleniinized be 
tween us., Huffh Eliiott, Georgina Park, anr] 



182 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



la the presence of us, Thomas Park, Archi 
bald Elliott. 

Smith and Wilson- At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of Jume, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-six,, were married after 
regular proclan a tioui, of barms, James 
Smith, of the towin=hip of Vanighan, bach 
elor, and Agnes Wilson, of the city of Tor 
onto, spinster, by mo, John Barclay. This 
marriage has beein duly solemnized between 
us. James Smith. Agnes Wilson, and in the 
presence of <ua. Andrew Dun-net, Miargaret 
Smith. 

Patterson and Finlay At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-six, were ma-Tried by 
license., James Patterson, of the city of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Margaret Fliilay, of 
the same place, spinster, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized betweein. us, Jain^s Patterson. Margaret 
Finlay, and in the presence of us, James 
Forrmanj, Sarah Carter, 

Kerr and Ileiuiessey At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of June,, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-^six, were married by li 
cense,. Archibald K.err. of the township of 
Westminster, bachelor, and Eliza Hennes 
sey, of Toroiiito, spinster, daughter of the 
late James Hennessey, of Irela-nd, by me, 
Johui. Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Arch. Kerr, Eliz,a 
Heniri efisey, and in the presence of us, John 
Barker, Eliza Jn.ne Wilson. 

Barker antd Wilson At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of June., one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-six., were married by li 
cense, John Barker, o-f the township of 
Oneida. bachelor, and Eliza Jane Wilson, of 
Co-bourg, spinster, daughter of Joseph Wil- 
eon, of the saime place, by me, John Barclay. 
fThis marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween, us, John Barker. Eliza Jane Wilson, 
and in the presence of us, Arme Jane Lewis, 
Arch. Kerr. 

McLean, and Cameron At Toronto, on the 
thirtieth day of June*, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-^six, wore married after 
regular proclamation of banns. Neil Mc>- 
Leain, bachelor, and Sarah Cameron, spins 
ter, both of the township of Va/ughan, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between, us, Neil McLean, 
Sarah Cameron., and in the presence of us, 
Keil McD Oiinald. William Ramaand. 

Cook and IrwLn. At Toronto, on the se 
cond day of July, one thousand eight hun- 
<lrol and forty-isix we-re married by license, 
Thomas Oook, of the township of Whit- 
church, bachelor, and Eliza Jane Irwin, of 
the same place., spinster, daughter of 
Samuel Irwin, of the said township, by me, 
John Barclay, PLis marriage has been doily 
solemnized between us, Thomas Cook, Eliza 
Irwin., and in the presence of us John 
Irwin, James gcarlett. 

Hatton and Dunnville At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of Julji, one thousand 
eight hundred and Jorty-vsix, were married 
by licenea, George Ilatton,, of the city of 
Hamilton,, widower, and Mary Anne Dunn-" 
ville, of the cit" of Tior on/to, spinster, 
Aa-ughter of Thomas Duiuivillei, of Tyronne, 
Ireland., by me, John Barclay. This mar- 
riap-e has been duly solemnized between us, 
George Hattoi* uVIary Anne Duunville, and 
in the presenice of us> John Tyler, DaTid 
McMillan. 

McLean and McRae At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fourth day of Jul^y, one thousand 



eight hundred and forty-isix, were married 
after regular proclamation of banner Wil 
liam. McLe*nb oi Toronto, bachelor, and 
A-nirue McRae. of Tho-ra, spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been, duly 
solemnized between <us, William McLean, 
Amine McRaa, wl in the presence of us. 
Huffh Miller, William Clyme. 

Irvi-ne an.d ChrLsrtner At Toronto, on the 
twentieth day tyt August, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-six, were married, 
by license,, William Irvine, of the township 
of York, bachelor, and Mary Jane Christ- 
iner, of Etqbicoke, spinster, daughter of Ben 
jamin/ Christner, of the same place, by me, 
Johni Barclay. This marriage has been d uly 
solemnized between oiSk William Irvine^ Mary 
Jaine Christner, and in the presence of us, 
George Kemipsbell, JRo-ger LeTer. 

Headerson and McGillvray At Toronto, 
oin, the twenty -seya ith day of Aug-ust, one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-six, were 
ina.rried bv licence:, William Henderson, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Catherine Mc- 
Gillvrary, o rfthe same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of the late Donald McGillvray, of, Scot 
land, deceased, ;by me, John Barclay. This 
marria-ge has been duly solemnized between 
us, William Henderson, Catherine M cGill- 
vray, and in the prcc*ence of us., Johnston 
MeBryan, Robert Smith* 

Ewart airnd Skirvinig At Toronto, on the 

first day of September,, onie thousand eight 

hum lied and fortv-six, were mariied by li- 

! censa, Thomas lEwart, bachelor, and Cath- 

| erin0 Sea ton Skirving-, spinster, both of 

I roTomito, by nne, John Barclay. This mar- 

riaige has been diu-ly solemnized between us, 

i Thomas Swart, Oa-therinie Seaton Skirrlag 1 , 

j ainid in the presence of us., John Ewart. 

jr., A,n.nie iSkirvingi. 

Henderson and McBriiio At Toronto, on 
the sixth id av of October, one thousand eight 
hiinid i el and forty-six, were married 
after regular proclaiination of banns, Don 
ald Henidrson,, bachelor, and Ellen McBrine, 
spinster, J>oth of Tioroin.to. by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage lias been. daily 
solemnized between us, Donald Henderson, 
Ellen McBrinfii, and in the presence of us, 
Huigh Matheson, John McBrine. 

MeCallum a,n.d McOonkei At Toronto, on 
the ni-tiith day of October, one thousand ei^ht 
huniired and forty-six, were married by li 
cense,, Robert McOallum, of Toronto, bach 
elor, and M>a.ri:i Mcdonkov, of Ki"iston, 
spineter, dau^ hter ,of Ed wivrd MoCoiii.key,, 
of Piescott, by me., John Barclay. This 
marriage has -bean, duly solemrulzed between 
us, Robert McCalluin. Maria McConkey, and 
im the prescsiwe of us, William Whitelaw, 
S< iphia E. Dflin g-. 

Hackshaw and Brown At Toronto, on the 
twe fth day of October, one -thousand eig-ht 
hundrel and forty-six, were married by li 
cense. William Hackshaw. of the township 
of York, bachelor, and Helen Brown, of 
the city o>f Toronto, by mie. John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized 
between us, William Hackshaw, Helen Brown, 
and in the presence of us* John. Alexande-r 
M^GregoT, Tbtomaa Faragber. 

Dauwels and Rone At To ronto^ on the 
thirteenth day of October, one thousand 
eight humdred and forty-eix, James Da*i- 
ieK bachelor, and Mary Anne Rjone, spm- 
ter,, both pof Mlarkhiiira, were after regular 
proclnmatktti of ba:nin^, uriiTel in marriage, 
by me, John Barclay. Thia marriage has 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



183 



been duly solemnized between us. Jamas 
Daniels, Mary Anine Rone, and in the pre- 
en.ce of us, John, Daniels. Maria Daniels. 

Burns and Stoneham At Ttoronto, on the 
thirten<th day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-six, were married, 
by license, William Burns, of the township 
of York, widower aaud Martha Stoneham, 
of Toronito, spinster, daughter of Joseph 
Stoneham, -of Chingniacouey, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage bas been duly 
solemnized between us William Burns, 
Martha Stojieham. and in the presence of 
us, Mark Stoneham, Paauiy Simmons. 

Jones and Stewart At Toronto, on the 
fifteenth day of Octo ber,. one thousand eight 
hundred and fort "-six, were married by li 
cense, James Jones, of the township ot 
Seu-rboro , widowvi, a.n/1 Margaret Stewart, 
of the township of York, widow, by me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between "us, John Jones, Mar 
garet Stewart, amid in the presence of us, 
Rufu.s Howe, Isaac Latham. 

Sturgess a.ad Swinburn At Toronto, on 
the twenty-first day of October, one thou 
sand eiifht hundred arid forty-fix, John 
Sturrrese, bachelor, and Margaret Swinburn, 
spinster, both of Toron.to, were after re- 
gu.lar proclamation of banms, united in 
marriage by me John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been, diuily solemnized between us, 
Joim Sturs-e^s, Margaret Swinburn, and in 
th epresemce (of usi, George Brown, Mary 
Esson. 

Flack and Heron. At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of October; one thousand 
eight huwired and forty-six, were mar 
ried by liceniset David Flack, of Toron to, 
bachelor, anid Anine Heron,, of the same 
place, widww of the late William Hero.n, 
deceased, by met John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been d lily solemnized between us, 
David Flack, Auwie Heron, and in the pre- 
coace of us, E^erton Snider,, Harriet Anne 
Ward. 

Ratley and McGregor At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of November, o>ne thousand eight 
hundred and forty-six, were married by< li 
cense. Thomas Rattey, of Toronto, bach 
elor, and Margaret McGregor, of the same 
place, spinster, dausfMer of John McGre 
gor, of Gait, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage wa-s diulv solemnized between us, 
T,. Ratley, Margaret McGregor, and in the 
presence of <ua, A. Diogrwall. John McGre 
gor. 

Dodds and RutledgeAt Toronto, on the 
eleventh day of Noveanben, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-isix, were married 
by license, George Dodds. bachelor, and 
Catherine RU tledye, spinster, daughter of 
William RutledgBk all of the township of 
Oaledon, by ame> John Barclay. This mar- 
ria2 has been duly solemnized between us, 
Georjre Dodds, Catherine Rutledge, and in 
the presence of uev J. J. RutledeP. 

Secor aoid Orone At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of November, one thousand 
ei;rht hundred and forty-isix, were married 
by license, Isaac Secor,, jr., bachelor, and 
Margaret Crone* spinster, daughter of Wil 
liam Crone, all of Scarboro j by me, John 
Barclay. This on-arriagie has been duly 
solemnized between usi, tsaao Seoor, Margaret 
Crone, and in the presence of us* Nelson 
Gates, Thomas Youms. 

Riddel ainid Kidd At Toronto, on the 
fifteenth day of DeceSm beir, one thousand 
hutndred and forty-eix, were mar 



ried by license* John Riddel, of Hamilton, 
bachelor, an,d Jessie Kidd, of Toronto, spins 
ter, daug-hter ot John Kidd, of the said 
city, by me, Joh.n Barclay, This marriage 
has bean, duly solemnized between us, John 
Riddel, Jessie Kidd, and in the presence 
of UK, Walter Telfer, A. Kidd 1 . 

Measrher and Love At Toroato, on the 
tweriity-eiirht day of Decefmber, o-no thou- 
eajiid ei^ht haundred and forty-six, were 
married by license, Thomas Meag-her, of the 
townohlp of Toronto, widowen, and Mar 
garet Lovet of the caimo place, spinster, 
daiu.s hter of James Lovei, of Ireland, by 
me, Joha Barclay, This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between ua, Thomas 
Meatrher, Margaret Love, and in the pre 
sence oS us, Robert Parks, Thomas Citton, 
Kn.ox and Young At Toronto, on the 
I thirty-first day of December, on thousand 
i ei^ht huindrea and fortj -six, were mar 
ried by license, Thomas Knox, bachelor, 
Hiryl Catherine Yo-Uing-, Spinster, daughter 
of Thomas Youinior, all of the township of 
Scarboro , by me, Jo>ia Barclay. This mar- 
ri -i 2e has been, duly solemnized between us, 
Thomaa Knox, Catherine Young, and in the 
presence of us, 1-s.a.ac May, Mrs. May. 

Park ain,d Chester At Toronto, on the 
thirty-first day of Decefnuber, oine thou- 
saad eight hundred a-na forty-six, were 
ma.rried b lyiceinse, Thomas Park, bach 
elor. amd Hannah Chester, spinster, both 
of Scarboro , by me, Johin. Barclay. This 
ma,rria.2ie has been duly solemnized between 
us, Thomas Park, Haowiah Chester, and in 
the presence of us, Archibald Elliot, Re 
becca Chester;. 

Jackson, and Addison At Toronto, on the 
fifth day of Jan-uary, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty->seven, were married by 
Jiiense, ,1o>hn Jackson, bachelor, and Mar 
garet Addison, Spinster, daughter of the 
late James Addison., ail of the township 
of Vaiieiha.!!, toy me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been/ dulv solemnized be 
tween ua, Johm Jackson, Margaret Addison, 
a,ad in the presence of us James Addl- 
son, Thoimas Elsie. 



Th-ain,psoti and Malloy At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of Jairauaity, one thousand 
eijht hundred and forty-seveni, were mar 
ried by licence, Robert Thompson, of the 
tow;nehip, of Vau;rhan, bachelor, and Janet 
j Malloy, of the sme place, spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. Tni-s marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Robert Thompson* 
Janet Malloy, and in he presence of ua, 
Arch. McMurchy. John McCallum. 

GiLray and Brack At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of Jajmuarjy, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty -seven, wer 
married, alter proclamation of bamnsu John 
GiLray, of Scarboro , bachelor, amd Elizabeth 
Brack, of York towjiship, spinster, by me, 
John. Barclay. Tuia marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, John Gilrajr, Eliza 
beth Brack, amd In the presence of 113, 
Johai Danby, Robert Gilray. 

luglis and Bell At Toronto on the sixth 
day of February, ona thousand eight hun 
dred and fortv-iseven, were married by 11- 
cense Russoll Ingliai, of Toronto, bache 
lor, and Jane Bell, of the samo place, spin- 
eler, daughter of the late Jaa. BelU by me, 
John. Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
so em.nized between us, Russell Lnglis, Jane 
Bel, and in the presence of mu John Bell. 
Maxy Ann Thompson. 



134 



LAM DM ARKS OF TORONTO. 



Clelaud and Mackay At Toronto, on the 
ninth day of February, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-seven, Peter Oleland, of 
the township of Elora. and Ann Mackay, 
of Toronto, spinster, were, after regular 
nuibUoation of baninfl, united in marriage 
y me. Joha Barclay. This marriage has 
teen duly solemnized oetween ug. Peter Cle- 
laud, Ann Mackay.. and in the presence of 
114, Rod. Macdoaald,. Arch. Taylor. 

Faulkner aind Jenkins- At Toronto, on 
the fifteenth dv ol March, onte thou 
sand eight htundred and forty-seven, were 
married by license, Alexander Faulkner, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth Jenkins, 
of the sarae place, spinster, daughter of 
the late Henry Jenkins, of Ireland, by me, 
Jotom Barclay. This marriage hag been duly 
solemnized betwewn us, Alex. Faulkner, 
IllizaJjeth Jemkins, ajd in the presence of 
us, Clayton J. BoTille, Anna Milne. 

Gormley and Thompson At Toronto, on 
the twenty-fifth day of March, onethou- 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married by license, Patrick Gormley, of the 
township of Vaughan, bachelor, and Eliza 
beth Thompson, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of the late George Thompson, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, Patrick Gorm 
ley, Elizabeth Thompson, and in the pre 
sence of us, Robert Thompson, Henry Mc- 
Clusky. 

Kerr and Kerr At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of March, one thousand 
ight hundred and forty-seven, were mar 
ried by license, William Kerr, of Toronto, 
widower, and Anne Kerr, of York town 
ship .spinster, daughter of the late Alex. 
Krr, of Tyrone, Ireland, by me-, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemniz 
ed between us, William Kerr, Anne Kerr, 
andjn the presence of us, James Thompson, 
Margaret Kerr. 

Gates and Secor At Toronto, on the 
thirtieth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-seven, were married t>y 
license, John Gates, of Scarboro, bachelor, 
and Grata Secor. of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of Isaac Secor, the elder of the 
said township, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, John Gates, Grata Secor, and in the 
presence of us, Isaac Secor, Septimus La- 
call. 

Maxwell and Gray At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-seven, were mar 
ried by license, James Maxwell, bachelor, and 
Euphemia Gray, spinster, both of the town 
ship of York, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, James Maxwell and Euphemia Gray, and 
In the presence of us, George Gray, Jannet 



Bowes and Beith At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-seven, were married by 
license, James Bowes, of Toronto, and Sus 
annah Beith, of the same place, spinster, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage bas 
been duly solemnized between 115, James 
Bowes, Susannah Beith, and in the presence 
of usf, John Cochran, oJhn Spottiswood. 

Duncan and Bell At Toronto, on the 
third day of June, one thousand eight hun 
dred and forty-seven, were married by li 
cense, Robert Duncan, of Markham, bache 
lor, and Sarah Ann Bell, of Scarboro, spin- 



ster, daughter of John Bell, of the same 
place, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, Rob 
ert Duncan, Sarah Ann Bell, and In the 
presence of us, William Mitchell, Eliza Boll. 

Graham and Lapp At Toronto, on the 
twenty-second day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-seven, were mar 
ried by license, John Graham, of the town 
ship of Whitchurch, bachelor, and Eliza 
beth Lapp, of Markham, spinster, daugh 
ter ofthe late Henry Lapp, deceased, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, John Graham, 
Elizabeth Lapp, and in the presence of us, 
Andrew Lapp, Peter Lapp. 

Daniel and Mitchell At Toronto, on the- 
twenty-third day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and forty-seven, were mar 
ried by license, John Daniel, of Markham,. 
bachelor, and Mary Jane Mitchell, of Scar- 
boro, spinster, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage -has been duly solemnized botween 
us, John Daniel, Mary Jane Mitchell, and 
In the presence of us, Abraham Phenix, 
Rebecca Mitchell. 

Webb and Paterson At Toronto, on the- 
first day of July, one thousand eight hun- 
dredand forty-seven, wcr-j married by refii- 
lar proclamation of Banns, John Webb, 
widower, and .Jessie Paterson, widow, both 
of Toronto, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Webb, Jessie Paterson, and in the 
presence of us, John Murray, Toronto, Eli 
zabeth Barnes, Toronto, Duchess. 

Bateson and Watson At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of July, one thousnnd eight 
hundred and forty-seven, were married af 
ter regular proclamation of Banns, Mat 
thew Kateson, bachelor, of Toronto, and 
Hannah Watson, spinster, of Montreal, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, Matthew Bate- 
son, Hannah Watson, and in the presence 
of us, William Worsdellgar, William Thomas 
Mutton. 

Sanderson and Webb At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-seven, were married by 
license, Francis Sanderson, of the township- 
of York, bachelor, and Elizabeth Webb, of 
Toronto, spinster, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Francis Sanderson, E. Webb, and in the 
presence of us, John Ash ton, Isabella Rob- 
ison, Toronto. 

Wright and Stibbard At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-seven, were marred, a-l ter 
regular proclamation of Banns, James 
Wright, bachelor, and Jane Stibbard, spin 
ster, both of Toronto, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, James Wright, Jane Stibbard, and 
in the presence of us, Peter Sheppard, Mary 
Ann Hobson. 

Sinclair and Shan At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of July, one thousand 
eis-ht hundred and forty-seven, were mar- 
riel by license, Donald Sinclair, widower, 
and Jane Shan, spinster, both of Ohingua- 
cousy, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been dulv solemnized between us, Don 
ald Sinclair, Jane Shan, and in the presence- 
of us. Sarah MaoClain, Anna Laird. 

MoGaw and Lunny At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of July, one thousand 
eifrht hundred and forty-seven, were mar- 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



185 



by license, James McGaw, bachelor, and 
Ellen Lunny, spinster, both of Toronto. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, James McGaw, Ellen Lunny, and in the 
presence of us. Peter Milloy, Mary Leo- 
hard. 

Dick and Ca-rfrae At Toronto, on the 
sixth day of Aiiigust, one thousand eight 
hundred and fortv-eoven, were married by 
license, James Dick, bachelor, and Joanna 
Carfrae, splinter, daughter of the late John 
Cnrfraek all of the city of Torooito;, by me, 
John. Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
olemnized between us, James Dick, Joanna 
Carfrae, amd in the presence of us. John 
B. Gordon* S, B. Campbell. 

Lamb aoud Marian At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of August, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married by license, George Lamb, of York, 
bachelor, anid Sarah Marian, of the same 
place/ spinster, daughter of Patrick Marian, 
of Ireland, by me Johin Barclay. This mar 
riage has been diuly solemnized between us, 
George Lam>b, Sa.rah Mariau, and in the 
presence of ua, Bernard Mulvany, David 
Roach. 

Ersktne and Harris At Toronto, on the 
twenty-eighth day of August, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty -seven,, were 
marriel by license, Igal Erskine, of G-uelph, 
bachelor, amd Diian& Harris, of the same 
place, spinster, daughter of George Harris, 
of Middlesex, Bog., bv me, George Barclay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween- UA Igal Brskine, Diana Harris, and in 
the presence of ua, James 0. Latham, Wm. 
Pollet, Jr. 

Campbell amd White At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven,, were 
married by proclamation of ban,n&. James 
Campbell, bac-helor, and A-noi White, spin 
ster, both of Toronto, by.me, John. Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, James Campbell, Ann White, and 
In the presence of us, William Cruickshank, 
O. Ilea.p. 

Riddeil and Alexander At Toronto on the 
twenty-fourth day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married by license, Josoph Riddeil, bache 
lor, a-nid Elizabeth Alexander, spinster, both 
of Toronto, by me, Johin Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Joseph Riddeil, Elizabeth Alex 
ander, and in the presence of us., James 
Brooks, Mary Ann Dawson. 

McNeil and Cameron At Toronto, on the 
thirtieth day of September, ome thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married by license, Malcolm McNeil, bache 
lor, and Catherine Cameron, spinster, both of 
Gwillimbury Weat^ by me John. Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Malcolm McNeil, Catherine Oam- 
eroa, and in the presence of us, Donald 
Cameron. 

Chrisholm and. Begg At Toronto, on the 
fifth day of Octo ben, oine thousand eight 
huiadred arid forty-seven, were married by 
license* William Chrisholm, otf Pickering, 
bachelor, and. Margaret Begg, of the same 
place, spinster, daughter of Alexander Begg, 
of Aberdeen, Scotland, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween us, William Chrisholm, Margaret 
Begg,, amd in the presence of usv John An 
drew, George Begg. 



Hayden and Forde At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were- 
married by license, George Hayden, bache 
lor, and Susan Forde, spinster, both of To 
ronto, by me, John Barclay. This marriage- 
has been duly solemnized between us, Geo. 
Hayden. Susan Forde, and in the presence of 
us, W. J. Hoyden, Win. Grainge-o 

Hood and M<cMullen. At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married by license, James Hood, of Lamb- 
ton-, bachelor, and Ann McMulUn, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter ol Samuel 
M cMulliri, also of the same place, by me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has beeu duly 
solemnized between us, James Hood*, Ana 
MicMullin, and in the presence of ua, Henry 
McMullin, Margaret Hood. 

Oilman, and Lyons At Toronto, on 

the first day of Novetmiber, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married by license, EHsha Dilnian, of Whit- 
church, bachelor, aaid Mary Lyons, of the 
same p .a^e,, spinster, by me, Jotm Barclay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween us, Edsha Dilnian, Vary Lyons, and 
in, the presence of us, Wnx. Fish, Thoa. 
Caldwell. 

Bison, and M-cIntee At Toronto, on 
the third day of Noveuniber, oine thou 
sand eight hundred a,;id forty-seven, were- 
nwirried by license, William Henry EJison 
bachelor, aud Elizabeth Mclntee, epinter, 
the former of Markham, the latter of Louth,. 
by me, Jofon Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly soleminized between us, William 
H. E saa, Elizabeth M/cln,teei, and in the 
presenice of us Joton. Micljiteo^ Eiizafbeth 



Reid amid Harrison, At Toronto, on 
the teath day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were- 
married by llconise, Joseph Reid, bachelor, 
a.nd Bell Ann Harrison, spinster, both of 
Toronto, by me, Joh-n Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solaimnized between us, 
Joseph Reidt, Bell AMI Harrison, and in the 
presesace of ui, W. Taylor, Sarah Harrisoni 

GJbsomi and McGowan At Scarborough, on 
the eleventh day of NovtitiLbei , one thou- 
sa nd eight hutoured and forty-seven, were 
married by license, William Gibson, of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth MoGowan, 
of Scarboro , spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has bee,n, duly solemnized be 
tween. us,, William Gibson, Elizabeth Mc- 
Gowau, and in the presence of us* James 
Gibson* A. McPherson^ 

Du.riin a>nd McClure At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married* after proclamation of bannd, Jon- 
atha.ni Dunn, bachelor, and Phoebe Me- 
Clure, spinster, both of Scarborough, by me. 
Johin. Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Jonathan Dunn and 
Phoebe McOlure. arad In the presence of us, 
Joseph McClure, Sarah McClure. 

Stonehouse and Docherty At Toronto on 
the seventeenth day of December.one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married. after regular proclamation of 
bam-ne, William Storehouse, bachelor, and 
Catherine Dochertyj spinster, both of Scar 
borough, by we. .lolni, Barclay. This mar 
riage has been, duly solemnized between us, 



186 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



William Stomebouso, Catherine Docherty, 
and in the presence of us John\ Smith. 

Blair amd Boydi At Toronto, on the 
twentieth day of December;, one thou 
sand eight humdTed and forty-seven, were 
married by license, John Blair, of the city 
<rf Toranito, bachelor, and Mary Boyd, of 
Scarboro , spinster, daughter of Isaac Boyd, 
of the same place* by me, John. Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, John Blair, Mary Boyd, and in, the 
presence of us, Isaac Boyd, Abey McGonet. 
Roddy and McElrea At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married by license. John Roddy, of Toronto, 
bachelor, anid Isabella Ann McElrea, of the 
said city, spinster, by me, John. Barclay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween, us, John Roddy, Isabella. Ann MeElrea, 
and in the presence o* us, Michael P. Hay- 
ness Eliza Kennedy. 

Socor and Cornell At Scarborough, on the 
twenty-third day of DcemJbBTi one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
married bv license, Lewis Seoor, of Scar 
boro , bachelor, and Eliza Cornell, of the 
said township sp lister, bv me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been, tlulf solemnized be 
tween us, Lewis Secor, Eliza Cornell, and in 
the p--e.sen.ce of us, Peter Sccor, Thomas 
Abranndn. 

We .sh and WraglesworthAt Toronto, on 
the 24th day of December, o.ne thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
marriel, after regular proclamation of 
l>.irns. Tho-ma? W-Vsh, of Esqueslng, bache 
lor, anrl Isabella Wraglesworth, spinster, of 
Trafalgar, by me, Johm Barclay. This mar 
riage has been diuly solemnized between us, 
Tlr-ivis Walsh, Isabella Wragles worth, and 
in the presence of UJ>, Samuel Welsh, Clem, 
W. Ca,niig:e. 

Cowan aad McOainis At Toronto, on the 
thii-tv-first day <<t DeceWber, orae thou 
sand* eight hundred and forty-seven, were 
i-arriM by li cense. George Oowan. bache 
lor, and Sarah Anne McCamis, spinster, 
daughter of James McOaniis. all of the 
township of Vauguau, bv Tie, John Barclay. 
Tliis marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, George Cowan, Sarah Ann Mc- 
Camis, and in the presence w us, James 
peils, Susauniia Cowan. 

\rmold and Cairns At Toronto, on the 
e evemth day of January, one thou- 
s-,i,rvl eight hundreu and forty-eight, were 
unite 1 in marriage, after regular Pfoc a - 
m at ion of Banns William Arnold, Of 
Vaughan, bachelor, and Mary Cairns, of 
King, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, William Arnold, Mary Cairns, and 
ia the presence of ua, John Hale. William 

fanning and Mitchell Ac Toronto, on the 
eleventh day of January., one thou 
sand eignt hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by license, Alexander Canning, of 
Markham, bachelor wrjd Rebecca Mitchell, 
of Scarborough, spinster, daughter of Jas. 
Mitchell, of same place, bv me, John. Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized 
t woon us, Alexander Canning, Rebecca Mit 
chell, and in the presence of us, William 
J. Mitchell, John A. Roche. 

Cooper and Logan.- At Toronto, on the 
e eventh day of January. one thou 
sanxl eight hundred and forty -eight, were 



married by license James Cooper, bache 
lor, and Mary Logan,, spinster, both of To 
ronto, by me. John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been, duly solemnized between us, 
James Cooper, Mary Loga.ni, and in the pres 
ence of us, Alex- Cooper. Barbara Donald- 
sou. 

elloffjr and Henderson At Toronto, on 
the thirteenth oar ot January, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by license. Jones Josiah Kellogg, 
jaehelor, anid Mary Jane Henderson, widow, 
ioth of Toronto, by mo, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be- 
: ween, us, Mary Jane Henderson, .J J. Kel- 
,ogg, and in the presence of us, Thomas 
Gerutle, Eliza L. Forrest. 

South and Bates At Scarborough, on the 
twenty-seventh day of Januaujy, one thou 
sand eight hundred a-icl forty-eight, were 
united In marriage, after regular proclama 
tion of banns, George South, bachelor, and 
Sobrirna Beulah Bales* spinster, by me, 
Sabrina Beulah Batea, spinster, by me. 
solemnized between us, George South, Sa 
brinft Beulah Bates, and in the presence of 
us,, Edward Winstanley, Lewis W. Sedor. 

Graham and Little At Toronto, on 
the fourth day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by license, Thomas Graham, of 
York, widower, and Mary Ann Little, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of John 
son, Little, of Fermanagh, Ireland, bv me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Thomas Graham, 
Mary Ann Little, and in the presence of 
us, Robert Boyd, James Atwill. 

Miller and Whiteside At Toronto, on 
the eighth day of March, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by licemise, John Miller, bachelor, 
and Margaret Whltesidei. spinster, daugh 
ter of .Dn.niel Whiteside, all of the township 
of Pi 1 kering, by me. Johni Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Miller, Margaret Wliiteside, and in 
the presence of us, Andrew Miller, Herbert 
Topping 1 . 

Sylvester and Tingle At Toronto, on the 
fifteenth diay of March, one thou- 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
united in marriage, after regular procla 
mation of bamns, William Sylvester, ofYork, 
bachelor, and Jane Tingle, spinster, of 
Scarboro , by me, John. Barclay. Tliis mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
William Sylvester, Jane Tingle., and in the 
presence of us, John Henry Sylvester, John 
Hamilton. 

McKenzie and McCombe At Toronto, on 
the eighteenth day of March, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
united in marriage, after . regular procla 
mation, ot banns, Alexander McKenzie, wid 
ower, anid Jane Mc,Combe, spinster, by me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Alex. McKenzae, Jane 
McC-ombe.. a,nd in the presence of us, Thos. 
U. hcrty, Arabella Sanderson. 

Dougherty aind Mahan, At Toronto, on 
the twentynsecond day of March., one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by license, Hanry Doughertjy, bache 
lor, n.nd Bridget Manan, spinster, both of 
! York Mills, township of York, by me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
s Yemnized between us, Henry Dougherty, 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



187 



Bridget Mahajnt, and in the presence of us, 
George Lamb, Bernard Mulvany. 

SLsley and Underwood At Toronto, on 
the eighth day of April, one thou 
sand eight hu.ri.dred and forty-eight, were 
married by licenae, Bowley SBslefcr, bachelor, 
and Elizabeth Underwood, spinster, both of 
Scarboro , by me Johin Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly Aotamnlzed between us, 
Bowley Sisley, Elizabeth Underwood, and in 
the presemce of ua, Robert McCowan, David 
JBarmfather. 

Thompson,, and Hogg At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day Of April, otne thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
united in marriagiQ, after regular pjrocla- 
matioin, of banns. William Thompson* bache 
lor, and Helem. Hogg, spinster, both of the 
township of York, by me, John Barclay. 
This marria.sre has beeru duly solemnized be 
tween us, William Thompson* Helen Hogg, 
and In tihe presence of u* John Hogg, 
Peter Thompson.. 

MtoCowian. and Underwood At Scarboro , 
the twemty-aeToath day of April, one 
thoufia.ad eight hundred amd forty-eight, 
were married by licon,?o, Robert McCowam, 
bachelor, amd Jane Uuderwood, spinster, 
both of Scarboro . bv mei, John. Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Robert MfoCowatH, Jane Under 
wood, and in the preseace of us, A. M- 
Pfaersom James Li (Well. 

Sutherland and Stevenson At Toronto, on 
the rainietee nth day otf May, one thou- 
aamid eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by licemee, Adam Sutherland, bache 
lor, and Mary Stevenson* spinster, both of 
Toronto, by ma, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been, duly solemnized between us, 
Adam Suthei laavl, Mary Stevensonj, and in 
the presence of usi. John Grieva, Almira 
Reynolds. 

Parker amd Raiiford At Toronto, on the 
thirty-first day of Mk(y, one thou 
sand eight hundred fund forty-eight, were 
married by license, Joseph Parker, of 
Whitby, bachelor, and Ainne Radford, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of the 
late John, Radford, Somersetshire* deceas 
ed, by me., Jolun Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us. 
Joseph Parker, Amua Radfoni, and in the 
gresenice of us, Jaimos Neilson, William 
Rider. 

Pickering and Doug an At Toronto, on 
the eighth day of July, one thou 
sand, eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
marriei by license, John Pickering, of York 
township, widower, arid Margaret Dou.gan, 
of Tio-roiirtp, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has bee.ii; duly soleannized be 
tween usi, John Pickering, Margaret Dougan, 
ati/rl in the preaeraee oT us, Francis Brown, 
Joseph Riddell. 

Bradley anyl Roberts At Toronto, on the 
fourteenth day of Aug-ust, one thou 
sand eight huiidred aund forty-cigrht, were 
ma-rriel by license, John Braiiley, bachelor, 
ewl Aiine Jatoe Roberts, spinster, both of 
Thornihill, by me, John Bar<:l;t,y. This mar 
riage has bean, duly solemnized between us, 
Johitii Bradley, Anne Ja-ne Roberts, and in 
the presence of us, Joseph Frenchturem, 
Martha Roberts. 

Gardner and McLead At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of Scsptemibe-n, one thou 
sand eight hundred ajid forty-eight, wero 
united In marriage,, after regular pyocia- 



mation of baranff, James Gardner, bachelor, 
of Scarboro , and feabella McLeo(i, spinster, 
of the same place* by md, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us. James Gardner, Isabella McLeorl, 
and in the presence of ua, Thos. Browa- 
lie, Jane McDonald. 

Hemphill anxi Watsoto At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fiecoTLd day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred ana forty -eight, were 
married by license, James Hemphill, bache-- 
lor, and Margaret Watson, spinster, daughter 
of James Watson, all of the township of 
Vaughan, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
James Hemphill, Margaret Watson and in 
the p-esence of us, William Watson., James 
Miller. 

Snider anil jStump At Toronto on 
the third diay of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty -eight, were 
married by license., Peter Snider, bache 
lor, and Catherine Stump, spinster, daugh 
ter of Jacob Stump, all of Vaughan, by me, 
John. Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between ua. Peter Snider, Cath 
erine Stump, anid in the presence of usi, 
Henry Borfcholder, William Sine. 

Mitchell and Ritchey At Toronto, on 
the fourth day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by license, Robert Mitchell, of the 
city of Toronto, bachelor, and Jane 
Ritchey, of the same place., spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between ua, Robert Mitchell, 
Jane Ritchey, and in the presence of u% 
John Ewart, Jr.,, Louisa Hill. 

Brooks and Pickel At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by license, William BrookSj of Ux- 
bridge, bachelor, and Larry Rowena Pickel, 
of Reach, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marringe has been duly soleionized be 
tween, us, Win. Brooks. Larry Rowena Pickel, 
and in the presence of nis, Stephen, Rowena 
Pk-kel, Mary Ann, Brooks. 

Janes and Shrutob At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of October one thou 
sand eight hundred amd forty-eight, were 
married by license, Andrew Jones, of Scar- 
bo>ro , widower, a,njd Sarah Shrubb, of To 
ronto, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been daly solemnized be 
tween us, Andrew Jones, Sarah Shrubb, anil 
in the presence of us, William Wilfrid, 
Rosa Cameron.. 

Clapton and White At Toronto., on the 
thirty-first day of Dctcfber, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by license, John Claxtpti, of 
Vaugha.ni, baehe or, and Anne White, of 
snme place, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has beei duly solemnized be 
tween us, John Claxtoia, Anne White, and 
ia the presence of us, Isaac Burton, Martha 
Clnxton,, Rosa Gamer 011. 

Kenrpthorne and Webb At Toronto, on 
the sixth day of Novemiber, pine thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
m-arrie-1 by license. William Ktempthorne, 
bachelor, and Amanda We-bb, spinster, both 
c f Pi ke:i :g. by me. John Barc ay. This niar- 
rifige ha.s beon duly solemnized between us, 
Wihiam Kempthorne, Amanda Webb, anji 
in the presence of us, Caleb Powell, Har 
riet Webb. 

M Keozie and Degear At Toronto, on 



188 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



tbe sixth day of November, one thou- 
aaind eight hun/lred and forty-eight, were 
married, by proclamation, of bannsi. William 
Mc Kenizie., of Markham. bachelor, and Ellen 
Degear, of Toronto,, spinster, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, William McKenzie, 
Ellen, Degear, and in the presence of u% 
William D. Edgar, Agnes MKanzie. 

Dyce amid Strachan At Toronto, on 
the ninth day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by license, Alexander Dycei, of Ham 
ilton,, bachelor, ajid Elizabeth .Strachan, of 
Pickerinig, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Alfcx. Dyee* Elizaheth Strachan, 
a.n;d in the presence of us, D. Strachan,, 
William Polley. 

EvvLnig and Coleman At Toronto, on the 
fifteenth day of November, one thou- 
saiid eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married, after regnlar proclamation of 
banns, John Ewing, bachelor, and Mary Cole- 
miain,, spinster both of Scarboro , by me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Johm Ewing, Mary 
Colema.ni, and in the presence of us, Daniel 
Galbreath, Elizabeth Galbreath. 

Mo Fay den airad Watt A tToronto, on the 
sixteenth day of Novetm,ben, one thou 
sand eight h umpired aind forty-eight, were 
were married t>y license, Hugh McFayden, of 
MarkhaaDi, bachelor, and Mary Jane Watt, 
of Etobicoke, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has l>een duly solemnized be 
tween us. Hugh McFayden, Mary Jane Watt, 
and in the presence of us, William, Walker, 
Mary LitcL. 

Bell a.nd Lloyd At Toronto, on the 
twenty-eighth day of November, one thou- 
eand eight hundred and forty-eight, were 
married by license, William Bell, of Albion, 
bachelor, and Mary Anne Lloy(l, of King, 
epineter, daughter wf the late William, Lloyid, 
of the same towns-big*, by me John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, William Bell, Mary Anne Lloyd, 
and in the presence of us, Duncan Bell* 
Harriet Lloyd. 

Ega;n and McEvo-y At Toronto, on the 
fourth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-nine, were married by 
license, Johm Egan, bachelor, and Catherine 
McKvov, spinster, both of the township ol 
Vaujghan, by met, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Egan, Catherine McEvoy, and in the 
presence of us, Joseph Farr, Nancy Mc- 
Kinnon. 

Allen and Hearst At Toronto, on the 
fourteenth day of February, one thou- 
eand eight hundred and forty-nine, were 
married by license, Samuel Allen., of Mono, 
bachelor, a-nd Margaret Hearst, of Toronto, 
spinster, by me,, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Samuel Allen, Ma-rgaret Hearst, and in the 
presence of us, George PLatt, Eliza Jane 
Hearst. 

McCormick and Hearst At Toronto, on 
the fourteenth day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-nine, were 
married by license, John MteCormick, of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Mary Anne Hearst, 
of the same place, spinster, by me, John 
Barcla-y. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us., William McCormick, 
Mary Anne Hearst, and in the presence of 
us, Robert Hearst. Eleanor Potter. 



Watson and Mackintosh At Toronto^on- 
the seven/teenth day of February, one thou 
sand eight hum.dred and forty-nine, were 
married by licenee, Jonathan Watson, bache 
lor, aind Anne Mackintosh* spinster, both of 
Toronito. by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between ua, 
Jonathan Watson, Ann Mackintosh, and in 
the presence of us, John, Wilson, Eliza Mack 
intosh. 

Muir and Lemon. At Toronto., on the 
twenty-first day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-nine, were 
married by license, Francis Muir, of Owen 
Soumd. bachelor, and Elizabeth Lemon, of 
Scarboro , spinster, daughter of Donald 
Lemon, of Erin, by me, John Barclay. Thi* 
j marriage has been, doily solemnized be- 
! tweem us, Francis Muir, Elizabeth I-emon, 
| a/nd in the presence of ua, Robert Reid, 
j James Weir. 

Baker ana He Jges At Toronto, ra th 

twenity-ise-venth day of Marohk ome thou- 

! samid eight hundred and forty-nine, were 

married by license, John Baker, widower, and 

Martha Hedges, spinster, both of Toronto, 

by me, Jdhn Barclay. ThLs marriage has 

been duly solemnized between us,, John 

Baker, Martha Hedges, airoi in the presence 

i of us, George Alban Simes, Sarah Simes. 

Wilson and MJackintosh At Toronto, on 
! the thirty-first dav of March,,oine thou- 
samd eight huin dred a-nd forty-nine, were 
married by lieerKse, John. Wilswn, of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Elizabeth Mackintosh, of the 
fiame placei, spiineter, daughter of Dona.14 
Mackintosh, of Nairn. Scotland, by me, 
John. Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, John Wilson, E dz* 
Mackintosh, and hi the presence of us, 
Jonathan Watecvn, Ann Watson. 

McBroom and Cleuigh At Toronto, on 
the second day of April, one thou 
sand eight humdred and forty-nine, were 
married by licenise, William McBroom, of the 
township of Toronto, bachelor, and Maria 
Cleuigh, of the city of Torointo, spinster, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage ha 
been duly soileromdzed between ua, William 
McBroom, Maria Cleugh. and. in, the pres- 
en,ce of ua, Williaim Oruickfltoank, Willlaja 
Taylor. 

Wadjlell am Chrtetie At Toronto, on 
the eightean.th day of May, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-nine, wera 
ma,rried by licentse, James WaSldcll, of To 
ronto, widower, ain/d Matilda Christie, of 
the same place, spinster, daighter of Am- 
drew Christie, of Derry., Irelanjl, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized t^etween ns; Jamos Waildell, Ma- 
1 tilda Churis-tiey and in the presenca of ua, 
j William L. Henriiing, Ma,ria Henning. 

Gumin and McKonnon At Toronto, on the 
twenty-<fourth day of Myi. OTie thou- 
saind eight hundred and forty-nine, were 
marrie:! by lirenisie., Johin, Giunn. wi Jower, 
and .)aet MacjLnnon, spinster, both of 
Thornhill, by me, John. Barclay. This mar 
riage has bean duly solemnized between us, 
John Gunn, Janet McKinnon, and in the 
presence of usk Jotoi M ackay, John Mc- 
Arthur. 

Amderson an.d Jo^nes At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of Mafr, one thou 
sand eight humdred and forty -nine, were 
married bv license, Alexi^ lor Anderson, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Ursula Jones, spin 
ster, of the same place, daughter of Wil 
liam Jones, formerly of Scarboro . now af 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



1S9 



England, by me. Johm Barclay. This mar 
riage has bean doily solemnized between us, 
Alex, Anderson* Ursula Jones, and in the 
presence of us, Alex. Ross, Jane Stann. 

Burton and Sherden At Toronto, on the 
twenty-Tseoooiid day <xf June* one thou- 
aaaid eight htudlred and forty-nine, were 
married by licemise>, Isaac Biirtcxn, of York, 
bachelor, a,rud Bri,dge>t Sherden, of the same 
place* widow, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Isaac Burton, Bridget Sherylen, a>nd in 
the presence of us, William Hudson. George 
TShompaoin. 

Duncan and Colwell At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of July, one thousand eight 
bjumdred and forty-iine, were "married by 
license, John Duncan, of Chinguacousy, 
bachelor, aiad Eliza Colwell, of Toronto 
township, spinster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween, us, John Duncan. Eliza Colwell, and in 
the presence of us-, James Maw, Christina 
Ducket*. 

Ewing and Martin At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of July, one thousand eight 
huinidretd and forty-nine, were married by 
license, Joih-ii, Ewing, of augJian, bachelor, 
ainil Jane Mia-rtia, of some place, spinster, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage hag 
beoni duly solemirJzed between us., John 
E viij.g, Ja.i!o Martin, and in the, presence of 
us-, Alex. BwLnig, Mary Carney. 

Davidson an.<l M-cGregor At Toronto, on 
the nineteenth day of July, one thou- 
fia.n.il eight huntlred and forty-nine, were 
Hi -Trie I by license, Thomas Davidson* of 
M nit real, bachelor, and Mary McGregor, 
of Toronto, spinster, daughter of Charles 
McGregor, of Perthshire, Scotland, by me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Thomas Davidson, 
Mary McGregor, anrl in the presence of us, 
Wallace Go-rrie, Margaret Sarah Baty. 

Campbell and McDiarmSl At Toronto, on 
the twenty-first day of August, one thou- 
&an.d eight hundred mnd forty-nine, wero 
married by licenas,, William Campbell, of 
Erin,, bachelor, and Catherine McDiarmi i, 
of Tioro nito, spinster "by me, John Barclay. 
This marriige has Ixse.n, daily solemnized be 
tween us, William Campbell, Catherine M>c- 
Diarrai-d, a,n. l in the presence of us,, M. 
Lilla Cameron, Rosa Cameron, Duncan Mc- 
Nab. 

Allen and Wallace At Toronto, on the 
fourteenth day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty nine, wero 
married, after regular proclamation, of 
banna, James Allan, 2nd Battalion Rifle 
Brigade, bachelor, and Elizabeth Wallace, 
of Toronto, sp uster, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween, ua, .lames Allen* El : /.a.both Wallace, 
and In the presence of us, John Sharp, 
Francis Drescoll. 

McKiinlay and Hyndmen At Toronto, on 
the fourth dny of October, o.ne thou 
sand ig-ht hundred and forty-nine, were 
m.arrie 1 by license, Angus McKinlay, of 
Ki.n-g. bacholor, and Catherine Hyndman, 
of Toronito. spinster, by 111*3, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been, d uly solemnized be 
tween us, Angus- McKuilay, Catherine Ilynd- 
-maaiu an. l in the ip -eseiice of us, Alex. Ding- 
wall, Robert McKellar. . 

Ford a.n.-I Dyir.es At Toronto, on the 
twenty -second dray of October, one thou- 
saad eight huuUred and forty-nine, were 



united In marriage*, by license granted ac 
cording to la-w, John Ford, of the town~ 
ship of Etobicoke, bachelor, anid Sarah 
Dynes, of Toronto township, spinster, by me, 
John Barclay- This marriage hasibeen duly 
solemnized between u*v John Poi^d. Sarah 
Dytnea, anfl In the presence of ua, Samuel 
Walsh, Elizabeth Dyines. 

Miller antd Merrin At Toronto, on the 
second day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-nine, were 
married by iice.iiise, William Miller, witknver, 
ainid Elizabeth Mieirrin, wyk>w, both of To- 
ron.to, by me, John Barcla-y. This mar 
riage has been, dn.ly solemmized between ns, 
William Miller, Elizabeth Merrto, and i(n the 
presence rf us. Th-omas Sheriden., Ellen Ben- 
uott- 

Frank and Xurin At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of Noytuiiiber one thou 
sand eight bui/lred and forty-nine, were 
uin ited in marriage* by license granted ac 
cording to law, Archibald Frank, of the 
township of Caiedoni, bachelor, and Mary 
Anne Nunn, of the sune place, spinster, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriag-o has 
been duly snlomnize-d butweon us Are hi >ald 
Frank, Mary Aiiiiie Nunn. and in th^ pros 
ince of us, Alex. Patullo. Elizabeth Xutnni. 

McCrea and Williamson At Toronto on the 
twenty-frmrth dny of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-nine, were 
anated in, in.arrin.g-ei, by iiceriise granted ac- 
cordlag to law, Wiiliam McCrea. of Toronto, 
bachelor, amid Eniilv Williamson, of York- 
ville, daughter- of Johin Willisiiiiiison., York 
township, by me, John Barclay. This mar- 
ringe has been, d u y solennmi/ed between us, 
Willia.m McOrei, Emily Williamsooi, and in 
the presence of us, Janws Bell, John Wil 
liamson. 

Quartos an.d Rutherford At Toronto on 
the 26th day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-nine, were 
married by license granted according to law, 
-Fohn Quartos, of Port Credit, bachelor, and 
Elizabeth Rutherford, of the same place, 
spinster, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage hns beon dm. y solemnized between us, 
John Quarter, Elizabeth Rutherford, and 
in the pros&ncc of us, William Quartesl 
Rachel Rutherford. 

Dale and Nicol At Toronto., on the 
town ty -seventh daiy of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-nine, were 
married by license granted according to law, 
James Dalo, of the township of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Elizabelih Nicol, o ftho same 
place, spinster, daughter of Daniel Nicol, 
of said township; by rap* John Barcla y. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween us, James Dale., Elizabeth Nicol, and 
in. the presence of us v Thos. Thom.ps.oni 
Mary Niool. 

Hoskin and Armstrong At Toronto, on 
the thirtieth day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundre,d and forty-nine, wer 
married by Hccm.se, Peter Hoskin, of Chin 
guacousy, bachelor, and Mhrtha Armstrong, 
of the same placn, spinster, daughter of 
Adam Armstrong, of said township, by me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has ,been duly 
solemnized between us, Peter Hoskin, Martha 
Armstrong, and in the presence of us, Adam 
Armstrong, Archibald Armstrong. 

Graham and Currie At Toronto, on 
the fourth riay of December, one thou 
sand eight hundroid aird forty-nine, were 
married by liceawi, Alexander Graham, of 



190 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



the township of Lobo, bachelor^ and Mary 
Currie,, of the city of Toronto, spinsteir, 
by ma, John. Barclay. Thlfl marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Archibald 
Graham, Mary Currie, and in the presence 
of us, Duncan McNab, Archibald McMillan. 

Bennet and Miclntyre At Toronto, oto the 
seventeenth day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and forty-nine, were 
married after regular proclamation, of banns, 
Jacob Bonnet, bachelor, and Elizabeth Mc- 
Jjwtyre, both of the tomiscip of York, Vy me, 
John. Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Jacob Bennet, Eliza 
beth McLntyre, and in the presence of us, 
Jamos Maguire, Mary Jane Brown. 

Martin and Reid At Toronto, on tb> 
fourteenth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
license, Samuel Martin, of York, bachelor, 
and Rachel Reid, of Toronto, spinster, 
by me, John. Barclay. This marriage has 
duly solemnized between us, Samuel Mar 
tin, Rachel Reid, and in the presence of 
us, John Reid, Elizabeth Reid. 

Gowanlock and Armstrong At Toronto. on 
the twenty-eighth day of Januaity, one thou-> 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license, Robert Gowanlock, of Holland 
Landing, bachelor, and Jane Armstrong, 
of Chinguacousy, spinster, daughter of Adam 
Armstrong, of the said township, by me, 
John. Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Robert Gowanlock, 
Jaae Armstrong, and in the presence ot 
us. Adam Armstrongs Elizabeth Gowanlock. 

McDonough and Hickey At Toronto, on 
the seventh day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
license, ,William Barnhart McDonough, 
bachelor, and M ary Hickey, spinster, both 
of Toronto., by me* John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
William Barnhart McDonough, Mary Hickey, 
and in the presence of usu Thomas Nicol, 
Mary Arm Hennan. 

McKenzie and JS oble At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, after regular pro 
clamation of bannsi, James McKenzie, of 
Uxbridgei, widower, and Isabella Noble, 
widow, were united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. Thus marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us,, James MeKenziev 
Isabella Noble, and In the presence of us, 
Robt. Robertson, Homer Newall. 

Burkholder and DeGraw At Toronto, on 
the nineteenth day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license, Abraham Burkholder, of Chin- 
jrnaoousy, widower, and Rebecca DeGralw, 
widow of the late John DeGraw, of the 
same place, 6y me, Joh ii Barclay. This mar 
riage has bean duly solemnized between us, 
Abraham Burkholder, Rebecca DeGraw, and 
In the presence of us, Abel Stafford, Sarah 
(Stafford. 

Bell and Pew At Toronto, on the twenty- 
first day of February, one thousand eight 
nundred and fifty, were united in marriage* 
William Bell, of Scarboro , bachelor, and 
Mary Pern, of the same place, spinstefr, 
daughter of the late William Pew., of Ar 
magh, Ireland, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
ua, William Bell, Mary Pew, and in the pres 
ence of us, Thomas Brownlie, Fanny Bell. 

McDonald and McGillivrny At Toronto, on 
the twenty-eighth dayof February, one thou 



sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license, John McDonald, of Vaughan, 
bachelor, and Margaret McGillivray, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of Neil Mc- 
Gililvray, of tho said townehip, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage haa been duly sol 
emnized between us, John McDonald, Mar 
garet McGillivray, and in th presence of 
ua, John Clark, Arcb. McKinnon. 

Hatrick and Watson At Toronto.on the 
second dar of M&rcto, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
license, John Hatrick of Pickering, bache 
lor, and Elizabeth Watson* spinster, of the 
same place, daughter of the late John Wat 
son, bv mi>, John Barclay. Thin marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, John 
Hatrick. Elizabeth Watson, afnrl in the pres 
ence of us, John O Brien, P. Walsh. 

Logan and Steen At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
license, Andrew Logan, bachelor, and Jane 
Steen, spinstor., both of Toronto, by me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized oetween tia, Andrew Logan, Jane 
Steem, and in the presence of ius Alex. 
Anderson, IJrsula Anderson. 

Allison and Bentley At Toronto, on the 
eighth day of April, oe thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, after regular pro 
clamation of banns, Andrew Allison, bache 
lor, and Forrester Beotley, spinster, both 
of Toronto, were united in marriage by me, 
John, Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Andrew Allison, For 
rester Boatlev, and in the presence of us, 
David Torranca, Jessie Murray. 

Leckie and Bicket At Toronto, on the 
fourth day of Miay., one thousand eight 
hundred and fiftv, were married by license, 
Alex. Leckie, bachelor, and Jane Bicket, 
widow of the late James Bicket, all of To 
ronto, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has tnen dulr solemnized betweenus, Alex. 
Leckie, Jane Bicket. and in tho presence 
of us, W. Burns, H . Reynolds. 

Stewart and Gynin At Toronto, on tv ft 
seven.th day of Milan, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
license, John Stewart, private in u. ;vil. -ud 
Battalion Rifle Brigade., now stationed at 
Toronto, bachelor, and Bridget Gynin, of 
the said city spinster, daughter of the late 
William Gynin,, of Lachinc, Canada East, 
by mo, Jo 1m Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, John Steiw- 
art, Bridget Gynin, and in the presence ot 
ua, Wm. White, W. Evans. 

Smith and Forsythe At Toronto, on the 
twenty-eighth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
license, William Smith, of Toronto, bache- 
or, and Elizabeth Forsythe, widow, of the 
same place, by me, John. Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us t 
William Smith, Elizabeth Forsythe, and in, 
the presence of us Alexander Mara, Mar 
garet Mara. 

Lundy and Lawn At Toronto, on the fifth 
day of July, one thousand eight hundreji 
and fifty, were married by license, Prancla 
Lund,y of Chinguacousy. bachelor, and Jane - 
Lawn, of the same place, spinster, by me, 
Jotoni Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Francis Lundy, Jane 
Lawn, and in the presence of ua Thoma 
Lawn. Francis Mllburn. 

Anderson and Finlay At Toronto, ott 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



191 



the sixth day ol July,, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
proclamation of baiuia, Kobert Atidersuin, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Pinlay, spin 
ster, of the same place, by me, John, Barclay. 
This marriage has been, d Uly solemnized be 
tween, us, K. Anderson, Mary Finlay, and in 
the presence of U8k William Davim, Mar 
garet Caroll. 

McDougald and McDonald At Toronto, 
on the eighth day of July, ojie thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
regular proclamation of banns,, Duncan .Mc 
Dougald, bachelor, and Mary McDonald, 
spinster, both of Vaughan, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnised between us., Duncan McDougald, 
Mary McDonald. 

Malcolm and Moyle At Toronto* on the 
eighteenth day of July, one thousand 
eight hundred a.ad fifty, were united in mar 
riage, after regular proclamation of banns, 
John Malcolm, bachelor, and Letitia Moyle, 
spinster, both of Scarboro , by me, 
Johu Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us,, John Malcolm, Le 
titia Moyleu and in the presence of us, Jas. 
Thomson, Agnes Moyle, 

Putherbaugh and Bell At Toronto, on 
the twenty-ninth day of August, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license, Samuel Putherbaugh, of Vaughan, 
bachelor, and Catherine Boll, of the same 
place* spinster, daughter of Widow Bell, of 
Brock, by me John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Samuel Putherbaugh,, Catherine Bell, and 
in the presence of ua, Jos. Clark, James 
Wilson, 

Stineori and Murdy At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license-, Alexander Stinson, of Etobicoke, 
bachelor, and Jane Murdy, of York, spin 
ster, daughter of Joseph Murdy, of the 
same place, by me, John Barciay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Alexander Stinson., Jane Murdy, and in the 
presence of nc, Benjamin Madill, of York 
township, and Mary Anne Madill. 

Tebbutt and Ernest At Toronto, on the 
riftee>n<th day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
license, Walgate Tebbutt, (bachelor, and 
Catherine Ernest, spinster, daughter of 
Michael Ernest, all of Toronto, by me, 
Joha Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Walgate TelXbutt, 
Catherine Ernest, and in the presence of 
us, Michael Ernest. 

Campbell and McArthur At Toronto, on 
the sixteenth day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license,, James Campbell, of Fullerton, 
bachelor, and Catherine McArthur, of To 
ronto, spinster, daughter of Donald Mc 
Arthur. of Owen Sound, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, James Campbell, Catherine 
McArthur, and in the presence of UBJ, John 
MteArthur, Wi. Gillespie. 

Charltcm and Oliver At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
license,, Thomas Charltoa. oi York, bache 
lor, and Mary Aim? Oliver, of the samo 
placei, spinster, daughter of John Oliver 
Monagha.-i., Ireland, by me, John Barclay. 
Tihis marriage has bean d Uly solemnized be 



tween us. Thomas Charltou, Mary Anne 
Oliver, and in the presence of us, William 
Shulocka Mary An;i Dunne. 

M cNab and McDonald At Toronto, on 
the thirty-first day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by lice, ise,, John M :Nab, of Toronto, bache 
lor,, and Janet McDonald, of the said city, 
spinster, daughter of the late Archibald 
McDonald, of Argyleshire, Scotland, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us,, Jonn McNab, Jane 
McDonald, and in the presence of us, Arch. 
Dunkeson. Win. Ardjwm. 

Oliver and MKay At Toronto, on the 
-sixth day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
lice, iso, Fraacis Oliver, of Chingnacousy, 
widower, and Anne McKay, of the same 
place, spinster daughter of Widow McKay, 
of the said townshiuu by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween us, Fraucij Oliver, Anno McKay, and 
in the presence of John Harkneas. 

Stickly and Burkholdor At Toronto, on 
the twelfth day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license, John Stickly. of Whitchurcfti, 
bachelor, and Sarah Burkho der, of Vaugha ii, 
spinster, daughter of Henry Burkholder, of 
same place, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized" bet ween us, 
John Stickly, Sarah Burkholder, and in the 
presence of us, Michael Burkholder, Mary 
Dixon. 

Goddes and Carter. At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license, William Geddea, of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Jane Carter, of the same 
place, widow of the late Ross Carter, of 
West Gwillimbury, by me, John Barclajy. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween us, Win.. Geddes, Jauo Carter, and in 
the presence of us,, A. Jack, Hughi Miller. 

Greenwood and Smith At Toronto, on 
the second day of December, one thou- 
eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
licence, Charles Greenwood, of Toronto, 
bachelor, a.nd Joanna Smith, of the same 
city, sipinst&r, daughter of Thos. Smith, of 
Glasgow, Scotland* Ivy me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween, uj, Charles Greenwood, Joanna Smith, 
and in the presence of us, William Cleverton, 
George Chapman,. 

Broadley and McParland At Toronto, on 
the fourth day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license* George Broadley, of Vaughan, 
widower, and Eliza McFarland, of York, 
spinster, daughter of the late Francis Mc 
Farland, of Tyrone, Ireland, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage haa been, duly sol 
emnized between us., George Broadley, Elizii 
McFarland, and in the presence of us, James 
MicFarland, Eliza Jane McFarland. 

McMullin and McFarland At Toronto, 
on. the sixth day of December, ona thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license, Hen^y McMullin, of Uxbridge, 
bachelor, and Margaret Mc : FarIane, of Eto 
bicoke, spinster, daughter of Alexander Mc- 
Farlajie, of same place, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be- 
Farlane. and in the presence of us-, Rosa 
Cameron., Lucretia Wait. 

Ellis and Sioner At Toronto, c>n the 
sixteenth day ol December, one thousand 



192 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



eight hundred and fifty, were married by 
regular proclamation of banns, Thomas Ellis, 
bachelor, and Elizabeth Stoner, spinster, 
both of Scarboro , by mei John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Thomas E lis, Elizabeth Stoner, 
and in the presence of us, Henry Elli.% 
Elizabeth Ellis. 

Macdonald and Black At Toronto, on | 
the nineteenth day of December, one thou- | 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were marriaJ ; 
by license. Neil Macdonald,, bachelor, of 
Owen Sound, and Mary lilack, spinster, of 
same place, by me/, John, Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Neil Macdonald, Mary Black, and in the 
presence of us, Duncan McArthur, Noil Mc- 
Kechnie. 

McNiel and Bemnet At Toronto, on the 
twentieth day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were married 
by license, Hugh McNiel, of Etobicoke, 
bachelor, a."d Anne Bonnet, of the samo 
place, widow of thle late John. Bennet, of 
Toronto, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized, between us, 
Hugh McNiel, Arane Bennet, and itn the pres 
ence of ua, Roderick McNiel, Niel McLean.. . 

Smith and Miller At Toronto, on the 
twentieth day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty, were mai-ried 
by licence, David Sir.ith, ot Koronto, wid 
ower, and Maria Miller, of the same place, 
widow of the late Thomas M. ller, by my, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, David Smith, Maria 
Miller, and in tho presence of us, Robt. Lee, 
Mary Jane Martin. 

Hanna and Calbeck At Toronto, on the 
thirty-first day of December, ono thou 
sand eight hundred an4 fiftyyears, were 
united in marriage. Gordon Hanna, of Ghhi- 
jfuacousy, and Jane Calbeck, of Oaledon, 
widow of the late Arthur Calbeck, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been dul.v 
solemnized between usi, Gordon Hanna, Jaoie 
Calbeck, a/nid in tho presence of us, Henry 



Ewiag and Mitchell At Toronto, on the 
sixth day of January, o,ne thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-one, were married by li 
cense, Alexander Ewing, of Vaughan, bache 
lor, and Janet Mitchell, of the samo place, 
spinster, daughter of the late William 
Mitchell, deceased, by mo, John Bajclay. 
This marriage has beon duly solemnized be 
tween. ua, Alexander Ewing, Janet Mitchell, 
and in the presence ot us Jas. Hardie, Wil 
liam Martin. 

Laidlaw and McNiel At Toronto, on the 
eighth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-one, were married by li 
cense, Andrew Laidlaw, of Toronto, bache 
lor, and Mary McNiel, of the same place, 
daughter of the late James McNiel, of Lan 
arkshire, Scotland by me, John Barciay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be* 
tween us, Andrew Laidlaw,, Mary McNie:, 
and in the presence of usv Robt. Bolton. 
Margaret Carmichael. 

Boyle and Madill At Toronto, ou the fif 
teenth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-one, were married by li 
cense, Arthur Bovlo., bachelor, and Mary 
Ajine Madill, spinster, daughter of Ben 
jamin Madil! nil of Toronto, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Arthur Boyle, Mary 
Aim* Madill, and in the presence of us, 



Joseph Murdy, Mary Ann Fox. 

McKinlay and Beaton At Toronto, on the 
twenty-sixth day of January, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar 
ried by license, Jaines McKinlay, of King, 
bachelor, and Catherine Beaton, of the same 
place, daughter of Archibald Beaton, of 
the Island of Mull, Scotland, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol- 
eiD,.iizod between us, James McKinlay, Cath 
erine Beatoiij, and in the presence of us, 
Donald Beaton, Lachlan McKinlay. 

Johnstone and Cleugh At Toronto, on the 
thirty-first day of Jan.uaifv-|. one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar- 
ril by lioemsiei, John John.stonr,. of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Anne Cleugh, ">f the 
same place, spinster, daughter of Edmund 
Cleugh, also of Toronto. by me, John 
J.arciay. This marriage has boon duly sol 
emnized between us,, Jonn Johnstoue, Anna 
Cleugh, and in the presence of ur Andrew 
Tolmie, Thomas Parcing. 

Lang and Clunas At Toronto, on the, 
thirteenth day of (February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar - 
riel by license, John Lang, of Chingua,cousy, 
bachelor, and Catherine Clunas,, spinster, 
daughter of the late Alexander Clunas,, of 
Caledon, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly eoleuvnizod, between us, 
John Lang, Catherine Clunas, and in the 
presence of ue, John Clunas., Margaret 
Clur.as. 

Gilchrist and Pollock At Toronto, on 
the fifteenth day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar 
ried by license, Robert Gilchrist, of Scar 
boro , bachelor, and Agnes Pollock, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of iJohn Pol 
lock, of the said township, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Robert Gilchrist, Agnea 
Pollock, and in the presence of us, John 
Reynolds, Ann Eliza Jackson. 

Gordon and Steele At Toronto, on the 
twenty-eighth day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar 
ried by license,, William Gordon, of Albion, 
bachelor, and Agnes Steele, of the same 
place, spinster, by me, John Barclay, 
This marriage has beon. duly solemnized be 
tween us, William Gordon. Agnes Steele, and 
in the presence of ust Thos. Swinarton, Win,. 
Raid. 

Gooderham and Williamson At Toronto, 
on the fifth day of March, one thou 
sand eight hundreu and fifty -one, were mar 
ried by license, Jaines Gooderham, of Scar 
boro , bachelor, aind Margaret Williamson, 
o f the same place, spinster, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has bee-n duly sol 
emnized between us. James Gooderham. Mar 
garet Williamson, and in the presence of 
us, Jesse Hosiery, Hisadller Deth Dowes. 

Story and Strong- At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-one, were married by li 
cense, Andrew Story, of Pickering, bachelor, 
and Anne Strong, of the same place, spin 
ster, daughter of Widow Strong, of said 
township, by me. John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Aniirew Story,, Aim Strong, and ui the 
presence of us. John Miller, Andrew Story, 

Johnston aad Madill At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-one, were married by li 
cense. Joseph Johnston, of York, bachelor. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO, 



193 



and Mary Anne Madlll, of the same place, 
spinster., daughter of the late John Ma- 
dill, of the said township, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol- 
emndzed between us* Joseph Johnston, Mary 
Antne Maclill, and in the presence of ua, 
Samuel Madlll, ESSL Madill. 

Plough and Malloy At Toronto, on the 
twentieth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and fiftv-one, were married by li 
cense, Christopher Plough, of Vaughan, wid 
ower, and Mary Malloy, of the same place, 
spinster, by me. John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnize^ between us, 
Christopher Plough, Mary Malloy, and in 
the presence of us, Joel Hollinshead, Isabella 
Malloy. 

Graham and Mundell At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar 
ried by licence, James Graham, of Pickering, 
bachelor, and Anne M undell, of the .same 
place, daughter of William Muuulcll, alliO of 
Pickering, by meu John 1 arclay .This mar 
riage has boon duly soleniuiize 1 between us, 
James Graham, Anmj M undell, and in the 
presence of us, William Boll, William Stewart 



Burkholder and McPadyen At Toronto, on 
the tenth da;/ o April, one thousand eight 
hundred and fiftv-oiie, were married by li 
cense, Henry Burkholder, younger, of 
Vaughan, bachelor, and Mary McFadyen, 
of the same placet, spinster, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Henry Burkholder, Mary 
MjoFalyen* and in the presence of us, Sarah 
Farmer, Edward Burgess. \ 

McArthur and McGillivray At Toronto, 
on the twenty-second day of Majy.one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-onu, were mar 
ried by license, Duncan MArthur, of 
Vaughaai, bachelor, and Anne McGillivray, of 
the same place, spinster,, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Duncan McArthur, 
Anne McGillivray, and in the presence of 
usu Archibald Kinnon, Arch. Mclnnes. 

Blair and Boyd At Toronto, on the 
third day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-one, were married by li 
cense, Robert Blair* of Pickering, bachelor, 
and Eliza Boyd, spinster, of Toronto, daugh 
ter of Isaac Boyd, of Scarboro(, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between usj Robert Blair, Elizia 
Boyd, and in tLe presence of us, Isaac Boyd, 
Scarboro , Anne Kiegen, Scarboro . 

Gordon, and Oumjning At Toronto, on 
the tweinity-first day of Ju\y, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar 
ried by license, William. Gordon* of Pick 
ering, bachelor, and Anno Gumming, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of James 
GiHniming, of the said township, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage, has been duly 
solemnized between us^ William Gordon, 
Anne Gumming, and In the presence ot us, 
Andrew Hanton, John Begg. 

Watson and Brown At Toronto, on the 
fourteenth day of August, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-one, were marrieid 
by license, Laumcelot Whale Watson, of Per- 
gua, and Mary Brown* of Toronto, spinster, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage haa 
l>een duly solemnized between us, L. Wl. 
Watson,, Miary Bro-mn,, ari f l in the presence 
of na. James D. Mackay. Wrn. Pattison. 

McDonald and Munro At Toronto, on the 



third day of Suytcinber, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-one, were married by li 
cense,, Robert McDonald, bachelor, of 
Whitby, and Mary Munro, of Pickering, 
spinster, by trie, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly soleminize/d. between us, 
Robert McDonald, Mary Munro, and in the 
oresence ofus, AJin Common. Thos. Ander- 
on. 

Buchanan and Thomson At Toronto* on 
the eighth day ol September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar 
ried by license, Janios Buchanan, of Scar 
boro , bachelor, and Harriet Thomson, spin 
ster, daughter of George Thomson, of the 
?aid township, by me,, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween usi, James Buchanan,. Harriet Thom 
son,, and in the presence of Edward Thom 
son. 

Dan die and Boyd At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth clay of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar- 
riel , after regular proclamation of banns, 
David Dandie, of the 2nd Battalion, 71st 
H. St. Infantry, and Mary Boyd, formerln 
of the Parony Parish, now of Toronto, 
by me, Jolm Barclay. This marriage has 
been, duly solemimzed between us, D. Dan- 
die, Miary Boyd,, and in the presence of MB, 
John Kiltniben, Eli/abeth Boyd. 

Yenning and Malr At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fifth day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty -one, were mar 
ried by license, Richard Yenning, of Pick 
ering, bachelor, and Barbara Mair, of the 
Fame place, spinster, daughter of James 
Mair, of said township, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be- 
tweeti us,, Richard Yenning, Barbara Mair, 
and in the presence of us, James Yenning, 
James Mair. 

Connell and Farrell. At Toronto, on the 
twenty-sixth day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar 
ried by license. John Oonnell, of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Jane Farrell, of the same 
place* spinster, daughter of James Farrell, 
the elder- of said city, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has boon duly solemnized be 
tween us, John Oonnell, Jane Farrell, and in 
the presence of us, William Johnston, Sarah 
L.ou<;en. 

Tivy a-nd Miullony At Toronto, on th 
fifteenth day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and i it tv-one, were mar 
ried by licen.se, William Tivy,, of Etoblcoke, 
bachelor, and Catherine Mullony, of the 
same place, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has neon duly solemnized between ni, 
William Tivy, Catherine Mullony, and in 
the presence of us, John Fletcher,, Margaret 
McClinchy. 

McDowell and) Bryson At Toronto on the 
twenty-second day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, were mar 
ried by license. James McDowell, of Btobi- 
coke, bachelor, and Agnes Bryson, of York, 
spinster, daughter of tho late Robert Bry 
son, of Antrim, Ireland, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been, duly solemn 
ized between us, James M oDowell, Agnes 
Bryson, and In the presence of us, Robert 
Bryson, Elizabeth Merromb. 

Marble and MoTargate At Toronto on th| 
twenty-sixth day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-one, wore mar- 
riel by licetnsei, William Harvey Marble,, of 
Toronto bachelor, iwid Mary McTar,gat 



194 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



of the same plaoa spinster, by me. John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between usi, Wm. Harvey, Ma;jr 
M oTargata, and in the presence of MS, P. 0. . 
Swift, Elizabeth Blevlna. 

Mitchell and Harrison At Toronto, OJB I 
the eighth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-two, Colour-6er- j 
geant Alexander Mitchell, Reserve Bat- , 
talion, 71st- Regt.. in the Garrison of To- 
ronto, and Sarah Harrison, of the" said city, 
of Toronto, spinster, were united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, A. 
Mitchell, Sarah Hftrrlaom, and in thw pres 
ence of us, J. Simpson,, W. Harrison. 

Martin and Baxter At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-two, after regular 
publication, of banns, Roger Miartin, of the 
2nd Battalion, 71st Hd. Lt. Infantry, bache 
lor, and Matilda Baxter, of Toronto, spin 
ster, were united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Roger Miartin, Ma- 
til "a Baxter, and In the presence of us. H gh 
Martin., Deleuia Donald. 

McLean and McCartney At Toronto, on 
the twentieth day of Mlarch, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-two, Archibald Mc 
Lean, of Thornhill, bachelor, and Janet Mc 
Cartney, of Toronto spinster, daughter of 
Allan McCartney, of Thorah., were by li 
cense united in marriage, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemnized 
between us A. McLean, Janet McCartney, 
and in the presence of us,, Francis Ramsey-, 
Ann. Mclutosh. i 

iGooderham and .McDonald At Toronto, 
on the twenty-eighth day of March, one 
thousan.il eight hundred an dfifty-two, 
George Gooderham,, of Scarboro , bache 
lor, and Catherine McDonald,, of the same 
place., spinster, daughter of the late Arch. 
McDonald, of Argyleshire, were united in 
marriage by ineb John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized betweefi us, 
George Gooderham, Catherine McDonald, 
and in the presence of us, Thomas Gooder 
ham, John McDonald. 

Kollmyer and Thompson At Toronto, on 
the seventh day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-two, Sovereign ; 
Kollmyer, of Woodstock, bachelor, and Anne 
Thompson, of Toronto, widow of the late 
An.tho.ny Thompson, of Quebec, were united 
in, marriage by me* John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us,, Sovereig-n Kollmyer, Anne Thompson, i 
and inj the presence of us, Wm, S. Hennifrig, ; 
Muriel Henning. 

Taylor an.d Beatty-At Toronto, cm the j 
edghth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-two, William Taylor, of j 
Toronto, bachelor, and Margaret Beatty, j 
of the same pl&ce, spineter, daughter of i 
the late James Beatty, ot the said city, i 
were by license united in marriage, by me, . 
John Barclay. This inarriaire lias been duly | 
solemnized between us, William Taylor, Mar- | 
garet Sarah Beatty,, ana in the presence of : 
usi, Robert T. Griffith, Maria Clarkson. 

Porterfield and Stone At Toronto,, on the 
twentieth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-two, John Porterfield, 
of Scarboro , bachelor, and Charlotte Stone, 
of the same place,, spinster* daughter of 
the late Robert Stone,, were by license 
united in marriage, by me. John Barclay. 



This marriage has been dirty solemnized be 
tween, ua, John Porterfiold, Charlotte, atone, 
ftn.d in the presence of us, John Meek, Marj 
Ann. Stone. 

Nelson and Dawes At Toronto, otn the 
sixth day of May, one thousand eight hutir- 
dred and fift-r-two, Christopher Nelson, of 
York, bachelor, and Elizabeth Dawes, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of Wil 
liam Dawes. of the said township, were by 
license united in maj-riago, by me, John 
Barclay. Thi* marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Christopher Nelson. 
Elizabeth Dawes, and in the presence of usk 
Clement Dawes, Fanny Bock. 

Cameron and Steven At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-two, Daniel Cameron^ 
of Toronto, widower, and Elizabeth Steven, 
of the same place, spinster, were by license 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been, duly solemnized be 
tween ua, Daniel Cameron, Elizabeth Steven, 
and in the presence of us, John Williamson* 
Victoria Me Vicar. 

Harrington aad Green At Toronto, ota 
th third dav of June., one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-two, Robert Harrington, 
of Scarboro , bachelor, and Henrietta Gireon, 
of Markham, spinster., were by license united 
in marriage by mei, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized betweein us. 
Robert Harrington, Henrietta Green, and 
in the presence of \is, John Chester, Helem 
Little. 

Mitchell and Greenway At Toronto, on 
the sixteenth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred tuid fifty-two, Wil iam 
Mitchell, of Markham,, bachelor, and Eliza 
Greenway, of Tecumsethu spinster, daugh 
ter of Alexander Greenway., of the sajnie 
place, were, by license, united in marriage 
iiy me, John Barclay. This marriaare hr^s 
been, duly soleminized between us, William, 
Mitchell, Elizabeth Green.way. and in the 
presen.ce of usj. Thomas Mesistruy, Emma 
vSlmyth. 

Huckerby and Baxter At Toronto, on the 
twan.ty-third day of June, one thoueand 
eight hundred and fifty-two,, James Huck- 
erby, of Toromto, bachelor, and Ellen Bax 
ter, of the same placo, widow of the late 
Robert Baxter, were by license united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This 1 mar 
riage has been, duly solemnized between us, 
James Huckerby, Ellen. Baxter, and in the 
presence of u&, Robert MeCallum,, Maria 
McCallum, 

Andarsotn and Ditty At Toronto,, on. 
the thirty first day of Jul-y one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-two, Jaines Ander 
son,, of Mono, widower, and Elizabeth Ditty, 
of Mulmur, widow, were by license united in 
marriage by mo, John, Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly soicrr>nizPQ betweein ns, 
James Anderson, Elizabeth Ditty, and in 
the presence of us, Edward Barry, John 
Clarke. 

Hughes afld Lawrence At Toronto, on the 
ninth day of September, one thousand eight 
hundred and fiftv-two, William Hughes,, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Henrietta Law 
rence., of Whitby, spinster, daughter of 
Tfhomas Lawrence* wore by license united 
in marriage by me. John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized betweein us, 
William Hughes, Hemriotta Lawrence, and 
in the presence of us, William Smith, Ann 
Lawrence. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



195 



MoArthur aiad McArthur At Toronto, on 
the eleventh day of September, ona thou- 
etand eight hundred and fifty-two, Neil Mo- 
Arthur, of Eldon* bachelor, and Cather 
ine McArthur, of Asprey,. spinster, daugh 
ter of Duncan McArthur, were by license 
milled in marriage bt rac. John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Niel McArthur Catherine McAr- 
Arthur, and in the presence of MS, Alex 
ander McKinnon, A. Laid. 

Hill and Love-At Toronto, on the twen 
tieth day of September, one thousand eight 
hmudred and fifty-two, Isaac Hill, of Tra 
falgar, bachelor, and Martha Love, of York, 
epiiiater, were by license united in marriage, 
by ma. John Barclay. This marriage haa 
been duly solemnized between us, Isaac Hill, 
Martha Love,, an.d i;. the presence of us(, 
Ctem, Horrood, Harriet Cameron,. 

Mills and AdanisAt Toronto, on the 
first day of October, one thousand eiight 
hundred and fifty-two, John Milfa, of Al 
bion., bachelor, and Eliza Adams, of To 
ronto township, in the Gore, spinster, daugh 
ter of John Adjarns. of the same place, wero 
united in marriage by license, by ine, Jobn 
Barclay. This marriage has been, duly spH 
emnized between use, John Mills, Eliza 
A<Ham&, and in the presence of us, Thosmas 
Byons, Elizia Mills. 

Sinclair arid Oliver At Toronto, on the 
tenth dav of November, one thousand eight 
hundred "and fifty-two, Duncan Sinclair, of 
Erin, widower, and Ellen Oliver, of the same 
place, widow, were, by license, united in 
marriage, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Duncan Sinclair, Ellen Oliver, and in the 
presence of us, John McArthur, Rebecca 
Wilson. 

McArthur :i.nd Currie At Toronto, on the 
eig-hteenth day of November, one thou 
sand eis ht hundred and fifty-two, Neil Mc 
Arthur, of Hamilton, Bachelor, and Ann 
Currie, or" tho township of Toronto, spin 
ster, vfcri united i" marriage, by license, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnize."! between us, Niel Mc 
Arthur, "Ann Currie, and in the presence 
of us, Colin MoArthur, Mary Currie. 

Sutherland and Sutherland At Toronto on 
the twcnty-tiiird d;\y of November, one 
thousand ei-jlit huii lred and fiftv-two, Rob 
ert Sutherland, of Gwilliinbury West, bach 
elor, and Barbara Sutherland, of the same 
ji..iee, spinster, daughter of Herman Suth 
erland, of said township, were by license 
united in marriag-e, by me, John Barclay. 
This, marriag-e has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Robert Sutherland, Barbara Suth 
erland, and in the presence of us, William 
Budge, Alex. Dingwall. 

Johnson and Ekerlin At Toronto, on the 
sixth day of December, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-two, William Johnson, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Jane Ekerlin, of 
the same place, spinster, were united in 
marriage, by me, John Barclay. This mar- 
riagei has been duly solemnized between us, 
William Johnson, Jane Ekerlin, and in the 
presence of us, Thomas Watt, Janet Watt. 

George and Rogers At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-two, James 
George, of Hamilton, bachelor, and Clara 
Jane* Rogers, of Toronto, spinster, daughter 
ef Joseph Rogers, of the same place, were 
united la marriage, by license, by me, John 



Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, James George, Clara 
Jane Rogers, and in the presence of is> 
George Ewart, Agnes Blake. 

Patterson and Rusk At Toronto, on the 
thirtieth day of December, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-two, William Pat 
terson, of Mono, bachelor, and Elizabeth 
Rusk, of the same place, spinster, were, by 
license, united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, William Patterson, 
Elizabeth Rusk, and in the presence of us> 
Rosa Cameron, Isciuh Ruak. 

Campbell and Mclnnes At Toronto, on the 
thirty-first day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-two, William 
Campbell, of Scarboro, bachelor, and Sarah 
Jane Mclnnes, of Markham, spinster, daugh 
ter of James Mclnnes, of the same place, 
were united in marriage, by license, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, William Campbell, 
Sarah Jane Mclnnes, and in the presence of 
Us, J|phn Campbell, Daniel Spring. 

Wilson and Campbell At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty three, Robert Wil 
son, of Toronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth 
Campbell, spinster, of the same place, were 
byl license united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Robert Wilson, Eliza 
beth Campbell, and in the presence of us, 
Robert Taylor, Wm. Steven. 

Patterson and McOormick At Toronto, 
on the twenty-lthird day of March, one 
thousand eight hundred and fifty-three, 
Alexander Patterson, of Scarboro, bach 
elor, and Anne MeOormiok, of Toronto, 
spinster, daughter of John MoOormick, of 
Argyleshire, were by license united in mar 
riage, by me, John Barclay. This mar- 
riagei has been duly solemnized between us, 
Alexander Patterson, Anne McCormick, 
andi in the presence of us, John Meek, Wil 
liam Crawford. 

Underwood and Taylor At Toronto, on 
the; twenty-fourth day of March, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-three, after 
regular publication of banns, Francis Un 
derwood, of Scarboro, bacholor, and Nancy 
Taylor, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of the late Richard Taylor, of Scarboro, 
were united in marriage, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly so emn- 
ized between us, Francis Underwood, Nancy 
Taylor, and in the presence of us, TJ. charJ 
Taylor, Helen Little. 

Robinson and Finlay At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fifth day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-three, Andrew 
Rpbinson, of the city of Toronto, bachelor, 
and Sarah Finlay, o!f the same place, spin 
ster, daughter of Richard Finlay, of the 
same city, were by license united in mar 
riage, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, An 
drew Robinson, Sarah Finlay, and in the 
presence of us, Robert Finlay, Catherine 
Stuart. 

McNeill and Johnston At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of April, one thousand 
eight "hundred and fifty-three, James Mo 
Neill, of Meadowville, Toronto township, 
bachelor, and Jane Johnston, of the sam 
place, spinster, daughter of the late John 
Johnston, were .united in marriage, by me, 
John Barclay. This marria ge has been 



196 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



duly solemnized between us, James McNeill, 
Jane Johnston, and in the presence of Dor- 
oas Smyth, Rosa Cameron. 

Robb and Daniells At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of July one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty three, William Robb, 
of Markham, widower, and Maria Daniells, 
of the same place, spinsterk daug-hter of 
James Daniells, also ol Markham, were by 
license, united in marriage, by me John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, William Robb, 
Maria Daniells, and in the presence of 
Alex. MoPherson. 

Oarr and McKechnie At Toronto, on the 
first day of August one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty three, Robert Oarr, of 
Toronto, widower, and Mary McKechnie, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of the 
late Donald McKechnie, of Lanarkshire, 
Scotland, were by license, united in marriag-o 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Robert 
Oarr, Mary McKochnie, and in the presence 
of us, Donald McNiven, William McKechnie. 

Hunter and Mair At Toronto, on the 
third day of August, one thousand eightv 
hundred and fifty three, Georgo Hunter, of 
Uxbridge, bachelor, and Isabella Mair, of 
Pickering, spinster, daughter of James Mair, 
of the samo place, were by license, united 
In marriage by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, George Hunter, Isabella Mair, and in 
the presence of us, Joseph Duggan, Rachel 
Gra.ham. 

McDougall and Wells At Toronto, on the 
eighth day of September, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty three, David McDougall, 
of Vaughan, widower, and Frances Wells, of 
Toronto, spinster, were by license, unitoi in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage 1 has been duly solemnized between us, 
David McDougall, Frances Wells, and in the 
presence of us, Rosa Cameron, Mary Ann 
McClellan, 

Todd and Purdy At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty three, Thomas 
Todd, of Markham village, bachelor, and 
Jiane Purdy, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of James Purdy, of .Scarboro , were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized 
between us, Thomas Todd, Jane Purdy, 
and in the presence of us, Jamos Burrows, 
Betty Anne Burrows. 

Rich and Lynn At Toronto, on the fifth 
day of October, one thousand eight hundred 
and fifty-three, after regular publication 
of ba.nns, John Rich, of Scarboro , widow 
er, and Ellen Lynn, of the same place, spins 
ter, were united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, John Rich, Ellen 
Lynn, and in the presence of William Rich, 
Anne Lynn. 

Davison and Montgomery At Toronto, on 
the tenth day of October, one thousanl eight 
hundred and fifty-three, George Da-vison, 
of Trafalgar, and Eliza Montgomery, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of the late 
Sarah Montgomery, were by license united 
In marriage by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage 1 has been duly solemnized between 
us, Georgo Davison, FJiza Montgomery, and 
in the presence of John Wallis-, Elizabeth 
Wallis. 

Willson and Cowan At Toronto, on the 



fifteenth day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-three, William, 
Martin, WilJson, of York township, widower, 
and EJiza Oowan, of the flame place, spins 
ter, were united iu marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has "been duly 
solemnized between us, William Martin Will- 
sou, Eliza, Cowan, and in the presence of us 
John Lindsay, William Wills. 

Brown and Mills At Toronto, on the 
seventeenth day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-three, Charles 
Brown, of Tullamore, bachelor, and Su 
sannah Mills, of Lamb ton, spinster, were by 
license united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Charles Brown, 
Susannah Mills, and in the presence of us, 
Noble Taggart, Margaret McClinchy. 

Dunn and Walton At Scarboro , on the 
twenty-fourth day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-three, Levi 
Dunn, of Scarboro , bachelor, and Mary 
Anne Wwlton, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of Joseph Walton, were united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar- 
ria.ge has been duly solemnized between us, 
Levl Dunn, Mary Anne Walton, and in the 
presence of us, Thomas Little, George 
uunn. 

Castle and Carfrae At Toronto, on the 
ninth day of December, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty three, Samuel Castle, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Oarfrae, of 
the same placo, spinster, were by license, 
united in marriage, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized 
between us, Samuel Castle, Mary Carfrae, 
and in the presence of us, Mary Hamilton, 
James Hamilton. 

Linfoot and Simpson At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-three, John 
Linfoot, of Richmond Hill, widower, and 
Mary Simpson, of the same place, widow 
of the late John Simpson, were by license, 
united in marriage, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized 
between us, John Linfoot, Mary Simpson, 
and in the presence of John Cameron, 
Martha Baker. 

Shipley and Williamson At Toronto, on 
the second day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, Francis Ship 
ley, Jennett Williamson, and in the pro 
se nee of us, John McDonald, Arch. Duncan. 

Finlay and Dale At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-four, Robert Finlay, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Jane Dale, of the 
same place, spinster, were by license, united 
in marriage, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage hsus been duly solemnized be- 
tweem us, Robert Finlay, Jane Dale, and in 
the presence of us, Thomas Dale, Mary 
Irf" therdale. 

White and Gilinore At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of January one thousandeigiit 

hundred and fifty four, Charles White, 
of Pickering, bachelor, and Elizabeth Gil- 
more, of the same place, spinster, were by 
license, united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Charles White, 
Elizabeth Gilmoro, and In the presence of 
us, James S. Polmey, William Gilmore. 

Bryson and Sweeny At Toronto, on the 
eighth day of February one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty four, Robert Bryson, of 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



197 



the township of York, bachelor, and Cath 
erine Sweeny, of the same place, widow, 
were by license, united in marriage, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Robert Bryion< 
Catherine Sweenv, and in the presence of 
us, Robert Mills , Samuel Wright. 

Elliott and McArthur At Toronto, on 
the twenty-third day of March, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-four, Hum 
phrey Elliott, of Toronto, bachelor, and 
Mary McArthur, of the same place, spin 
ster, were by license, united in marriage, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Humphrey 
Elliott, Mary MeArthur, and in the pre 
sence* of us, Ruisel Inglli, B. S. Miller. 

Gilchrist and McMillan At Toronto, on 
the third day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-four, Peter Gilchrist, of 
Mara, bachelor, and Mary McMillan, of 
Yorkville. spinster, daughter of the late 
Peter McMillan, of 1s&, Scotalnd, were by 
license, united In marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Peter Gilchrist, Mary 
McMillan, and in the presence of us, Rod 
erick Doherty, John Sinclair. 

Randall and Boxall At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fourth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, Adolphus Ran 
dall, of Toronto, bachelor, and Matilda Box- 
all, of the same place, spinster, daughter of 
Henry Boxall, of Guildford, in the County 
of Surrey, England, were by license, united 
In marriage, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Adolphus Randall, Matilda Box- 
all and in the presence of us, James Lyon, 
Elizabeth Lyon. 

Cobine and McKay At Toronto, on the 
twenty-eighth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, Robert Oo- 
bine, of Hamilton, bachelor, and Jane Mo- 
Ray, widow of the late Win, McKay, of the 
same city, were by license, united in mar 
riage, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Robert Oobine, Jane McKay, and in 
the presence of us, John Osprey, James 
Armstrong. 

Date and Cruthers At Toronto, on the 
twenty-eighth day of June, one thousand 
tight hundred and fifty-four, Joseph Dale, 
f Pickering, bachelor, and Anne Cruthers, 
f the same place, widow of the late Wil 
liam Cruthers, were by license united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized betweeta us, 
Joseph Dale, Anne Cruthers,, and in the 
presence of us, Thomas Richards , Wil 
liam McQuay. 

Johnston and Rctallick At Toronto, on 
the twentieth day of July, one thousand 
ight hundred and fifty -four, William John 
ston, of Scarboro , bachelor, and Elizabeth 
Retallick, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of the late William Retallick, of To 
ronto, were by license united in marriage 
by me, John. Barclay. This marriaore hate 
been duly solemnized between us* William 
3ohnston, Elizabeth Retallick, and in the 
presence of us, Andrew Thomson, Cather 
ine Cox. 

Stewart and Macdonald At Toronto, on 
tho twenty-first day of Ju])y, one thousand 
Wiofht hundred and fifty-hour, Matthew 
Stewart, of Toronto, bachelor, and Isabella 
Maodonald, of the same place, spinster, 



daughter of the late Archibald Macdonald, 
of Argvleshire, Scotland, were by license 
united in marriage bv me, John Barclay. 
This marriage: has been duly solemnized be 
tween, us, Matthew Stewart, Isabella Mac 
donald, and in the presence of ua, Jofhn 
McDonald, Peter McDonald. 

RIbble and Dorin. At Toronto, on the 
twen.tjr-flecond day of July, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, Chas. Ribblet, 
of Oakville, bachelor, and Ellen Dorin, of 
Toronto, spineter, were by license united 
In marriage by me, John. Barclay. This maT- 
ria<ge has been, duly solemnized betweeta us, 
Charles Kibble* Elian Dorin, and in the 
presence of us, Samuel Kingston, Matilda 
Ribble. 

Gun*i and Mcliitash At Toronto, otn the 
twenty-sixth day of July, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, Robert Gunn, 
of the Royal Canadian Rifles, bachelor, and 
Mary Mclntosh, of the Toronto Garrison, 
tpuifitar, were, after regular publication of 
of banns, united in marriage by me. John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, R. Gunn, Mary Mcln 
tosh, and in the presence of us, Wm. Mc- 
Callum,, Margaret Keitler. 

Me Whirr and Dixon At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fourth day of August, one thoupend 
eig-ht hundred and fiftv-four, Robert Mo- 
Whirr, of Trafalgar, bachelor, and An.ne 
Dixon, of Western* spinster, were by license 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween, ua, Robert McWuirr, Anne Dixon, 
an.d in the presence of u% J. Alexander, 
James Wilson. 

Forbes and Armstrong At Toronto, on 
the twenty-ninth day of August, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-four, James 
Forbes, of Pine Grove village, bachelor and 
Jane Armstrong, of the same place, spin 
ster, were by license united in marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, James 
Forbes, Jane Armstrong, and in the pre 
sence of us, Robert Robinson, Mary Ad- 
dlson. 

Thibodo and Yenning At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of September, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, John Baptiste 
Thibodo, of Uxbridge, bachelor, and Jane 
Vennlug, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of Richard Yenning, of Pickering, were 
by license united In marriage by me, Joha 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us. John Baptist Thibodo, 
Jane Yenning, and in the presence of us, 
J. Mulen, Ellen Drummond. 

Manes and Conner At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of September, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, Thomas 
Manes, of ChurchTille, widower, and Mar/ 
Conner, of the same place, spinster, were 
by license united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Thomas Manes, Mary 
Conner, and in the presence of us, J. H. 
MacKerras, John Mulen. 

Sinclair and Thomson At Toronto, on the 
third day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-four, Archibald Sinclair, 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Thomson, 
of Kingston, spinster, were by license unit 
ed in marriage by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Arch. Sinclair, Mary Thomson, and In 



198 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



the presence of us, G. H. Wyatt, Anna 
Thompson. 

Press and Glue At Toronto, on the ninth 
eta,/ of October, one thousand eight hun 
dred and fifty-four, James Press, of Mark- 
tain, bachelor, and Phoebe Glue, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of John Glue, 
of Pickering, were by license united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
b.as oean duly solemnized between us, Jas. 
Press, Phoebe Glue, and in the presence of 
us, David Moore, Mary Moore. 

Forbes and Ferguson At Toronto, on the 
^sixteenth day of October, one thousand 
ight hundred and fifty-four, John Forbes, 
bachelor, and Isabella Ferguson, spintser, 
both residing in the township of Whitby, 
were by license united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, John Forbes, Isa 
bella Ferguson, and in the presence of us, 
Xietsy Stewart, John Ferguson. 

Taylor and Tinning At Toronto, on the 
sixth day of November, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-four, John Taylor, of 
Cobourg, bachelor, and Sybella Tinning, of 
Toronto, spinster, recently from Liverpool, 
England, were by license united in marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage lias 
besn duly solemnized between us, John Tay 
lor, Sybella Tinning, and in the presence 
of us, Lawrence Clark, John McOlean. 

McLean and McKinnon At Toronto, on 
the sixth day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, were married 
by license, Alexander McLean, of Brock, 
bachelor, and Anne McKinnon, of Toronto, 
daughter of Lachlan McKinnon, of Brock, 
by me, John Barclay, M.A., Minister. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Alexander McLean, Anne McKinnon, and 
In the presence of us, B. D. McFarlane, 
Neil McDonald. 

Dale and Dodsworth At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, Matthew 
Dale, of the township of Toronto, in the 
Gore, bachelor, and Mary Dodsworth, of 
Chinguacousy, spinster, daughter of Wil 
liam Dodsworth, of the same place, were 
by license united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Matthew Dale, Mary 
Dodsworth, and in the presencce of us, John 
Dale. 

Kellington and Andrew At Toronto, on 
the eighth day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-four, William Kell 
ington, of Albion, bachelor, and Maria An 
drew, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of William Andrew, of the same town 
ship, were by license united In marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
beon duly solemnized between us, William 
Kellington, Maria Andrew, and In the pre 
sence of us, William Andrew, Ewan Andrew. 

Bobeson and Boss At Toronto, on the 
ninth day of December, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-four, Joseph Robeson, of 
Ttoronto, bachelor, and Isabella Boss, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of Clarke 
Ross, of the said city, were by license, 
united in marriage, by me, J^hn Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Joseph Bobeson, Isabella Boss, 
andj in the presence of us, Thomas Tinning, 
Elenora L. Boboson. 

Foster and McLachlan At Toronto, on 
the twenty-first day of December, one 



thousand eight hundred and fifty four, Sam 
uel Foster, of the Village of Weston, bach 
elor, and Agues McLachlan, of the same 
place, spinster, daughter of the late Hugh 
McLachlan, of Fifeshire, Scotland, were by 
license, united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Samuel Foster, Agnes 
MoLachlan, and in the presence of us, James 
Quinn, John Nicholson. 

Morley and Hedges At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-f. mr, William 
Morle.v, of Toronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth 
Hedges, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of William Hedges, of Walpolo, were 
by license, united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized, between us, William Morley, 
Elizabeth Hedges, and in the presence of 
us, John BaJcer, M. Huntley. 

MoLellan and Hay man At Toronto, on 
the thirtieth day of Decmber, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-four, Donald 
McLellan, of Erin, bachelor, and Mary Hay- 
man, of Toronto, spinster, daughter of John 
Hayman, of Nottawasaga, were by license, 
united in marriage, by me, John Barclay. 
This, marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Donald McLellan, Mary Hay 
man, and in the presence of us, David M. 
McLement, John McNab. 

Bell and Bond At Toronto, on the 
second day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-five, James Bell, of Scar- 
boro, bachelor, and Mary Bond, of the same 
place, spinster, daughter of the late David 
Bond, of Dumfries, Scotland, were united 
in marriage by license by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, James Bell, Mary Bond, and in 
the presence of us, James Larway, John 
Buchanan Cameron. 

Hart and Malloy At Toronto, on the 
fourth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-five, Samuel Hart, of 
Vaughan, bachelor, and Christina Malloy, 
of the same place, spinster, daughter of 
Malcolm Malloy, of the said township, were 
by license united In marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Samuel Hart, Chris 
tina Malloy, and in tha presence of us, Don 
ald McNaughton, Malcolm Malloy. 

Hair and Misselbrook At Toronto, on the 
twenty-sixth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-five, William Hair, 
of Scarboro, bachelor, and Mary Missel- 
brook, of the same place, spinster, were 
by license united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, William Hair, Mary 
Misselbrook, and In the presence of us, 
Charles Misselbrook, Martha Misselbrook. 

Wanless and Ellison At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of January, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-five, Andrew 
Wanless, of Toronto, bachelor, and Mary 
Ellison, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of William Ellison, of/ the said city, were 
by license united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Andrew Wanless, Mary 
Ellison, and in the presence of us, Bobert 
Taylor, William Ellison. 

Gordon and Charlwood At Toronto, on 
the tenth day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-five, Joseph Gor 
don, of Vaughan, bachelor, and Harriet 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



199 



Charlwood, of the town of Barrie, spinster, 
daughter of John Charlwood, of the same 
plate, were united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Joseph Gordon, Har 
riet Charlwood, and in the presence of us, 
H. Holmes. 

Garrat and Freer At Toronto, on the 
fifth day of March, one! thousand eight hun 
dred and fifty-fire, Edward Garrat, of 
BropkvUle, in Oyle county, State of Il 
linois, U. S., widower, and Anne Freer, of 
York township, Canada, widow of the late 
Peter Freer, were by license united in mar 
riage, fcy me, John Barclay. This mar- 
riag-e has been duly solemnized between us, 
Edward Garrat, Anne Freer, and in the 
presencce of us, Jacob Strong, Sarah Strong-. 

Brown and Crawford At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of March, one thousand eig/ht 
hundred and fifty-five. Charles Brown, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Margaret Craw 
ford* of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of the late Thomas Crawford^ of the 
County of Fennan,a,gh J Ireland* were by 11- 
oense united in marriage by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, Charles Brown, Margaret 
Crawford, and in the presence of us, James 
Hastings, A. McMullen. 

Atkinson and Williamson At Toronto, ojn 
the seveateenth day of March, one thou 
sand, eight hundred and fifty-five, Joseph 
Atkinson., of Yorkvillet bachelor, and 
Emma Williamson, of the same place, spin 
ster, were by license united in marriage by 
me. John Barclay. This marriage has been. 
duly solemnized between us, Joseph Atkin 
son, Emma Williamson, and In the presence 
of us Robert Wilson, Sarah Ann Cundall. 

Munshaw and Dollery At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-five* William Munshaw, 
of the towniship of York, bachelor, and 
Ruth Dollejry, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of the late Charles Dollery, were 
by license united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been, duly sol 
emnized between us, William Munshaw, Ruth 
Dollery, an<l in the presence of us, James 
Hi=lop, Emma Dollery. 

Hunter and Joslin At Toronto, on the 
eleventh day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-five, after due pro- 
t.ii-uijii >.. LU oaiui. ,, John Hunter, of \ork 
township,, bachelor, and Elizabeth Joslin, 
of the same place, spinster, were united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Hunter, Elizabeth Joslin, and in the 
presence of us, William Youing. . Elizabeth 
Joslin. 

Wilcox and Harris At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred aJid fifty-five, Charles Wilcox, of 
the township of Toronto, bachelor, and 
I>ucin,da Harris, of the same place, spinster, 
were by marriage united, in. m arrlage, by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage ha*? been duly 
olemnized between, ua, Charles Wilcox, Lu- 
eitLda Harris, and in the presence of us, 
Francis Winter, Sarah Ann Harris. 

Dunn and Burton At Toronto, otn the 
eighth day of May, one thousand eight huru- 
dred and fifty-five, Samuel Dunn, of the 
township of York, bachelor, and Sarah 
Burto-o, of the same place, spinster, were 
by license united in marriage*, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 



emnized between us Samuel Dunn, Sarah 
Burton, and in the presence of us, Jacob 
i Sto-ny, Jane Jollanda. 

Malcolm and Burns At Toronto, on the 
twenty-sixth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-fivei, Archibald 
Malcolm, bachelor- and Isabella Burns, spin 
ster, both of Scarboro , the latter daugh 
ter of the late William Burns, of Whitby, 
were, by publication of banna, united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized betweein us 
Archibald Malcolm,, Isabella Burns, and in 
the presence of us, Arch. Walker, Janet 
Burns. 

Rblnson and White At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-five, William Robinson, 
of Pickering, widower, and Mary White, of 
the same place widow of the late Thomas 
White, were, by license, united in marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
beeu duly solemnized between us, William 
Robinson, Mary Whitet, and in the pres 
ence of us,. H. Hetheriu gton. Isabella Black. 

Luke and Welch At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fourth day of July, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-five, Benjamin 
Luke, of the city of Toronto, widower, and 
Bridget Welch, of the same place, widow, 
were by license united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Benjamin Luke, 
Bridget Welch, and in the presence of us, 
Robert Grier, Mary Jane Glenn. 

Doyle and Dority At Toronto, on th 
first day ot August, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-five, John Doyle, of To- 
ronto, bachelor, and Harriet Dority, of 
Ge >rgina. widow, were by license united iu 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Doyle, Harriet Dority, and in the pre 
sence of us, Matthew Stewart, Harriet Ford. 

Fernie and McClish At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-five, George Fernie, 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Helen McOlish, 
of the same place, spinster, wore by license 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, George Fernie, Helen McClish, and 
in the presence of us, James Drummond, 
Janet Gorrie. 

Paxinan and Shaw At Toronto, on the 
thirty-first day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty.-five, James Pax- 
man, of Toronto, bachelor, and Anne Shaw, 
of Etobicoke, spinster, daughter of James 
Shaw, were by license united in marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
boon duly solemnized between us, James Pax- 
man, Anne Shaw, and in the presence of 
us, William Gough Brow, Mary Jane Clark. 

Paterson and Walker At Toronto, on the 
third day of November, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-five, John Paterson, 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth Walk 
er, of the same place, daughter of the lato 
John Walker, of Aberdeen Scotland, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, John Paterson, Elizabeth Walk 
er, and in the presence of us, John Milne, 
James Paterson. 

Mitchell and Smith At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of November, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-five, John Mitchell, of 
Markham. widower, and Agnes Smith, of th 



20* 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



same place, widow of the late John Smith, 
of Dundee, Scotland, were by license united 
In marriage by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, John Mitchell, Agnes Smith, and in the 
presence of us, Richard O Connor, Elizabeth 
ItcQoillen. 

Oliver and Dean At Toronto, I on the 
second day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-six, Robert Oliver, of 
Chinguacousy, bachelor, and Jane Dean, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of Joseph 
Dean, of the said township, were united in 
marriage by license by mo, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Robert Oliver, Jane Dean, and 
In the presence of us, William Daley, Anne 
Dean. ^ 

Simpson and McClura At Toronto, on the 
fourteenth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-six, James Simpson, 
of Vaujjhiin, bachelor, and Jane McGlure, 
of the same place, spinster, daughter of 
Thomas McClure, of the said township, were 
by license united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, James Simpson, Jane 
McOlure, and in the presence of us, John 
Ritchie, Johnston McClure. 

Mitchell and Irwin At Toronto, on the 
twenty-sixth day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-six, Robert Mit 
chell, of Toronto, widower, and Ellen Ir 
win, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of the widow, Sarah Irwin, of the said city 
were by license united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
srilemnized between us, Robert Mitchell, El 
len Irwin, and in the presence of us, Eliza 
Irwin, D. MacFarlane, George Denholm. 

Brady and Cameron At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of March, one thousand 
e^Iit hundred anddd fifty-six, Felix Oolin 
Crosbie Bra ly, of Norval, bachelor, and Mar 
garet Lilla Cameron, of Toronto, spinster, 
daughter of John Cameron, of the said city, 
esquire, were by license united in marriage 
by me. John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Pelix 
Colin Crosbie Brady, Margaret Lilla Cam 
eron, and In the presence of us, W. Manly, 
J. Brady. 

Baird and Do.nd At Toronto, on the 
fourteenth day of M ay, one thousand eight 
hundred aind fifty-six, John Balrd, of the 
city of Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Dond, 
of the same place, spinster, were by li 
cense, united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between MS, John Baird, Mary 
Dond, and In the presence of us, Wm. Jones, 
Margaret Jones. 

Reid and McClelland At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of Mifff, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-six, James 
Reid,, of Hamiltom, bachelor, and Elizabeth 
McClelland, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of John McClellind, of the city of 
Hamilton,, were, by license, united In m/ir- 
riage by met, John Barclay. This mar 
riage hi-s been duly solemnized between us, 
James Reid, Elizabeth McClelland, and In 
the presence of us, W- G. Brown, James 
Reid. 

Sprowl and Stein At Toronto, on the 
twe ;ty-fourth day of Mr y,, one thousand 
eiffht hundred and fifty-six, John Smyden 
Sprowl, of the town of Whitby, wido.wcr, 
and Mary Anne Stein, of the township of 



Albion, spinster, were by license united iw 
marrla-ge by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
J. S. Sprowl, Mary Anne Stein, and in the 
presence of us. J. S. Hane, Susan Stein. 

McFadyn a*nd McGinnis At Toronto, on. 
the sixteenth day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-six, Lauohlan 
McFadyen, of Toronto, bachelor, and Eliza 
beth McGinnis, of the same place, spin 
ster, daughter of Donald McGinois), of 
TJiorah, were, by license, united In mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between, us, 
Lauohlan McFadyao, Elizabeth McGinnia, 
and in the presence of usi Simuel MoNab. 
Margaret MoCLtchan. 

Franklin and Pearson At Toronto, on the 
thirty-first day of December, one thousund 
eight hundred and fifty-six, :ifter regular 
publication, of banns,, Benjamin Frajnklln, 
of Brampton., bachelor, and Esther Pear 
som,, of Toronto, spinster, daughter of Jo 
seph Pearso.n,, of Bnimjiton,, were united 
in marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between uc, 
Benjamin Franklin, Esther Pearson, and i> 
the presence of us, Henry Lewis, John 
F.raser. 

McKinnon and MoGdllivriv At Toronto, 
on. the seventh day of January, one thou 
sand eight hundred s>nd fifty-seven,. Arch 
ibald McKinnon, of the Gore of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Janet McGillivray, piaster, 
of Vaughani, daughter of Neil M cGi livray, 
of the same place, were by license i nite I in 
marriage by me, John. Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized betwnp"i us, 
Archibald McKinnon J:met McGiJlivray, 
and in the presence of usi, Frrquhar Mc 
Gillivray, Miry McGillivraiy. 

McKay n;nd Watson At Toronto, on th 
seventh day of January, one thousand, eight 
hundred and fifty-seven,, Don i Id McKay, of 
Vaughan., bachelor, and Eliza Watson, of 
the same place,, spinster, daughter of Rob 
ert Watson,, of the sime place, were by 
license united in niarri iige by me, John 
Barclay. This marriaure has been duly 
solemnized between us, Donald McKiy, Elirtk 
Watso;;i., and in the presence of us, Michael 
Burkholder, Janet Ourrie. 



Gibson and Gibson At Toronto, on 
twenty-first day of Jnnuartr, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-seven, Jnmes Gib- 
fiO n, of Trafalgar, bachelor, arid Eliza* Gib- 
sou, of the, same place, spinster, wer)o by 
license united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between ua, John Gibson, Eliza 
Gibson, and vn the presence of us, William J. 
Mason,, John Askin. 

McKinnon and Brown At Toronto, <m the 
seventeenth day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-seven, Dune in Mc 
Kinnon, of Vaughrui, widower, and Ellen 
Brown,, of the same plice, widow, were by 
licen.se united in marriage by me, J. a. 
MacKerras, for Dr. Barclay. This mar~ 
riage haa been duly solemnized between us, 
Duncan McKinnon, Ellftn Browji, and fn the 
presence of us, Dugald McCraig, Catherine 
Brown.. 

Brown and McLaren At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred ruid fifty -seven., John 
Brown., of King, bachelor, and Christina 
McLaren,, of the snme place, daughter of 
M cL-are:i* of said township, were bf 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



201 



license unite! in marri i,ge by me, John 
Barcliy, D.D. This marriage has been* duly 
solem-uzed between, us, John Brown, Chris- 
ti a McL -ran, and in the presence of us^ 
Peter McKellar, Alexander McLaren. 

Hall a. wl Burns At Toronto, on the fourth 
day of March, one thousand eight hundred 
a:i,l fifty-seven,, Tlhom/ia Hall, of Scar- 
bo-ro , a i-l J Uiet Burns, of the same place, 
spinster, daughter of widow Burns, were by 
license united in marri ge by me, John Bar 
clay. This mirriage Las been duly solemn 
ize 1 bet wecvii us,. Thoma? II ill, Janet Burns, 
a;ii,l in the presence of us. Georgo Secor, 
Isabella Hall. 

Cochra.ii .- .iwl Kline At Toronto, on the 
eleventh ^lajy of M> rch, one thousand eight 
hun. lre.! and fifcy-iseven, Willi-m Cochran, 
of Kiriig, bachelor, and Mary "Kline, of the 
same pi i-c<a, widow of the late John Nich 
olas Kline, were united by license In m( r- 
ri&g-e by m(i, Jotei BP relay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
William. Oochri n,, Mary Kline, and in the 
presence of 114, Thomas Roberts m,, Lu- 
vinia Brown. 

Lewis and Lewis At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of March, i ne thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-seven., Wmi. John 
Lewis., of Bram(pto.Ti,, b chelor, a>nd A.gnes 
Boyd Lewis,, of Albion,, spinster, were by 
license unite 1 in marri w;^, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, William B. Lewis, 
A. B. Lewis., a i. r l in. the presence of us, John 
PlAtt, .1 me- ? E liotl. 

Hume ai:ii"l Oallfloder At Toronto, on the 
fourteenth day of May. one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-seven years, Geo. Hume, 
of Scarboro , bachelor, and Sarah Callen- 
der, of the snine jilace, spinster, daughter 
of William Callender, of the said township, 
were united in Tnarriage by license by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us., George Hume, Sarah 
Callender, and in the pres-enee of us, Wil 
liam Martin, Helen Hiime. 

Padley and Barker At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fifth day of Maiy., one thousand eight, 
hundred and fifty-seven, Robert Padley, of 
Cobourg, bachelor, and Mary Barker, of the 
township of Whitby, were by license united 
in marriage by me. John Barclay. This mar 
riage ha-s been duly solemnized between, us, 
Robert Padley, Mary Barker, and in the 
presence of us. Joseph Connell, Mrs. Oonnell. 

Carlyle and Blunt At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of Juno, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty^seven, John Carlyle, of 
Toronto, bachelor, und Elizabeth Blunt, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of Jo 
seph Blunt , of Hamilton, were, by license, 
rriited in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, John Carlyle, Elizabeth Blunt, 
and in the presence of n-,, Thomas Carlyle, 
Mary Ann Allan. 

Frasor and Russell At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of June, cue thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-seven, Matthew Fraser, 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Helen Russell, 
of the same rdace. spinster, daughter of the 
late George "Russell, f Murrayshire, Scot 
land, were, bv license, united in marriage, 
by m". - T obn Tar Iny This m:"ri:i"-p 1-ni bopn 
uly solemnized !; tween us, Matthew Fra-e--, 
Helen Hussell ;iu;l in the presence of us, 
George Russell James Thomson. 

Steele and Stokes At Toronto, on the 



twenty first day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty seven, Luis 
Steel, of Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Anne 
Stokes, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of John Stokes,, were by license united in 
marriage, by me John Barclay. This Mar 
riage lias been duly solemnized between us, 
Luis Steel, Mary Anne Stokes, and in the 
presence ot us, P. Linscott, George Colle. 

Colle and Stokes At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-seven, George 
Colle, of Toronto, bachelor, and Martha 
Stokes,, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of John Stoke* of the said city, were, by 
license, united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us. George Colle, Martha 
Stokes, and in the presence of us, P. Lin 
scott, Luie Steel. 

Ewart and Rogers 1 At Toronto, on the 
sixth day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and fiftynseven, George Ewart, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Agnes R.ogers, spin 
ster, daughter of Joseph Rogers, of the 
said city, were, by license, united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
G. Ewart, Agnes Rogers, and In the pres 
ence of us, John Ewart, Christina Rogers. 

Graham and Low At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of Ivovomber, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-seven, John Gra 
ham, of Chinguacousy, and Miiry Ann Low, 
of the same place, spinster, were, by license, 
united in marriage bv me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, John Graham, Mary Ann Low, 
and in the presence of us, John Graham, sr., 
William Low. 

Hogg and Deane At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-eight, David Hoggv Bar 
rack Master, Toronto, widower, and Eliza 
Frances Deane, widow of the same place, 
were, by license, unitel in marriaare by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
olomni/.e 1 between us, David Hogg, Eliza 
Frances Deane, and in the presence of us, 
Andrew Henderson, Mat. Henderson. 

Grahame and Morrison At Vaughan, on 
the fourth day < f February, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-eight, William Riclh- 
ard Grahame., Esq., of Minsdrum, Vaughan, 
widower, and Elizabeth Morrison, of same 
rl-iop. spinster, were, by license, united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
W. R. Grahame, Elizabeth Morrison, and* in 
the presence of us, John Ewart, Mary Mc- 
Nab. 

Rogers and Smith At Toronto, on th 
twenty -fifth day of February,, one thousand 
eight "hundred and fifty-eight, Levi Rogers, 
of West Gwillimbury, bachelor, and Caroline 
Sukey Smith, of Toronto, spinster, were, 
by license, united in marriage by me, John 
B arclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnize ! between us, Levi Rogers, Caroline 
Sukey Smith, and in the presence of na, 
Robert Lowe, Mary Lowe. 

Taylor and K.binson At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-eight, Jonathan Taylor, 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth Robin 
son, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of Georgo Robinson, of the said city, were, 
bv license, united in marriage by me, John 
ll arclay. This marriage has been duly sol- 



202 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



<emnized between us. Jonathan Taylor, Eiizla- 
beth Robinson, and in the presence of UB, 
Wm. Jackson. Toronto, C. W. Julia A. Rob 
inson. 

Orford and Taylor At Toronto, on the 
sixth dajr of April, one thousand eight hun 
dred and fifty-eight, James Orfiord, To 
ronto, widower, and Mary Ferguson Taylor, 
of the seme place, spinster, daughter of 
Hugh Taylor, of the said city, were, bf,- li 
cense, united in marriage, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, Jauies Orford, Mary Fergu- 
gon Taylor, and In the presence of us, P. ! 
Mulleney, Fanny Summers-. 

McNiel and .ronnson At Toronto, on the 
twenty-second uay of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-eight, by license, 
George McNiel, of Etobicoke, bachelor, and 
Mary Johnston, of York, spinster, daugh- j 
ter of Thomas Johnston, o fthe said town- i 
ship, were united in marriage by me, John j 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol- | 
emnized between us* George McNiel, Mary i 
Johnston, and in the presence of us, Rich- I 
ard McGuire, Catherine McLauyhlin. 

McMum and Paisley At Toronto, on the i 
eights day of May, one thousand eight him- j 
dred and fifty-eight, Joseph McMum, of ; 
Chinguacousy, bachelor, and Ellen Paisley, 
of the same place, spinster, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Joseph McMum, Ellen Paisley, 
and in the presence of us. T. C. .Fraser, 
Samuel Hunter. 

Wells and Collis At Toronto, on the 
eighth day of May, one thousand eight hun 
dred and fifty-eight, John Wells, of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Affie ollis. of the 
same place, spinster, were united in marriage 
by license by me. John Barclay. This mar- j 
riage his been duly solemnized between, us, 
John Wells. Affie Collis, and in the pros- ! 
ence of us, Maria Louisa Hurly, Arch. Boyd. 
Sisley and Heron At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fourth day of May, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-eight, by license 
of His Excellency the Governor-General, 
Robert Sisley, of Sca rboro , and Jannet \ 
Heron, of the same place, were united in i 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar- < 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Robert Sisley, Jannet Heron, and in the ; 
presence of us. Andrew Thomson, Christina 
Thomson. 

Burton and Witherspoon At Toronto, on 
the fourth day uf June, one thousand eight : 
hundred and fifty-eight, by license of the 
Governor-General, James Burton, of 
Vaugnan. bachelor, and Margaret Wither 
spoon, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of James Witherspoon, of said town 
ship, were unite 1 by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, James Burton, Margaret Witherspoon, 
and fn the presence of us, William Burton, 
Eliza Burton. 

French and Crumble At Toronto, on the 
fifteenth day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-eight, by license of the 
Governor-General, Thomas French, of Am 
aranth, bachelor, and Jano Crumble, of the 
same place, spinster, daughter of James 
Crumble, of the said township, were united 
In marriage by me, John Barclay. Thl=t mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Thomas French, Jane Crumble, and in the 



presence of us, Sarah Morris Chapman, Rosa 
Cameron. 

Steele and Robertson At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-eight, by license of the 
Governor-General, John Cussona Steele, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Aneil Robert 
son, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of the late John Robertson, were united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay, D.D. Thia 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, John Cussons Steele, Mary Aneil Robert 
son, and in the presence of us, Robt. Dalby. 
of EJora., and Hugh Oliver, of Hamilton- 
Penny and Veney At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-eight, after regular pro 
clamation of banns, Jamos Penny, of S(M,r- 
boro , bachelor, and Eliza Ve M\V, of the same 
place, spinster, were unite 1 iu marriage by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, James Penny, 
Eliza Veney, and in the presence of us, 
Geo. Parsons, Margaret Ferguson. 

Miller and Perkins At Toronto, on the 
twenty-eighth day of Juljy, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-eight, by license of 
His Excellency the Governor-General, Chas. 
Miller, of Vaughan, bachelor, and Rebecca 
Jane Perkins., of the same township, spin 
ster, were united in marriage, by me John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnize 1 between us. Charles Miller, Re 
becca Jane Perkins, and in the presence of 
us, Samuel Frazer, Maria Waugh. 

Fairbairn and Stevenson At Toronto, on 
the thirtieth day of August, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-eight, by license of 
His Excellency the Governor-General, Thos. 
Fairbairn, of Toronto, bachelor, and Mary 
Stevenson, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of the late Robert Stevenson., of 
Edinburgh, Scotland, were united in mar 
riage by me. John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between ua, Thos. 
Fairbairn,, Mary Stevenson, an 1 in the pres 
ence of us, Mary Anna Irving, Richard 
Fairbairn. 

Henderson and Keith At Toronto, on the 
sixteenth day of September, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-eight, by license 
of HLs Excellency the Governor-General, 
Thomas Render^ i, of the township of 
Guelph, bachelor, and Margaret Keith, of 
Toronto, spinster, were unite 1 in Tiiar- 
riage, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Thomas Henderson, Margaret Keith, and in 
the presence of us, Amelia Keith, George 
Henderson. 

Clarkson and Waller At Toronto, on the 
twentv-ninth day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-eight, by li 
cense of His Excellency the Governor-Gen 
eral, William Clarkson, of Markham, bache 
lor, and Rosa Waller, also of Markham, 
spinster, daughter of James and Elizabeth 
Waller, were united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriaere has been duly sol 
emnized between us, William Clarkson, R< sa 
Waller, and in the presence of John Milburn 
Robinson, Rebecca Robinson. | 

Ballard and Birchard-At Toronto, on the 
first day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-eight, James Ballard, of 
Pickering, bachelor, and Esther Birchard, 
of Pickering, daughter of Samuel Birchard, 
of Scott, were united in marriage by me, 
John Barclav. This marriage has been dulj 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



203 



solemnized between us, James Ballard, 
Esther Birchard, and in the presence of 
Duncan McArthur, K. F. Cameron. 

McCallum and McNaughton At Toronto, 
on the twelfth ilay of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-eight, by li 
cense, John McCallum, of King, bachelor, 
and Ann McNaughton of Vaughan, spin 
ster, daughter of Donald McNaughton, by 
license, were united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. Tnis marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, John McCallum, Ann 
McNaughton, and in the presence of us, 
John Larkin, Flora McNaughton. 

Thomson and Diell At Toronto, on the 
fltfh day of January, oue thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-nme, after regular pro 
clamation of baiins, John W. Thomson, of 
Scarboro , bachelor, and Mary Diell, of the 
tame place, spinster, were united in mar 
riage by ma, John Barclay, D.D. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between 
u* John W f Thomson, Mswy Diell, and in 
the presence of James A. Thomson, John 
Holmes. 

Somerville and McLachlan At Toronto, 
on the twentieth day of January, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fiftv-nine, James 
Somerville, of King, bachelor, and Flora 
McLachlan, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of Hugh McLachlan, of the said 
township, were, by license, united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been dul> solemnized between us, James 
Somerville, Flora McLachlan, and in the 
presence of ui, D. Hewett, James Bowman. 

1 atterson and Strachan At Toronto, on 
the twenty-first day of January, one thou 
sand eight hundred and fifty-nine, James 
Paterson, of Toronto, bachelor, and Jane 
.Strachan, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of the late James Strachan, of Stone- 
haven, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, were, by 
license, united in marriage by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, J. Paterson, Jane Strachan, 
and in the praience of us, G. C. Strachan, 
Catherine Strachan. 

Harrison and Boswell At Toronto, on the 
seventeenth day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-nine, William Mai- 
lory Harrison., of King , Bachelor, and Mary 
Boswell, of the same place, were unite ill in 
marriage, bj license, jb me, John Barclay, 
D.D. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between ua, Robert Mallory Harrison, 
Mary Boswell, and in the presence of Hector 
Cameron. 

Eckardt and Woodall At Toronto, on the 
twenty-second day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty -nine, Jacob Eck 
ardt, of Markham, bachelor, and Margaret 
Esther Woodall, of the same township, spin 
ster, daughter of William H. Woodall, also 
of Markham, were, by Mcense, united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Jacob Eckardt, Margaret Esther Woodall, 
and In the presence of William McDonald, 
Clarissa Woodall. 

Patton and Lennox At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-nine, Daniel Patton, of 
the township of York, bachelor, and Maria 
Lennox, of the same place, spinster, were, 
by license, united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Daniel Patton, Maria 



! Lennox, and In the presence of James Arm 
strong, Alisjr Groveny. 

McPherson and Culham At Toronto, on 
the thirtieth day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty-nine, Alexander Hc- 
Pherson, of Etobicoke, bachelor, and 
Sage Culham, of the same place, widow of 
the late Joseph Culham. were, by license, 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us. Alex. McPherson, Sage Culham. 
and in the presence of us, Roderick! Donald, 
Donald McFadyen. 

Roberts and Keith At Toronto, on the 
second day of May, one thousand eight hun 
dred and fifty-nine, George Roberts, of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Amelia Keith, of the 
same place, spinster, were, by license, united 
in marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage hasi been duly solemnized between n, 
George Roberts, Amelia Keith, and in the 
presence of us, William Novell, Jane Atkin 
son. 

Gallagher and Humphries At Toronto, on 
the nineteenth day of May, one thousand 
eight hundred and fifty -nine, William Gal 
lagher, of Toronto, widower, and Maria 
Humphries^ of the same place, widow of the 
late Richard Humphries, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, William Gallagher, Maria Hum 
phries, and in the presence of us, John 
Mitchell, Eliza Milligan. 

Findlay ana Dunn At Toronto, on the 
ninth day of June, one thousand eight hun 
dred and fifty-nine, .John Findlay, of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth Dunn, of the 
same place, spinster, were, bv license, united 
in marriage, by me, John Karclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, John Findlay, Elizabeth Dunn, and in 
the presence of us, John Ross, P. M. Bald 
win. 

Gibb and Gallow At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-nine. Lawrence Gibb, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Gallow, of the 
said city, spinster, were, by license, united 
in marriage by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Lawrence Gibb, Mary Gallow, and in 
the presence of us, Jehu Patterson, Grace 
Gallow. 

Fairbairn and Robertson At Toronto, on 
the eighth day of July, onei thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-nine. Richard Fairbairn, 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Robertson, 
of the same place, spinster, daughter of An 
drew Robertson, of Niagara, were, by li 
cense, united in marriage by mo, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, Richard Fairbairn, Mary 
Robertson, and in the presence of ua* Rob 
ert Harrison, Eliza F. Browne. 

Shaw and McClure At Toronto, on tne 
nineteenth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and fifty-nine, Samuel Shaw, the 
younger, of Toronto, bachelor, and Caro 
line Olive McClure, of the said city, spin 
ster, daughter of the late Robert McClure, 
were, by license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us. S. Shaw, Caroline 
Olive McClure, and in the presence of tu. 
Robert J. Griffith, Ellen McClure, 8. B. 
Campbell. 

, Irwin and Davidson At Toronto, on th 
nienteentb. day of July, one thousand 



204 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



hundred and fifty-nine., Robert Irwin, of 
Newmarket, widower, and Anne Davidson, of 
the same place, widow of the late Joseph 
Davidson, were, by license, united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
baa been duly solemnized between ui, 
Robert Irwin, Anne Davidson, and in the 
presence of us, Thomas Palmer, Elizabeth 
Barringer. 

Smith and Farquhar At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty, Alexander Smith, 
of Marxham, bachelor, and Annie Farqu 
har, of Toronto, spinster, daug-hter of Alex 
ander Farquhar, of said city, were by li 
cense, united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Alexander Smith, An 
nie Farquhar, and in the presence of us, 
Charles Brodie, Ellen Spofford. 

Davidson and Evans At Toronto, on the 
third day of April, one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty, David Davidson, of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Lorecei Evans, of Hamilton, 
spinster, daughter of Lewis Evans, of said 
city, were, by license, united in marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, David 
Davidson, Lerecai Evans, and in the pres 
ence of us, William Wallace, B. Ferguson.* 

Martin and Bier At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty, James Martin, of Ham 
ilton, widower, and Anne Bier, of George 
town, spinster, wero, by license, united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been dulv solemnized between us, 
James Martin,, Anne Bier, and in the pres 
ence of us, Chauncv O. Valentine, Harriet 
A. Morris. 

Catcher and Thorn At Toronto, on the 
seventeenth day of May. one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty, Charles Catcher, bache 
lor, of Toronto, and Elizabeth Thorn, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of John 
Thorn, Glasgow, Scotland, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Charles Catcher, Elizabeth Thorn, 
and In the presence of us,. Win. H. Sparrow, 
George Sparrow. 

Egan and Heniphill At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of Juno, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty, were married by 
license, Johnston Eg-an, of King, widower, 
and Rebecca Hemphill, of Vauprhan, snin- 
iter, daughter of Joseph Hemphill, of the 
said township, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Johnston Eo-an, Rebecca Hempnill, and 
in the presence of us, William Hemphill, 
Martha Hemphill. 

Savage and Trahy At Toronto, on the 
thirty-first day of August, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixtj, John Savage, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Catherine Trahy, of 
the same place, iplnster, daughter of Wil- 
1 .m Trahy, of Somerside, Ireland, de 
ceased, were by liioense united In mar 
riage, by me, John Barclay. This marri 
age has been duly tolomnized between us, 
John Savage, Catharine Trahy, and in the 
presence of us, Charles Mason, Margaret 
Foot 

Dunbar and Kenwood At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of September, one thousand 
might hundred and sixty, John Dunbar, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Isabella Kenwood, 
Of the same* place, widow of the late John 



Kenwood, of Bradford, were by license unit-- 
ed in marriage, by me, John Barclay. This 
marrta-go has been duly solemnized between 
us, John Dunbar, Isabella Kenwood, and 
in> the presence of us, John Hosheran, Anne 
Clifford. 

Croft and Straohan At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty years, John 
Croft, of Toronto, bachelor, and Emily 
Strachan, of the same place, spinster, 
da.uigb.ter of the late James Strachan, of 
Stoiiehaven, Scotland, were, by license, unit 
ed in marriage, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly soleinnixed be- 
j tween us, John Croft, Emily .Strachan^ 
wid in the presence of us, W. Strachan, 
I Margaret Strachan. 

Ambrose and Wilson At Toronto, on the 

I fifteenth day of January, one thosuand 

I eig-ht hundred and sixty-o-iie, were married, 

! by license, Charles Thomas Ambrose, of 

j Walkerton, widower, and Georgina Wilson* 

! of Holland Landing, spinster, daughter of 

; the late John Wilson, late of H. -VI. 1 Oth 

Regt., by me, John Barclay. This marri* 

age has been duly solemnized between us, 

Ckas. F. Ambrose, Georgina Wilson, and 

in the presence of us, J. W. H. Wilson, A. E. 

Williamson, 

Dodsworth and Judge At Toronto, on the 
first day of February, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-one, John Dodsworth, 
of Albion, County of Peel, widower, and 
Isabella Judge, of the same place, widow 
were by license, united in marriage, by 
me, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between us, John Dods 
worth, Isabella Judge, and in the presence 
of James Calbec^, Jane Walker. 

Logan and Gallow At Toronto, on the 
second day of February, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty, were married by license, 
Gilbert Logan, of Toronto, bachelor, and 
Grace Gallow., of the sw,me place, spinster, 
daughter of William Galiow, of said city, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Gilbert 
Logan, Graoe Galluw, and in the presence 
of us, Augusta Gallow, William Gallow, 
Samuel Thompson. 

Burns and Martin At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-one, James Burns, 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Jane Sissar Mar 
tin, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of John Martin, of Barnach, Stamford, Eng 
land, were, by license, united in marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, James 
Burns, Jane Sisson Martin, and in the pres 
ence of John Levack, Christina Levack. 

Wanless and Bell At Toronto, on the 
second day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-one, were married by li 
cense, John Wanlesa, of Toronto, bachelor, 
and Susan Bell, widow of the late Daniel 
Kinsman, of the County of Cornwall, Eng 
land, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us. 
Job- Wanless. Sm>an Bell, and in tho pres 
ent-, of us-, Edwin Gledhill, Daniel Kinsman. 

Ceorwinski and McKinnou At Toronto, on 
the twenty-first day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-one, Lewia 
Ceerwinski, of Whitchurch, bachelor, and 
Mary Alice McKinnou, daughter of Angus 
McKinnon, of Markhain, spinster, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



205 



This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Lewis Ceerwinslu, Mary Alice Mc- 
Kinnon, and in the presence of us, W. S. 
Pollockj R. A. Arksey. , 

Hunter and MeDouald At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of Nfv amber, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-one, Lachlan Hun 
ter, of Caledon, bachelor, and Butsy McDon- 
aldu of Toronto, spinster, were by license 
united in marriage by me John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be- 
Lschlan Hunter, Betsy McDonald, and in 
the presence of us, John Bond, Esther Mc- 
Doiiald. 

Burkholder and Brown At Toronto, on 
the eighteenth day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-one, Michael 
Burkholder, of Vaughan, Bachelor, and Su 
sanna Brown, of tho same place, spinster, 
daughter of Jonathan Brown, of the said 
township, were, by license, united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, 
Michael Burkholder. Susanna Brown, and in 
the presence of us, Thomas Nye, Margaret 
Ann Ormand. 

Robinson and McEachern At Toronto, on 
the thirtieth day of November., one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty -one, John 
Robinson, of Yaughan, bachelor, and Flora 
McEacherni, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of Colin MoEachern, of the said 
township, were, by license, united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Robinson," Flora McEacbern, and in the 
presence of us, Joseph Vickers, Margaret 
McEachern. 

Doron and Earnest At Toronto, on the 
first day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixtj-two, Alexander Robert 
Doron, of Esquesing, bachelor, and Mary 
Ann Earnest, of Toronto, spinster, were, by 
license, united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol- 
nmtzed between us, Alex. Robert Doron, 
Mary Ann Earnest, arid In the presence of 
John Earnest. 

Jolly and Fisher At Toronto, on the 
eighth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-two, were married, by 
ficense, James Jolly, of Picttering, and Jane 
Fisher, of the name place, spinster, daughter 
of the late Joseph Fisher, of the same place, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, James 
Jolljr, Jane Fisher, and in the presence of 
Alexander Bennett, Ruth Fishor. 

Elless and Stouar At Toronto on the 
twentieth day of January, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-two, after due pro 
clamation of banns, Jacob Elless, of Picker 
ing 1 , bachelor, and Sarah Jane Stonar, of 
Pickering, spinster, were united in marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage was 
duly solemnized between us, Jacob Elless, 
Sarah Jane Stonar, and in the presence of 
Robert Moon, Hannah Adams. 

Qampbell and Pangman At Toronto, on 
the f .rst day of March, one thousand eitrht 
hundred and sixty two, were married by li 
cense, John Campbell, of Caledon, bachelor, 
and Mary Jane Pangman, of the same place, 
spinster, by mo, John Barclay. This marr 
riage has been dnly solemnized between \is, 
John Campbell, Mary Jane Pangman, and 
In the presence of ns, William Harkins, 
Oatharine Doyle. 

Woodberry and McGla-uchlin At Toronto, 



on the first day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-two, by license, 
Joseph Woodberry, of Toronto, bachelor, 
and Marguret McGlauchliu, of the same 
place, spinster, were united in marriage, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Joseph 
Woodberry, Margaret McGlauchlin, and in 
the presence of us, W. Sutherland, Mar 
garet Sutherland. 

Robertson and McDougald at Toronto, on 
the twenty-sixth day of March, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-two, were 
married by license, John Robertson, of the 
Village of Bramptom, bachelor, and Mary 
McDougald, of the same place, spinster, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, John 
Robertson, Mary McDougald, and In the 
presence of us, A. Gilchrist, Anne Gil- 
christ. 

Kennedy and Robertson At Toronto, on 
the twenty-fourth day of April, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-two, William 
George Kennedy, of Trafalgar, in the 
Qounty of Halton, bachelor, and Isabella 
Robertson, of the same place, sninster, 
daughter of William Robertson, were by 
license, united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, William G. Kennedy, 
Isabella Robertson, and in the presence of 
us, Alex. Robertson, Mary Waterson. 

Patterson and Kerr At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of May, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-two, John Hark- 
j ness Patterson* of Toronto, bachelor, and 
Marlon Kerr, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of John Kerr, of the said city, 
were,, by license, united in marriage- by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, John H. Patterson, 
Marion Kerr, and in the presence of us, 
George McLeod, William Brjdon. 

Bowlby and Rogers At Toronto, on the 
third day of June, one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty-two, John Wedgewood 
Bowlby, Esq., LL.B., of Brantford, bache 
lor, and Marion Christina Rogers, of To 
ronto, spinster, daughter of Jos. Rogers, 
of the said city, were, by license* united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has" been duly solemnized between usk 
J. Wedgewood Bowlby, Marion Christina 
Rogers, and in the presence of us, J. Munns. 
Hamilton, J. A. Rogers. 

Willerton and Glass At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of June, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-two, Christopher Wil- 
lerton,, of Toronto, bachelor, and Agnes 
Glass, of the same place, widow, were, by li 
cense, united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage ha<? been duly sol 
emnized between us, O. Willerton, Agnes 
Glass, and In the presence of us, Jaanes 
Boyd, Isler McDonald. 

Culver and Burke. At Toronto, on the 
ninth day of September, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-two. Franklin Culver, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Margaret Burke, of 
the same place, spinster, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Franklin Culver, Margaret Burke, 
and i* 1 the presence of us, John Melvin, 
Christina McDonald. 

Macfarlane and Irwin At Toronto, on the 
eighteenth day of September, one thousand 
eisrht hundred and sixty two, Duncan Mac- 



206 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



far lane, of Guelph, bachelor, and Eliza 
Irwin, of Toronto, spinster, were bj* license 
united in marriage, by me John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized 
between us, D. Macfarlane, Eliza Irwin, 
and in the presence of us, Malcolm Mac 
farlane, John Ritchey Jr. 

Corr and Ormand At Toronto, on the 
twenty second day of September, one thou 
sand eigtot hundred and sixty two, Matthew 
Oorr, of Toronto, bachelor, and Margaret 
Anne Ormand, of the same place, spinster, 
were after publication of Banns, united 
in marriage, by me John Barclay. Thip mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Matthew Corr, Margaret Anne Ormaiid, 
and in the presence of us, Patrick Kennedy, 
Muy Brown. 

Pattison and Piper At Toronto, on the 
twenty fourth day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty two, by 11- 
oense, William Pattison, of Fergus, bach 
elor, and Anne Archibald Piper, of the 
same place, widow, were united in marriage, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Win. Pat 
tison, Anne Archibald Piper, and In the 
presence of us, George Brown, John Rid- 
dell. 

Taylor and Spiers At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty two, Robert Taylor, 
of Toronto, widower, and Mary Jane Spiers, 
of the same place, widow of the late jmvid 
Spiers, of the said city, deceased, were by 
license, united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Robert Taylor, Mary 
Jane Spiera. and in the presence of us, 
Samuel Hutchison. Sarah Hutchison. 

Wlllson and Proctor At Toronto, on the 
twenty ninth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty two, were mar 
ried by license, George Willson, of King, 
bachelor, and Melissa Proctor, of the same 
place, spinster, daughter of Isaac Proctor, 
of the same township, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between ua, George Willson, Melissa 
Proctor, and in the presence of us, Hugh 
Wilson, Sarah Webb. 

Wallace and West At Toronto, on the 
fourth day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty two, Peter Wallace, 
of Toronto, widower, an<l Hanah West, of 
Scarboro, spinster, daughter of Oliver West, 
deceased, were by license, united in mar 
riage, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Peter Wallace, Hannah West, and in the 
presence of us, George Tillsberry, Andrew 
Cook. 

Miller and Milne At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of November, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sitxy-two, William 
Miller, of Pickering, bachelor, and Elizabeth 
G-oodfellow Milne* of the same place, spin 
ster., daughter of Peter Milne, of Markhara, 
were, by license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us. Win. Miller, Eliza 
beth G. Milne, and in the presence of us, 
James Lawrie, Elizabeth Brown. 

Hunter and Purchase At Toronto, on the j 
twentieth day of December, one thousand I 
eight hundred and sixty-two, were mar 
ried by license, John Hunter, of tha vollage 
of Chester, widower, and Anne Purchase, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of Henry 



Purchase, of the same place, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, John Hunter, Anne 
Purchase, and in the presence of us, Thomas 
Thome, Marion Purchase. 

Borland and Bolger At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-three, after due publi 
cation of banns, David Borland, of the Army 
Medical Corps, bachelor, and Theresa Bof- 
ger, of Toronto, spinster, were united in 
marriage br me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us 
David Borland, Theresa Bolger, and in the 
presence of us, Edward Bolger, Ormlight 
Butler. 

Shepland and Boyce At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fifth day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-three, George Shep 
land, of Yorkville, bachelor, and Jane Boyce, 
of the same place, spinster, daughter of the 
late John Boyce, of England, deceased, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized* be 
tween us, George Shepland, Jane Boyce, and 
in the presence of ua, Peter Shepland, Eliza 
beth Shepland. 

Herod and Sandilands At Toronto, on the 
sixth day of May., one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty-three, George Samuel Herod, 
M.D., of Guelph, bachelor, and Margaret 
Sandilands, of the same place, spinster, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, George S. Herod, Margaret San 
dilands, and in the presence of us, George 
Arkle, A. H. Mills. 

Thomson and McComb At Toronto, on 
the eighteenth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-three, James Alex 
ander Thomson, of Scarboro, bachelor, and 
Mary Jane McComb, of the same place, 
spinster, were, by license, united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, 
James Alexander Thomson, Mary Jane Mc 
Comb, and in the presence of us, Gharles 
Rawson, Elizabeth Ellen Thomson. 

Ad xins and McFadyen At Toronto, OB 
the third day of Novemtber, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-three, were mar 
ried, by license, John Admins, of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Flora Allan McFadyen, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of the 
late Roderici McFa-dyen, of the Isle of 
Sxye, Scotland, deceased, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, John AdCiins, Flora. Allan 
MoFadyen, and in the presence of John 
Milne, Alice O Keofe. 

Spencer and Forrest At Toronto, on the 
eighth day of December, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-three, Vetorus Spencer, 
of Nottawa, bachelor, and Matilda I arreat, 
of Collingwood, widow of the late Robert 
Forrest, of Haldiman County, were united 
in marriage, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized between 
us, Velorus Spencer, Matilda Forrest, and 
in the presence of Annetta Forrest, Mary 
Gilmore. 

Wilson and Miller At Toronto, on (he 
twenty-ninth day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-three, Wil 
liam Wilson, of Trafalgar, bachelor, anj 
Anne Miller, of Esquesing, spinster, daugh 
ter of Robert Miller, of the same place, 
were by license, united in marriage, by me> 
John Barolay. This marriage has been 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



207 



dnlj solemnized between us, William Wil 
son, Anne Miller, and in the presence of 
us, George Wilson, Miss Jane Wilson. 

McDonald and Hughes At Toronto* on 
th* sixteenth day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-four, Donald 
Mitchell McDouald, of Toronto, bachelor, 
andx Jane Hughes, of the same place, widow 
ol the late Geo/ge Hughes, of Peterboro, 
deceased, were by license, united in mar 
riage, by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, D. 
M. McDonald, Jane Hughes, and in the 
presence of us, J. Helen McDonald, J. Mac- 
donald. 

Spencer and McDonald At Toronto, on 
the sixteenth day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-four, Theodore 
Henry Spencer, of Toronto, barrister-at- 
law, bachelor, and Mary Caroline Augusta 
McDonald, daughter of Hon. Donald Mc 
Donald, of the said city, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, T. H. Spencer, M. C. A. McDon 
ald, and in the presence of us, J. Helen Mc 
Donald. 

Reid and Hunter At Toronto, on the 
first day of March, one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty-four, James Reid, of Gara- 
fraxa. bachelor, and Mary Hunter, of the 
same place, spinster, were by license, 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, James Reid, Mary Hunter, and 
in the presence of us, William. Edwin;. Reid, 
Mary Hunter. 

Bryant and Goldring At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-four, John Bryant, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Jessie Goldring, of 
the same place, widow of the late George 
Goldring, of the said city of Toronto, de 
ceased, were, by license, united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Bryant, Jessie Goldring, and in the 
presence of us,, George Manson, M. S. 
Boaden. 

Alexander and Sutherland At Toronto, on 
the eleventh day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-four, Robert S. 
Alexander, of the town of Cobourg, bache 
lor, and Ann Sutherland, of Toronto, spin 
ster, daughter of the late K. M. Sutherland, 
were, by license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, R,. S. Alexander, Ann 
Sutherland, and in the presence of us, Melita 
Sutherland, George James Wellesy. 

Thomas and Rogers At Toronto, on the 
twenty-eightn day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-four, Frederick 
Charles Thomas, of Toronto, bachelor, and 
Margaret Rogers, spinster, daughter of 
Charles Rogers, of the said city, were 
united in marriage by me, John "Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween u, F. v . llio im-*. -U. Kogers, and in the 
presence of us, D. RKm. < lias. R. Smoke. 

Skinner and McDonald At Toronto, on 
the eleventh day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty -four, George Skinner, of 
Schomberg, widower, and Christina McDon 
ald, of Toronto, spinster, were, by license, 
unite 1 in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Gj.cikianr, Christina McDonald,and 



in the presence of John Doldernesa, Mar 
garet Rennie. 

Henley and Steinhoff At Toronto, on the 
seventeenth day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-four, William Henley, of 
Markham, bachelor, and Elizabeth Agnes 
Steinhoff, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of Peter Steinhoff, of th same 
i township, were, by license, united in mar- 
ria.ge by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
bus been duly solemnized between us, 
William Henley, Elizabeth Agnes Steinhoff, 
and in the presence of us, Elizabeth Malone, 
George Strachan. 

Evans and Sinclair At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-four, Edward Wakeonan 
Evans, of Toronto, bachelor, and Margaret 
Ferguson Sinclair, of the same place, spin 
ster, wero by license, united in marriage, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Edwaxd 
Wakeinan Evans* Margaret Ferguson Sin 
clair, and in the presence of us, J. R. Baker, 
J. Evans, jr. 

Lamb and Findlay At Toronto, on th 
twenty-sixth day of July, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-four, Robt. L-amb, 
or ihe rov !>" of \ > ( . W., bachelor 
and Agnea Ftndlay. of the township of York, 
spinster, daughter of Alexander Findlay, of 
Abflrdeonshlre, Scotland, were, by license 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Robert Lamb, Agnes Findlay, 
and in the presence of us, John Findlay, 
Elizabeth Findlay. ; 

Mein and Fraser At Toronto, on the 
eixth day of October;, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixtr-four, James Mein, of 
North Easthope, bachelor, and Catherine 
Fraser, of the same place, spinster, were, 
by license,! united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been dulv sol 
emnized between us*. James Mein, Catherine 
Fraser, ani in the presence of us, G,. B. 
Walker. F. H. Orme. 

Turnbull and McDonald At Toronto, on 
the seventh day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-four, Geo. Turn- 
bull, of Toronto, bachelor, and Anna Mc 
Donald, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of Donal.l McDonald, of Osprey, were by 
license, united in marriage by me, ,lolm 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between UPJ, George Turnbull, Anne- 
McDonald,, and in the presence of us, John 
Millichamp, Frederick Williams. 

Knowles and MarshallAt Toronto, on 
the thirty-first day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-four, John 
Knowles, of Pickering, bachelor, and Fanny 
Marshall, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of rlio laic, John Marshall, of Devon 
shire, England, were, by license, united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage ha? been duly soleinni/.ed betweeni v.s* 
John Knowles, Fanny Marshall, and in the 
presence of us, George Tait, Maria Pront. 

Jones and McClure At Toronto, on the 
twenty-first clay of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-four, Williaan 
Owen Jones, of Toronto, bachelor, and 
Emily Victoria. McClure, of the same city, 
spinster, daughter of the late Robert Mc 
Clure, were, by license, united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, 
M illiam Owen Jones, Euuly V. McClure, and in* 



208 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



the presence) of us, A. B. Robertson, Delia 
Ru McClure, S. B. Campbell. 

Ooalwill and Oolwell At Toronto, on tho 
fifth day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-five. Robert Coalwill, of 
Toronto, bachelor, .and Anne Colwell, of the 
same place., spinster, were by license, united 
in marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us, 
Robert Coalwill, Anne Oolwell, and in the 
presence of us, Edward Purcell, Jane Cald- 
well. 

Dewsbury and Andrews At Toronto, on 
the eleventh day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-five, Thos. Dews- 
bury, of Toronto, bachelor, and Jane An 
drews., of the same place, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage/ has beon duly solemnized be 
tween MB, Thomas Dewsbury, Jane Andrews, 
and in the presence of us, Edlen Glancey, 
Richard Dewsbury. 

Cherry and French At Toronto, on the 
seventh day, of March t , one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-five, Joseph Cherry, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Agnes French, of 
the township of King, spinster, were, by 
license, united in marriage by me, James 
S. Douglas, for John Barclay. This mar 
riage bus been duly solemnized between nsi, 
Joseph Cherry, Agnes French, and in the 
presence of Us* Samuel Tiltoii, Sophia Cherry 
Livingston an 1 Appelbe At Toronto, on 
tho ninth day of March, one thousand eight 
hundred ana sixty-five, John Livingston, 
K^I., barrister-at-law, bachelor, of George 
town,, and Mary Patience Appelbe, of !Stew- 
arttown, spinster, daughter of the late Wlm. 
Appelbe, were united in marriage by li 
cense, by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between usu 
John Livingston, Mary Appelbe, and in the 
presence of us,, D. Blain, barrister, To 
ronto, and Rebecca Aupelbe, Esquesing. 

(-roiTLf! find Vorrin ^t Toronto, on the 
second day of May, one thousand eight hun- 
urod and sixty-five. Joseph Gorrie, of the 
<;ilv of Toronto, bachelor, and Catherine 
Norrla, of the same place, spinster, were 
united i.i marriage, by license, by me, John 
liarc .ay. This marriage has been .duly^ sol 
emnized between us, Joseph Gorrie, Cath 
erine Norria, and in tb.6 presence of us, 
Henry Scott,, Win. H. Dudley. 

Dewar and Parkinson At Toronto, on 
the fourth* day oi May. one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-five. Henry Robertson 
Dewar. of Toronto, bachelor, and Mary 
Elizabeth Parkinson of the same place, spin- 
.ster, were united in marriage, by license, 
bv me. John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, Henry 
Robertson Dewar, Mary Elizabeth Parkin 
son, and in the presence oi us, R. W. Park 
inson, J. E. Henning. 

Rice and Smallacombe-At Toronto, on 
the sixteenth dt,y or May., one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-five, John Rice, 
of Whitby. bachelor, and Elizabeth Small- 
acombe, spinster, of Toronto, were united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between nsi 
John Rice, B. Smallacombe, and in the 
presence of us. Stewart Wells, A. Erskine. 
,A!c\i(^s and H;i " p li-v At, Toronto, on tie 
.sixteenth day of May, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-five, John McNiess, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Harriet Anno Haw- 
ley, of the same place, spinster, daughter 



of James Hawley, of Peterborough, Eng 
land, were by license united in marriage by 
me. John Barclay. This marriage has been 
duly solemnized between u% John McNiess, 
Harriet Anne Hawley, and in the presence 
Of us, Michael Donnelly, Annie G. Peierkin. 

Townsley and Patevson At Toronto, on 
the twenty-thirdl day of May. one thousand 
eight hundrec and sixty-five, Thos. Towns- 
ley, of Yorkvllle, bachelor, and Ann Pater- 
son, of the same place, spinster, were, by 
license, united; in marriage by me, John SL 
Douglas, fo-r John Barclay. This marriage 
has- been duly solemnized between us, Thos. 
Towusle^, Ann Paterson, aud in the pres 
ence of us, Joseph Cherry, A. D. Cherry. 

Roso and Miller At Riggfoot, Markham, 
on the fifth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-five, the Rev. 
Walter R,. Ross, of Pickering* bachelor, and 
Elizabeth Miller, spinster, daughter of, Geo. 
Miller, Esq., of Riggfoot, were.j by license, 
united in marriage by met, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly, solemnized be 
tween us 1 , Walter R. Ross, Elizabeth Miller, 
and in the presence of us. John Miller, Eliza 
beth Holmes. / 

McGregor and Rogers At Toronto, on the 
twenty-eighth day of June, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-five, Daniel Mc 
Gregor, of Hullett, bachelor, and June 
Rogers, spinster, daughter of Charles 
Rogers, of Toronto, were by license un ted 
in marriage by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized*, between 
us 1 , Daniel McGregor, Jane Rogers, and in 
the presence of us. Di. Blain, barrister, To 
ronto, and Charles Rogers, Jr. 

Bennett and Matthewson At Toronto., on 
the first day of July-, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-five, Hugh Dudgeon Ben 
nett, of Vaughan, bachelor, and Sarah Mat 
thewson, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of Hugh Matthewson, of the said town 
ship, were united in marriage, by license, 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us Hugh 
Dudgeon Bennett, Sarah Matthewson, and in 
the presence of us, John Bannerman, Helen 
Hanlin. 

Matheson and) White At Toronto, onr the 
sixth day, of July, one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty-five, Donald Matheson, of 
Vaughan, bachelor, and Elizabeth White, of 
the same place, spinster, were by license, 
united in marriage, by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Donald Matheson, Elizabeth White, 
and in the presence of us, John McNeil, Martha 
Hedges,. 

Latimer and Low At Toronto, on the 
seventh day of July,, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-five, William Latuner, of 
Vaughan, bachelor, and Sarah Jane Low, of 
the same place, spinster, daughter of the 
late Daniel Low., of Co. Down, Ireland, were 
united in marriage by mo, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized bey 
tween us, William Latimer, Sarah Jane Low, 
and in the presence of us,, J. S. Rogerson, 
James M. Latime-r. 

Bolton and Chapman At Toronto, on the 
eighth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-five, Isaac Bolton, of 
Etobicoke, bachelor, and Mary Jane Chap 
man, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of Robert Chapman, of the said township, 
wore, by license, united, in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



209 



solemnized between us, Isaac Bolton, Mary 
Jane Chapman, and in the presence of us, 
George Garbutt, Eliza Fulljames. 

MacKerras and Dennistown At Toronto, 
on the* sixteenth d<ay of August, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-five, the Kev. 
John Hugn MacKerras, of Bowmanville, 
bachelor, and Margaret Dennis-town, spin 
ster, daughter of Robert Donnistown, Esq., 
Peterboro , were, by license, united; in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, 
J. H. MacKerras, Margaret Dennistown, and 
in the presence of us, Donald MacLean, 
Mary B Fortye. 

Rodgers and McNeil At Toronto, on the 
fifteenth day of September, one thousand 
eight nund-red and sixty-five, David Rod 
gers, of York, bachelor, and Margaret Mc 
Neil, of Toronto, spinster, were by license 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriagei has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, David Rodgers, Margaret McNeil, 
and in the presence of us., Jacob Stubbs, 
John Boyd. 

Savage and Ledgorwood At Toronto, on 
the eighteenth day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-five, John 
.Savage, of Richmond Hill, bachelor, and 
Mary Ledgerwood, of same place, spinster, 
ware, by license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us John Savage, Mary 
Ledgerwood, and in the presence of us, 
Agnes Ledgerwcwd, James Davidson. 

McKenzie and McClymont At Toronto, on 
the nineteenth day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundired and sixty-five, James 
McKenzie, of York, widower, and Jane Mc 
Clymont, of the sumo place, spinster, 
were, by license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnize! between us, James McKenzie, 
Jane McClymont, and in the presence of us, 
James French, Wm. Little. 

Mitchell and Donaldson At Toronto, on 
the twenty-fiftn day of September, one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-five, 
David Mitchell, late of Glasgow, near To 
ronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth Donaldson, 
late of F irt ar, Scotland, now of Toronto, 
spinster, daughter of Alexander Donaldson, 
were, by license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
swlemniz.e 1 between ua, David Mitchell, 
Elizabeth Donaldson, and in the presence of 
us, Michael J. Clark, Alex. Donaldson. 

Cunning-ham and McColl At Toronto, on 
the twenty-sixth day of October, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-five!. Robert 
Cunning-ham, of Vaughau, bachelor, and 
Jane McColl. of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of the late Hugh McColl, of King-, 
were, by license, united in marriage by mo, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
Hol .MiiMi/p i;;twee . us, Robert Cunningham, 
Jane McColl,, and in the presence of us, Jas. 
W Turner, George; Netheridge. 

Pearson and Dallas At Toronto, on the 
twenty-second day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-five, David 
Bi.Tsett Pearson,, of Montreal, widower, and 
Eliza Dalla,?, of Toronto, spinster, daughter 
of Angus Dallas, of the said city of Toronto, 
were, by license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnised between us, David Bissett Pear 
son, Eliza Dallas, and in the presence of us, 
R,. R. Linton. Frances Linton. 

Stephens and Jones At Toronto, on the 



sixth day of Januajry, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-six, Ebenezer Stephens, 
of Scarboro, bachelor, and Emma Jones, 
of the same place, spinster, daughter of 
James Jones, of the said township, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay, 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us. Ebenezer Stephens, Emma, Jones, 
and- in the presence of us William Donald 
son, William Clark. 

Reid and Elliott At Toronto, on the 
eleventh day of January, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-six, James Reid, of 
Vaughan, bachelor, and Sarah Jane Elliott, 
of tho same place, spinster, daughter of 
John Elliott., of Vaughan, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me., John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, James Reid, Sarah Jane Elliott, 
and in the presence of us, Marion Halliday, 
Joseph McFarlaue. 

Aitken and Marshall At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of January, one thousanii 
eight hundred and sixty-six, John Aitken, 
of Weston, bachelor, and Annie Marshall, 
of Toronto, ppinster, daughter of John Mar 
s-hall, of the same ^lace, were united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage has 1 been duly solemnized between us, 
John Aitken, Annie Marshall, and in the 
presence of us, Mary Marshall, Jas. Crosier. 

Dilkes and Colby At Toronto., on the 
thirtieth day of MayV one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-six, Harry Dilkes, of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Frances Louise Colby, 
of tho same places spinster, daughter of 
the late Jesse Colby, of Morristown, New- 
Jersey, U. S., were by license united in 
marriage by me., John Barclay. This mar 
riage has 1 been duly solemnized; between uau 
Harry Dilkes, Frances Louise Colby, and in 
the presence of us, John EJ. Colby, W!m. 
Geo. Castell. 

Ingram and Holtby At Toronto, on the 
ninth day of July, one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty-six, George Ingram, of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Elizabeth Holtby, of 
the same place, spinster, were by license, 
united in marriage by me., John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, George Ingram, Elizabeth Holtby, 
and in the presence of J. Threlkeld,, Eli/a- 
beth Collard. 

Gilbert and Chase At Toronto, on tlw 
twelfth day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-six, were married by li 
cense,, William Gilbert, Corporal II. M. 47th 
Regt., bachelor, and Mary "Elizabeth) Chase, 
of Toronto, spinster, D.v me, John Barclay. 
This marriage- has been duly solemnized be- 
i twoen us, W. Gilbert, Cort>oral II. M. 47th 
Regt., Mary Elizabeth Chaae, and in the 
presence of us, William Miller, 47th Regt., 
Sarah Miller. 

Mitchell and Carson At Toronto, on the 
second day of August, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-six, John Mitchell, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Rebecca Carson, of 
the same place, spinster, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me., John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us* John Mitchell, Rebecca Cars-on, 
and in the presence of William Bronte, 
Elizabeth Calgary. 

Monro and McLean At Toronto, on the 

third day of September, one thousand eight 

I hundred and sixty-six, wore married by li- 

! cense. Alexander Monro, of Toronto, bache- 

I lor, and Bessie McLeAn, of the same place, 

spinster, daughter of the late Angus Mo- 



210 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



Lean, of the aald city, by me. John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Alexander Monro, Bessie McLean. 
and in the presence of us, Robert Kerr, 
Jr.. Maggie Bright. 

McDougall and McDougall At Toronto, 
on the eleventh dav of September, one thou 
sand eigrht hundred and sixty -six, Murdoch 
McDougall, of Blderslie, bachelor, and Mary 
McDougall, of Toronto, spinster, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Murdoch McDougall, Mary Mo- 
Dougall, and in the presence of us, Anne 
McDougall, Noil McDougall. 

Morrison and Craig At Toronto, on the 
twenty-seventh day of September, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-six, Mat 
thew Morrison, of Toronto, bachelor, and 
Prudence Craig, of Chinguacousy , spinster, 
daughter of David Craig, of the said town 
ship of Ohinguacousy,, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Matthew Morrison, Prudence 
Craig, and in the presence of us, Hugh Mor 
rison, Mary Morrison. 

Reid and Kavanagh At Torontov on the 
eighth day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty -six, after regular pro 
clamation of bannsv John Held, of HI. M. 
17th Regt. of Foot, and Annie Kavanagh, 
of Toronto, spinster, were united in mar 
riage by me, John Barclay. This marriage 
has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Reid, Annie Kavanagh, and in the 
presence of us, John Scanlon, Sarah Kav 
anagh. 

Bell and Taylor At Toronto, on the 
seventeenth day of October., one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-six, Samuel Bell, 
of the city of Detroit, U. S., bachelor, and 
Agnes Isabella Taylor, of the city of To 
ronto, spinster, daughter of Archibald, Tay 
lor, of said city,, wera 1 by license united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar- 
hns been duly solemnized between us, 
Samuel Bell, A gne* Isabella Taylor, and in 
the presence of us, R*. Binton, Jennet Mc- 
Kenzie. 

Coey and Hull At Toronto, on the 
twelfth day of December, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-six, by license, John 
Coey, of Vaughan, bachelor, and Elizabeth 
Hull, of same place, spinster, were united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar- 
has been duly solemnized between us, 
John Coey, Elizabeth Hull, and in the pres>- 
ence of us. John Watson, Susanna Brown. 

Orozier and Marshall At Toronto, on- the 
twenty-eeventh day of December, onp thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-eix, James 
Crorier, of Toronto, bachelor, and Mary 
Marshall, of the same place, spinster, daugh 
ter of John Marshall, of the said city, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, James Crozler, Mary Marshall, and 
in the presence of us. Joseph Marshall, Mary 
Thomson. 

Gemmell and Morrison At Toronto, on 
the second day of February, one thousand 
eight hundred, and sixty-seven. Thorn. Gem 
mell. of St. Mary s, widower, and Chris 
tina Morrison, of the same place, spinster, 
laughter of the late John Morrison, were 
united in marriage by me. John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Thomas Gemmell, Christina Mor 



rison, and in the presence of \m, John 
Helps. Jane Struthers. 

Curry and McNabb At Toronto, en the 
fifth day of February, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-seven. John Curry, of 
Nottawasaga. bachelor, and Anne McNabbj 
of Toronto, spinster, daughter of the late 
Peter McNabb, of Nottawasaga, were 
united in marriage by me. John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us. John Curry, Anne McNabb, and 
in the presence of us,, John J. Gtrassiok, J. 
Mullen, Alex. T. Pulton. 

Milburn and Edminson At Toronto, on 
the twenty^-sixth day of February, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-seven, Joseph 
Milburn,, of the township of Smith, bache 
lor, and Mary Anne Edmiiitjon, of the same 
place, spinster, daughter of John Eilminson, 
of the sai;l township, were, by license, 
united in marriage by me, Joftin liarclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Joseph Milburn, Mary Ann Edmin- 
son, and in the presence of us, Anne Hunter, 
Lilly Cameron. 

Williamson and Balrd At Toronto, on 
the nineteenth, day of March, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-seveu. William Ren- 
nie Williamson, bachelor, of Amaranth, late 
of Caledon. and Martha Baird, spinster, 
daughter of Adam Baird, of the same place, 
were, by license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, William Rennie Wil 
liamson, Martha Baird, and in the presence 
of John Denison. Rosa Cameron. 

Dallas and Waddell At Toronto, on the 
ninth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-seven, Angus Dallas, of 
Toronto, widower, and Jane Ann Waddell, 
of the same place, spinster, were by license 
united in marriage by mo,, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Angus Dallas, Jano Ann Waddell, 
and in the presence of us, Francis Rooney, 
Sarah Kelly. 

Clarke and Leary At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty -seven. Private Henry 
Clarke, of H. M. 17th Regt. of Foot, now 
stationed at Toronto, bachelor, and Jane 
Leary., of Toronto, widow of the late Tim 
othy Leary, of Belfast, Ireland, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, H. Clarke, Jane Leary, and in the 
presence of us. James McGormick, Ellen 
Mamer. . 

Bruce and Telford At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day of ApriL one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-seven, John Gould 
Bruce, of Toronto, bachelor, and Rosanna 
Telford. of the same place, spinster, were 
by license* united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, John G. Bruce, Rosanna 
Telford, and. in the presence of us, Sa.muei 
HuD, Margaret ROBS. 

Harton and Miller At Toronto, on the 
twenty-ninth day of April, one thousand 
eight hundred, and sixty-seven, James* Har 
ton, of Toronto, bachelor, and Margar- 
otta Miller, of the same place, spinster, 
laughter of John Miller, Armourer Sergeant 
in IT. M. 17th Regt. of Foot, were by license 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Jair 3 Harton, Margaretta Millon 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



211 



and in the presence of us. John Miller, 
Sophia Miller. 

Carroll and H ayward At Toronto, on the 
thirtieth day of April, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-seven, William Carroll, 
f the Commissariat Staff Corps, bachelor, 
and Clara Havward, Toronto, spinster, were 
by license, united in marriage, by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between MS, W. Carroll, Clara Hy- 
ward. and in the presence f us, B. Briggs, 
Charles McEachern. 

Waterhouse and Qormiey At Toronto, on 
the first daiy of May., one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-seven, after duo procla 
mation of banns, Robert Waterhouse, Corp 
oral in H. M. 17th Regt., bachelor, and 
Elizabeth Gormley, Toronto, spinster, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us,. R- Waterhouse, Elizabeth G-orlm- 
ley, an t in the presence of us, H. Clarke, 
Jane Clarke. 

Strachan and Murdoch At Toronto, on 
the twenty-sixth day of June, one thousand 
eight humired and sixty-seven, .luhii 
Strachan. of Toronto, bachelor, and Mar 
garet Murdoch, of the same place, spinster, 
daughter of Alexander William Murdoch, of 
the said city, were, by license, united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage hart been duly solemnized, between us. 
J. Strachan, M. Murdoch, and in the pres 
ence oS us, A. MacNabb, M. A. Murdoch. 

McLennan and Marks At Toronto, on the 
eleventh day of July, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-seven, by license of His 
Excellency Loird Monok, Governor-General 
of Canada., Hugh McLennan, of the city of 
Toxotito, widower, and Elizabeth Marks, of 
the same place, spinster, were united in 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage ha been duly solemnized) between us,, 
H. McLennan, E. Marks, and in the presence 
of net, R. J. Stanley, Mrs. Stanley. 

Pringle and Wait At Toronto, on the 
thirteenth day of August, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-seven, by license 
ef HL? Excellency Lord Monck, Governor- 
General of Oanada, Thomas Murray Pringle, 
of Toronto, bachelor, and Lucinda Henrietta 
Wait, of the same place, spinster, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween as, T, M. Pringle, L. H. Wait, and in 
the presence of as, B. S. Dick* on, O. C. 
fcobb. 

Crawford *nd Robertson At Toronto, on 
the twenty - third day of September, one 
tfeeusand eight hundred and rixty-seven, by 
Veenm of His Excellency the Governor-Gen 
eral of Canada, Lord Monok, Emory Oscar 
Crawford, of Buffalo, U. S., bachelor, and 
Jennett Robertson, ef Toronto, daughter 
t the late John Robertson, were united IB 
marriage by me, John Barclay. This mar 
riage baa been duly solemnized, between ua, 
R. O. Crawford, Jennett Robertson, and in 
the Dresence of us, Harriet Plowman, John 
Bobertson. 

Briggs and Bisooe At Toronto, OB the 
twenty-sixth day of October, one thousan.a 
eight hundred and lixty-ieren, by license 
ef Hb Excellency the Governor-General, 
Lord Mo nck, Frederick Briggs, Royal Com 
missariat Staff Corps, bachelor, and Eliza 
beth Biscoe, of Toronto, spinster, were 
\roited in marriage by me, John Barclay, 
marriage has been duly solemnized be 



tween us, Frederick Briggs, Elizabeth Biscoe, 
and in the presence of us.. Win. Skellington, 
Margaret McArthur. 

Hallam and Kcrny At Toronto, on the 
second day of November, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-seven, by license of His 
Excellency Viscount Monck, Governor-Gen 
eral of Canada. ThoTOa." Hallum, Lance-Corp- 
oral H. M. 17th Regt. of Foot, now sta 
tioned at Toronto, bachelor, and Sarah 
Kennjr, of the said city, spinster, daughter 
of John Kenny* of the same place, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnired be 
tween us. Thomas Hallam, Sarah Kenny, 
and- in, the presence of us, H. Clarke, Eliza 
Kenny. 

MoDougall and Altken At Toronto, on 
the twenty-second day of November, one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty -seven, by 
license of His Excellency the Governor- 
General. John McDougall, of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Christina Aitken, of the same 
place, spinster, daughter of the late James 
Aitken, were united Jn marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, John McDougall, 
Christina Aitken, and in the presence of 
us, William Deans, Matilda Moffatt. 

McEchnle and Mclntyre At Toronto, on 
the twenty-seventh day of November 1 , one 
thousand eight hundred and sixty-seven, 
hy license of His Excellency the Governor- 
General of the Dominion of Oanada, Roder 
ick McEchnie, of the township of Proton, 
bachelor, and Margaret Mclntyre, of Eldon, 
spinster, were uulted in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. Th g marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us. Roderick McEchnie, 
Margaret Mclntyreu and in the presence of 
us , Alex. McKenzie, Isabella Mclntyre. 

Farley and Robinson At Toronto, on the 
thirtieth day of November, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-seven, by license 
of His Excellency the Governor-General of 
Canada, William Farley, of Toronto, bache 
lor, and Christina Robinson, of the same 
place, spinster, were united in marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage ha 
been duly solemnized between us, William 
Farley, Christina Robinson, and in the pres 
ence of us, Wm. Lamb, Mary Robinson. 

Low and Blair At Toronto, on the fifth 
day of December, one thousand, eight hun 
dred and sixty-seven, by license of His Ex 
cellency the Governor-General, Viseount 
Monck, of the Dominion of Canada, author 
izing the solemnization of marriage between 
John Low. bachelor, and Maria Jane Blair, 
spinster, both of Toronto, the said John 
Low and Maria Jane Blair were united in 
marriage by me. John Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnize^ between ua, 
John Low, Maria Jane Blair, and in the) 
presence of us, Laimmie Gibb, Rich Riehey. 

Biekel and Lark At Toronto, on the sixth 
day of December, one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty-seven, by license- of His Ex 
cellency the Governor-General of "Can 
ada, George Edward Biekel, bachelor, of 
Toronto, and Hannah Maria Lark, spin 
ster, of Weaton, were united in marriage 
by toe, John Barclay. This marriage ha 
been drily solemnized between us, Gk. B. 
Biekel, w. M. Lark, and in the presence of 
us, WV Kennedy, Aggie Cameron. 

Scanlon and Marshall At Toronto, on the 
nineteenth day of December, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-seven, after regu- 



212 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



lar publication of bann.<% John Scanlon, of 
If. M. 17th Regt. of F : oot, bachelor, and 
^Elizabeth Marshall, of Brantford, spin- 
flter, daughter of Henderson Marshall, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us. John Scanlon, Elizabeth Marshall, 
and in the presence of us, John Reid, J. 
Anne Raymond. 

Duguid and Gardener At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fourth day of Deoettnber, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-seven* Alex 
ander Duguid, of Toronto, widower, and Rliza 
Gardener, of the same nlaee. spinster, daughter 
of the late Thomas Gwrdener, Ireland, were 
by license, united in marriage by me, John 
Barclay. This marriage has been duly sol 
emnized between us, Alexander Duguid, 
Eliza Gardener, and in the presence of us, 
Robert Hunter, William S. Duguid. 

Tedder and McGillivray At Toronto, on 
the thirty-first day of December, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-seven,, by li- 
cense of His Excellency Viscount Monok, 
Governor-General of Canada, Thomas Ted 
der, of Vaughan, bachelor, and Mary Mc 
Gillivray, of the same place, spinster, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us. Thomas Tedder, Mary McGilli 
vray, and in the presence of John Tedder, 
Catherine McGillivray. 

McLeask and Cooper At Toronto, on the 
fifth day of March, one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty-eight, by license of His Ex 
cellency Viscount Mouck, Governor-General 
of Canada, Peter Stephen McLeask, of the 
Commissariat Staff Oorps, bachelor, and 
Sidney Maria Cooper, of Toronto, spinster, 
were, by license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, Peter Stephen Mc 
Leask, Sidney Maria Cooper, and in the 
prpesence of us, Alice Tylston Fryer, John 
ston E. Cooper. 

Blair and Turner At Toronto, on the 
twenty-third day ofd March, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-eight, after regu 
lar proclamation of banns> Thomas Blair, 
private in the 17th Regt., bachelor, and 
Caroline Turner, of Toronto, spinster, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, T. Blair, Caroline Turner, and in 
the presence of us. Charles Edwin Gardner, 
Margaret Starr. 

Milligan and McArthur At Toronto, on 
the twenty-second day of April, one thou 
sand eight hundred and sixty-eight, by li 
cense of H s Excellency the Governor-Gen 
eral, James Milligan, of H. M. 13th Regt. 
of H-uesars, and Janet McArthur, of To 
ronto, spinster, were united in marriage 
by me, John Barclay. This marriage has 
been duly solemnized between us, James Mil 
ligan, Janet McArthur, and in the presence 
of us, Frederick Briggs, Margaret McAr 
thur. 

Palmer and Campbell At Toronto, on the 
fifth day of May, one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty-eight, after regular pro 
clamation of banns, John Palmer, of H . M. 
17th Regt., bachelor, and Isabella Deni- 
ren Jane Camjibell, of Toronto, spinster, 
were, bv license, united in marriage by me, 
John Barclay. This marriage has beon duly 
olemnize 1 between us, John Palmer, Isabella 
D. Jane Campbell, and in the presence of 
John Clark. 17th Regt., and Ellen Robins. 

Delamore and Proudfoot At Toronto* on 



! the first day of June,, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-eight, by license of Hi 
i Excellency the Governor-General, Jeremiah 
! Arnold Delamore, of Trafalgar, bachelor, 
and Caroline Proudfoot, of the same place, 
spinster, daughter of J. Proudfoot, were 
united in marriage by- me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us* Jeremiah Arnold Delamore, Caro 
line Proudfoot, and in the presence of us, 
Aggie B. Cameron, Vina Pares. 

Peddie and Downie At Tro-onto, on the 
sixth day of August, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-eight, wore married by 
license., of His Excellency the Governor- 
General, Peter Peddie, of the township of 
Nottawasaga, and Mary Downie, of the town 
of Milton, by me, Kenneth Maclennan, act 
ing for the Rev. Dr. Barclay. This mar 
riage has been duly solemnized between us. 
Peter Peddie, Mary Downie, and in the 
presence of us. James Peddle. Jane Downie. 
Lamb and Robinson At Toronto, on the 
sixth day of August, o-ne thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-eight, William Lamb, of 
Toronto, bachelor, and Mary Margaret Rob 
inson, of the same place, spinster, daughter 
of the late George Robinson* by license of 
His Excellency the Governor-General, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be- 
tewen us* Win. Lamb, Mary M. Robinson, 
and in the presence of us. Wm. F&rlery, 
Christina Farley. 

Munn and Holow At Toronto, on the 
tenth day of August, one thousand eis ht 
hundred and sixty-eight, by license of His 
Excellency, the Governor General, David 
Munn, of Nottawasaga, widower, and Sarah 
Rolow, of Toronto, spinster, daughter of 
tho late Francis Rolow, of Oakville, were 
united in marriage by me, John Barclay. 
This marriage has been duly solemnized be- 
tweon us, David Munn, Sarah Rolow, and in 
the presence of us, David Whelihan, Anni 
Blackman. 

G ; ray and Daly At Toronto, on the 
eleventh day of August, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-eig-nt, by license of His 
Exoolloncy, the Governor General of the 
Dominion of Canada, Frost Wood, Esq., of 
Quebec, bachelor, am! Jessie Leonora Daly, 
of Toronto, spinster, daughter of J. M. Daly, 
were united in marriage, by me, John Bar 
clay. This marriage has been duly solemn 
ized between us, F. Wood Gray, Jessie L. 
Dalv, and in the presence of us, W. Geo. 
Boswell, J. A. Daly, jr., S. J. Daly. 

Scadding- and Rogers At Toronto, on the 
twenty-fifth day of August, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-eight, by license 
of His Excellency, the Governor General, 
Edward Ashenden Scadding, bachelor, of 
Toronto, and Jennet Augusta Rogers, spin 
ster, daughter of Joseph Rogers, of the 
same place, were united in marriage, by 
rue, John Barclay. This marriage has been 
luly solemnized between us, fi. A. Scadding, 
Jennet Augusta Rogers, and in the pre 
sence of S. Scadding, J. A. Bastedo. 

Hooper and Gilmore At Toronto, on the 
twenty-sixth day of August, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-eight, by license 
of his Excellency, the Governor General, 
Oharlei Edward Hojper, of Toronto, bach 
elor, and Isabella L mise Gllmore, were unit 
ed in marriage, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween, us, Chas. Ed. Hmper, Isabella Louise 



LANDMARKS OF TORONTO. 



213 



Gilmore. and in the presence of James Michie, 
Maria Louisa Gilmora. 

Malcom and Cooper At Toronto, on the 
first of October, one thousand eight hun 
dred and sixty-eight, by Hcensa of his Ex 
cellency, the Governor General of the Do 
minion of Canada, Andrew Malcom, of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Emma Adelaide Coop 
er, of the same place, spinster, were united 
in marriage, by me, John Barclay. This 
marriage has been duly solemnized be 
tween us, Andrew Malcom, Emma Adelaide 
Cooper. 

Wallace and Dean At Toronto, on the 
first day of October, one thousand eight 
hundred and sixty-eight, after due publica 
tion) of banns, George Wallace, of Toronto, 
bachelor, and Jane Dean, of the same place, 
spinster, were united in marriage, by me. 
John Barclay. This marriage has been duly 
solemnized between us, George Wallace, 
Jane Dean, and in the presence of us, Ohas. 
Dean, Mary Dean. 

Campbell and McEaohern At Toronto, on 
the eighth day of October, one thousand 
eight hundred and sixty-eight, by license of 
His Excellency the Governor-General of the 
Dominion; of Canada, Neil Campbell, of To 
ronto, bachelor, and Charlotte McEaohern, 
of the same place, sp nater, daughter of 
Roger McEachbrn, of the vUlage of S