WW2 German Cavalry

Cavalry of the Wehrmacht


The 1st Cossack Division

The 1st Cossack Cavalry Division was created by combining the von Pannwitz Mounted Force, the Cossack Platow Cavalry Regiment, and the von Jungschultz Cavalry Regiment on 04August1943.
 
Order of Battle
1st Brigade
     CO Col. Wagner
  1st Don Cossack Regiment
  4th Kuban Cossack Regiment
  2nd Siberian Cossack Regiment
  Caucasus Artillery Battalion
 
2nd Brigade
     CO Colonel von Schulz
   3rd  Kuban Cossack Regiment
   5th Don Cossack Regiment (under Gen. Kononov, the only Cossack CO)
   6th Terek Cossack Regiment
   Caucasus Artillery Battalion
 
 In late 1943 the 1st and 2nd Brigades were converted to Divisions and later formed the Cossack Cavalry Corps, under LtGen. von Pannwitz.
 December of 1944 sees the Cossack Corps taken over by the Waffen SS and redesignated the 1st and 2nd Cossack Divisions of the XV SS Cossack Cavalry Corps (30April1945)
 
 
 
Dates from:
(Cavalry of World War II by J Piekalkiewicz, Horses of the German Army in World War II by Paul Louis Johnson, Cavalry of the Wehrmacht by Christion Klaus Richter, Axis Cavalry in World War II by Dr. Jeffrey T. Fowler)
 
 
 

2nd Cossack Division

The 2nd Cossack Cavalry Brigade was formed from the members of the 2nd Cossack Cavalry Brigade:
 3rd Kuban Cossacks
 5th Don Cossacks
 6th Terek Cossacks

The Kalmyk Cavalry Corps

The Kalmyk Kavallerie Korps started its existence as the Abwehrtruppe 103 (or 103rd Defense Troop), although it was later nicknamed the "Kalmyken Verband Dr Doll" in honor of one Dr. Doll, counter-intelligence officer who was responsile for expanding and divided  the unit into two brigades of two regiments each in August, 1942.
 
 The Korps was set-up by the Panzer Army high command within the 6th Army at Stalingrad as a vanguard for the protection of the extended rear lines.
 By mid 1943, there were seven reported Kalmyk units in service.(Cavalry of World War II by J Piekalkiewicz)
 
 August 1943 Order of Battle:
 
1st Battalion
2nd Battalion
3rd Battalion
4th Battalion
5th Battalion
  Each consisting of 5 squadrons, with 5 additional squadrons fighting in the steppes.
 
 The participation of the Kalmyk Kavallerie Korps in the German Wehrmacht was unique. In make-up and function it resembled a free corp.
 Because of its special status, the Kalmyk cavalrymen did not regard themselves as reenforcements of the German Army but rather as an independent allied force.
 Germans within the Korp had no jurisdiction but, rather, filled only administrative positions (sanitary services and functions).
 The leadership of battalions and squadrons was in the hands of the Kalmyks themselves.
 Most officers came from the Red Army Cavalry, meaning that they had senior people who had graduated from the Soviet War Academy.
 
(Cavalry of World War II by J Piekalkiewicz, Horses of the German Army in World War II by Paul Louis Johnson, Cavalry of the Wehrmacht by Christion Klaus Richter, Axis Cavalry in World War II by Dr. Jeffrey T. Fowler)

Credits

Cavalry of World War II by J Piekalkiewicz
 Horses of the German Army in World War II by Paul Louis Johnson
Cavalry of the Wehrmacht by Christion Klaus Richter
 Axis Cavalry in World War II by Dr. Jeffrey T. Fowler