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SERVICING MISSION INTRODUCTION
HUBBLE SM4
HUBBLE SM3B
HUBBLE SM3A
HUBBLE SM2
HUBBLE SM1
HUBBLE DEPLOYMENT
SM1 RELATED CONTENT

(Shuttle Mission: STS-61)
Servicing Mission 1, launched in December 1993, was the first opportunity to conduct planned maintenance on the telescope. In addition, new instruments were installed and the optics of the flaw in Hubble's primary mirror was corrected.

COSTAR
After Hubble's deployment in 1990, scientist realized that the telescope's primary mirror had a flaw called spherical aberration. The outer edge of the mirror was ground too flat by a depth of 2.2 microns (roughly equal to one-fiftieth the thickness of a human hair). This aberration resulted in images that were fuzzy because some of the light from the objects being studied was being scattered.

COSTAR (the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement) was developed as an effective means of countering the effects of the flawed shape of the mirror. COSTAR was a telephone booth-sized instrument which placed 5 pairs of corrective mirrors, some as small as a nickel coin, in front of the Faint Object Camera, the Faint Object Spectrograph and the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph.

COSTAR Animation (RealPlayer)



WF/PC2 in the enclosure
WFPC2 in the enclosure



Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2)

WFPC2 significantly improved ultraviolet performance over WFPC1, the original instrument. In addition to having more advanced detectors and more stringent contamination control, it also incorporated built-in corrective optics.


Image of solar arrays prior to capture<br>
Image of solar arrays
prior to capture


In addition, SM1 included the installation and replacement of other components including:

  • Solar Arrays
  • Solar Array Drive Electronics (SADE)
  • Magnetometers
  • Coprocessors for the flight computer
  • Two Rate Sensor Units
  • Two Gyroscope Electronic Control Units
  • GHRS Redundancy Kit
  •  

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    Last Updated: November 01, 2006
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