Wyatt Earp Photo Page
 

Wyatt Earp

Click here!
This picture of Wyatt, taken in about 1886, is probably the most widely reproduced photograph of him. Unfortunately it's often a poorly retouched version of this picture that's used.
Click here!
Bat Masterson and Wyatt in 1876 while they were in Dodge City, Kansas. While the record is incomplete, it's known that Wyatt became deputy city marshal on May 18, 1876, but in June Wyatt and Bat were deputy county sheriffs. Masterson went on to become the sheriff of Ford County, which contains Dodge City. This is the only known photograph of Wyatt wearing a badge.
Click here!
Wyatt (center) is flanked by Ed Englestadt on the left and John Clum on the right in this picture taken on the beach in Nome, Alaska in 1901. Wyatt spent several summers up there during the gold rush where he was part owner of the Dexter Saloon. John Clum was Tombstone's fourth mayor and was serving in this capacity at the time of the gunfight. The outlaws later tried to assassinate both him and Wyatt.
Click here!
Wyatt later in his life.
Click here!
Another picture of an older Wyatt.
Click here!
This photograph was taken just two weeks before he died on January 13, 1929. He was 80 years old.
Click here! Hunters Hot Springs, Montana. Phony photo?

Wyatt's Wives

This is not Josie.
The semi-nude photograph often said to be of Wyatt's third wife, Josie, is not really her and is not even an 1880s-style photograph. It actually dates from 1914 and was widely distributed by the ABC Novelty Company of Brooklyn, New York. It also appeared on Mexican postcards and a 1960s poster for the band Vanilla Fudge.
Click here!
The Northern was Wyatt's saloon in Tonopah, Nevada. It's very likely the woman in the white blouse is Josephine as it looks very much like other known pictures of her. This photograph was taken in 1902 and may be the earliest available picture of her.
Click here!
Josephine Earp later in her life. She and Wyatt remained together until his death in 1929. Wyatt and most of their friends called her "Sadie", a nickname derived from her middle name, Sarah. She is now more often referred to as "Josie".
Click here!
Celia Ann "Mattie" Earp was Wyatt's second wife. They were together for about eight years.
Click here!
One writer claimed this picture is of Wyatt's first wife, Urilla Sutherland, but it is actually of a woman named Christine Mayer, who was also known as "Kid Glove Rosey" and was arrested for shoplifting in the late 1800s.

Wyatt's Brothers

Click here!
Morgan Earp was shot through the shoulders in the gunfight near the O.K. Corral. Though he recovered from this, the outlaws murdered him a few months later. It was his death that prompted Wyatt to launch his vendetta against the outlaws. It was actually the Vendetta, not the gunfight, that made Wyatt famous.
Click here!
Virgil Earp was Tombstone's marshal and deputy U.S. marshal for the area. He was shot through the calf in the gunfight. Two months later he was severely wounded in an attempt by the outlaws to murder him. Six inches of bone had to be removed from his left arm, crippling him for life.
Click here!
James Earp owned the Sampling Room Saloon in Tombstone. While he was in Tombstone at the time of the shootout, he played little role in it. Wyatt's older half-brother Newton didn't move to Tombstone with the rest, but his youngest brother, Warren, did. Warren was away at the time of the gunfight, but he was involved in the Vendetta.

Wyatt's Friends

Click here!
This photograph of Doc was taken in Prescott, A.T. in 1879. It's thought that Doc sent this picture to his aunt, Ella McKey.
Click here!
Doc in 1881. This picture was taken by Tombstone photographer, C. S. Fly, whose shop was at the site of the famous gunfight.
Click here!
Some have suggested this is Doc's last photograph, saying it was taken in 1887, but Doc was extremely ill by that time and was bedridden for much of that year. Doc himself testified in 1884 that by then he weighed only 122 pounds. While he was good looking in his younger days, by this point he was probably more of a walking skeleton. In his obituary the Ute Chief of November 12, 1887 reported, "From the effects of the disease, from which he suffered probably half his life, Holliday, at the time of his death, looked like a man well advanced in years, for his hair was silver and his form emaciated and bent, but he was only thirty-six years old." Also, this could not be a younger picture of Doc because of the receding hairline. In addition, this man doesn't look like Doc any of the known photographs of him.
Click here!
This is another suspect photograph. While it's often published in books as being Doc, it doesn't look like any of the known pictures of him.
Click here!
Bat Masterson remained Wyatt's friend for most of his life. They initially met as buffalo hunters and later worked together in law enforcement in Dodge City, Kansas. For a short time, Bat also dealt cards for Wyatt when Wyatt had the gambling concession at the Oriental Saloon in Tombstone. He eventually became friends with President Theodore Roosevelt, who arranged for him to be appointed deputy U.S. marshal for the southern district of New York state.
Click here!
Gunfighter/gambler Luke Short was a good friend of both Wyatt and Bat. He, too, dealt cards for Wyatt at the Oriental. Wyatt came to Luke assistance when he was run out of Dodge City in an incident that became known as the Dodge City War.

The Opposition

Click here!
Ike Clanton was the main instigator of the gunfight near the O.K. Corral. He was unarmed when the fight took place and quickly fled the scene. This is a detail from a photograph taken by C. S. Fly in his gallery at the site of the gunfight. Ike was involved in rustling and stagerobbing.
Click here!
Frank McLaury in 1879 before coming to Tombstone. As the Earps tried to disarm the cowboys, Frank and Ike's brother, Billy, drew their weapons. Even though Billy fired at Wyatt, Wyatt knew Frank was the most dangerous shot of the bunch so that's who he fired at. Billy's shot missed, but Wyatt's struck Frank in the stomach.
Click here!
Tom McLaury in 1879 before coming to Tombstone. He was killed by a shotgun blast fired by Doc Holliday. Frank and Tom had been involved in selling stolen cattle.
Click here!
Tom McLaury, Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton shortly after the gunfight. They and their fancy caskets were place on display in the window of a hardware store by their relatives to rile up indignation against the Earps and Holliday. This is the only known photograph of Billy Clanton.
Click here!
Rustler Johnny Ringo was an expert shot and on at least one occasion he almost had it out with Doc Holliday. Ringo was probably involved in the ambush of Virgil Earp and the murder of Morgan Earp. He was later found dead under mysterious circumstances. Though some later claimed he was killed by Wyatt and Doc, they were actually in Colorado at the time.
Click here!
Johnny Behan was the first sheriff of Cochise County. Behan was Wyatt's primary rival. Originally he came to Tombstone as Wyatt's replacement as deputy sheriff for the area when Tombstone was still part of Pima County. Behan was friends with the outlaws and later did everything he could to get Wyatt tried for murder. For a picture wrongly said to be of Behan, look here.
Click here!
Milt Joyce was the chairman of the county board of supervisors. He also leased the bar and restaurant concessions at the Oriental Saloon, while Wyatt and his partners had the gambling concession. Joyce became one of the leaders of the anti-Earp faction and a strong supporter of the outlaws. At one point he got into an argument with Doc and Doc shot him through the hand. Joyce's partner was also wounded in the conflagration. Both Joyce and Sheriff Behan were later found to be involved in government corruption.

Tombstone

Click here!
Tombstone in 1879. The population of the town was 900 when the Earps arrived on December 1, 1879 and it doubled over the next two months.
Click here!
Tombstone in 1881 looking to the northwest.
Click here!
This street map of Tombstone on October 26, 1881 (the date of the gunfight) gives the locations of some of the important businesses and events. A much more detailed map can be found in Wyatt Earp Speaks!
Click here!
The fire of May 25, 1882 destroyed most of the western half of Tombstone's business district, including the O.K. Corral. The previous year on June 22, 1881 a fire had destroyed most of the eastern half of the business district. Since they didn't have water to put fires out with, they had to try to contain fires by dynamiting buildings in the fire's path.
Click here!
Allen Street at Fifth Street in 1880. The large building on the left is the Grand Hotel, where many of the outlaws stayed when in town. The one on the right is the Golden Eagle Brewery. Virgil Earp was right in front of where the man is sitting when he was ambushed and severely wounded.
Click here!
The Cosmopolitan Hotel on Allen Street. The Earps moved here after the gunfight. Fearing attempts to assassinate them, they felt they would be safer living here than in their houses.

Charleston

Click here!
The outlaws came to dominate the town of Charleston and made it and Galeyville their headquarters. Charleston is about ten miles southwest of Tombstone.

 
 
 

Other Interesting People

Click here!
The famous gunfight was not at the O.K. Corral. It actually took place in Harwood's lumberyard down the street from the rear entrance to the corral. William Harwood sold lumber from his house after he was forced from office as Tombstone's second mayor (its first elected mayor). The gunfight began in the side yard between his house and Fly's Lodging House. Normally he stored his lumber there, but since there was so much construction going on, he was often sold out--as he was on the day of the gunfight. The end of the gunfight took place out in Fremont Street.
Click here!
George Parsons was a friend of Wyatt's who kept a journal recording every day of his seven years in Tombstone. His journal is one of the most reliable sources available for this period of Tombstone's history.
Click here!
When Ed Schieffelin went into Apache country to search for silver, his friends told him he was crazy and that all he'd find was his tombstone. When he discovered the first of several of the area's most successful mines, he named that mine Tombstone. The town that quickly sprang up was named after that mine. The mines made him a very rich man.
Click here!
Billy Breakenridge was deputy sheriff under Sheriff Johnny Behan and was involved in many significant events in Tombstone's early history. Later his story was ghostwriten by novelist William MacLeod Raine in the book Helldorado (1928).
Click here!
Buckskin Frank Leslie killed several people, including Billy the Kid Claiborne, who was one of the survivors of the gunfight near the O.K. Corral.

 

Trivia Question

Who was Dick Naylor?
 
 

More Wyatt Earp
 

Library of the Wild West

 Send Us a Note
 

Front Page

Ordering Information

Site Map

You're hiding out at
www.ferncanyonpress.com