The David and Lucile Packard Foundation

Packard Fellows

Sorted by Award Year: 1998

Igor L. Aleiner

Field: Physics
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Theory of interaction effects in mesoscopic and disordered systems; superconductivity.
Phone: 516-632-8132
FAX: 516-632-8774
Email: Igor.Aleiner@sunysb.edu
WWW: http://insti.physics.sunysb.edu/Physics/faculty.htm#aleiner
Address: Dept. of Physics & Astronomy
State University of New York, Stony Brook
Stony Brook, NY 11794




Matthew P. Augustine

Field: Chemistry
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Matthew Augustine researches improvement of the sensitivity and resolution of nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of molecular structure. Nuclear magnetic resonance is used to help understand chemical reactions and cell functions on a molecular scale.
Phone: 530-754-7550
FAX: 530-752-8995
Email: augustine@chem.ucdavis.edu
WWW: http://www-chem.ucdavis.edu/people/augustine.shtml
Address: Chemistry Department
University of California, Davis
0126 Chemistry Bldg
Davis, CA 95616




Ronald R. Breaker

Field: Biology
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Ronald Breaker works on the creation of enzymes that do not exist in nature. He is pioneering new techniques, including ``modular rational design'' and test-tube evolution, to create these enzymes, and perhaps to resurrect enzymes that have been extinct for nearly four billion years.
Phone: 203-432-9389
FAX: 203-432-3597
Email: ronald.breaker@yale.edu
WWW: http://www.biology.yale.edu/FacultyResearch/Breaker.html
Address: Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology
Yale University
452 Kline Biology Tower
P.O. Box 208103
New Haven, CT 06520




Rey-Huei Chen

Field: Biochemistry
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Rey-Huei Chen studies regulatory mechanisms of cell division. Her work focuses on the "checkpoint" mechanism which ensures that genetic information is transmitted accurately to both daughter cells when a cell divides. She investigates the checkpoint at molecular and biochemical levels.
Phone: 607-255-6542
FAX: 607-255-2428
Email: rc70@cornell.edu
WWW: http://www.mbg.cornell.edu/chen/chen.html
Address: Section of Biochemistry, Molecular, & Cell Biology
Cornell University
258 Biotechnology Building
Ithaca, NY 14853




Vincent Crespi

Field: Physics
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Vincent Crespi researches novel properties of carbon nanostructures. His work involves innovative research directions in nanoscale materials physics, which he believes promise to be fruitful for basic science and potential applications. In particular, his study will explore hydrogen storage, global structural optimization in the design of new materials, and helium in carbon nanotube bundles.
Phone: 814-863-0163
FAX: 814-865-3604
WWW: http://www.phys.psu.edu/people/crespi.html
Address: Department of Physics
Pennsylvania State University
104 Davey Lab
University Park, PA 16802-6300




Jason Cyster

Field: Biology
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Jason Cyster studies molecular mechanisms of lymphoid tissue patterning. "Lymphoid tissues play a central role in immunity," he says. Lymphoid tissues promote encounters between antigen, antigen presenting cells, and rare antigen-specific lymphocytes.
Phone: 415-502-6427
FAX: 415-476-0939
Email: cyster@itsa.ucsf.edu
WWW: http://itsa.ucsf.edu/%7Emicro/immunology/faculty/Cyster.htm
Address: Dept. of Microbiology & Immunology
University of California at San Francisco
Box 0414, HSE 301
San Francisco, CA 94143




Christopher J. Diorio

Field: Computer Science
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Christopher Diorio builds integrated circuits modeled after neurobiology. He has developed single-transistor devices, called synapse transistors, that mimic the local synaptic adaptation (plasticity) seen in nervous tissue. He is investigating local learning in arrays of silicon synapse transistors, both to understand how biology might use adaptation on a large scale, and also to investigate how engineers might build smart silicon machines.
Phone: 206-543-7165
FAX: 206-543-2969
Email: diorio@cs.washington.edu
WWW: http://www.cs.washington.edu/people/faculty/diorio/
Address: Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering
University of Washington
Box 352350, 114 Sieg Hall
Seattle, WA 98195-2350




Cary B. Forest

Field: Physics
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Cary Forest researches the principles of magnetohydrodynamics. He is building an experiment to study components of the dynamo theory. The Earth and other planets, the 1 and other stars, pulsars and perhaps even the entire galaxy have magnetic fields that are explained by the dynamo effect, a process by which electrical currents are generated by turbulent motion of conducting fluids or plasma. Forest's experiment will investigate and attack components of this theory.
Phone: 608-263-0486
FAX: 608-262-3077
Email: cbforest@facstaff.wisc.edu
WWW: http://aida.physics.wisc.edu/
Address: Physics Department
University of Wisconsin at Madison
3277 Chamberlin Hall
1150 University Ave
Madison, WI 53706




Rachel Green

Field: Biology
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Rachel Green's work delves into the molecular mechanisms of RNA catalysis. She has already made contributions to the problem of understanding how RNA functions as a catalyst. This problem is meaningful in biology, as it seems likely that early in the evolution of life on this planet, RNA functioned not only as the repository of genetic information, but also as the primary catalytic molecule for such basic reactions as self-replication.
Phone: 410-955-4922
FAX: 410-502-6718
Email: ragreen@jhmi.edu
WWW: http://www.med.jhu.edu/bcmb/faculty/green.html
Address: Molecular Biology and Genetics
Johns Hopkins University
JHU School of Medicine
725 N. Wolfe St, 523 PCTB
Baltimore, MD 21205




Manyuan Long

Field: Biology
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Manyuan Long studies young genes, the origin and evolution of gene structure, and the rate of new gene evolution. He taps into sophisticated computer software to study and compare thousands of genes at a time. He believes that new genes arise through the shuffling and mixing of existing genes or gene fragments.
Phone: 773-702-0557
FAX: 773-702-8740
Email: mlong@midway.uchicago.edu
WWW: http://pondside.uchicago.edu/ecol-evol/faculty/long_m.html
Address: Dept. of Ecology and Evolution
University of Chicago
Erman 105A
5801 South Ellis
Chicago, IL 60637




Juan Maldacena

Field: Physics
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Juan Maldacena studies string theory and black holes. He focuses on the description of black holes in string theory. He is interested in calculating the entropy of black holes.
Phone: 617-496-8188
FAX: 617-495-0416
Email: maldacena@physics.harvard.edu
WWW: http://www.physics.harvard.edu/fac_staff/maldacena.html
Address: Physics Dept.
Harvard University
Lyman 334
Cambridge, MA 02138




James P. Morken

Field: Chemistry
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

James Morken studies combinatorial experiments to develop new catalysts. A premise behind Morken's work is that catalytic chemical transformations offer significant practical advantages over non-catalyzed reaction pathways. He describes catalytic reactions as more environmentally friendly, more economical, and operationally safer than non-catalytic processes.
Phone: 919-962-8229
FAX: 919-962-2388
Email: morken@unc.edu
WWW: http://www.unc.edu/depts/chemistry/faculty/jpm/cfjpm01.html
Address: Dept. of Chemistry
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
CB#3290, Venable and Kenan Laboratories
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290




Bjorn Poonen

Field: Mathematics
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Bjorn Poonen researches number theory and arithmetic geometry. He states that there is a wide gap between theory and practice in the disciplines of number theory and arithmetic geometry. A common thread in his work is to take ideas that previously have been useful in theory, and to transform them into methods that can be used to solve down-to-earth problems. For example, in the past, he has proved results on random packing, with applications to communications networks.
Phone: 510-642-5229
FAX: 510-642-8204
Email: poonen@math.berkeley.edu
WWW: http://math.berkeley.edu/~poonen/
Address: Mathematics Dept.
University of California, Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720-3840




Leo Radzihovsky

Field: Physics
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Leo Radzihovsky studies statistical mechanics and field theory, with applications to a range of theoretical problems in condensed matter physics. This includes polymers, liquid crystals, membranes and random surfaces; phase transitions and critical phenomena; and the phenomenology of superconductors, with an emphasis on vortex states in the presence of disorder and thermal fluctuations.
Phone: 303-492-5436
FAX: 303-492-2998
Email: Leo.Radzihovsky@Colorado.EDU
WWW: http://lulu.Colorado.EDU/~radzihov/
Address: Department of Physics
University of Colorado at Boulder
University of Colorado at Boulder
Boulder, CO 80309-0390




Anna W. Roe

Field: Biology
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Anna Roe researches high resolution optical imaging of brain activity in primates. She studies perceptual and cognitive function, utilizing a high spatial resolution brain-imaging method. She works with trained monkeys while they are awake and alert, in collaboration with other investigators, to link cerebral cortex modules directly with visual perception and working memory.
Phone: 203-737-5853
FAX: 203-785-5263
Email: anna.roe@yale.edu
WWW: http://info.med.yale.edu/neurobio/roe/roe.html
Address: Neurobiology Dept.
Yale University
333 Cedar Street, SHM C303
P.O. Box 208001
New Haven, CT 06520-8001




Peter Schröeder

Field: Computer Science
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Peter Schröder's research is focused on the construction of scalable algorithms for problems in computer graphics. Many applications in this domain are in essence numerical algorithms which seek to model and simulate real world phenomena. As such they tend to be very computation intensive while at the same time requiring (ideally) interactive update rates. A very powerful set of tools satisfying these requirements are based on multi-resolution. The basic ideas are grounded in traditional wavelet and approximation theory which has to be radically generalized to be applicable to real world settings.
Phone: 626-395-4269
FAX: 626-792-4257
Email: ps@cs.caltech.edu
WWW: http://multires.caltech.edu/
Address: Department of Computer Science
California Institute of Technology
1200 E. California Blvd., MS 256-80
Pasadena, CA 91125




Lisa C. Sloan

Field: Geology
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Lisa Sloan studies the causes of warm climates in the Eocene and Paleocene eras. Sloan's work combines studies of past climates based on geologic evidence with computer modeling of Earth's climatic systems. Research on past climates can shed light on current and future climatic and environmental change, she says. Much of her work has focused on unusually warm intervals in Earth's history, such as the period 55 million years ago when crocodiles lived within the Arctic Circle and palm trees grew in what is now Wyoming.
Phone: 408-459-3693
FAX: 408-459-3074
Email: lsloan@earthsci.ucsc.edu
WWW: http://emerald.ucsc.edu/personnel/Sloan/index.html
Address: Dept. of Earth Sciences
University of California, Santa Cruz
1156 High St.
Santa Cruz, CA 95064




Shivaji L. Sondhi

Field: Physics
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Shivaji Sondhi is a theoretical condensed matter physicist with a particular interest in strongly correlated electron systems such as those exhibiting the quantum Hall effect. He has recently become interested in the problem of glass formation.
Phone: 609-258-4326
FAX: 609-258-1006
Email: sondhi@feynman.princeton.edu
WWW: HTTP://feynman.princeton.edu/~sondhi/research.html
Address: Physics Dept.
Princeton University
Jadwin Hall
Princeton, New Jersey 08544




Matthias Steinmetz

Field: Astronomy
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Matthias Steinmetz is researching high-resolution numerical simulations, to study formation and evolution of galaxies. Steinmetz uses a special computer developed by researchers at the University of Tokyo to perform numerical simulations of gravitational forces at work in the universe on the largest scales. In particular, he studies when and how galaxies like the Milky Way form, when the first stars began to shine, and how galaxies evolve.
Phone: 520-621-5923
FAX: 520-621-1532
Email: msteinmetz@as.arizona.edu
WWW: http://saguaro.as.arizona.edu/~matthias/
Address: Steward Observatory
University of Arizona
933 N. Cherry Avenue
Tuscan, AZ 85721




Yuri Suzuki

Field: Materials Science
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Yuri Suzuki's research focuses on understanding magnetism at the nanometer length scale. In particular, she is developing new classes of magnetic oxide thin film materials and new techniques of magnetic nanostructure fabrication to explore the nanoscale regime.
Phone: 607-255-6429
FAX: 607-255-2365
Email: ys53@cornell.edu
WWW: http://www.ccmr.cornell.edu/~suzuki/
Address: Materials Science and Engineering
Cornell University
214 Bard Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853




Zoltan Szabo

Field: Mathematics
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Zoltan Szabo is researching the geometry of smooth manifolds. This work involves the study of smooth structures of 4-manifolds. Results to date point to what he describes as a surprising link between topology and theoretical physics.
Phone: 609-258-4203
FAX: 609-258-1367
Email: szabo@math.princeton.edu
WWW: http://www.math.princeton.edu/~szabo/
Address: Dept of Mathematics
Princeton University
Fine Hall, Washington Road
Princeton, NJ 08544




Julie A. Theriot

Field: Biochemistry
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Julie Theriot is studying the transformation of chemical energy to mechanical energy in cell movement. Her work focuses on understanding the mechanisms of actin-based movement of the intracytoplasmic pathogenic bacteria Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri. She is investigating these systems at the molecular level, to yield insights into the mechanisms of whole-cell actin-based motility, as well as bacterial pathogenesis.
Phone: 650-725-7968
FAX: 650-723-6783
Email: theriot@Cmgm.stanford.edu
WWW: http://cmgm.stanford.edu/theriot/
Address: Dept of Biochemistry
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305-5307




Robert D. Van der Hilst

Field: Geophysics
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

Research Interests

Robert Van der Hilst is conducting research into the structure of the Earth's mantle. The study of the Earth's deep interior is typically based on inferences from seismic waves excited by earthquakes. Van der Hilst's efforts are designed to extract structural information from a range of wave types recorded in seismograms, to study large scale geodynamical processes in the Earth's interior.
Phone: (617) 253-6977
FAX:
Email: hilst@mit.edu
WWW: http://www-eaps.mit.edu/faculty/vanderhilst.htm
Address: Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
77 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02139




James J. Watkins

Field: Chemical Engineering
Packard Fellowship award year: 1998

,

Research Interests

James Watkins is researching chemical fluid deposition to make nanostructure devices. He says that the development of advanced materials for device applications requires deposition methods that provide precise control over the structure of the active metal, semiconductor or metal-oxide component. He hopes these efforts will provide new routes to "smart" materials.
Phone: 413-545-2569
FAX: 413-545-1647
Email: watkins@ecs.umass.edu
WWW: http://www.ecs.umass.edu/che/watkins.html
Address: Chemical Engineering
University of Massachusetts
686 N. Pleasant Street
Amherst, MA 01003-3110




The David and Lucile Packard Foundation
300 Second Street, Suite 200
Los Altos, California 94022
(650) 948-7658

Return to the Packard Fellows Directory

Email comments related the Packard Fellows web pages to webteam@cs.virginia.edu
Created and maintained by the UVA Computer Science Web Team and Gabriel Robins