106TH CAVALRY REGIMENT

 

106th Cavalry Regiment Distinctive Unit Insignia

106th Cavalry Regiment Coat of Arms

 

DISTINCTIVE UNIT INSIGNIA

 

COAT OF ARMS

 

Distinctive Unit Insignia.  Description:   A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/32 inches (2.62 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned:  Per fess dovetailed Or and Gules, in base four fleurs-de-lis, three and one, of the first.  

        Symbolism:   The shield is divided per fess dovetailed Or and Gules (yellow and red), denoting that the organization has served as Artillery as well as Cavalry.  Red and yellow, being the Spanish colors, also indicate Spanish-American War service within the continental limits of the United States.  The fleurs-de-lis on the red portion symbolize the combat operations of the organization in Europe during World War I and World War II.  

        Background:   The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 106th Cavalry Regiment, Illinois and Michigan National Guard on 17 December 1930.  It was amended to omit the motto on 6 July 1931.  It was redesignated for the 106th Heavy Tank Battalion, Illinois and Michigan National Guard on 3 October 1949.  It was redesignated for the 106th Tank Battalion, Illinois National Guard on 19 October 1953.  The insignia was redesignated for the 106th Armor Regiment, Illinois National Guard on 13 December 1960.  It was redesignated for the 106th Cavalry Regiment, Illinois Army National Guard on 7 January 1965.  It was amended to change the symbolism on 7 October 1969.  

 

Coat of Arms.

        Blazon:  

                Shield:   Per fess dovetailed Or and Gules, in base four fleurs-de-lis, three and one, of the first.  

                Crest:   That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Illinois Army National Guard:  On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules upon a grassy field the blockhouse of old Fort Dearborn, Proper.  

                Motto:   UTCUMQUE UBIQUE (Anywhere At Any Time).  

        Symbolism:

                Shield:   The shield is divided per fess dovetailed Or and Gules (yellow and red), denoting that the organization has served as Artillery as well as Cavalry.  Red and yellow, being the Spanish colors, also indicate Spanish-American War service within the continental limits of the United States.  The fleurs-de-lis on the red portion symbolize the combat operations of the organization in Europe during World War I and World War II.    

                Crest:   The crest is that of the Illinois Army National Guard.  

        Background:   The coat of arms was originally approved for the 106th Cavalry Regiment, Illinois and Michigan National Guard on 17 December 1930.  It was amended to change the wording of the description to reflect the correct period of service on the Mexican Border on 30 December 1932.  It was redesignated for the 106th Heavy Tank Battalion, Illinois and Michigan National Guard on 3 October 1949.  It was amended to delete the crest for organizations of the Michigan National Guard on 6 October 1949.  It was redesignated for the 106th Tank Battalion, Illinois National Guard on 19 October 1953.  The insignia was redesignated for the 106th Armor Regiment, Illinois National Guard on 13 December 1960.  It was redesignated for the 106th Cavalry Regiment, Illinois Army National Guard on 7 January 1965.  It was amended to change the symbolism of the shield of the coat of arms on 7 October 1969.