www.QV500.com - Dauer EB110 Part 1: EB110 SS
 

Dauer EB110 SS
Bugatti's revival under Romano Artioli lasted just a few years before the company went bust in 1997. Launching an enormously complex supercar costing more than half-a-million dollars seemed like a great idea back in the late eighties, but when the world economy tanked, Bugatti were left high and dry. Ironically, by the time trustees auctioned off Bugatti's stock of partially completed cars and parts, western markets were on the verge of recovery. For Bugatti's Campogalliano factory in Italy it was too late, but the EB110 had something of an afterlife as practically every part from the '97 fire sale was sold to Dauer Racing in Nuremberg.
   
Dauer will be familiar as the firm who masterminded undoubtedly the best street conversion for Porsche's 962, an example of which won outright at Le Mans in 1994. Included in the huge array of spares were five partially completed EB110's that Dauer built up between 2001 and '02. They basically became four-wheel drive versions of the original SS with carbonfibre bodies and tuned engines. Output rose from 612 to 645bhp which, combined with the reduced body weight, made these the fastest EB110's manufactured. The carbonfibre monocoque and independent double wishbone suspension were basically unaltered except for slightly softer springs to offset the reduction in weight. Likewise, 322mm brake discs with four-pot Brembo calipers and 18-inch BBS magnesium wheels were the same as earlier SS derivatives. Come 2001, Bugatti's 3.5-litre V12 may have been over a decade old, but it could still hold its own against the normally-aspirated engines powering most top flight supercars. Complete with four IHI turbochargers, five-valves per cylinder and a six-speed gearbox, the engines used by Dauer were specially blueprinted to improve gas-flow within the quad-turbo installation.
 

Dauer EB110 SS
As standard, the Dauer EB110 produced 645bhp, but with an optional sports exhaust and modified ECU, this rose to an astonishing 705bhp. Perhaps the most important new feature though was all-carbon bodywork, this saving around 200kg. The same material was also used for new one-piece inner fenders and the rear bulkhead. Not only were the new bodies considerably lighter than before, they were also a whole lot stronger. Each of the five cars manufactured came in a different colour, one being painted traditional Bugatti Blue, one Black, one Silver, one Dark Silver, the other coming in stunning lacquered Carbon.
   

Based on the simpler SS interior, Dauer's EB110's all came equipped with the SS bucket seats, three-spoke steering wheel, transmission tunnel and dash without glovebox. Quilted leather covered the sills, transmission tunnel and even the floor, colour-matching hide also being used for the dash, instrument binnacle, steering wheel, gearshift, windscreen pillars and door trim. With typical German attention to detail, the cockpit was much better finished than before although nothing could be done about the cramped footwells. Additionally, all five came with a combined Kenwood satellite navigation, DVD and TV system. The weight-saving made by using carbonfibre bodywork more than cancelled out the added ballast of four-wheel drive resulting in a stupendously quick car. 0-60 required just 3.3 seconds and while the Dauer EB110's top speed has never officially been recorded, the rumours are it could exceed 225mph. As you would expect, turbo lag was noticeable when accelerating from very low speeds, but in the zone and throttle response was instant. Handling and grip were improved thanks in part to the latest generation Michelin Pilot tyres which also generated less noise.

 

Dauer EB110 SS

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