International Forum >> Fellowship Programs >> Past Fellows
The International Forum for Democratic Studies runs two fellowship programs, a federally funded program, known as the Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows Program, and an unfunded Visiting Fellows Program. Brief bios of past fellows appear below, in reverse chronological order by fellowship year. To view a list of our current fellows, please visit Current Fellows.

For more information contact:
    Program Asst, Fellowship Programs
    Int'l Forum for Democratic Studies
    National Endowment for Democracy
    1025 F Street, NW, Suite 800,
    Washington, DC 20004, USA
    202.378.9700 / Fax:202.378.9407
    fellowships@ned.org


2006–2007

Diego Abente-Brun Dr. Diego Abente-Brun (Paraguay)
March–July 2007
“Between a Rock & a Hard Place: Dilemmas of Democracy in Paraguay, Ecuador, & Bolivia”

Dr. Diego Abente-Brun is currently deputy director of the International Forum for Democratic Studies at the National Endowment for Democracy. He has previously served as professor of sociology and politics at the Catholic University of Paraguay and senior research fellow at the Centro de Análisis y Difusión de la Economía Paraguaya (CADEP), a nongovernmental organization dedicated to the research and study of economic and social issues in Paraguay. In addition to his distinguished record as a scholar and published author, Dr. Abente-Brun has served as a senator (1993–2003), as Paraguay’s ambassador to the Organization of American States (1999–2002), as senior cabinet advisor to the Minister of Finance (2003–2005), and as Minister of Justice and Labor (2002). During his Reagan-Fascell fellowship, Dr. Abente-Brun explored the variables that may help or hinder the development of quality democratic systems in South America, with a particular focus on the experiences of Bolivia, Ecuador, and Paraguay.

— Last updated: Spring 2008

Events:
ArrowBetween a Rock and a Hard Place: Dilemmas of Democracy in Paraguay (Thursday, June 7, 2007)


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Ali Afshari Mr. Ali Afshari (Iran)
October 2006–February 2007
“The Challenge of Democratization in Iran”

Mr. Ali Afshari is a leading Iranian political activist who has championed the cause of democracy for over a decade. Beginning with his involvement in 1995 with the Islamic Student Association at Amir Kabir University, of which he was the secretary for three years, Mr. Afshari has been a tireless advocate of freedom, human rights and democracy. He has published more than fifty essays, conducted numerous interviews, and delivered over 100 speeches on topics relating to democracy in Iran. Imprisoned for his activities in 2000 and 2003, he spent 400 days in solitary confinement. During his fellowship, Mr. Afshari drew upon his experience as an opposition activist to assess the major factors contributing to the lack of democracy in Iran.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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Khapta Akhmedova Dr. Khapta Akhmedova (Russia)
March–July 2007
“The Psychology of Suicide Terrorism in Chechnya”

Dr. Khapta Akhmedova is professor of psychology at Chechen State University and head of the Mental Health Center for Peace-building, a nongovernmental mental health center that promotes peace-building. A native of Chechnya, she has worked tirelessly in the face of war to apply her expertise in psychology in support of a peaceful and democratic solution to the Chechen conflict. Her research has focused on what lures individuals to join terrorist groups and to engage in the kinds of suicide attacks Russia has witnessed in recent years. Following the first outbreak of war in Chechnya in 1997, she worked for the French humanitarian organization Medecins du Monde, where she coordinated psychological-assistance programs for refugees. Her many publications include writings in Russian, French, and English on terrorism, fanaticism, and postwar rehabilitation. During her fellowship, Dr. Akhmedova worked on a book on suicide terrorism in Chechnya, including measures that can be taken to end it.

— Last updated: Spring 2007

 

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Hafez Al-Bukari Mr. Hafez Al-Bukari (Yemen)
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow, October 2006–February 2007
Visiting Fellow (nonresidential), March–September 2007
“Monitoring Freedom of Expression in Yemen”

Mr. Hafez Al-Bukari is chairman of the Yemeni Polling Center, an NGO that fosters political and electoral awareness, and general secretary of the Yemeni Journalists Syndicate. As a veteran journalist and proponent of human rights and press freedom, Mr. Al-Bukari has written numerous articles in Yemeni and U.S. newspapers, including the Yemen Times, Yemen Observer, the Washington Times, and the National Review. In addition, he is a member of the informal advisory board of the American Enterprise Institute's Arab Reform program and coordinator of the International Federation of Journalists' Project in Yemen. During his fellowship, Mr. Al-Bukari developed a blueprint for a center that monitors freedom of expression in Yemen and the Gulf region.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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Rafiah Al-Talei Ms. Rafiah Al-Talei (Oman)
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow, October 2006–January 2007
Visiting Fellow (nonresidential), February–June 2008
“Promoting Women's Political Participation in Oman”

Ms. Rafiah Al-Talei is a news writer for the Middle East Broadcasting Networks, a nonprofit corporation that operates the Arabic-language Alhurra TV and Radio Sawa networks. She has served as editor-in-chief of Al Mar'ah, Oman's only Arabic and English-language women's magazine, as well as a frequent contributor to the online magazine Gulf in the Media. An experienced journalist specializing in media and women's rights, she has served as an editor and weekly columnist for Oman's leading daily newspaper, Oman, and was the contributing editor for the Oman section of Freedom House's 2005 report on "Women's Rights in the Arab World." As a candidate in 2003 for a seat on Oman's Consultative Council, which she lost by 102 votes, she educated people in her local district regarding the democratic process. Drawing on her experiences as a journalist and political candidate, Ms. Al-Talei's fellowship project examined the political challenges confronting Omani women today and identified ways to increase their involvement in the political process. In 2007, Ms. Al-Talei co-founded an NGO called the Gulf Forum for Citizenship, based in Woodbridge, Virginia.

— Last updated: Spring 2008

 

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Nigina Bakhrieva Ms. Nigina Bakhrieva (Tajikistan)
March–July 2007
“Democracy in Tajikistan: The Role of Nongovernmental Organizations”

Ms. Nigina Bakhrieva is founder and director of the Bureau on Human Rights and Rule of Law, a Dushanbe-based nongovernmental organization working to promote human rights, press freedom, and the rule of law in Tajikistan. One of her country’s leading human rights activists, she is the chair of a network of Tajik NGOs that has prepared a series of reports on human rights in Tajikistan for the UN Human Rights Committee. She has collaborated with and provided training for lawyers, judges, and NGO practitioners throughout Central Asia in the areas of judicial reform, human rights, and capacity building. She has also worked as a legal assistant in the UN Office for Peace Building in Tajikistan. Prior to joining the nongovernmental sector, she taught civil, commercial, and private law for six years as assistant professor of civil law at Tajik State National University in Dushanbe. During her fellowship, Ms. Bakhrieva examined the emergence of nongovernmental organizations in Tajikistan and the challenges they face in promoting democracy.

— Last updated: Spring 2007

Events:
ArrowNGOs and War: The Case of Tajikistan (Wednesday, June 6, 2007)


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Michael Boda Mr. Michael Boda (Canada/U.S.)
October 2006–February 2007
“Beyond Free and Fair: International Law as a Standard for Evaluating Elections”

Mr. Michael Boda is an international election consultant and has worked with the Inter-Parliamentary Union, the OSCE, the Carter Center, and the U.S. National Association of Secretaries of State on election standards and administration. In 2003–2004, he was a visiting research fellow at the Brookings Institution, where he conducted research on electoral processes. Between 1995 and 2000, he served as senior editor and deputy director of information resources at IFES, where he established and managed three global web-based resources, the Administration and Cost of Elections Project, CNN-IFES Election Watch, and ElectionGuide.org, which provide the public with up-to-date information on elections around the world. During his fellowship, Mr. Boda developed a framework for assessing elections that integrates the theory and practice of election monitoring and administration.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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Jose Luis Gascon Mr. Jose Luis Gascon (Philippines)
March–July 2007
“Reconsolidating Philippine Democracy: Constitutional Continuity and Change”

Mr. Jose Luis Gascon is executive director of LIBERTAS (Lawyer’s League for Liberty), a Manila-based network of civic-minded legal professionals committed to reforms in the justice sector and the promotion of freedom, equality, and the rule of law in the Philippines. He also lectures in the political science departments of Ateneo de Manila University and De La Salle University, and is corporate secretary of the International Center for Innovation, Transformation, & Excellence in Governance (INCITEGov). The youngest member to both the 1986 Constitutional Commission and the first Congress following the end of martial law, Mr. Gascon has also served as a peace negotiator and undersecretary of education. He was the recipient of an Asian Public Intellectual Fellowship in 2007, a Stanford University Summer Fellowship on Democracy and Development in 2005, and a Benigno S. Aquino Fellowship for Public Service in 2001. During his fellowship at NED, Mr. Gascon examined the challenges of Philippine democracy, with particular focus on the strengthening of political institutions.

— Last updated: Spring 2007

Events:
ArrowThe Congressional Elections in the Philippines: An Initial Assessment (Thursday, May 24, 2007)
ArrowDemocratic Recession in the Philippines: What Went Wrong? (Tuesday, July 17, 2007)

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Jared Genser Mr. Jared Genser (United States)
Visiting Fellow (nonresidential), October 2006–July 2007
“The Fifth Freedom: Inspiring Stories of Human Rights Defenders”

Mr. Jared Genser is an internationally recognized human rights lawyer currently working as an associate with the law firm DLA Piper LLP. He is the founding president of Freedom Now, an NGO whose mission is to improve respect for human rights by securing the release of prisoners of conscience through focused legal, political, and public-relations advocacy efforts. During his fellowship, Jared worked on a book entitled The Fifth Freedom: Inspiring Stories of Human Rights Defenders, a narrative nonfiction account of the real-life stories of people who have sacrificed their freedom to promote democracy and human rights around the world. He has served as pro bono counsel for the individuals to be featured in his book, having assisted in securing their releases from prison.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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Rahma Hugaira Ms. Rahma Hugaira (Yemen)
April–August 2007
“Using the Internet to Promote Women's Rights in the Arab World”

Ms. Rahma Hugaira is co-founder and chairwoman of the Yemeni Female Media Forum, a nongovernmental organization that promotes women’s rights and gender equality in the media throughout the Middle East. One of Yemen’s most respected journalists and a steadfast proponent of women’s rights, Ms. Hugaira has written for numerous Arabic newspapers and magazines, including Saba News, Al-Nas, Zahrat Al-Khaleej, and Al-Ahram. Among her other affiliations, she is director of the Rights and Freedom Defense section of the Yemen-based Foundation for the Defense of Human Rights and Freedom, and has previously served as president of the Yemeni League to Defend Journalists. During her fellowship, Ms. Hugaira examined the role of women in reform projects in the Middle East. In the long run, she plans to establish an interactive Arabic-language website that would facilitate networking among women’s rights groups in the Middle East.

— Last updated: Spring 2007

Events:
ArrowRedesigning the “Social Contract”: Toward Political Empowerment of Women in the Arab Gulf (Monday, July 9, 2007)

 

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Krzysztof Jasiewicz Dr. Krzysztof Jasiewicz (Poland/U.S.)
October 2006–February 2007
“Civil Society, Religion, and Democracy in Postcommunist Poland”

Dr. Krzysztof Jasiewicz is professor of sociology at Washington and Lee University in Virginia. A leading expert on voting behavior and political change in Poland, Dr. Jasiewicz was the founder and first director of Electoral Studies at the Institute for Political Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences. He has taught courses in sociology and comparative politics, with a focus on communism, post-communism, and European politics and societies, at U.S. and Polish universities for the last thirty-five years. He is the author, coauthor, or editor of over ten books in Polish and English, including The 1991 and 1993 Elections of the Polish Sejm (with R. Markowski, 2006) and Sustainable Democracy in Post-Communist Europe (with J. Pakulski and J. Higley, 1999) and has published articles on Polish politics and culture in a wide range of academic journals, including the European Journal of Political Research, Communist and Post-Communist Studies, and the Journal of Democracy. During his fellowship, Dr. Jasiewicz worked on a book-length manuscript on the role of religion as both a facilitator of and a potential obstacle to the development of civil society and pluralist democracy in Poland.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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Bernadeta Killian Dr. Bernadeta Killian (Tanzania)
March–August 2007
“Political Identity and Democratic Consolidation in Tanzania”

Dr. Bernadeta Killian is senior lecturer in the department of political science at the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. She is also Zanzibar coordinator at Research and Education for Democracy (REDET), a research and advocacy program based at the University of Dar es Salaam. Dr. Killian has previously served as coordinator of the Tanzania Election Monitoring Committee in Zanzibar. The winner of a Rockefeller Foundation African Dissertation Award for her research on democratization in Tanzania, she has published numerous articles on democratization and transitional politics in Tanzania and East Africa, as well as consultancy reports for organizations including the UNDP, World Bank, and the Tanzania Elections Committee. During her fellowship, Dr. Killian drew upon previously collected survey data to prepare an article on political identity and democratic consolidation in Zanzibar, and to expand into book form her dissertation on democratization in Tanzania.

— Last updated: Spring 2007

Events:
ArrowIdentity Politics in Zanzibar and the Challenges of Democratic Consolidation in Tanzania (Thursday, June 28, 2007)

 

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John Oliver Kollie Mr. John Oliver Kollie (Liberia)
October 2006–February 2007
“The Role of the Media in Fostering Peace and Good Governance in Liberia”

Mr. John Kollie is a senior producer with the Search for Common Ground in Liberia and Liberian correspondent for the English-language service of Radio France. The producer of two radio shows, "One Step Beyond" and "Policy Issues," Mr. Kollie works to create space for Liberians of diverse backgrounds to discuss critical issues relating to the future of their country. He won the Press Union of Liberia's "Investigative Reporter of the Year Award" in 2000 and its "Producer of the Year Award" in 2005. An activist for reconciliatory democracy, Mr. Kollie reported extensively on the misrule of Charles Taylor, an act that cost him his job at a Liberian television station. During his fellowship, he researched the role of the media in promoting peace and good governance in post-conflict settings and worked on a paper documenting his findings.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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Ilko Kucheriv Mr. Ilko Kucheriv (Ukraine)
October 2006–February 2007
“The Next Step for a Democratic Ukraine: Embracing Euro-Atlantic Values”

Mr. Ilko Kucheriv is founder and director of the Kiev-based Democratic Initiatives Foundation, a leading think tank that focuses on deepening democracy in Ukraine. Since its founding in 1992, Mr. Kucheriv and his institution have engaged in research and debates concerning public attitudes to political, social and economic issues. They have commissioned exit polls for major Ukrainian elections, including the 2004 presidential elections, in which massive electoral fraud led to the Orange Revolution. Widely recognized as one of Ukraine's most prominent nongovernmental activists, Mr. Kucheriv has been active in Ukrainian civil society for over twenty-five years. During his fellowship, he developed a communications campaign aimed at introducing Ukrainian citizens to the Euro-Atlantic movement and at helping them better understand and embrace Euro-Atlantic values.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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Thein Lwin Mr. Thein Lwin (Burma)
March–July 2007
“Education and Democracy in Burma”

Dr. Thein Lwin is director of the Teacher Training Center for Burmese Teachers, a nonprofit educational organization that seeks to transform the quality of education in Burma through ongoing countrywide teacher training programs. A leading proponent of the importance of education in promoting democracy, he holds a doctorate in education from the University of Newcastle, where he served as visiting lecturer in the department of education in 1999–2000. Dr. Lwin has previously also served as academic coordinator of the Burmese National Health and Education Committee, an umbrella organization of Burmese exile groups, as coordinator of an OSI-sponsored project in northern Thailand, entitled “Reading and Writing for Critical Thinking,” and as trustee of Prospect Burma, a British charity that offers scholarships to Burmese students wishing to study abroad. During his fellowship, Dr. Lwin studied educational reform within the context of political transitions, focusing on the role of classroom-level instruction in facilitating democratic change.

— Last updated: Spring 2007

Events:
ArrowEducation and Democracy in Burma: Decentralization and Classroom-Level Educational Reform (Tuesday, July 10, 2007)

 

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Manouchehr Mohammadi Mr. Manouchehr Mohammadi (Iran)
Visiting Fellow, February–May 2007
“The Student Movement in Iran: A Historical Perspective”

Mr. Manouchehr Mohammadi is a prominent democracy activist who has been at the forefront of the student movement in Iran for more than a decade. He has served as secretary general of the National Association of Iranian Students and has helped to organize a number of other student groups, including the National Union of Students and Graduates, the Organization of Iranian Intellectual Students, and the Students’ Defense Committee for Political Prisoners. For his involvement in the student uprisings of 1999, he was sentenced to death by the Iranian regime (subsequently reduced to a jail sentence of thirteen to fifteen years). In 2006, after seven years in Iran’s notorious Evin prison, Mr. Mohammadi managed to escape the country and obtain asylum in the United States. During his fellowship, Mr. Mohammadi examined the history and future prospects of the student movement in Iran.

— Last updated: Spring 2007

 

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Raushan Nauryzbayeva Dr. Raushan Nauryzbayeva (Kazakhstan)
March–July 2007
“Public Interest Lobbying as an Instrument of Democratization in Kazakhstan”

Dr. Raushan Nauryzbayeva is executive director of the Development of Civil Society, a public foundation that implements projects on human rights, ecology, and civic education in Kazakhstan. She is also president of the Alumni Research Association (ARA), a network of individuals who have held fellowships with such institutions as IREX and the Fulbright program. From 2001 to 2002, she served as deputy vice-rector of the Kazakh State Legal Academy, where she worked with the Ministry of Education on developing standardized educational methodologies and curricula, including workshops on promoting the rights of women and minorities. She has served as senior lecturer of law both at Kazakh State (1995–97) and at Kunaev University (2000–2001), where she has taught courses in constitutional and human rights law. During her fellowship, Dr. Nauryzbayeva focused on how to educate and train local Kazakh NGOs to advance their causes through participation and dialogue with governmental institutions.

— Last updated: Spring 2007

 

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Olga Nicolenco Ms. Olga Nicolenco (Moldova)
October 2006–February 2007
“Promoting Women's Involvement in Moldova's Local Public Administration”

Ms. Olga Nicolenco is head of the Chisinau chapter and permanent bureau member of the center-right Social-Liberal Party (SLP), one of Moldova's most forward-thinking, democratically minded political parties. A staunch proponent of democratic freedoms and social equality, particularly vis-à-vis women's participation in politics, she has been instrumental in the establishment of the SLP's women's caucus and in an educational campaign to deliver children's books to schools and kindergartens in the breakaway Transnistria region of Moldova. As a leading party trainer and party activist, she has participated in several television and radio shows and has published numerous newspaper articles on democracy and human rights. In November 2005, she became her party's candidate to run for mayor of Chisinau, the only woman on the ballot. During her fellowship, Ms. Nicolenco developed strategies to increase women's involvement in local public administration in Moldova.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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Jaime OrdonezDr. Jaime Ordóñez (Costa Rica)
March–July 2007
“Legal and Institutional Indicators of Democratic Governance in Central America”

Dr. Jaime Ordóñez is director of Centro Estudios Para el Futuro, a San-Jose-based institute that promotes democracy, human rights, and state reform in Central America. He is also director of the department of state theory at the University of Costa Rica’s Law School. From 2000 to 2001, he was Costa Rica’s special ambassador to the Organization of American States, where he directed its country’s negotiations related to the Inter-American Democratic Charter. He has taught constitutional and human rights law at a number of U.S. universities, including Columbia, Tulane, and the University of Maryland at College Park. In addition to writing over ten books in Spanish, including Democracy Without Rules (2004), Security, Military Forces, and Human Rights in Latin America (1999), and Human Rights: Indigenous Peoples (1995), he also has drafted ombudsman laws for Bolivia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, and Uruguay. From March to July 2007 Dr. Ordóñez was a Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow at NED, where he continued to work on compiling the 2007 Central American Report on Legal and Institutional Governance.

— Last updated: Spring 2007

 

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Le Quoc Quan Mr. Le Quoc Quan (Vietnam)
October 2006–February 2007
“Promoting Democracy in Vietnam: The Role of Civil Society”

A lawyer by training, Mr. Le Quoc Quan has worked for the past seven years as a local governance consultant to the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, UNDP, and the Swedish International Development Agency. An active participant in Vietnam's struggle for democracy, he has been vocal in his defense of religious freedom and political pluralism, both as a law student and legal advocate, and in his writings for the BBC and several Vietnamese newspapers. He is founder of Vietnam Solutions, a firm that provides consulting services on local governance, poverty reduction, and grassroots democracy for development projects in Vietnam. During his fellowship, Mr. Quan examined successful democratic transitions and considered how civil society might contribute to the democratization of Vietnam.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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Nilofar Sakhi Ms. Nilofar Sakhi (Afghanistan)
Visiting Fellow, January–March 2007
“Challenges Confronting the Women’s Movement in Afghanistan”

Ms. Nilofar Sakhi is executive director of Women Activities and Social Services Association (WASSA), an Afghan NGO that seeks to promote women’s empowerment through capacity-building workshops, seminars, and other activities. Ms. Nilofar Sakhi is executive director of Women Activities and Social Services Association (WASSA), an Afghan NGO that seeks to promote women’s empowerment through capacity-building workshops, seminars, and other activities. A leading advocate for women’s education and empowerment in Afghanistan, she spent the academic year 2006–2007 on a Fulbright fellowship at Eastern Mennonite University, in Virginia, where she pursued a graduate degree in conflict transformation. During her fellowship, Ms. Sakhi examined the challenges confronting the women’s movement in Afghanistan and gave a public presentation on the topic on March 8, 2007.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 


2005–2006
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Dany Ayida Dany Komla Ayida, Togo
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2006
Building Democracy on the Ruins of Postcolonial Dictatorship

Mr. Dany Ayida is the managing director of Africa Label, a consulting group dedicated to the promotion of development opportunities in Africa. A veteran activist for democratic reform in Togo, he founded and coordinated the Concertation Nationale de la Société Civile (CNSC), a network of pro-democracy advocacy groups that observed Togo's 2003 presidential election. In July 2003, he launched a program named Alternative Togo, which seeks to engage the Togolese diaspora in efforts to enact democratic change. He is also a seasoned journalist whose writings have appeared in La Parole, Nouvel Echo, and Le Temps, a newspaper he founded in 1999. Mr. Ayida remains an outspoken voice for human rights and democratization in Togo. In 1996, he was recognized as the Togolese Journalist of the Year, and in 1999 he was runner-up for the CNN African Journalist of the Year Award. Mr. Ayida recently published a book in French, entitled Il Faut Sauver le Togo (“We Must Save Togo”). Research for the book was done in part during Mr. Ayida’s stay at the NED, where he researched the potential for political transformation and democratic reform in Togo. In addition, Mr. Ayida published Contes du Pays de mes Aïeux (Tales of my Ancestral Lands), a collection of transcribed oral tales from various African nations. During his fellowship at the International Forum, Mr. Ayida explored strategies for facilitating the transition from authoritarian rule to multiparty democracy in Togo.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

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Joel Barkan Joel Barkan, United States
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
February–August 2000
October 2005–July 2006
Emerging Legislatures in Emerging African Democracies

Dr. Joel Barkan is professor emeritus of political science and international programs at the University of Iowa and senior associate at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. A widely recognized expert on democratic transitions in East Africa, he is the author of numerous articles, books, and book chapters on African politics, including Beyond Capitalism versus Socialism in Kenya and Tanzania (1994), "Uganda: An African Success Past Its Prime" (Woodrow Wilson International Center, 2005), "Kenya After Moi" (Foreign Affairs, 2004), "The Many Faces of Africa: Democracy Across a Varied Continent" (Harvard International Review, 2002), and "Protracted Transitions Among Africa's New Democracies" (Democratization, 2000). Over the past three years, he and several collaborators have collected a large amount of data on the role of legislatures in transitional African democracies. Dr. Barkan drew upon this data set during his Reagan-Fascell fellowship as he prepared a book-length manuscript on the legislative experience and democratization in six African countries.

— Last updated: Fall 2005

 

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Hossein Bashiriyeh Hossein Bashiriyeh, Iran
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
November 2005–August 2006
Political Mobilization and Democratic Transitions

Dr. Hossein Bashiriyeh is an associate professor of political science at the University of Tehran, where he has been teaching courses on subjects ranging from political mobilization and development to theories of democratic transitions since 1982. He is the author of fifteen books, including (in English) The State and Revolution in Iran (1984), and (in Persian) Transition to Democracy (2005), The Political Sociology of Iran (2001), Obstacles to Political Development in Iran (2000), and The Kingdom of Reason (1995). During his fellowship at NED, he examined the role of political oppositions in moving from "transitional situations" to "actual transitions," comparing cases of successful and unsuccessful democratic transitions in the last quarter of the twentieth century.

— Last updated: Fall 2005

 

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Ann Bernstein Ann Bernstein, South Africa
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2005–February 2006
Business and its Role in Newly Democratic Societies

Ms. Ann Bernstein is founding director of the Center for Development and Enterprise, an independent policy research think tank based in Johannesburg, whose publications are 'read and heard' in South Africa's cabinet. A leading proponent of the importance of economic growth in promoting democracy and sustainable development, she previously served as an executive director of the Urban Foundation, South Africa's then-premier NGO that had been instrumental in using the power and influence of business to persuade the apartheid government to reform key aspects of its approach to black urbanization. A board member of the Development Bank of Southern Africa between 1995 and 2001, she has published extensively on business, democracy, development, and policy-making in South Africa, including the books Migration and Refugee Policies (with M. Weiner, 1999), Business and Democracy: Cohabitation or Contradiction? (with P.L. Berger, 1998), and Policy Making in A New Democracy: South Africa's Challenges for the 21st Century. During her fellowship, Ms. Bernstein studied the role of business in society, especially in developing countries, and the impact of corporations on social, economic, and democratic processes.

— Last updated: Fall 2005

 

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Dogu Ergil Dogu Ergil, Turkey
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2005–February 2006
Democracy and Citizenship in Turkey: Assessing Youth Training and the Role of Public Opinion

Dr. Dogu Ergil is chair of the department of political behavior and a professor of political sociology at Ankara University in Turkey. He is also president and co-founder of the Centre for the Research of Societal Problems (TOSAM), based in Ankara. A renowned expert on terrorism, European integration, and the Kurdish minority, Dr. Ergil has written twenty-one books and dozens of articles and research papers. He has also served as an advisor to Turkey's former ministers of internal and external affairs and as a special advisor to the president of the Turkish Chambers of Commerce and Industry. In 2004, TOSAM took on the challenging work of putting together a comprehensive youth democracy training program for high schools, which was tested among high school and university students in southeastern Turkey. During his fellowship, Dr. Ergil completed this project by preparing a training manual, tentatively entitled Democracy and Effective Citizenship Training: A Handbook. He also worked on a monograph concerning citizens' attitudes toward secular and religious politics, based on research conducted prior to his fellowship.

— Last updated: Fall 2005

 

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Charles Fairbanks Charles Fairbanks, United States
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
September–December 2005
Attempted Democratic Breakthroughs in Postcommunist Societies

Dr. Charles Fairbanks is Director of the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University in Washington, D.C. His areas of expertise include the politics of Russia, Central Asia, and the Caucasus, strategic and security issues in the region, and human rights and democratization. He has previously served as deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of State, as foreign policy advisor to the campaigns of Ronald Reagan (1980) and George H.W. Bush (1988), and as a member of the political science faculty at Yale University and the University of Toronto. He is the author of The Allure of Summits (2000) and numerous articles, including "Georgia's Rose Revolution" (Journal of Democracy, April 2004), "Disillusionment in the Caucasus and Central Asia," (Journal of Democracy, October 2001), "Gorbachev's Cultural Revolution," (Commentary, August 1989), and "The Soviet Tragedy: A History of Socialism in Russia, 1917–1991" (Commentary, 1994). During his fellowship, he conducted a comparative study of democratic breakthroughs in the postcommunist world.

— Last updated: Fall 2005

 

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Elena Gerasimova Elena Gerasimova, Russia
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2006
Social and Labor Rights Advocacy in Russia

Dr. Elena Gerasimova is director and cofounder of the Center for Social and Labor Rights, a non-governmental organization that promotes economic equity, civil rights, and labor rights in Russia. She is a leading labor attorney, advocating improved wages and working conditions for Russian citizens and helping trade unions to defend their rights and the rights of their members. She is also a specialist in laws regulating civil procedure and freedom of association. Her leadership and courage have won the respect and cooperation not only of her colleagues, but also of local and federal authorities in Russia. Dr. Gerasimova has lectured on labor law at Moscow State University and the All-Russian Academy for International Trade and has published widely on the subject in Russia. During her fellowship, she compared Russian and U.S. approaches to preventing discrimination in labor relations and dispute resolutions. She also explored several features of the American legal community's relationship with labor NGOs, including the relationships of American NGOs with governmental bodies, how legal experts provide counsel to NGOs, and how NGOs work to accommodate international guidelines governing human rights. She used the results of her research to develop a strategy memorandum to guide the Center for Social and Labor Rights in its future activities and work.

— Last updated: Spring 2006

 

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Guillermo Jorge Guillermo Jorge, Argentina
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
April–August 2006
Bridging the North and South Anticorruption Agendas

Mr. Guillermo Jorge is a lawyer currently working in anti-corruption and asset-recovery programs for different Latin American governments and international institutions. He is also a professor of law at the Universidad de San Andres in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mr. Jorge worked for several years with renowned attorney Luis Moreno-Ocampo as a partner in Moreno Ocampo's law firm. Mr. Jorge was instrumental in challenging Argentine legal standards, in asking for the extradition of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet, and in litigating several cases before the Inter-American Commission of Human Rights. Considered "one of the experts in the region in asset recovery," he has served as pro-bono legal adviser for Transparency International and Poder Ciudadano. During his fellowship, Mr. Jorge produced a policy memorandum for Latin American law-enforcement agencies with analysis and recommendations on asset-recovery issues.

— Last updated: Spring 2006

 

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Nozima Kamalova Nozima Kamalova, Uzbekistan
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow (October 2005–March 2006)
Visiting Fellow (April–September 2006)
Civil Rights and the War on Terror in Uzbekistan

Ms. Nozima Kamalova is founding chair of the Legal Aid Society of Uzbekistan (LAS), a leading Uzbek NGO that safeguards and promotes the rule of law and human rights in Uzbekistan by investigating high-profile human rights abuses and providing free legal services to the poor. A highly respected human rights attorney who has been on the frontlines of the struggle for human rights and democracy in Uzbekistan, Ms. Kamalova has been instrumental in the revision of several Uzbek laws related to torture and human rights. As a Reagan-Fascell Fellow, Ms. Kamalova explored the impact of security measures in the “war against terror” on democratic freedoms and civil rights. As a Visiting Fellow, she conducted research at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in the spring and summer of 2006 and spent the academic year 2006–2007 at Harvard University’s Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. She is currently a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University’s Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law, where she continues her research and writing on the war on terror and human rights.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

TOP

Miria Matembe Miria Matembe, Uganda
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2006
Forms of Democracy and Their Implications for Women's Participation

Ms. Miria Matembe has been at the forefront of the struggle for women's rights in Uganda for over two decades. A member of Uganda's parliament since 1989, she served as Uganda's minister for ethics and integrity from 1998 to 2003, when she was elected to the Pan-African Parliament, an initiative of the African Union. She is the co-founder and former chairperson of Action for Development, Uganda's leading women's advocacy organization, and has held a number of previous appointments, including as a member of the Uganda Constitutional Commission, as member of the constituent assembly, which promulgated the 1995 national constitution, as deputy general secretary of the seventh Pan-African Congress (held in Kampala in 1990), and as senior lecturer in law and English at the Chartered Institute of Bankers in Kampala. During her fellowship, she conducted a comparative study of women's involvement in the political affairs of different democracies, in an effort to identify ways and means of enhancing the participation of women in Ugandan politics. Ms. Matembe has since returned to Uganda to implement the results of her fellowship, by establishing the Center for Women in Governance.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

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Penda Mbow Penda Mbow, Senegal
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2005–February 2006
Citizenship and Separation of Islam and the State

Dr. Penda Mbow is an associate professor of history at Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar, where she has published widely on African political and social issues, often focusing on the role of Islam in Africa. She has previously served as Senegal's minister of culture and as cultural advisor to the Senegalese department of ethnography and historical heritage. Dr. Mbow has received numerous academic awards, including a Fulbright grant to study at Michigan State University and a Rockefeller Foundation award for research at the Bellagio Center in Italy. In recognition of her achievements as a scholar, thinker, and political activist, she was named Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur Francaise (Knight of the French Legion of Honor) in 2003 and Commandeur de l'Ordre National du Mérite in 1999. Among her many areas of expertise are African intellectual history and Islamic gender studies. She is currently working on a report for the United Nations Development Program entitled, "History, Multiculturalism, and Democracy in Africa." Dr. Mbow spent her fellowship researching the evolution of Islam's relationship with democracy in Senegal, as well as the interplay between women, human rights, and religion in Islamic societies.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

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Grigorij Meseznikov Grigorij Mesesznikov, Slovakia
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2006
The Role of Think Tanks in Democratic Transitions and in Democratic Policy Making

Mr. Grigorij Mesesznikov is a political scientist and president of the Institute for Public Affairs (IVO), widely considered one of Slovakia's most influential think tanks. In addition to editing A Global Report on the State of Society, IVO's annual scorecard on Slovak democracy for the last ten years, Mr. Mesesznikov has also contributed to Freedom House's Nations in Transit from 1999 to 2004. Through scholarly research and political activism, Mr. Mesesznikov was an active participant in several opposition movements against the authoritarian regime of Vladimir Meciar in the 1990s and has gained a reputation for his positive and far-reaching "role in the struggle for democratization and the creation of a pluralist public sphere" in Slovakia. He was a senior researcher of political science and international relations at the Slovak Academy of Sciences, where he published numerous articles that pushed for democratic reforms. He also served as a member of the informal advisory board to the Democratic Party, a center-right political party that was part of the coalition that brought down the Meciar regime in 1998. During his fellowship, Mr. Mesesznikov examined the ways in which think tanks in advanced democracies influence the policy-making process in order to apply the lessons he learned to Slovakia.

— Last updated: Spring 2006

 

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Vandita Mishra Vandita Mishra, India
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2006
Democracy and the Party System: Possibilities and Constraints of India's Party System

Ms. Vandita Mishra is a journalist and member of the lead editorial team with the Indian Express, one of India's most prominent English-language daily newspapers. As the newspaper's senior assistant editor, she writes a weekly op-ed column called "Us and Them," which examines foreign media, as well as an occasional column on political issues for the editorial page. Prior to joining the Indian Express, she served as assistant editor at the Pioneer, another English-language daily, where she wrote a biweekly column for the editorial page. Her articles touch on a wide range of political issues and have also appeared in the Hindustan Times, the Tribune, and the journal Seminar. During her fellowship, Ms. Mishra conducted a comparative study of political party systems, with a particular focus on India's party system and the cultivation of norms governing relations between parties when they unite to form coalition governments. Her project resulted in a series of articles to be published in the Indian Express.

— Last updated: Spring 2006

 

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Mungiu-Pippidi Alina Mungiu-Pippidi, Romania
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2005–February 2006
A Democratic Agenda for State Building

Dr. Alina Mungiu-Pippidi is director of the Romanian Academic Society, one of Romania's foremost think tanks and a leading policy advocacy group in the region. She is an analyst for Freedom House's annual Nations in Transit survey for Romania, in addition to serving as a consultant to the United Nations Development Programme in the Balkans and to the World Bank in the Caucasus. Internationally recognized as one of Romania's most original thinkers, she has produced countless books and articles on Central European politics, as well as a critically acclaimed play. In the fall of 2004, Dr. Mungiu-Pippidi helped initiate the Coalition for a Clean Parliament, an anti-corruption campaign that sought to discourage the election of politicians with a record of corruption during the 2004 general elections. During her fellowship, she wrote a paper on anticorruption and public-integrity campaigns within the broader framework of state building.

— Last updated: Fall 2005

 

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Siamak Namazi Siamak Namazi, Iran
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
November 2005–February 2006
International Dimensions of Democratic Breakthroughs

Mr. Siamak Namazi is managing director of Atieh Bahar Consulting, Iran's premier private consulting firm, and serves on the editorial board of Iran Strategic Focus, a monthly publication that features news and analysis of political and economic developments in Iran. He has published numerous articles in major Middle Eastern journals, contributed chapters to several books, and has served as editor of Iran Quarterly Report, Iran Energy Focus, and Iran Focus. Mr. Namazi devoted his fellowship to a comparative study of different models of economic reform and their impact on political development, as well as the role of the private sector in promoting good governance.

— Last updated: Fall 2005

 

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Andrei Piontkovsky Andrei Piontkovsky, Russia
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2005–February 2006
Russian Political Elites and the Challenge of the 21st Century

Dr. Andrei Piontkovsky is a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute in Washington, D.C. From 1994 to 2005, he served as director of the Center for Strategic Research in Moscow, a Russian think tank that endeavors to support Russia’s political development through research and consultation on a wide range of reform issues, from the rule of law to economic policy. One of Russia’s foremost political commentators, Dr. Piontkovsky has been a consistent and outspoken critic of Putin’s model of “managed” democracy. In the summer of 2007, he returned to Moscow to face prosecution under newly expanded “extremism” legislation for his published criticism of the Putin regime’s consolidation of executive power. The Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post recently published articles on the Russian government’s harassment of Dr. Piontkovsky. He has also been a columnist for a number of Russian publications, including the Moscow Times, Novaya Gazetta, Russia Journal, and the online journal Grani.ru, as well as a regular political commentator for the BBC World Service and Radio Liberty in Moscow. His articles on international affairs and post-Soviet political development have been widely published and cited by Russian, European, and U.S. media. During his fellowship, he explored U.S. policy toward Russia and its implications for democracy promotion in Russia.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

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Aasiya Riaz Aasiya Riaz, Pakistan
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2006
How Think Tanks and Other Research Centers Strengthen Democracy

Ms. Aasiya Riaz is founding director of the Pakistan Institute for Legislative Development and Transparency (PILDAT), an independent, nonpartisan research and training institution established to strengthen democratic governance, monitor legislative performance, and enhance public participation in policy-making in Pakistan. As PILDAT's co-director, she has been involved in conceptualizing and implementing a wide range of programs and activities, including capacity-building workshops for legislators, the formulation of issue-based caucuses across parties, and the publication of democracy reports on policy issues. Ms. Riaz has also worked as an editorial writer with the Nation, a leading Pakistani English-language newspaper, as deputy editor of Pakistan Calling, an international monthly magazine, and as host of a current-affairs television program on Pakistan Television. During her fellowship, she studied the work of U.S. think tanks and the Congressional Research Service and their contribution to democracy in the United States. Based on her findings, she worked on an article on the role of research institutions in deepening democracy in Pakistan, for publication in both English and Urdu newspapers in Pakistan. She also organized a roundtable discussion with leading stakeholders in Pakistan on the need to create and support independent think tanks working on policy issues.

— Last updated: Spring 2006

 

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Roland Rich Roland Rich, Australia
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–June 2005
Democratization in East Asia

Mr. Roland Rich is the executive head of the United Nations Democracy Fund. Before joining the U.N. in 2007, he served as the founding director of Australian National University’s Centre for Democratic Institutions, Australia's preeminent institution for democracy promotion. A distinguished diplomat, he previously served in Australia’s foreign service, with postings in Paris, Rangoon, Manila, and, from 1994-1997, as Australian ambassador to Laos. He has also served as Legal Advisor and Assistant Secretary for International Organizations in Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. In 2005, Mr. Rich was a Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow at the National Endowment for Democracy, where he wrote Pacific Asia in Quest of Democracy (Lynne Rienner, 2007).

— Last updated: Spring 2008

 

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Judy Thein Judy Tin-May Thein, Burma
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2006
Civil Society and the Democracy Movement in Burma

Ms. Judy Thein was, until her retirement in December 2005, political specialist at the U.S. Embassy in Rangoon, in which capacity she analyzed and interpreted local political, economic, and social developments for the U.S. mission, supported the promotion of human rights and democracy in Burma, and called for higher standards of education and health for those in the Burmese democracy movement. As the embassy's senior-most local employee, she served as a vital link between the U.S. embassy and Burmese political groups, evaluating and relaying information vital to the formulation of U.S. foreign policy toward Burma. Prior to joining the U.S. mission, she was office administrator and finance comptroller for a USAID project office in Rangoon. Before that, she taught English and mathematics for nearly a decade. A steadfast proponent of democratic change in her country, Ms. Thein won the U.S. Department of State's Foreign Service National of the Year Award in 1998 and its Meritorious Honor Award in 1997 and 2001. Ms. Thein spent her fellowship exploring strategies for strengthening civil society and the Burmese democracy movement, including ways in which the international community may assist in their efforts.

— Last updated: Spring 2006

 


TOP
2004–2005

Fatimakhon Ahadovna Ahmedova Fatimakhon Ahadovna Ahmedova (Tajikistan)
March–July 2005
Democracy and Conflict Resolution in Central Asia

Dr. Fatimakhon Ahmedova is currently involved with the Center of Democratic Transformations, a Tajik NGO, where she oversees projects on Tajik political parties, public administration, and political training for women. In addition, she is an International Programme Intern at the Building and Social Housing Foundation, a UK-based organization. Under the Programme’s sponsorship, she recently traveled to Pakistan, both to write a joint project on nongovernmental organizations in Pakistan and Tajikistan, and to conduct research on how women can be empowered through housing programs. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology and linguistics from St. Petersburg State University in Russia and an M.A. in international human rights law from the University of Essex, in England. She has worked as a country coordinator and specialist on conflict management for the FAST Early Warning Project of the Swiss Peace Foundation in Khujand, and also for the United Nations Office for Project Services in Khujand. During her fellowship, Fatima examined how ethnic and political conflicts in the Ferghana Valley of Central Asia may be resolved in ways that bring peace and democracy to the region.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

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Ilyas Akhmadov Ilyas Akhmadov, Chechnya
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2004–February 2005
Visiting Fellow
March–September 2005
Chechnya's Struggle for Independence

Mr. Ilyas Akhmadov has been an outspoken advocate of peace, moderation, and independence for Chechnya. He was appointed foreign minister in 1999 by Aslan Maskhadov, who was democratically elected to the presidency of Chechnya in 1997. Mr. Akhmadov has consistently sought to focus international attention on the humanitarian tragedy in Chechnya and to promote a negotiated end to the war with Russia. In February 2003, he presented a comprehensive peace proposal, entitled The Russian-Chechen Tragedy: Conditional Independence under an International Administration (coauthored with Roman Khalilov), in which he argued that the only way to solve the Chechen conflict was through democratization of the region and its integration into the international community. He has published op-eds in the Boston Globe and the Washington Post and has been interviewed by a wide range of publications, including the New York Times, Washington Post, Christian Science Monitor, Boston Globe, Financial Times, Le Monde, and the International Herald Tribune. During his fellowship at the International Forum, Mr. Akhmadov began writing a book tentatively entitled Chechnya's Struggle for Independence.

— Last updated: Fall 2004

 

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Michael Allen, United Kingdom
Visiting Fellow
2004–2005
Corporate Social Responsibility, Civil Society, & Democracy in Developing Economies

Mr. Michael Allen has worked as director of external affairs for the Global Alliance for Workers and Communities, a partnership comprising the World Bank, corporations, and the International Youth Foundation. Prior to that, he taught employment law, human-resource management, and labor relations for five years at the Cranfield School of Management in Britain. His fellowship project explored the complex set of relationships among corporations, NGOs, and labor unions in improving working conditions and strengthening civil society in developing economies.

— Last updated: Spring 2005

 

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Dragan Djuric Dragan Djuric, Montenegro
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2004–January 2005
Prospects for Democracy and European Integration in Montenegro

Mr. Dragan Djuric is Montenegro's assistant minister for European Integration at the Ministry for International Economic Relations and European Integration in Podgorica. Previously he worked as a trade union and labor relations activist, as well as a freelance journalist. He was head of the department for international cooperation, education, and information affairs with the Confederation of Independent Trade Unions of Montenegro from 1987 to 2004. For the past five years, he was director of the NGO Center for the Development of Industrial Democracy in Podgorica. During his fellowship, Mr. Djuric analyzed Montenegro's prospects for European integration within the constitutional framework of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro and suggested measures to accelerate integration and promote democracy in Montenegro and the Balkan region.

— Last updated: Fall 2004

 

TOP

Andrew Finkel Andrew Finkel, Turkey/U.S.
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2005
Strengthening the Role of the Press during a Process of Reform: The Case of Turkey

Mr. Andrew Finkel is a prominent freelance journalist who has been based in Istanbul, Turkey, since 1989. He has served as a correspondent and freelance contributor to a number of publications and broadcasting organizations, including Time, The Times, the Economist, and CNN. He has been a featured columnist in the Turkish language press for the daily newspapers Sabah and Milliyet. An expert on Turkish politics, he is the co-editor of Turkish State, Turkish Society (1990). In 2002-2003, he held a Knight Wallace fellowship at the University of Michigan. Mr. Finkel's project consisted of two parts: the first focused on the media's ambivalent role in Turkey's current process of reform, while the second involved formulating a methodology whereby Turkish journalists can help raise the standards of their own industry.

— Last updated: Spring 2005

 

TOP

Raul Gangotena, Ecuador
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
April–September 2005
Inclusion and Democracy in Ecuador

Ambassador Raul Gangotena was, until recently, Ecuador's ambassador to the United States. He has since transitioned into a position as a member of the board of directors of the Indigenous and Afro–Ecuadorian Enterprise Corporations, based in Quito, Ecuador. Over his lengthy public career, he has been actively involved in Ecuadorian politics, business, education, and journalism, having served as chief-of-staff for President Sixto Ballen, executive director of the National Modernization Council, business professor at the Universidad San Francisco de Quito, and president of the Universidad de Las Americas. From 2000 to 2003, he was a board member for Ecuador's Fulbright Commission, and from 1989 to 1993, he served as board chair for the Children of the Street Foundation. He has published widely on business and public administration in Latin America and has been a respected op-ed columnist in Ecuador for over fifteen years. During his fellowship, Ambassador Gangotena examined how and why Ecuador has been successful in advancing and sustaining its democracy, paying particular attention to inclusion of indigenous people and the avoidance of armed political conflict and narcotics-based organized crime. He drew up his findings in the form of a policy paper.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

TOP

Hoon Jaung Hoon Jaung, South Korea
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
January–August 2005
Democratization and Foreign Policy-Making Process: The Accountability Deficit in South Korean Foreign Policymaking

Dr. Hoon Jaung is a professor of political science at Chung-Ang University in Seoul, Korea. He has also served as editor-in-chief of the Korean International Studies Review and author of numerous articles and book chapters on Korean politics. Dr. Jaung has served as a key member of the Task Force on the Reform of the Presidency, organized by the East Asia Institute (EAI) to redefine the role of the presidency (2002–2003) and as coordinator of the EAI Task Force on the Reform of the Electoral System, Political Parties, and the National Assembly (2003–2004). During his fellowship, he wrote an essay on the "accountability deficit" in foreign policy making in South Korea since the country's democratic transition. His essay explores the sources and patterns of this deficit by examining the apathy of the National Assembly, the changing nature of public opinion, and the enhanced impact of civic associations on foreign policy decision making.

— Last updated: Spring 2005

 

TOP

Guobiao Jiao Guobiao Jiao, China
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
April–August 2005
Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on the Media in China

Dr. Guobiao Jiao is associate professor at Beijing University's College of Journalism and Communications. A prominent journalist at Chinese Cultural Newspaper from 1996 to 2001, he has published widely on issues of journalism in China. Following the appearance online of his March 2004 essay condemning the Chinese government's Central Propaganda Department and his continued efforts to promote freedom of the press and human rights in China, he was suspended from his teaching duties. He has received media coverage in the New York Times and Washington Post and has given interviews to the BBC, Voice of America, the French International Broadcast Company, and Radio Free Asia. During his fellowship, he explored historical and contemporary perspectives on the Chinese media, and analyzed the impact of the Internet in China. He wrote a series of articles on the challenges and prospects for the media in China, for eventual publication as a book.

— Last updated: Spring 2005

 

TOP
Abiodun Kolawole Abiodun Kolawole, Nigeria
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2004–February 2005
Rural Empowerment and Popular Participation in Nigeria

Mr. Abiodun Kolawole is a research officer at the Center for Constitutionalism and Demilitarization, an NGO based in Lagos, Nigeria. He is affiliated with the Committee for the Defense of Human Rights and the Alliance for Democracy (AD), a Nigerian political party. An active participant in Nigeria's student and democracy movements, Mr. Kolawole was instrumental in the formation of the United Action for Democracy, a coalition of human rights, labor, and pro-democracy groups committed to social justice, transparency, and good governance. Noting that democratic nations cannot be built without the participation of the people, Mr. Kolawole used his fellowship to examine methods and strategies for encouraging popular participation as a means of strengthening Nigeria's fragile democracy.

— Last updated: Fall 2004

 

TOP

Chingiz Mammadov Chingiz Mammadov, Azerbaijan
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2004–February 2005
The Impact of Regional and International Trends on Democratization in Azerbaijan

Mr. Chingiz Mammadov was until recently an economic opportunities program officer at the Baku office of Mercy Corps International, a leading humanitarian assistance organization. He has previously worked as a senior program officer at NDI-Baku and as a consultant to the World Bank and TACIS. In addition, he has served as chair of the Azerbaijan Micro-Finance Association and as part-time lecturer on management and organization theory at Western and Khazar Universities in Baku. In 1989-93, he worked as editor-in-chief for Vatan newspaper, one of the flagships of perestroika in Azerbaijan, and spent one year as chief of media relations for the president of Azerbaijan. During his fellowship at NED, Mr. Mammadov studied the impact of regional and international trends on democratization in Azerbaijan. His findings culminated in an article highlighting opportunities for successful democratization policy in Azerbaijan.

— Last updated: Fall 2004

 

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Robert MattesRobert Britt Mattes, U.S./South Africa
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2005
Democracy Without the People? Citizens, Institutions and Economics in the New South Africa

Dr. Robert Mattes is associate professor of political science at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, where he is also director of the Democracy in Africa Research Unit at the Centre for Social Science Research. He has played a leading role in the development of the Afrobarometer, a multinational public-opinion research project that documents and analyzes what Africans think and say about democracy, economic reform, and good governance. A leading expert in the field of public opinion and political action in sub-Saharan Africa, Dr. Mattes is the author of numerous articles and books on public opinion in South Africa and across the continent. During his fellowship, he worked on a book exploring the successes and failures of South Africa's democratization process.

— Last updated: Spring 2005

 

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Michael McFaulMichael McFaul, United States
Visiting Fellow, August 2005–July 2006
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow, April–July 2005
International Dimensions of Democratic Breakthroughs

Dr. Michael McFaul is associate professor of political science at Stanford University, where he is also a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he worked for two years as a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace's Carnegie Moscow Center. One of the world's leading scholars on Russian and U.S.-Russian affairs, Dr. McFaul has authored or coauthored numerous books and monographs, including Between Dictatorship and Democracy: Russian Post-Communist Political Reform (2004) and Russia's Unfinished Revolution: Political Change from Gorbachev to Putin (2001). During his fellowship, he conducted a comparative study of countries that have undergone successful democratic breakthroughs and those that have not, paying special attention to the role external actors have played in shaping political outcomes.

— Last updated: Fall 2006

 

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James N'Gombe James Lapani Ng'ombe, Malawi
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2004–February 2005
Madala's Grandchildren

Dr. James Ng'ombe is executive director of the Malawi Institute of Journalism, which promotes media independence and professionalism through training, research, and writing. One of Malawi's most distinguished and prolific authors, he has published numerous works on political themes, including the novels Sugarcane with Salt (1989) and Madala's Children (1996). The latter, a national classic that explores the harsh realities of life under the one-party dictatorship of Dr. Hastings Banda, is a required textbook for high-school students. Dr. Ng'ombe also manages a publishing company, runs a radio station, and has taught language and communication at the University of Malawi. Following on the success of his second novel, Dr. Ng'ombe devoted his fellowship to writing a sequel, tentatively entitled Madala's Grandchildren. The novel examines the sociopolitical conditions in Malawi in the ten years following Dr. Banda's removal from office and pays special attention to issues of good and bad governance, corruption, and accountability.

— Last updated: Fall 2004

 

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Akin Olaniyan Akin Olaniyan, Nigeria
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2004–February 2005
Watching the Watchdog: The Role of the Media in Sustainable Democracy

Mr. Akintola Olaniyan was until recently deputy editor at The Punch, Nigeria's most widely read daily newspaper. An accomplished journalist whose writings have helped cultivate an awareness of democracy in Nigeria, Mr. Olaniyan has been actively involved in the work of a Lagos-based NGO, Journalists for Democratic Rights. He is the author of Corruption and Economic Development in Nigeria (2002) and chairs the African Media Support Initiative, an NGO that trains media practitioners and conducts research on the media and media related issues. During his fellowship, he studied the relationship between the media and sustainable democracy and prepared a report on how corruption in the Nigerian media adversely affects the state of Nigeria's democracy.

— Last updated: Fall 2004

 

TOP
Yulia Savchenko Yulia Savchenko, Kyrgyzstan
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2004–February 2005
"Civic Journalism" and Democracy in Kyrgyzstan

Ms. Yulia Savchenko is a television anchor and journalist who has achieved public recognition for her talk show on Pyramid TV in Kyrgyzstan. She holds bachelor's and master's degrees from Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University. Ms. Savchenko started work with Pyramid during her undergraduate years and is now the host of her own show, which features perspectives and debates on issues of political and social interest. During her fellowship, she will examine government-media relations in the United States and U.S. approaches to "civic" or "public" journalism. She is especially interested in how to promote both "guide dog" and "watchdog" press and in the complex relationships among journalists, corporate media, government officials, and the public in a functioning democracy. As a fellow, she wrote articles and prepared training courses that can be implemented in Kyrgyzstan.

— Last updated: Fall 2004

 

TOP

Vitali Silitski Vitali Silitski, Belarus
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2004–July 2005
Democratic Transitions from Post-Communist Authoritarianism: Serbia and Belarus

Dr. Vitali Silitski is an accomplished scholar who received a Ph.D. in political science from Rutgers University in 1999, an M.A. in politics from the Central European University in Budapest in 1994, and a BA from Belarusian State University in 1994. In 1999–2003, he worked as an associate professor of economics at the European Humanities University in Minsk, Belarus, a position he was forced to leave for publicly criticizing the government of president Alyaksandr Lukashenka. Since then, he has worked as a freelancer, writing extensively for the Belarusian and international press, as well as for scholarly publications. During his fellowship, Dr. Silitski conducted a comparative study of political developments in Serbia (1987–2000) and Belarus (1994–present), examining nondemocratic outcomes in political transitions. His research (1) explained the pathways of postcommunist development, including the nature of the authoritarian regimes that emerged after the break-up of the Soviet Union; (2) examined the dynamics of these regimes' democratization; and (3) identified applicable theories that can improve on current scholarship concerning transitions to democracy.

— Last updated: Fall 2004

 


TOP
2003–2004

Shahin Abbasov, Azerbaijan
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
November 2003–March 2004
The Role of the Media in Election Campaigns

Mr. Shahin Abbasov is deputy editor-in-chief of the daily Echo, an independent newspaper based in Baku, Azerbaijan. Prior to joining Echo, he was deputy editor-in-chief and senior correspondent at Zerkalo, one of Azerbaijan’s largest independent dailies. Mr. Abbasov’s fellowship project focused on media coverage of election campaigns. He was especially interested in observing how U.S. mass media operates in the weeks leading up to and following election day. He presented his findings in a report documenting the U.S. media’s role during elections and examined the ways in which the U.S. experience may be applied in Azerbaijan.

— Last updated: Fall 2003

 

TOP

Mohamed Al-Yahyai Mohamed Al-Yahyai, Oman
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
April–August 2004
Using the Internet to Promote Democracy in the Arab Gulf States

Mr. Mohamed Al-Yahyai is an Omani journalist who has worked to promote press freedom in the Arab Gulf states. He has served as an editor, correspondent, and columnist at a wide range of Arab-language newspapers and magazines, including Al-Bayan (Dubai), Al-Hayat (London), Al-Etihad (Abu Dhabi), and Akhbar al-Adab (Cairo). He is the author of two collections of short stories, Kharzat Al-Mashi (Cairo, 1995) and Youma Nafadat Khazeena al-Ghubar (Beirut, 1998). During his fellowship at the Forum, Mr. Al-Yahyai studied the role of the Internet in accelerating political reform and informing public attitudes toward democracy in the countries of the Arab Gulf region. Following his return to Oman, Mr. Al-Yahyai co-founded an Omani NGO called the Gulf Forum for Citizenship.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

TOP

Zainab Bangura Zainab Bangura, Sierra Leone
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2003–February 2004
Building Democracy After State Collapse

Ms. Zainab Bangura was recently appointed Sierra Leone’s Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation. Prior to her appointment, she served as chief of the civil affairs division of the United Nations Mission in Liberia, where she oversaw programs promoting national reconciliation and the restoration of state authority. She has also served as the chair and cofounder of the Movement for Progress, a political party that seeks to promote good governance, integrity, and the empowerment of women, youth, and the disabled in Sierra Leone. In addition, she is also the cofounder and coordinator of Campaign for Good Governance, Sierra Leone’s largest indigenous NGO, which promotes democratic participation, human rights, the rule of law, and the economic and political emancipation of women. During her fellowship, Ms. Bangura’s explored the ways in which democratic institutions may be rebuilt in a state weakened by civil war. Using Sierra Leone as a case study, she examined the steps needed to reestablish the structures of a stable democratic order in the wake of partial or complete state collapse.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

TOP

Anahit Bayandur Anahit Bayandur, Armenia
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
December 2003–April 2004
Obstacles to Democracy in Post-Soviet States

Ms. Anahit Bayandur is a leading activist of peace and human rights in Armenia and a former member of the Armenian parliament. She is currently director of the Yerevan-based Democracy School, a NED-funded project that seeks to enhance the Armenian public’s understanding of global issues. The Democracy School offers a forum for discussion among experts in the field, who in turn visit cities around Armenia to lead local citizens in seminars on issues such as global security, economic issues, and democracy-building. She has previously served as co-chair of the Armenian Committee of the Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly, an international network of civic organizations working to deepen Europe’s commitment to democracy and human rights. In 1992, Ms. Bayandur and Ms. Arzu Abdullayeva of Azerbaijan received the 1992 Olof Palme Prize for their joint efforts in bringing peace to the two countries. Ms. Bayandur’s fellowship project looked at transitions to democracy in the former Soviet states and the role of democracy-assistance organizations, such as NED, in facilitating democratic change.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

TOP

Ladan Boroumand, Iran
Visiting Fellow, September 1998–December 2000
Visiting Fellow, October 2003–September 2004
Promoting Democracy and Human Rights in Iran

Dr. Ladan Boroumand is cofounder and research director of the Abdorrahman Boroumand Foundation for the Promotion of Human Rights and Democracy in Iran, a nongovernmental organization that seeks to promote human rights awareness through education and the dissemination of information as a necessary basis for the eventual establishment of a stable democracy in Iran. The Foundation is best known as the home of Omid (www.abfiran.org), a website that details the human rights abuses committed by the Islamic Republic and memorializes its victims. Dr. Bouroumand is the author of articles on the French Revolution, the Islamic revolution in Iran, and the nature of Islamist terrorism. She is also the author of La Guerre des Principes (1999), an extensive study of the tensions throughout the French Revolution between human rights and the sovereignty of the nation. Dr. Boroumand recently published an article entitled, "Iran’s Resilient Civil Society: The Untold Story of the Fight for Human Rights" in the October 2007 edition of the Journal of Democracy. During her fellowship, Dr. Boroumand examined the prospects for democracy in Iran from a historical perspective.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

TOP

Oleksandr Fisun Oleksandr Fisun, Ukraine
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
April–August 2004
New Democracies or Neopatrimonial Systems? Post-Soviet Political Transformations Revisited

Dr. Oleksandr Fisun is associate professor of political science at Kharkiv National University in Ukraine, where he also received his Ph.D. in 1990. In 2001, he spent six months as a research scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center's Kennan Institute for Advanced Russian Studies. Dr. Fisun worked on a comparative study of postcommunist political regimes, a project that sought to understand post-Soviet political transformations, their outcomes, and consequences. During his time in residence at the Forum, he worked on a book-length manuscript on this topic, intended for both scholars and policy makers. Dr. Fisun recently returned to the Kennan Institute as a Fulbright Research Scholar, where he completed a project entitled, "Understanding Post-Soviet Politics: Neo-Patrimonial Interpretations."

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

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Lyudmila Georgieva Lyudmila Georgieva, Bulgaria
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2004
Approaches to Political Advocacy

Ms. Lyudmila Georgieva is founding chair of Foundation Common Cause, a Sofia-based NGO that educates citizens in the art of political advocacy. She is a lecturer in political advocacy at the Technical University in Sofia and a former member of the public council to the parliamentary committee on civil society affairs, the first committee in Bulgarian parliamentary history established to advance legislation strengthening civil society. Ms. Georgieva examined the principles and methods of political lobbying in the United States in order to assess their applicability in Bulgaria. During her fellowship, she conducted a comparative study of U.S. and Bulgarian approaches to political advocacy. To this end, she interviewed public and special interest groups, political action committees and consulted with congressional staff on Capitol Hill.

— Last updated: Spring 2004

 

TOP

Chee Soon Juan Chee Soon Juan, Singapore
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2004
Promoting Democracy in Singapore

Dr. Chee Soon Juan is secretary general of the Singapore Democratic Party and director of the Open Singapore Centre, an NGO that promotes accountability in all sectors of Singaporean society. Imprisoned twice for championing democratic change, Dr. Chee continues to be a powerful voice of dissent in his country. He is the author of numerous books and articles, including Your Future, My Faith, Our Freedom: A Democratic Blueprint for Singapore (2001), To Be Free: Stories From Asia's Struggle Against Oppression (1998) and Dare to Change: An Alternative Vision for Singapore (1994). During his fellowship, he worked on a manuscript concerning civil resistance and political change in Singapore.

— Last updated: Spring 2004

 

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Maria Lisitsyna Maria Lisitsyna, Kyrgyz Republic
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
April–August 2004
Youth Participation in Human Rights Promotion in Central Asia

Ms. Maria Lisitsyna is currently a researcher on Central Asia for Human Rights Watch. She is also founding president of the Youth Human Rights Group (YHRG), a nongovernmental organization that monitors human rights abuses and conducts human rights educational programs in Kyrgyzstan. A graduate of Kyrgyz National University and the faculty of law at the Kyrgyz-Russian Academy of Education, Ms. Lisitsyna has previously worked at the Bureau on Human Rights and Rule of Law. In May 2005, she was elected by the Kyrgyz Parliament to serve on her country’s Constitutional Council. In 2007, she was a Yale World Fellow in New Haven, Connecticut. During her fellowship, she studied the American experience of involving youth in human rights activities (promotion, recruitment, and training) and produced training materials for increasing the participation of youth in human rights monitoring in Central Asia.

— Last updated: Spring 2008

 

TOP

Anne Mugisha Anne Mugisha, Uganda
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2003–March 2004
The Role of U.S. Policy in Strengthening Democracy in Africa: The Case of Uganda

Ms. Anne Mugisha is a founding member of the Reform Agenda, a leading political organization in Uganda, and a former executive director of RESPOND Uganda, a transnational, pro-democracy NGO based in Washington, D.C. She has held positions in the Ugandan government and NGO sectors, including a period as charge d’affaires ad interim of the Uganda Permanent Mission to the United Nations. Ms. Mugisha is interested in the link between U.S. foreign policy and the strengthening of emerging democracies in Africa. Using Uganda as a case study, her project considered the balance between the United States’ security and economic interests and its desire to foster democracy in Africa. She also assessed the role of the donor community in democratization and conflict resolution.

— Last updated: Fall 2003

 

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Enkhtuya Oidov Enkhtuya Oidov, Mongolia
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
February–June 2004
Strengthening Human Rights in Mongolia

Ms. Enkhtuya Oidov has been a pioneer in the struggle for democracy in Mongolia since the 1980s. Currently serving as the general secretary of Mongolia's National Council for the Millennium Challenge Account, her efforts recently bore fruit when President Bush and Mongolian president Enkhbayar signed the Millennium Challenge Corporation Compact, through which Mongolia will receive $285 million in foreign assistance from the United States. A founding member of the Mongolian Party for National Progress, one of Mongolia's first political parties to advocate free-market reform, she served as a member of Mongolia's parliament between 1996 and 2000 where, as head of the Women's Caucasus, she organized training programs on promoting women to top-level government posts. In 1992, she founded LEOS, Mongolia's first civil society organization, which has since emerged as the country's preeminent democracy and civil rights advocacy group and largest women's NGO. During her fellowship, she studied the rise in human rights abuses and other setbacks that have followed in the wake of Mongolia's 2000 election and identified ways of reversing them.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

 

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Albino Okeny Albino Okeny, Sudan
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2003–February 2004
A Media Strategy to Make Dictatorship Unsustainable

Mr. Albino Okeny is cofounder and former editor-in-chief of the Khartoum Monitor, a leading Sudanese independent daily that publishes articles concerning southern Sudan, the civil war, and peace initiatives. Currently working as a Media for Peace program officer at Panos–Eastern Africa, a branch of the London-based Panos Institute, which promotes press freedom and information exchange on issues of global concern, he has also served as director of the English Service at Radio Omdurman in Khartoum. During his fellowship, Mr. Okeny researched how journalists can cultivate political awareness in a climate of repression. He also prepared a guide offering practical tips on how the media can educate ordinary citizens about their rights, serve as a mouthpiece for voices against autocracy, and promote a culture of debate and discussion.

— Last updated: Fall 2003

 

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Tomás Pojar Tomás Pojar, Czech Republic
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2003–February 2004
Dissident Aid: Humanitarian and Human Rights Advocacy Networks

Mr. Tomás Pojar is director of People in Need (PIN), a leading Prague-based organization devoted to humanitarian assistance and democracy promotion in repressed societies, crisis areas, and war-torn countries. During his fellowship at the Forum, Mr. Pojar conducted research on the various Western democracy-assistance programs available to dissidents in authoritarian states, such as Belarus, Burma, China, Cuba, and North Korea. The results of this study will enable his organization to identify and implement the most feasible and effective strategies for strengthening the work of human rights activists in closed societies.

— Last updated: Fall 2003

 

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Aqil Shah Aqil Shah, Pakistan
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2003–July 2004
Why Democracy Fails in a National Security State: The Case of Pakistan

Mr. Aqil Shah is a political analyst and columnist who covers national security issues, politics, and civil-military relations in Pakistan. He has worked as an analyst with the South Asia Project of the International Crisis Group, a nonprofit, multinational organization working through field-based analysis and high-level advocacy to prevent and resolve deadly conflict. A Rhodes Scholar with an M.Phil. from Oxford University, he has taught international relations at Quaid-e-Azam University in Islamabad and has authored a number of articles and book chapters, including “Pakistan’s ‘Armored’ Democracy,” which appeared in the October 2003 issue of the Journal of Democracy. Mr. Shah’s fellowship project examined the structural sources of Pakistan’s failed transition to democracy in the 1990s, a project that culminated in a major article for publication.

— Last updated: Fall 2003

 

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Fidaa Shehada Fidaa Shehada, Palestinian Territories
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
May–September 2004
The Transition to Democracy in Palestine

Ms. Fidaa Shehada is a capacity building officer in crisis management at the Palestinian Institution for the Dissemination of Democracy and Community Development (Panorama), a Ramallah-based nonprofit organization that seeks to strengthen Palestinian civil society through community development. She has previously served as a training and human resources officer at the development organization, FATEN, and as a board member of the Teacher Creativity Center, an institute offering training courses on democracy and human rights education. She holds a master's degree in democracy and human rights from Birzeit University (2003). During her fellowship, Ms. Shehada explored the trends that facilitate and impede the democratization process in Palestine.

— Last updated: Spring 2004

 

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Muborak Tashpulatova Muborak Tashpulatova, Uzbekistan
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
March–July 2004
"Strategies for Strengthening Democracy in Uzbekistan"

Ms. Muborak Tashpulatova is executive director of the Tashkent Public Education Center, a leading civic education organization in Uzbekistan that trains teachers in interactive methods of education, produces textbooks on teaching human rights and civic education, and conducts "town hall"-style civic forums for parents, youth, and the government. Ms. Tashpulatova is a recipient of NED's 2002 Democracy Award. During her fellowship at the International Forum for Democratic Studies, Ms. Tashpulatova evaluated current options and strategies for promoting democracy in Uzbekistan.

— Last updated: Spring 2004

 

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Vladimir Tismaneanu Vladimir Tismaneanu, Romania/United States
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2003–July 2004
Democracy Romanian Style: Personalities, Parties, Ideologies (1990–2004)

Dr. Vladimir Tismaneanu is professor of government and director of the Center for the Study of Post-Communist Societies at the University of Maryland–College Park. Since 1998, he has been the editor of East European Politics and Societies, a leading quarterly journal in the field. He is the author of numerous books on East European history and politics, including, most recently, Stalinism for All Seasons: A Political History of Romanian Communism. His articles and interviews have appeared in major American and European publications, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and the Times Literary Supplement. During his fellowship, Dr. Tismaneanu worked on a book that examined the impact of political personalities and their ideological preference on party formation and development in Romania.

— Last updated: Fall 2003

 

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Francisco Villagrán Francisco Villagrán de León, Guatemala
Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellow
October 2003–February 2004
Trade Agreements and Democracy: The U.S.-Central America Negotiations

Mr. Francisco Villagrán de León is a career diplomat with 18 years of experience in the Guatemalan foreign service. He has served as Guatemalan ambassador to the Organization of American States, the United Nations, Canada, Norway and Germany. Before coming to NED, he worked as a consultant on institutional development for the Organization of American States. Mr. Villagrán’s fellowship project explored the links between trade agreements and institutional development, with particular emphasis on the opportunities that the current CAFTA negotiations between the U.S. and Central America may present for democratization in that region.

— Last updated: Fall 2003

 


TOP
2002–2003

Adotei Akwei, Ghana
Governance, Repression, and Human Rights in Africa
Visiting Fellow, July–December 2003

Mr. Adotei Akwei is Senior Advocacy Director for Africa at Amnesty International USA, serving as his organization's chief spokesperson, strategist, and liaison with the U.S. government, media, and the general public on African human rights issues and U.S. foreign policy toward Africa. A native of Ghana, he has previously worked for the Lawyer's Committee on Human Rights, as well as for the American Committee on Africa and the Africa Fund. During his fellowship, Mr. Akwei worked on a book on governance, repression, and human rights in Africa.

— Last updated: Fall 2003

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Herbert Boh Herbert Boh (March–July 2003)
Promoting Media Reform to Advance Democracy in Africa

Mr. Herbert Boh is a leading Cameroonian journalist currently working for the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace and Disarmament in Africa (based in Lome, Togo). His fellowship project sought ways of promoting free speech, professional ethics, and the delivery of unbiased, non-incendiary information by the African media, notably public radio and television. He explored practical ways of improving and sustaining access to information through the setting up of an online news service focusing on human rights and democracy in Africa.

— Last updated: Spring 2003

 

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Ceslav CiobanuCeslav Ciobanu (March–July 2003)
The Thorny Path of Moldova's Emerging Democracy

Dr. Ceslav Ciobanu is Moldova's former ambassador to the United States, Canada, and Mexico. An economist by training, he has actively participated in the formulation and promotion of economic and political reform in Moldova, especially through the privatization of state property, agricultural reform, and the restructuring of collective farms and the energy sector. His fellowship project examined the benefits and risks of federalization to Moldova's democratic development.

Summary of Dr. Ciobanu's Forum presentation, held on June 5, 2003, "Democracy in Moldova: Challenges and Prospects."

— Last updated: Spring 2003

 

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<istafa Erdpgam Mustafa Erdogan (March–July 2003)
Transitions to Democracy: The Role of Constitutional Courts

Dr. Mustafa Erdogan is professor of political theory at Hacettepe University in Ankara and co-founder of the Association for Liberal Thinking, a Turkish NGO that seeks to promote understanding and acceptance of the values of liberty, human rights, and the rule of law. A Fulbright scholar at George Mason University in 1997-98, he has published widely on human rights theory and Turkish politics. His project examined the role of constitutional review in transitional democracies, particularly the contribution of constitutional justice to democratization in Eastern Europe.

— Last updated: Spring 2003

 

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Steven Finkel Steven Finkel (October 2002–July 2003)
Teaching Democracy: Adult Civic Education and the Development of Political Culture

Dr. Steven Finkel is a professor of politics at the University of Virginia, where he teaches courses on public opinion, political behavior, and research methods. During his fellowship, he assessed the efficacy of civic education initiatives in the Dominican Republic, South Africa, and Poland, preparing a book on his findings, tentatively entitled, Teaching Democracy: Adult Civic Education and the Development of Democratic Political Culture.

Summary of Dr. Finkel's Forum presentation, held on May 7, 2003, "Can Democracy Be Taught? The Impact of Civic Education Programs in Developing Democracies."

— Last updated: Fall 2002

 

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Olga Gyárfásová (March–July 2003)
Political Polling in Transitional Democracies

Ms. Olga Gyárfásová is a program director at the Institute for Public Affairs, an independent public-policy think tank in Bratislava. She has written extensively on value orientations and patterns of voting behavior in Slovakia and is interested in issues of public-opinion surveys, electoral studies, and political development. Her project examined how political polls in the United States shape public policy and how political polling may be used to strengthen democracy in Slovakia.

Summary of Ms. Gyárfásová's Forum presentation, held on June 18, 2003, "Slovakia's Road to Democratic Consolidation: A Pollster's Perspective."

— Last updated: Spring 2003

 

TOP

Baogang He (May–July 2003) Village Democracy in China

Dr. Baogang He is an associate professor of government at the University of Tasmania, where he teaches Chinese politics, Western political theory, and international relations. He is currently on sabbatical at the National University of Singapore's East Asian Institute, where he is a senior research fellow. During his fellowship at the Forum, Dr. He worked on a book on the rise of representative assemblies and committees in the villages of China and their impact on democratization in China. His book, Rural Democracy in China, a part of which he wrote while a Fellow at NED, is slated to be published in November 2007, by Palgrave Publishers.

Summary of Dr. He's Forum presentation, held on June 10, 2003, "How Democratic Are Village Elections in China?"

— Last updated: Fall 2007

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Luz Maria Helguero Luz María Helguero (March–July 2003)
Developing Democracy Through Regional Newspapers

Ms. Luz María Helguero is the publisher and former editor-in-chief of the Peruvian newspaper El Tiempo, based in Piura. An activist in civic organizations working to promote transparency, citizenship, and freedom of information, she ran for Congress as a Reform Party candidate in 2000 and was a Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University in 2001. While at the Forum, Ms. Helguero developed a training program to enable Peruvian newspaper editors and publishers to strengthen the accuracy, integrity, and professionalism of Peru's regional press. Since returning to Peru, she has established the citizen news blog Gua 3.0. The blog, the first of its kind in the region of Piura, offers easy access to a public forum where citizens may participate in political and social exchange. It is administered by the newspaper El Tiempo, where Helguero is executive director.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

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Tolekan Ismailova Tolekan Ismailova (October 2002–February 2003)
The Prospects for Democracy in the Kyrgyz Republic

Ms. Tolekan Ismailova is the founding president of Kyrgyzstan's Coalition for Democracy and Civil Society, a nongovernmental organization that works to strengthen democracy and build civil society in the Kyrgyz Republic. A leading civic expert in her country, Ms. Ismailova examined ways in which civic activists can promote democratic development in Kyrgyzstan. She also wrote an article on Kyrgyzstan's prospects for democracy ten years after its independence and one year after it joined the U.S.-led coalition against terrorism.

Summary of Ms. Ismailova's Forum presentation, held on November 21, 2002, "The Prospects for Democracy in the Kyrgyz Republic: Assessing the Impact of 9/11."

— Last updated: Fall 2002

TOP

Richard Joseph Richard Joseph (October 2002–April 2003)
State Crisis and Democratic Development in Africa

Dr. Richard Joseph is director of the Program of African Studies and John Evans Professor of Political Science at Northwestern University. He has devoted his career to understanding democracy, development and conflict resolution in Africa. Formerly director of the African Governance Program at the Carter Center and Asa G. Candler Professor of Political Science at Emory University, he is the author and editor of numerous books, including State, Conflict, and Democracy in Africa (1999). During his fellowship, Dr. Joseph worked on a book on state crisis and democratic development.

Summary of Dr. Joseph's Forum presentation, held on April 1, 2003, "Democratic Development and the African Predicament."

— Last updated: Fall 2002

TOP

Marek Kweik Marek Kwiek(November 2002–March 2003)
The Reinvention of the University and Democratic Values in Central Europe

Dr. Marek Kwiek is a professor in the department of philosophy and Director of the Center for Public Policy at Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland. An analyst of higher-education reforms in Poland and Ukraine, he has participated in projects supported by the Open Society Institute in Budapest, the European Commission in Brussels, and USAID concerning reform in higher education. During his fellowship, he worked on a book about the reinvention of the university and the promotion of democratic values in Central Europe. That book, "The University and the State: A Study into Global Transformations," was published in 2007. Dr. Kwiek is currently studying higher education as
a 2007−2008 Fulbright New Century Scholar.

— Last updated: Fall 2007

TOP

Clayton Lillienfeldt Clayton Lillienfeldt (October 2002–July 2003)
Integrating Conflict Resolution and Democracy: A Training Manual

Mr. Clayton Lillienfeldt is a senior trainer and mediator at the Cape Town-based nongovernmental organization, Mediation Transformation Practice, where his work focuses on post-conflict reconstruction, HIV/AIDS, and nation building. During his fellowship at the National Endowment for Democracy, Mr. Lillienfeldt designed a training manual on conflict management and democracy to integrate and strengthen the work of those working toward peace and democratization.

Summary of Mr. Lillienfeldt's Forum presentation, held on February 11, 2003, "Bridging Conflict Management and Democracy in Africa."

— Last updated: Fall 2002

TOP

Ahmen Subhy Mansour Ahmed Subhy Mansour (October–December 2002)
The Roots of Democracy in Islam

Dr. Ahmed Subhy Mansour is an independent scholar in Islamic studies who has taught at Al Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt, where he also obtained his Ph.D. in history. He has worked with Saad Iddin Ibrahim as a consultant to the Ibn Khaldoun Center in Cairo. The author of numerous books on Islam, one of which landed him in prison, Dr. Mansour recently obtained political asylum in the United States. During his fellowship, Dr. Mansour worked on a book tracing the roots of democracy in Islam and the need to amend the Egyptian constitution.

  • Summary of Dr. Mansour's Forum presentation, held on December 16, 2002, "The Roots of Democracy in Islam."

    — Last updated: Fall 2002

    Benedict Sannoh Benedict Sannoh (October 2002–February 2003)
    The Process of Democratization in Liberia: Lessons for the Future

    Counselor Benedict Sannoh, one of Liberia's leading human rights lawyers, is an attorney at the Center for Law and Human Rights in Monrovia and assistant professor of law at the University of Liberia. A political asylee in the United States, Counselor Sannoh prepared a policy memorandum assessing the political situation in Liberia following the 1997 presidential elections, with recommendations to the U.S. government and policy community on how democratic forces in Liberia may be strengthened.

    — Last updated: Fall 2002

    Schu Sugawara (June–August 2003)
    Japan's Role in Promoting Democracy through Governmental and Nongovernmental Efforts

    Mr. Schu Sugawara is a Japanese representative to Worldview Rights, an Oslo-based NGO that promotes democratization through the media. A journalist by training, he has served as president of the Asia Press Club, a Tokyo-based news service focusing on free media, human rights, and Asia. During his fellowship, he examined U.S. democracy-assistance programs for insights and lessons learned that may be applicable to Japan. The results of his research were published in a book entitled Alternative International Assistance (in Japanese), published in Japan in 2003.

    — Last updated: Spring 2003

    Myamosor Tuya Nyamosor Tuya (October 2002–February 2003)
    Promoting Democracy in Mongolia

    Ms. Nyamosor Tuya is a prominent activist in the pro-democracy movement in Mongolia. She has been involved in political party development, democracy education, and international affairs, and is a member of the National Consultative Council of the Democratic Party. In 1998-2000, she served as her country's first female foreign minister. During her fellowship, Ms. Tuya prepared a compilation of essential readings on democracy to be published in Mongolia.

    Summary of Ms. Tuya's Forum presentation, held on February 26, 2003, "Democracy in Mongolia: Accomplishments and Challenges."

    — Last updated: Fall 2002

    Chaihark Hahm (November 2001–August 2002)
    Constitutionalism and Democracy in South Korea

    A citizen of South Korea, Dr. Chaihark Hahm is a scholar of law and religion with training from Harvard and Yale Universities, Dr. Hahm's project focused on constitutional review and democracy in South Korea. He examined the role of the Korean Constitutional Court in building democracy in South Korea, using a comparative framework that considered the influence of political culture and cultural traditions in Asia, as well as the recent experience of constitutionalism in post-communist countries.

    — Last updated: Fall 2001

    Charlie James Hughes (May 2002–August 2002)
    A Practitioner's Handbook on Civic Education Initiatives

    Charlie Hughes is the director and "driving force" behind the Forum for Democratic Initiatives (FORDI) in Sierra Leone. As a fellow, Mr. Hughes worked closely with NED staff to survey NED-funded projects in civic education worldwide and prepared a handbook on civic education initiatives for use by practitioners in Sierra Leone and beyond.

    — Last updated: Spring 2002

    Ramin Jahanbegloo (October 2001–August 2002 )
    Intellectuals and Democracy in Iran

    Dr. Ramin Jahanbegloo's project focused on the role of Iranian intellectuals in promoting Iranian democracy, including the attitudes of youth and young professionals in Iran today. A scholar-activist trained in France, he continues to publish in Iranian journals and organize conferences introducing Western ideas of democracy into Iranian public discourse. While in the United States, Dr. Jahanbegloo gave many lectures and presentations to American policy and academic audiences.

    — Last updated: Fall 2001

    Ivliane Khaindrava (April–August 2002)
    Democracy, Society, and the Rule of Law in Georgia Since Independence

    A journalist, Mr. Ivliane Khaindrava is currently a political analyst for the electronic bulletin, "View from Georgia," at the Tbilisi-based Center for Development and Cooperation/Center for Pluralism, where he also directs the Caucasian Regional Studies program. He was a member of the Georgian Parliament in the mid-1990s, and has been active in Georgian politics. Mr. Khaindrava's project examined the successes and failures of democracy-building in post-independence Georgia.

    — Last updated: Spring 2002

    Yuriy Krynytskyy (April–August 2002)
    Political Technologies and the Promotion of Democracy in Ukraine

    Mr. Yuriy Krynytskyy is a young activist from Kharkiv, Ukraine, who serves as press secretary and head of a district division of the "Rukh" party (People's Movement of Ukraine). His project focused on election campaigns "in an unfavorable information environment." During his fellowship, he researched American party campaign and public relations strategies, political advertising, and the use of television debates.

    — Last updated: Spring 2002

    Ndubisi Obiorah (June–August 2002)
    Corruption and Democracy in Africa: A Comparative Perspective

    Mr. Obiorah is a Nigerian human rights lawyer who works for HURILAWS, the Human Rights Law Service in Lagos. While attending Harvard Law School, Mr. Obiorah spent the summer as a fellow, researching the impact of corruption on human rights and democratic development in Nigeria and examining the legislative and enforcement mechanisms developed in the United States.

    — Last updated: Spring 2002

    Ana Julia Ramos (May–August 2002)
    Information and Political Participation in Colombia: A Comparative Perspective

    Ms. Ramos has taught law at the University of the Andes and also served as coordinator of the NED-supported project, "Visible Candidates-Visible Congress," based at the University of the Andes. Her project examined the relationship between information and political participation and considered new approaches to the promotion of transparent political practices and accountability.

    — Last updated: Spring 2002

    Vladimir Solonari (March–August 2002)
    Comeback? Communist Parties in the Post-Communist World

    Vladimir Solonari is a historian who served as a member of the Moldovan parliament between 1990 and 2001. As a Reagan-Fascell Fellow, he worked on a book on the comeback of the Moldovan Communist Party and wrote several articles, including "Creating 'a People': A Case Study in Post-Soviet History-Writing," published in Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History. After leaving the Forum, he spent a few months as a fellow at the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies in Washington, D.C.

    — Last updated: Spring 2002

    Moethee Zun (April–August 2002)
    The Struggle for Democracy in Burma

    Moethee Zun has played a central role in Burma's struggle for democracy, first as organizer of the Burmese underground student movement and later as co-founder of Burma's second-largest political party, the Democratic Party for a New Society. His fellowship allowed him to complete a book documenting his personal struggle for democracy in Burma.

    — Last updated: Spring 2002

    Myroslava Gongadze (November 2001–March 2002)
    The Media and the Current Crisis in Ukraine

    Ms. Gongadze’s project documented the media’s role in the disappearance and murder of her husband-journalist Georgy Gongadze-and in the ongoing political repercussions of his killing. An experienced journalist, she holds a law degree from Lviv State University and was involved in politics in Ukraine at the grassroots level. During her fellowship, she made public presentations, and gave interviews in the United States and Europe concerning the need for an international investigation into her husband’s murder.

    — Last updated: Fall 2001

    Kayode Soremekun (November 2000–July 2001)

    Kayode Soremekun is a Nigerian professor of International Relations at Obafemi Awolowo University, in Ile-Ife, Nigeria, where he received his Ph.D. and M.Sc. degrees in international relations. Dr. Soremekun is the editor of several books, including Governance and Democratization in Nigeria (1995) and Nigeria's Second Republic (1988). Among numerous professional accomplishments, he received a Netherlands Fellowship, served as foreign policy fellow at the University of Maryland, and was a consultant to the Stockholm-based International Institute of Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA). While a fellow at the International Forum through the summer of 2001, Dr. Soremekun conducted research on the differing U.S. responses to democratization in Nigeria and Kenya.

    — Last updated: Fall 2000

    Toshimitsu Shigemura (August 2000–May 2001)

    Mr. Shigemura studied law at Waseda University in his native Japan before beginning a career in journalism with the Mainichi Newspapers in 1971. His long and distinguished career with Mainichi includes service as a correspondent in Seoul, Korea from 1979 to 1985 and in Washington, D.C. from 1989 to 1994. From 1994 to earlier this year Mr. Shigemura was an editorial writer based in Tokyo. He also served as a professor of international relations at TAKshok University in 2000. Mr. Shigemura is the author of numerous well-respected books and articles on international relations, and especially on Korea. While at the Forum he studied U.S.-Japanese-Korean relations, focusing on how those three nations might use democratic values to help North Korea prepare for eventual unification with the Republic of Korea.

    — Last updated: Fall 2000

    Zora Bútorová (November 2000–May 2001)

    Zora Bútorová, a sociologist and democracy activist from the Slovak Republic, is affiliated with the Bratislava-based Institute for Public Affairs, a NED grantee. She is the author of numerous studies of public opinion and political behavior in postcommunist Czechoslovakia and Slovakia (including several articles in the Journal of Democracy) and has focused in particular on gender issues, nationalism, and civil society development. During her time at the International Forum, she worked on two projects. The first was to study public opinion for a book entitled Slovakia 2000: A Global Report on the State of Society, published in Slovak and English editions. The second project involved editing a volume of interviews with prominent Slovak women, entitled Fragile Strength: Life Stories of Women Leaders, published in Slovak in March 2001.

    — Last updated: Fall 2000

    Chaibong Hahm (January 1999–August 2000)

    Chaibong Hahm, who earned his MA and PhD degrees at Johns Hopkins University, is an associate professor of political science at Yonsei University in Seoul, South Korea, director of the Comparative Cultural Studies Center at the Institute of East and West Studies at Yonsei, and editor-in-chief of Jontong Gua Hyundae (Tradition and Modernity), a quarterly journal. He is the author of, most recently, Postmodernity and Confucianism: in search of Korean political discourse and Korean Politics in the 21st Century, both in Korean. He is also the author of many articles in Korean and English on democracy and related subjects. While at the Forum, Professor Hahm conducted research on "The Confucian Gentleman and the Private Individual," as well as worked on the continuation of an international project on "Liberal, Social, and Confucian Democracy."

    — Last updated: Spring 1999

    Elizabeth Spiro Clark (September 1998–November 2000)

    Elizabeth Spiro Clark, is currently on leave from the U.S. Department of State. Her most recent position in the State Department was as Director of the Office of Programs in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor. She served as a political reporting officer in South Africa in the mid-1980s and as political counselor in the U.S. Embassy in Oslo in the early 1990s. Prior to joining the Foreign Service Ms. Clark wrote extensively on U.S. Foreign Policy and human rights. Concurrently, Ms. Clark is also an associate of the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University. While at the Forum she conducted a research project on "Democracy Promotion and Elections: Case Studies in the Policy Process."

    — Last updated: Fall 1998

    Presentation: Rethinking Support for Transitional Elections

    Dogu Ergil (October 1999–March 2000)

    Dogu Ergil, who received his doctorate in development studies at the State University of New York at Binghamton in 1975, is professor of political science at Ankara University in Turkey and president and director of projects of TOSAV, the Foundation for Research of Societal Problems, a nongovernmental organization based in Ankara that was created to address the tensions between Turks and Kurds. The organization conducts research and conflict resolution training programs, and disseminates democratic ideals through public outreach efforts. Dr. Ergil has written a number of books on Turkish-Kurdish relations and reconciliation, most recently Turkey's Encounter with Herself (1997) and The Eastern (Kurdish) Question (1995), as well as numerous articles published in scholarly journals. He is also a radio and TV commentator and a frequent contributor to the Turkish Daily News, Turkish Probe, and other serial publications. While at the Forum, Dr. Ergil worked on a project entitled "In Search of Peace Among and Between Turks and Kurds."

    — Last updated: Fall 1999

    Gérard Conac (January 1998–September 1999)

    Gérard Conac was most recently Professor of Political Science at the University of Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne) and Director of the Research Center on Constitutional Law. He has served as an advisor to French governments, and has had a crucial role in training senior French civil servants as well as heads of state in many countries of francophone Africa. He is the author of numerous publications in political science, and is a leading expert on constitutional law in central and eastern European countries and in those of sub-Saharan Africa. While at the Forum, Professor Conac undertook a comparative analysis of building democracy in African and European states in transition, with particular attention to Benin, Madagascar, Romania, and Bulgaria.

    — Last updated: Spring 1998

    Jeffrey C. Gallup (February–May 1999)

    Mr. Gallup has served most recently as senior advisor to the Director of the Cambodian Institute of Human Rights (CIHR), a local nongovernmental organization specializing in human rights, democracy, peace, and good governance education. He was also an advisor to the Vice Chairman of the Cambodian National Election Committee and an advisor to the President of the Coalition for Free and Fair Elections, an election monitoring group, in Phnom Penh. Mr. Gallup has also served as Deputy U.S. Ambassador and Charged' Affaires to Togo and as chief of the political section at the U.S. Embassy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. He is also the author of many publications on democratic development in Cambodia, including "Teaching Human Rights in Cambodia" (with Kassie Neou) published in the October 1997 issue of the Journal of Democracy. While at the Forum, Mr. Gallup authored a study of the 1998 Cambodian Elections.

    — Last updated: Spring 1999

    Zakia Jawhar and Halima El Glaoui (May–July 1998)

    Zakia Jawhar and Halima El Glaoui are editors of Prologues, a Casablanca-based journal created in 1993 that serves as a forum for the exchange of ideas among writers and thinkers in Morocco. During their fellowships, Ms. Jawhar and Ms. El Glaoui studied issues related to democratization, and improved their editorial knowledge through observing the operations of the Forum's Journal of Democracy.

    — Last updated: Spring 1998

    Robert R. LaGamma (March–September 1998)

    Robert R. LaGamma, a recently retired U.S. Foreign Service Officer, served from 1995 to 1997 as director of the U.S. Information Service (USIS) office and Minister-Counselor for Public Affairs at the U.S. Embassy in Pretoria, South Africa. Among his activities there, he organized a conference on democracy education in May 1997, called Civitas Africa, that brought together over 100 leaders from 15 African and other countries. From 1993 to 1995, he was director of the Office of African Affairs in USIA's Washington office, which oversees 37 offices in Africa. In that capacity, he launched numerous initiatives to support democratic transitions in Africa, particularly concerning freedom of the press, and organized the first White House Conference on Africa presided over by President Clinton in 1994. Mr. LaGamma held previous posts in Nigeria, Senegal, Togo, Cote d'Ivoire, Zambia, Southern Rhodesia, and Italy. While at the Forum, he researched and wrote on "The Growth of Independent Media and Democratization in Selected African Countries."

    — Last updated: Spring 1998

    Dai-Kwon Choi (February–July 1998)

    Dai-Kwon Choi is Professor of Law at Seoul National University College of Law in Seoul, South Korea, where he earned his law degree in 1961. He specializes in Constitutional Law, Legislation, and the Sociology of Law. He also earned law degrees from the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) and the University of California (Berkeley), as well as a doctorate in Political Science from Berkeley in 1976. From 1994 to 1996, Dr. Choi was Director of the American Studies Institute at Seoul National University. He is the author of numerous publications in both Korean and English on government, constitutionalism (including publications on the Korean Constitution), and legal education, most recently, A Study of Intellectual Currents in American Society with a Particular Focus on Legal Education and The Choosing of Representatives in Korea. While at the Forum, Dr. Choi examined American law and regulations on political parties, campaign finance, and elections, and studied American legal education.

    — Last updated: Spring 1998

    Dominique Fournier (January–October 1998)

    Dominique Fournier was most recently a consultant to the cabinet of the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Canada, in which capacity he focused on ways to improve Canada's relations with the Organization of American States. He previously served as a consultant to the Charles R. Bronfman Foundation for which he surveyed Mexican Studies programs in Canadian universities. Dr. Fournier received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the Latin American Centre, Saint Antony's College, University of Oxford, in 1996. His dissertation focused on "The International Dimension of Democratization: Argentina and Chile." While a fellow at the Forum, Dr. Fournier researched the means by which the Organization of American States can make its contributions to democratization in the Americas more effective.

    — Last updated: Spring 1998

    Daniel M. Brumberg (January–August 1997)

    Daniel M. Brumberg is Assistant Professor of Government at Georgetown University where he has taught since 1993. He has also served as a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences in Mexico City, and has taught at Emory University, where he served as a Middle East Fellow at the Carter Center, and at the University of Chicago. Dr. Brumberg is the author of many publications on Middle East politics, Islam, and democratization, most recently "Khomeini's Legacy" in Scott Appleby (editor), Spokesmen of the Despised: Fundamentalist Leaders in the Middle East (University of Chicago Press, 1996). While a fellow at the Forum, Dr. Brumberg researched and wrote on "Ideological Innovation in Post-Revolutionary States: The Case of Iran."

    — Last updated: Spring 1997

    Ibrahim Idris Ibrahim (April–August 1997)

    Ibrahim Idris Ibrahim is Dean of the Faculty of Law, Assistant Professor of Law, and Director of the Ethiopian Human Rights and Peace Center at Addis Ababa University in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, where he has taught since 1983. While on sabbatical leave he is also serving as codirector of the Trial Observation and Information Project in Addis Ababa. Mr. Ibrahim is the author of Ethiopian Law on the Exclusion and Deportation of Foreign Nationals, Applicability of Foreign Civil Laws in Ethiopia, and Teaching Material for the Study of Private International Law in Ethiopia, among other publications. While a fellow at the Forum, he prepared teaching materials on human rights for use in Ethiopian law schools.

    — Last updated: Spring 1997

    Chieko Kitagawa Otsuru (February–August 1997)

    Chieko Kitagawa Otsuru is Associate Professor at the Japan Center for Area Studies, National Museum of Ethnology, in Osaka, Japan. She has done extensive research and writing on American politics and foreign policy, including recent articles on "Conceptual Disputes Over Political Equality," "Foreign Aid and American National Interests," and "American Foreign Policy of Peacemaking." While a fellow at the Forum, Professor Kitagawa Otsuru conducted research on "The Legitimacy of Intervening for Democracy," with a particular focus on U.S. efforts abroad.

    — Last updated: Spring 1997

    Aymen M. Khalifa (November 1996–June 1997)

    Aymen M. Khalifa was most recently the Editor of the Cairo-based monthly publication Civil Society: Democratic Transformation in the Arab World published by the Ibn Khaldoun Center for Development Studies where he previously served as Civil Society Program Officer. He is the author of numerous publications on democratization in Egypt, most recently "Reviving Civil Society in Egypt" published in the July 1995 issue of the International Forum's Journal of Democracy. He also conceptualized the documentary film Days of Democracy which recently premiered at the 1996 Human Rights Watch International Film Festival. While at the Forum, Mr. Khalifa researched and wrote on the relationship between freedom of expression and democratization in Egypt.

    — Last updated: Fall 1996

    Emmanuel Gyimah-Boadi (October 1996–July 1997)

    Emmanuel Gyimah-Boadi, a native of Ghana, was most recently assistant professor in the School of International Service at The American University, and professorial lecturer at the School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University, both in Washington, D.C. He has also been a lecturer in Political Science at the University of Swaziland and the University of Ghana, and was previously a consultant to the Institute of Economic Affairs in Accra, Ghana, and at the World Bank in Washington. He is the author of numerous publications on politics and economics in Ghana, and in Africa more generally, most recently "Civil Society in Africa" published in the International Forum's Journal of Democracy. While at the Forum, Professor Gyimah-Boadi researched and wrote on "Consolidating African Democracies in the '90s: A Conflict Resolution Approach."

    — Last updated: Fall 1996

    Rita Jalali (June 1996–March 1997)

    Rita Jalali is Assistant Professor of Sociology at James Madison College, Michigan State University, where she has taught since 1993. She is the author most recently of Issues in Social and Economic Development and Affirmative Action Policies in Comparative Perspective (both forthcoming), and co-author (with Seymour Martin Lipset) of Racial and Ethnic Tensions: A Global Perspective. While a fellow at the Forum, Prof. Jalali worked on a research project entitled "Foreign Aid and Feminist Politics in India."

    — Last updated: Spring 1996

    Kathleen Smith (February–December 1996)

    Kathleen Smith is Assistant Professor of Government at Hamilton College in New York where she has taught since 1993. She is the author of Remembering Stalin's Victims: Popular Memory and the End of the Soviet Union, Decommunization After the 'Velvet Revolutions' in East Central Europe, and Destalinization in the Former Soviet Union. While a fellow at the Forum, Prof. Smith worked on a publication entitled "Mythmaking in the New Russia: Constructing a Usable Past After Communism."

    — Last updated: Spring 1996

    Andrei Marga (July–December 1996)

    Andrei Marga has been Rector of the University of Cluj in Romania since 1993. He has also taught the history of philosophy and other subjects at the University of Cluj since 1971. He is the author of many publications on philosophical subjects and issues, including "Cultural and Political Trends in Romania Before and After 1989," "The Modern World and the Individual: From the Metamorphism of Eastern Marxism to Marx's Errors," and "The Culture of Scholarship in Europe Today." While at the Forum, Prof. Marga researched a critique of political relativism, distinguishing between what is truly universal in democracy from what is specific to particular times, places, and conditions.

    — Last updated: Spring 1996

    Oleg Zaznaev (April–September 1996)

    Oleg Zaznaev is Associate Professor of Political Science at Kazan State University in Kazan, Russia. He is the co-author of The Political System of the Republic of Tatarstan, and "Methodological Problems of Political Science", as well as author of publications on typologies of political regimes. While at the Forum, Prof. Zaznaev researched a "Comparative Analysis of Presidentialism and Parliamentarism: A Search for a Democratic and Stable Form of Government."

    — Last updated: Spring 1996

    Ghia Nodia (February–June 1996)

    Ghia Nodia is head of the Department of Political Philosophy at the Institute of Philosophy, Academy of Sciences of Georgia, and Chairman of the Caucasian Institute for Peace, Democracy and Development. He is also Professor of Sociology at Tbilisi State University. He is the author of numerous publications, particularly on nationalism and democracy. While a fellow at the forum, Prof. Nodia focused on two kinds of transition to democracy, one based on propitious social, cultural, and economic conditions, and one stemming from a lack of such conditions and therefore on a conscious effort of political elites to imitate existing models of democracy.

    — Last updated: Spring 1996

    Hyug Baeg Im (September–December 1995)

    Hyug Baeg Im, who received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Ewha Womans University in Seoul, Korea. He is also Secretary General of the Korean Association of Political Economy. He is the author of The Market, the State, and Democracy: Korean Democratic Transition and the Theories of Political Economy and co-author of Political Integration of the Two Koreas: Theory and Practice, as well as author of numerous articles on political economy and transitions to democracy. While a visiting fellow at the Forum, Prof. Im undertook a study of "Authoritarian Capitalist Development and Democratization in Korea."

    — Last updated: Fall 1995

    Haleh Esfandiari (February–June 1995)

    Professor Esfandiari is a native of Iran who has been teaching Persian language and literature at Princeton University for the past fifteen years. Before coming to the United States she worked as a reporter and editor with the Kayhan newspapers in Tehran, then as a senior official of the Women's Organization of Iran, and subsequently as the Deputy Director of an important cultural organization in Tehran. While a fellow at the Forum, Professor Esfandiari worked on a book entitled Reconstructed Lives: Women and the Islamic Revolution. It is based on interviews she conducted during visits to Iran and examines in detail, through individual biographies, how Iranian women have coped with the impact on their lives of the Islamic Revolution.

    — Last updated: Spring 1995

    Robert S. Leiken (February 1995–January 1996)

    Robert Leiken has had a varied career -- teaching in the U.S. and Mexico; as a visiting scholar at both Harvard and the Carnegie Endowment; and organizing various conferences and events, including coordination of "The New Moment in the Americas" conference in November 1994. The conference brought together thirty hemispheric cultural leaders and produced a volume of essays, of which he is the editor, in advance of the December 1994 Summit of the Americas. As a follow-up to this conference, Mr. Leiken worked on a series of articles related to both the "Hemispheric Ideal" and to democratic development in the Americas. He explored the extent to which the Western Hemisphere is emerging as an economic, political, and cultural reality based on democracy, free trade, multi-ethnicity and cultural intercourse.

    — Last updated: Spring 1995

    Kanan Makiya (February–June 1995)

    Kanan Makiya was born in Baghdad and pursued an architectural career in England that involved projects in Baghdad and elsewhere in the Middle East. In the early 1980s he began work on a book about the nature of Iraqi nationalism and the excesses of the Ba'thist regime. This book, Republic of Fear, was published under the pen name Samir al Khalil in 1989. Makiya's second book, Cruelty and Silence, published in 1993, further documents political cruelty in the Arab world and is also a passionate critique of Arab intellectuals' response to that cruelty. Mr. Makiya is currently the Director of the Iraq Research and Documentation Project at the Center for Middle East Studies at Harvard University. While a fellow at the Forum, he worked to help create a computerized archive of formerly secret Ba'thist documents seized during the Gulf War, and to develop an online research work station for this archive. Mr. Makiya also researched a new book that partly focuses on public cruelty in the non-Western world.

    — Last updated: Spring 1995