The Official Web Site of Vince Lombardi The Official Web Site of Vince Lombardi The Official Web Site of Vince Lombardi The Official Web Site of Vince Lombardi
The Official Web Site of Vince Lombardi The Official Web Site of Vince Lombardi The Official Web Site of Vince Lombardi The Official Web Site of Vince Lombardi
The Official Web Site of Vince Lombardi

BIOGRAPHY

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In 1967, after nine phenomenal winning seasons with the Packers, Vince decided to retire as head coach (though he would still act as general manager). The Packers had dominated professional football under his direction, collecting six division titles, five NFL championships, two Super Bowls (I and II) and acquiring a record of 98-30-4. They had become the stick by which all other teams were measured.

One year into his retirement, Vince realized that he still wanted to coach. He accepted the head coaching position for the Washington Redskins in 1969. During that season, Vince kept what had become the Lombardi tradition and led the Redskins to their first winning record in 14 years. In January of 1970, his professional coaching record stood at a remarkable 105-35-6, unmarred by a losing season, and the NFL named him their acclaimed "1960s Man of the Decade."

Unfortunately, Vince would never again have the opportunity to lead another team to the Super Bowl. He was diagnosed with intestinal cancer and died on Sept. 3, 1970. Over 3,500 people attended his funeral (the news was filled with stories about fans who drove cross-country to be there), and hard-nosed football players cried openly. President Richard Nixon, who had telegrammed Vince get well wishes while he was ill, sent another telegram of condolence to Marie signed "The People." Vince was buried at Mount Olivett Cemetery, in Middletown, N.J.

Vince helped the men he coached succeed to the furthest of their abilities. He brought them pride and victory, and his legacy of perseverance, hard work and dedication has made him one of the most admired and well respected coaches in history.

Vince Lombardi was inducted into the Professional Football Hall of Fame in 1971, the same year that the Super Bowl trophy was renamed in his honor. Considered the NFL's most prestigious award, the Vince Lombardi Trophy is coveted by every player and coach in the league. The honor assures that Lombardi's name will never be forgotten, and that his legacy as one of the greatest head coaches of all time will last an eternity.

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Historical Photo Gallery