WAMi 05 Festival Artwork by Rolf Harris - Download JPEG or PDF.
WAMi 05 Festival, Conference & Awards

MEDIA RELEASE ARCHIVE:

March 3, 2005
WAMi 05 Metro Wrap Up as Regionals Begin
(PDF print version for download also available here)

February 23, 2005
Eskimo Joe Have Their WAMi Cake and Eat It
(PDF print version for download also available here)
(PDF print version of the WAMi Festival 2005 Award Winners List also available here)

February 22, 2005
And The WAMi Award Goes To...
(PDF print version for download also available here)

February 8, 2005
WAMi Big Names Announced
(PDF print version for download also available here)

January 31, 2005
WAMi Awards & Conference
(PDF print version for download also available here)

January 18, 2005
Awards Hotlist Out, Get Your Tickets Now!
(PDF print version for download also available here)

January 11, 2005
WAMi Conference 2005 DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION
(PDF print version for download also available here)

December 17, 2004
Rolf Harris Official WAMi Festival Patron
(PDF print version for download also available here)

October 8, 2004
WAMi 2005 Applications Open - "Heads up if you wanna be in the spotlight"
(PDF print version for download also available here)

September 27, 2004
Introducing....The WAMi Festival, Conference, & Awards 2005
(PDF print version for download also available here)

FURTHER REFERENCES:
Splendid Isolation, 2004 Scoop Magazine Article
(PDF print version for download also available here)

Bailey Tells All by Simon Collins, The West Australian
(PDF print version for download also available here)

ONATHON - Paul Curtis Project with Ken West

Stories from the Revolution

Ritchie Yorke - Interview, X-Press Magazine Article
(PDF print version for download also available here)

 
WAMi 05 METRO WRAP UP AS REGIONALS BEGIN
  Download a PDF version of this media release.

The WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards 05 wrapped up on Sunday night, after the hugely successful Festival ran in its 11th year.  The hotly discussed WAMi Awards at the Beck’s Verandah and the inaugural WAMi Conference DIY Global Revolution featuring music industry masterminds from across Australia, were the standout highlights of the festival this year.  The WAMis were the perfect way to end summer in Perth and the only way to begin autumn in the regional parts of WA, with the regional WAMi showcases kicking off this weekend across 9 towns including Kojonup, Albany, Bunbury, Kalbarri and Geraldton. These shows will feature WA acts such as the Dave Mann Collective, Saritah, Snowman and more!  Check http://wam.asn.au/ for the full WAMi regional showcase gig guide.

In 2005 the WAMis stepped up a level. The change of venue for the WAMi Awards to the Beck’s Verandah was praised by many.  The WAMi Awards, saw Eskimo Joe walk away as big winners with six awards, Bon Scott, Dave Hole and Martin Clarke (Clarion records) inducted into the WAM Hall of Fame and triple j’s Robbie Buck put in a stellar performance as host.  This was the WA music industry’s night of nights, and it didn’t disappoint.  The WAMi DIY Global Revolution Conference was a huge success with the Conference Cast and punters alike all taking in the DIY knowledge, inspiration and advice that was on offer.  With names such as Philip Stevens, Sebastian Chase and David Vodicka sharing their stories, it’s no wonder the conference attendees walked away from the DIY Conference informed and inspired!

Paul Bodlovich, Executive Director of WAM commented on the WAMi Festival for 2005
"Highlights for me?  The enthusiasm with which our most high profile artists continue to embrace their local music scene.  As well as the obvious ones who performed, we had great behind the scenes support from many others.  Eskimo Joe obviously scooped the cake pool this year, and what a great result that really evidences the degree to which they've stayed rooted in Perth.  Big Saturday (the inaugural WAMi Conference rolling on into the biggest yet Saturday Spectacular) was amazing, with the Monkey Bar complex full for upwards of 20 hours.  I think this year's CD is the best yet.  The WAMi Awards was a landmark event for us, and I think finally got the point across that we're not the same WAM of the nineties.  The inauguration of Bon Scott into the WAM Hall of Fame seems to have settled some jitters that have been going on in some circles.  The influx of national industry types into Perth, and the feedback from them on not just the event but the people they met and the bands that they saw.  And a personal highlight for me was definitely "Abmusic Day", which brought people together who don't normally come together in a way that has generated some lasting outcomes. So, its been a big year, a lot of work, and next year is already just round the corner.”

The WAMi showcases proved to be another favourite of the festival with Eskimo Joe, Jebediah and Little Birdy, the cream of WA’s crop, all taking part.  Some of the hottest up and coming bands - El Horizonte, The Flairz and The Silents, had cracker sets at the Saturday Spectacular in front of record label A&R, media and interstate industry guests.  As did The Fuzz and Red Jezebel at their respective showcases.  This was one WAMi Festival you didn’t want to miss.

The WAMis hit the road this weekend, with over 20 licensed and all ages gigs across the state scheduled throughout the next few months.  The WAMi regional showcases will travel to the South West, Mid West, Great Southern, Wheatbelt, Goldfields and Peel regions.  WAMi Award winners Snowman and Pete Stone do the south west leg of the tour this long weekend.  For your regional WAMi fix, check the main festival page for a full list of dates and venues.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING…
“The WAMis had a real sense of fresh air about them. There seemed to be a greater pride in the wonderful music scene of WA and the WAMis really captured this feeling. The DIY Global Revolution was a real highlight for myself. I was extremely pleased with how many people choose to be involved both as punters and as delegates in this great day of shared experience. It was a tribute to the foresight of Carolyn Bailey and WAM to bring it together so well here in Perth. Congratulations to all involved, it was a privilege to be part of." Philip Stevens, Jarrah Records & Manager John Butler Trio, The Waifs and Little Birdy

" Well 2005 was another freaking great WAMi's. Seriously freaking great music - red jezebel, snowman, the flairz and el horizonte that means you - freaking knowledgeable speakers on informative panels and the traditional Perth hospitality ramped up to new freaking level. Bring on 2006!" Kirileigh Lynch, Assistant Music Director - triple j

" WAMi 2005 was a great experience and professionally learnt a lot from watching others talk about their areas of expertise. I also enjoyed seeing heaps of brilliant music which was of a very high standard! Looking forward to it in 2006" Catherine Haridy, A&R Manager – Festival Mushroom Records

“ This year the WAMi Festival came of age, thanks to the top notch talent this State has produced. The awards saw Eskimo Joe, one of Australia's best bands for some time, rightly earn six awards at a venue befitting WA music's night of nights." Simon Collins, Music Editor – The West Australian

“ The Saturday Spectacular provided a unique opportunity to witness an amazing diversity of WA artists, performing under one roof". Anna Willems, Music Director - Nova 93.7

“ I made it to the awards and thought it was pretty cool. I saw Red Jezebel who sounded great!” Elissa Macneall, Music Director - 92.9

" Moving from the grungey Hydey to the bling-bling festival club, the WAMi Awards shone bright like a teenager drunk on his parent's liquor cabinet. Fantastic." Annika Priest, Music Editor - Sunday Times Magazine (STM)

" Great WAMIs this year especially the booze fuelled awards in the magnificent verandah surrounds. Although the dark lord threatened to appear all we got was the  ramblings of some "nude monkey" and Snowman's constant references to their parentage. Big ups for giving RTRFM 92.1 another cake for the media award. Maybe next year the winners can get a wobble board in keeping with the work of the great Rolf. Respect!" Dave Cutbush, Events Manager, Announcer - RTRFM 92.1

“ As a first time attendee of the WAMi Festival I was totally blown away with the energy and excitement that the conference generates for local WA music. There seems to be a lot of community spirit amongst the industry and musicians alike which is incredibly healthy and infectious. I saw some great acts while I was there like The Silents, Snowman, El Horizonte, The Avenues, Outfit Faux, and of course The Flairz.” John Mullen, A& R Manager – Dew Process

See wam.asn.au for all your WAMi Festival, Conference & Awards ’05 info.

WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards 2005 is presented by SmokeFree WA, proudly sponsored by Healthway.

For further information or images, or WAMi Cake tastings, please contact:
Sarah Thomas, Publicist
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA or 0410 468 507
e. publicist@wam.asn.au
 
 
 
ESKIMO JOE HAVE THEIR WAMi CAKE AND EAT IT
  Download a PDF version of this media release.
Download a PDF version of the WAMi Festival 2005 Award Winners List.

Last night, Tuesday February 22, the WAMi Awards hosted by triple j’s Robbie Buck, toasted the WA music industry and celebrated! Eskimo Joe are eating large quantities of cake this morning, after their clean sweep of the WAMi Awards - picking up all 6 of the ‘WAMis’ that they were nominated for. These included Most Popular Album and Most Popular Act. The Panda Band, were voted as WA’s Most Promising New Act and Snowman were voted by the general public as Favourite Newcomer. The WAMi Awards were held in the beautiful outdoor setting of the Beck’s Verandah, at the Perth Concert Hall and the stars were shining as award winners were presented their WAMi cakes. Jebediah, Carus, the Kill Devil Hills were amongst those who performed; and Bon Scott, Martin Clarke and Dave Hole were inducted into the WAM Hall of Fame. 2004 was a significant year for WA Music and the WAMi Awards last night saw many success stories celebrated! Head to the WAMi Festival 2005 page for the full list of WAMi Award winners and the WAMi Festival gig guide.

After the release of their brilliant sophomore album, a Song Is A City, Eskimo Joe were always a shoe in for Most Popular Album, but Little Birdy, Red Jezebel and the Kill Devil Hills were stiff competition with all three Nominees releasing top notch albums in 2004. Little Birdy, picked up the gong for Most Popular Music Video for their single Beautiful To Me, with vocalist Katy Steele being awarded Best Female Vocalist at the Monday night presentations. The latest Fremantle band to set tongues wagging, The Kill Devil Hills picked up the WAMi Award for Best Country Music Act and Best Blues / Roots Act after kicking off the WAMi Awards night with a rockin’ performance.

The prestigious Golden WAMi for contribution to the WA Music Industry in 2004, was filled with worthy nominees including Nigel Bird, Mark Genge, Luke Rinaldi and Philip Stevens. The Golden WAMi was awarded to Nigel Bird, the Regional Support Coordinator at WAM and Venue Booker for the Swan Hotel in Fremantle. Philip Stevens picked up two awards acknowledging his work as manager for John Butler Trio and The Waifs, winning the Management Award for outstanding achievements in 2004 by a Manager as well as the award for Best Record Label, for Jarrah Records.

Don’t forget, tickets for the WAMi DIY Global Revolution Conference are on sale for $45. WAMi Festival ’05 Season Passes are on sale now, with the bonus Kiss My WAMi compilation CD set. Platinum Season Passes  (entry to DIY Global Revolution Conference & showcases) are $103 and the Gold Season Passes (entry to all showcases) for $45. All tickets to WAMi events are sold through BOCS Ticketing Outlets, at bocsticketing.com.au and via phone charge 08 9484 1133 (1800 193 300 for callers outside of Perth metro area). BOCs booking fees apply.

See wam.asn.au for all your WAMi Festival, Conference & Awards ’05 info.

WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards 2005 is presented by SmokeFree WA, proudly sponsored by Healthway.

For further information or images, or WAMi Cake tastings, please contact:
Sarah Thomas, Publicist
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA or 0410 468 507
e. publicist@wam.asn.au
 
 
 
AND THE WAMi AWARD GOES TO...
  Download a PDF version of this media release.

After a huge turn out at Little Birdy’s stellar Live at the Wireless performance, the WAMi week has kicked off with a bang. WAM, the West Australian Music Industry Association Inc, announced the first round of WAMi Award winners at the Monkey Bar last night, just prior to Eskimo Joe‘s performance in the WAMi spotlight. Tonight, the WAMi Awards at the Beck’s Verandah are shaping up to be another big event. The core WAMi Awards (Most Popular Album, Most Promising New Act, Best Live Act) and cakes being presented, plus the induction of Bon Scott, Martin Clarke and Dave Hole into the WAM Hall of Fame is also on the agenda. This is WA music’s night of nights! Tickets for the WAMi Awards at the Becks Verandah, Perth Concert Hall are $33 and on sale now from BOCS ticketing. Check out the WAMi Festival 2005 page for the full list of WAMi Award nominees.

WAMi Award winners, announced on Monday night:

Management Award: Philip Stevens (John Butler Trio, The Waifs & Little Birdy)
Best Live Sound Engineer: Gavin Tempany (live engineer for Little Birdy)
Best WA Based Record Label: Jarrah Records (home to John Butler Trio and The Waifs)
Best Male Vocalist: Nathan Gaunt
Best Female Vocalist: Katy Steele (Little Birdy)
Best Guitarist: Nathan Gaunt
Best Drummer: Angus Diggs (Jeff Lang, Mick Hart + session musician)
Best Electronic Producer: Lo Key Fu
Best Bassist: Vanessa Thornton (Jebediah)
Best Instrumentalist: Kathy Potter (Bashful)
Best DJ: Greg Packer

Head down to the WAMi Awards from 7pm tonight to enjoy complimentary drinks and finger food (until 9pm), and catch performances by Jebediah, Kill Devil Hills, Carus, Dom Mariani and the Majestic Kelp, Red Jezebel and the Panda Band. The Beck’s Verandah will be buzzing with WA music, tonight, under the stars.
Don’t forget, tickets for the WAMi DIY Global Revolution Conference (this Saturday!) are on sale now for $45. WAMi Festival ’05 Season Passes are on sale now, with the bonus Kiss My WAMi compilation CD set. Platinum Season Passes  (entry to WAMI Awards, DIY Global Revolution Conference & showcases) are $103 and the Gold Season Passes (entry to all showcases) for $45. Individual tickets to the WAMi Awards are $33. All tickets to WAMi events are sold through BOCS Ticketing Outlets, at bocsticketing.com.au and via phone charge 08 9484 1133 (1800 193 300 for callers outside of Perth metro area). BOCs booking fees apply.

See wam.asn.au for all your WAMi Festival, Conference & Awards ’05 info.

For further information or images, or WAMi Cake tastings, please contact:
Sarah Thomas, Publicist
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA or 0410 468 507
e. publicist@wam.asn.au
 
 
 
WAMi BIG NAMES ANNOUNCED
  Download a PDF version of this media release.

Western Australia is producing some damn fine acts of late, with one of the most common questions asked being ‘what’s in the water over in WA?’.  WAM, the West Australian Music Industry Association Inc don’t have a simple answer to that question, but they have delightedly spilled the beans and announced the inclusion of some big hitters in this years WAMi Festival, with Eskimo Joe, Jebediah and Little Birdy all set to make an appearance!  The cream of WA’s crop will perform at this year’s WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards - over 120 acts spread out over 17 WAMi showcases, from February 17 – 27. Visit wam.asn.au for a full list of WAMi showcase events. Let the WAMis begin!

In 2004 Eskimo Joe, Little Birdy and Jebediah were each nominated for ARIA Awards, released charting albums and spent the year touring the nation! Little Birdy will fly the WA flag, with what’s sure to be a cracker Live at the Wireless performance, Monday Feb 21 at Curtin University.  LATW will be broadcast live on triple j, with Little Birdy hitting the stage at 5pm sharp, and yes it’s open to the public! Just when you’re thinking Monday night in Perth couldn’t get any better, consider that the Monkey Bar will play host to the Live at the Wireless After Party, with Eskimo Joe stepping up into the WAMi spotlight.  The WAMi Awards presentation night is another corker event, boasting an impressive schedule of award winners eating cake and Jebediah performing live under the stars.  Speaking of name dropping, Little Birdy will also be headlining the WAMi  Saturday Spectacular at the Monkey Bar, Saturday Feb  26.

Meanwhile, the WAMi Indigenous showcase will feature live sets by Mary G and Lois Onley on Saturday Feb 19 at Neil Hawkins Park, Joondalup.  An Indigenous Music Roundtable will be held at Abmusic (Bentley Campus) on Wednesday Feb 23 and will bring together prominent indigenous artists and media representatives from around Australia to strengthen existing networks and develop new ones.

The WAMi DIY Global Revolution Conference on Saturday Feb 26 is big.  Indeed it’s so big that Creative Industries at Queensland University of Technology, have decided to upgrade their involvement.  Manager Peter Higgs will be replacing Greg Hearn as a Key Note Speaker. In recent years Higgs has consulted to Federal and State governments, educational, legal and arts organisations in the area of Creative Industries, rights and content management, digitisation and digital distribution strategies.  Previous to that, he spent six years with Apple Computer as Third Party Marketing Manager working with software developers and creative talent on the impact of computer technology on their craft and business practices.

WAMi Festival ’05 Season Passes are on sale now, with tickets to the WAMi Awards and Conference available at $33 and $45 each respectively.  All tickets to WAMi events are sold through BOCS Ticketing Outlets, at bocsticketing.com.au and via phone charge 08 9484 1133 (1800 193 300 for callers outside of Perth metro area). BOCs booking fees apply.

See wam.asn.au for all your WAMi Festival, Conference & Awards ’05 info.

For further information or images, or WAMi Cake tastings, please contact:
Sarah Thomas, Publicist
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA or 0410 468 507
e. publicist@wam.asn.au
 
 
 
WAMi AWARDS & CONFERENCE
  Download a PDF version of this media release.
Download a PDF
version of the WAMi 2005 Conference Highlights.

Increase your Knowledge. Improve your Chances
WAM, the West Australian Music Industry Association Inc, has announced the latest names to join their DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION, the conference that chooses to break the mould on Feb 26.

Kirileigh Lynch (Assistant Program Director triple j); Catherine Haridy (A’n’R Festival Mushroom Records); Paul Sloan (MD Supersonic Enterprises); Brian Boys (Head of Entertainment Yahoo!); Neil Fernandes (ex-Manikins now Assistant Director-General Department of Education and Training); Pete Morris (Telesis); Simon Collins (The West Australian); Mike Wafer (Xpress); Bruce Milne (Au Go Go Records); Stephen King (Media Arts Lawyers;) Julie Horrigan (MGM / Westlink-WA); Stu Copeland (Blackstone Society); Mike Tucak (lawyer); Kate Switajewski Kelly & Co (represent Eskimo Joe); Michael Jones (CBS+ post graduate lawyer Minter Ellison); Nick Compton (WAAPA Arts Management graduate); Karen Lee (ArtsWA); Alan Corbet (JazzWA & ArtsWA Fellowship recipient); Daniel Susnjar (ArtsWA Fellowship recipient); and Paul Bodlovich (ED WAM).

These folks join the previously announced lineup - Sebastian Chase (CEO MGM); David Vodicka (Rubber Records, Media Arts Lawyers); Peter Higgs (Senior Research Fellow Creative Industries Research and Applications Centre); Philip Stevens (Jarrah Records & Manager Little Birdy, The Waifs, John Butler Trio); Paul Curtis (Manager Regurgitator); Heath Bradby (Redline Records & Manager Jebediah, Rhibosome); Ritchie Yorke (elder statesman of Australian rock journalism); Philip Mortlock (MD Origin Records); Christie Eliezer (Australian Bureau Chief of Billboard); and Peter Karpin (MD BMG Publishing) - forming the most credible group of music industry commentators yet assembled in this state.

Media producer Carolyn (James) Bailey has designed the The WAMi Conference 05 DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION to provide insight into how to derive an income from contemporary music: “the conference contains various levels of knowledge being presented in two separate areas – one in which audiences will gain ‘LIVE KNOWLEDGE FOR NOW’, and one in which they will be inspired by ‘LIVE KNOWLEDGE FOR THE FUTURE’”.

Part conference, part gig and part TV show, DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION will feature performances by Saritah; Kilted Generation; The Big Hoo-Haa!; Andrew Horabin; DJ Paul Malone; DJ Dan the Man. The EXPO Up Close and Live large format photographic exhibition by Gary Peters will provide a spectacular backdrop, and tertiary students from law, business and arts management will acknowledge the paths into the music industry from tertiary institutions as they co-host a number of segments.

In order to best tell our story, WAM has developed Stories from the Revolution (below). Please contact Sarah Thomas WAM Publicist should you wish to develop one of these stories.

WAM has developed an online forum in partnership with perthbands.com, which provides an insight into the thinking of the conference cast and the opportunity to influence their thinking. Visit http://wam.asn.au to be a part of the forums, and for all info on the WAMi Conference 05 DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION.

The WA music industry is currently running hot! This is a fact, and has been repeatedly acknowledged over the past couple of years by such voices as ARIA, APRA, triple j, Rolling Stone, Scoop, The West Australian and WA Business News. WAMi Conference 05 DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION is the ideal opportunity to become a part of this phenomenon.

WAMi Conference tickets are available through BOCs Ticketing at $45 plus booking fee.

WAMi Awards
Let Them Eat Cake
WAM is pleased, excited and thrilled to announce that Robbie Buck, triple j presenter extraordinaire and big-time fan of Australian Music through his Home and Hosed program, will host the 2005 WAMi Awards.

This year the WAMi Awards are styling it up and moving to a more performance orientated format, all in the gorgeous open air surrounds of the Beck’s Verandah at the Perth Concert Hall on Tuesday February 22. Helping to celebrate the occasion will be Jebediah, Carus,The Panda Band, Dom Mariani & The Majestic Kelp, Red Jezebel and the Kill Devil Hills. It will be a night of fun and celebrations for industry, VIPs and local music fans alike.

The WAMi Awards have existed, in one form or another, for over 20 years. In 2005, with the phenomenal success of a number of our artists on national and international stages WAM is proud to not only be able to give these wonderful ambassadors recognition at home, but also to ensure that their feet are planted firmly on the ground by presenting them with the now famous WAMi cakes. No dangerous, pointy, pointless paperweights here.

All nominees for WAMi Awards are determined by an industry polling process, with shortlists of four then voted on by the public in a number of categories and the rest of the categories going back to the industry for a further voting process.
Past winners read like a veritable who’s who of the WA music industry – the big hitters among the nominees this year are Eskimo Joe, Little Birdy and Snowman, with Luke Rinaldi looking to follow up his Golden WAMi (for Contribution to the Industry) win in 2003 with another big cake.

As well as this year’s WAMi Awards, we will be inducting three more notable achievers into the WAM Hall of Fame. Previous inductees include Dom Mariani, Suze DiMarchi, John Mayer and Kim Salmon. The West Australian music industry has a rich past going back to the fifties, and the Hall of Fame gives us the opportunity to acknowledge those who have, over a long period of time, achieved significant success.

The Western Australian music industry is currently running hot! This is a fact, and has been repeatedly acknowledged over the past couple of years by such voices as ARIA, APRA, triple j, Rolling Stone, Scoop, The West Australian and WA Business News. The WAMi Awards is the ideal opportunity to become a part of this phenomenon.

WAMi Awards tickets are available through BOCs Ticketing at $33 plus booking fee.

See wam.asn.au for all your WAMi Festival, Conference & Awards ’05 info.

For further information or images, or WAMi Cake tastings, please contact:
Sarah Thomas, Publicist
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA or 0410 468 507
e. publicist@wam.asn.au

 
 
 
AWARDS HOTLIST OUT, GET YOUR TICKETS NOW!
  Download a PDF version of this media release.
Download a PDF
version of the WAMi 2005 award nominees list.

From February 17 - 27 all eyes will be on Perth during the WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards. Bigger than ever before, WAMi ’05 includes the inaugural WAMi Conference DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION; showcases featuring cutting edge WA acts; and the night of nights for the WA music industry, the WAMi Awards ceremony. Season Passes for this year’s WAMi Festival go on sale THURSDAY JANUARY 20 from BOCS Ticketing, which is also the date that public voting for the WAMi Awards opens.

Only available when you purchase a WAMi Season Pass, the Kiss My WAMi compilation set features the cream of WA music, with acts such as Eskimo Joe, Karnivool, Dave Mann Collective, Bank Holidays, Lake of Bass, The Panda Band and stacks more over 4 CDs. The Kiss My WAMi compilation is a must have in anyone’s WA music CD collection.

In 2005 WAM, the West Australian Music Industry Association Inc, are keeping Season Passes and tickets to the WAMi Awards night & conference affordable and budget friendly. For $45 the Gold WAMi Season Pass entitles you to entry to all WAMi Festival 05 gigs, including the Saturday Spectacular; and comes with the Kiss My WAMi CD compilation set. Or for those who have WAMi fever, take advantage of the Platinum WAMi Season Pass which entitles you to entry to all WAMi 05 events, including the WAMi Conference, WAMi Awards and the Saturday Spectacular; and comes with the Kiss My WAMi CD compilation set. All this at the bargain price of $103. Plus you can use all season passes regionally when the WAMis go down south on the long weekend of March 3 – 6. Indeed the super keen could even follow the remaining WAMi tours round WA throughout the rest of March AND May!
Tickets to the WAMi Awards and Conference are also available at $33 and $45 each respectively. All tickets to WAMi events are sold through BOCS Ticketing Outlets, at www.bocsticketing.com.au and via phone charge 08 9484 1133 (1800 193 300 for callers outside of Perth metro area). BOCs booking fees apply.

The WAMi Awards recognise the top achievers in WA Music over the past 12 months. In a year where the WA music industry’s profile has continued to rise nationally and locally WAMi Award competition is fierce. Eskimo Joe, Little Birdy and Snowman lead the nomination field, with both Little Birdy and Eskimo Joe nominated for Most Popular Album alongside Red Jezebel and the Kill Devil Hills. Nominees in the Industry only voted category for the Golden WAMi for contribution to the WA Music Industry in 2004 are: Mark Genge (RTRFM), Nigel Bird (Venue Booker, WA MMF Chairperson & WAM Regional Support Coordinator), Philip Stevens (Manager Little Birdy, The Waifs & John Butler Trio) and Luke Rinaldi (Venue Booker, WA MMF State Coordinator, Manager Red Jezebel, Capital City).

To vote in this year’s WAMi Awards grab a copy of X-Press Magazine and The West Australian on Thursday January 20 and 27 and look for the voting page. Voting closes on Wednesday February 9. The WAMi Awards will be presented on Tuesday February 22 at the Verandah, Perth Concert Hall.

Click here to download a complete llist of the WAMi 2005 award nominees.

For further information or images, please contact:
Sarah Thomas
Publicist
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA or 0410 468 507
e. publicist@wam.asn.au
 
 
 
WAMi CONFERENCE 2005 DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION
  Download a PDF version of this media release.

With the WAMi Festival, Conference & Awards ’05 slated to run from February 17 – 27, WAM, the West Australian Music Industry Association Inc, announces the inaugural music business conference entitled WAMi Conference 2005 DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION. The day long event to held on Saturday February 26 at the Monkey Bar, is the first music business conference of its kind to be staged in Perth. DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION will provide inspiration, resources and pathways to empower artists to seek sustainable income using the DIY ethic. Conference tickets go on sale Thursday January 20 for only $45 + Booking Fee.

The WAMi Conference 2005 DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION will bring together Australia’s music industry visionaries and highest calibre practitioners examining the topics of DIY Global Revolution, Income Streams in the New Economy and So You Wanna Own A Record Company. These people are either those who are directly driving or participating in the current success of artists such as The John Butler Trio, The Waifs, Little Birdy, Joel Turner, Regurgitator, Jebediah, 1200 Techniques and Eskimo Joe; or those who have been invited to provide expert guidance towards how income will be derived in the global future market where music meets technology. Entry level music business knowledge will be provided in the DIY Tool Box are with topics including Essential Law, Grants and Manufacturing, Marketing & Touring.

This WAMi Conference is the first time such directed knowledge has been provided, it is a story of celebration about what can be achieved when music business is done on an artist centred basis. DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION will identify the formula and business structure behind how The John Butler Trio achieved landmark national and international success without the involvement of a major record company.

The Conference Cast includes Sebastian Chase (CEO MGM); David Vodicka (Rubber Records, Media Art Lawyers); Peter Higgs (Senior Research Fellow Creative Industries Research and Applications Centre); Philip Stevens (Jarrah Records & Manager Little Birdy, The Waifs, John Butler Trio); Paul Curtis (Manager Regurgitator); Heath Bradby (Redline Records & Manager Jebediah, Rhibosome); Ritchie York (elder statesman of Australian rock journalism); Philip Mortlock (MD Origin Records); Christie Eliezer (Australian Bureau Chief of Billboard); and Peter Karpin (MD BMG Publishing). Plus more Labels and Managers to be announced.

A WAMi Conference site has been established at http://wam.asn.au featuring cast member profiles and an online discussion forum, where the foundations of conference discussions have already been laid and opened for debate. All are invited to have their say.
DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION has been produced for WAM by Carolyn (James) Bailey. Carolyn’s credits include: producer commercial radio; co-producer Countdown Australian Music Awards (ABC); consultant Austin Texas Chamber of Commerce SXSW; consultant Austrade New York; lecturer Music Business & Technology NYU; producer College Satellite Network; producer Saturday Morning Live (Network 7).

Tickets on sale Thursday January 20 at all BOCS Ticketing Outlets, at www.bocsticketing.com.au or via phone charge 08 9484 1133 (1800 193 300 for callers outside of Perth metro area).

For further information or images, please contact:
Sarah Thomas
Publicist
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA or 0410 468 507
e. publicist@wam.asn.au
 
 
 
ROLF HARRIS OFFICIAL WAMi FESTIVAL PATRON
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WAM, the West Australian Music Industry Association Inc, is pleased to announce Rolf Harris as the patron of the WAMi Festival, Conference & Awards 2005 to be held across WA from February 17 – 27. Formerly known as the Kiss My WAMis, 2005 will mark the 11th year of the WAMi festival and the year Rolf Harris was proudly welcomed to the fold. To celebrate Rolf has created an original artwork for the festival poster.

Paul Bodlovich, WAM Executive Director, said of Rolf’s appeal, “we were looking for someone who had a high profile, not just in music, but in general. Rolf Harris has a strong Western Australian identity.” Rolf’s successes are of relevance to the 2005 program, as Paul commented “as an entertainer and artist he’s always done things his own way, and that way of thinking ties in with the DIY (Do It Yourself) Global Revolution theme of the WAMi Conference”.

Rolf Harris, the boy from the dusty streets of Bassendean in Western Australia has become a household name in both Australia and the UK. Rolf has been performing and entertaining for over 50 years, working in music, visual arts and hosting a plethora of TV shows in the UK and Australia. His hit songs include ‘Tie Me Kangaroo Down Sport’ and his widespread appeal has seen him voted the most popular act at Glastonbury Festival.

Regretful that he is unable to attend the WAMi Festival, Conference & Awards in 2005, Rolf commented on his new role as patron of the WAMis and the advantages of the isolation of growing up in WA: “It was with honour and pride that I recently accepted the offer from WAM to be the official patron of the 2005 WAMi Festival. I grew up in Western Australia. Art and music, the only two things I was interested in, seemed to be far away on the other side of the world. This isolation meant you had to develop on your own, picking up whatever pointers you could from the radio, the art books you could read, or the few and far between art exhibitions that ever came your way. I’m sure that being so far away from everything, gave me the determination to succeed somehow, and, in a way, gave me a unique perspective which I believe is an advantage”

With Rolf Harris officially on board as patron, the final loose ends of the WAMi Festival, Conference & Awards 2005 are being tied up. The WAMi Festival showcases the finest WA acts and celebrates the WA music industry’s achievements. Full details of the WAMi Festival, including the inaugural WAMi Conference DIY Global Revolution, set to inspire on Saturday February 26, will be announced in the new year. The conference will feature industry visionaries taking strategic DIY discussions to the next level, as well as delivering essential practical information, all in an easy to digest format.

WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards 2005 is presented by SmokeFree WA, proudly sponsored by Healthway.

For further information or images, please contact:
Sarah Thomas
Publicist
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA
m. 0410 468 507
e. publicist@wam.asn.au
 
 
 
HEADS UP IF YOU WANNA BE IN THE SPOTLIGHT
  Download a PDF version of this media release.

WAM, the West Australian Music Industry Association Inc, will be packing the punches with its WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards 2005 and now is the time for artists to get onboard. Formerly the Kiss My WAMi Festival, the WAMi Festival will feature showcases spanning February 17 to 27. WAM is calling for applications from artists wanting to perform in the showcases and / or have a track featured on the illustrious Kiss My WAMi compilation CD.

WA artists of all styles are invited to apply and to do so you’ll need to go to wam.asn.au or call 9227 7962 (1800 007 962 for regional WA) and get your hands on an info kit. The kits will be available from Thursday October 14. Interest in West Australian talent continues to grow around the world and The WAMis are recognised as THE showcase of contemporary WA music, so don’t miss the boat!
The Kiss My WAMi compilation CD will continue to be a 4 disc promotional set distributed widely to media and industry locally, nationally and internationally, including coverage of delegates at events such as MIDEM and SxSW. Widely regarded as the most successful promotional compilation in Australia, in September 2003 the Kiss My WAMi compilation was the most played album on Australian community radio according to the CBAA (Community Broadcasting Association of Australia).

Highlights of the WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards 2005 include free public events in partnership with the City of Fremantle, City of Perth and City of Joondalup; the WAMi Awards ceremony on Feb 22; the Saturday Spectacular, nestled in the middle of the showcase concert series on Feb 26; plus an all ages concert series and regional tours!

WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards 2005 is presented by SmokeFree WA, proudly sponsored by Healthway.

For further information or images, please contact:
Paul Bodlovich
Exective Director
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA
m. 0438 007 962
e. paul@wam.asn.au
 
 
 
INTRODUCING... THE WAMi FESTIVAL, CONFERENCE & AWARDS 2005
  Download a PDF version of this media release.

Celebrating and Showcasing Western Australian Original Contemporary Music

WAM, the West Australian Music Industry Association Inc, is pleased to announce the WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards 2005. Formerly the Kiss My WAMi Festival, this monstrous event is now in its 11th year.

For 10 days in February, from the 17th till the 27th, all eyes will be on Perth for the latest cutting edge acts and noteworthy conference outcomes. Plus to ensure that WA appetites are catered to, further events under the WAMi umbrella will be held throughout February.

2005 will see an exciting new format for the WAMis, with a leaner showcase program, more free events, new partnerships and perhaps most notably, the inauguration of a new Music Business Conference which will seek to attract even more industry professionals from interstate and overseas.

Submissions will be called for shortly, inviting artists to apply for inclusion in the showcase program, as well as the traditional CD-sampler compilation set of all Western Australian music.

Public voting for the WAMi Awards will take place in January, with the winners to be announced at a special presentation night on February 22. Also to be announced will be new inductees into the WAM Hall Of Fame.

WAMi 05 is a SmokeFree event. WAM acknowledges the support of the Government of Western Australia through ArtsWA and the Federal Government through the Australia Council.

For further information or images, please contact:
Paul Bodlovich
Exective Director
p. 9227 7962 or 1800 007 962 for Regional WA
m. 0438 007 962
e. paul@wam.asn.au
 
 
 
SPLENDID ISOLATION, 2004 SCOOP MAGAZINE ARTICLE
  Splendid Isolation was published in the Spring 2004 edition of Scoop Magazine.
Download a PDF version of this article.


Maybe there’s something in the water, or perhaps it’s just our geographical distance from mainstream influences. Whatever the cause, there’s no doubt the nation is dancing to a distinctly West Australian beat. Text by Sarah Szabo.

Philip Stevens has just ushered a television crew from a current affairs team out of his Fremantle office. He hasn’t eaten lunch and another interviewer wants his time. Assistants rugby-tackle the calls as they come in and politely take messages. He’s getting used to it – Philip is John Butler’s manager.

Making history at the Australasian Performing Rights Association (APRA) awards by winning the peer-voted Song of the Year when you’re a self-published, singer-songwriter with no major label backing and an Australia-wide No.1 album with double platinum status (and rising) tends to excite the hordes. Thirty-year-old dreadlocked hippies from Pinjarra (via California) playing bluesy, reggae rock are never a shoo-in against winsome soapie starlet crooners and their marketing juggernauts.

John Butler maintains he never set out to take on the multinationals. “I just set out to live my dream and it kind of went that way. We showed everyone that we could do it that way but no one was really interested until it was too late,” he says. “The multinationals were there once we had sold 30,000 albums but for me it just meant they were interested in the money.”

The John Butler Trio and Philip Stevens are riding that sweet wave that comes to few, but is desired by many. They are, in short, hot.

And, if you believe the glossies, so is Perth in general. “Is Perth the new Paris?” asked Australian Vogue, citing an extraordinary number of West Australians like John Butler as leading the scene in the music and entertainment world. Even The Bulletin, a magazine with its pen more firmly poised on politics than pop, has seen fit to comment on our rising stocks (and we’re talking musical, not financial). Hype and hyperbole go hand in hand with the territory, yet we do seem to have come across all renaissancey.  

Witness Luke Steele from The Sleepy Jackson, with his smeared makeup, outrageous hair and penchant for wearing outfits suitable for a children’s party. (Nothing says “Je suis un Rock Star” like dodgy grooming and inappropriate attire).

His sister Katy Steele’s band, Little Birdy, has a big presence and, with a debut album out in October, is a safe bet for the next big thing. Two of the band’s songs appeared 16th and 25th respectively in Triple J’s 2003 Hottest 100 chart – the biggest public music poll in Australia – and Katy has been warmly compared with the legendary PJ Harvey. “There is a serious vibe going on in Perth,” she says. “I sound like a hippy, but it’s true. It is all a bit incestuous but everyone feeds off each other in a good way.”

If you can’t hum the tune or sing the refrain from the Waifs’ smash hit London Still, you are very unusual and possibly dead. Still-living legend Bob Dylan became a fan after The Waifs opened for him in Australia and then insisted on their company for his North American and European tours (they call him Bob).

With the likes of Eskimo Joe, The Hampdens and End of Fashion, the sounds of Perth are the musical “it” girl of the moment. And we are not talking Britney-style manufactured pap aimed at the prepubescent dollar – it’s “lush instrumentation and solid grooves” (Rolling Stone on Eskimo Joe); “a shimmering blend of acoustic strings, down-tempo beats, gorgeous pop melodies and soulful lyrics” (Sony on The Hampdens); and “truly great guitar playing” (Melbourne’s The Age on John Butler). It’s music for grownups that’s walking off the shelves like hipster jeans and crop tops. Basically, if you didn’t already live in Perth, you’d be forgiven for wanting to get here quickly before you’re any more unfashionable. Vive la Perth.

Paul Bodlovich, the executive director of the WA Music Industry Association (WAMI), believes Perth’s isolation factor is an important element in the equation. “West Australians generally are very outward looking people,” he says. “We feel that we are inherently more isolated so we actually absorb a lot more of the world’s culture than people who live in places that they think are the centre of the earth.” John Butler agrees. “Perth’s isolation is a real special thing, it helps breed something unique,” he says. “Look at Australia’s animals  – we have really different and interesting animals because we are isolated and we have an interesting outlook on music for the same reason.”

Although Paul believes that WAMI itself and WA’s contemporary music funding, administered by ArtsWA, have certainly assisted a number of bands with opportunities, “the simple fact is that we are actually just producing really good bands, particularly over the past few years”.

As a manager, to have one band reaching the zenith of the nation’s charts is exceptional, two looks like serious machinations are afoot and a third waiting in the wings is positively unholy. Philip Stevens runs Jarrah Records, the independent label co-owned by John Butler and The Waifs, and also manages Little Birdy on the side. A complete lack of formal business training, a diploma in environmental biology, and experience as a waiter and decorator have obviously created something greater than the sum of its parts. “To have a role in music without actually having a musical bone in my body was a wonderful realisation,” says Philip.

John Butler and The Waifs had been putting in the hard yards for years, touring, releasing records and building up a grassroots fan base. Their shared folksy roots had seen them cross paths in Perth’s small-knit music community and a friendship was formed. Jarrah Records was created in 2002 at Philip’s suggestion, essentially to release albums in the US. “It has been nice to have a name and an icon so we can sit alongside the Sonys and the BMGs and the Warners and we can proudly say that we are Jarrah Records,” Philip says.

John Butler agrees that “it has taken us out of the vague ambiguous world of the independents where you kind of get lumped into a big pile of many meanings and when we are doing well the credit gets focused”.

And focused it has been. The Waifs cleaned up at last year’s Australian Record Industry Association awards (ARIAs) and the John Butler Trio’s Sunrise Over Sea album debuted at No.1 on the national ARIA albums chart, closely followed by the single Zebra being named APRA song of the year. The album is set for release in the US next March, aided by a deal with Lava Records, an imprint of Warners Music. Jarrah Records is now being recognised as the most successful independent label in Australia. “We have done good,” says John, with classic understatement.

Philip admits to a drive and competitive nature that seems to work well for the business side of the industry, but identifies an intangible element to the label’s success. “There is a magic quality with the people I have been lucky enough to work with and that doesn’t happen very often,” he says. “John’s passion for what he does and the way that he plays and the fact that you can’t help but fall in love with The Waifs when you see them live – they are so charming and funny. Most bands don’t have that quality and never will.”

Little Birdy, together for less than two years, is also showing the kind of promise that threatens something supernatural. “Musically the band is just growing together because we formed without really knowing each other,” says Katy. “We have only started to get to know each other properly in the past six months so it has been a big learning curve for everyone. I have only been writing songs for a few years so it is all kinda new to me too.”

Philip admits he got close to begging Little Birdy for the manager’s gig because others were starting to circle. “She has an incredible voice and songwriting ability for a young person,” he says of Katy.

Competing with the major players in the music industry is very much a David and Goliath scenario, yet Philip has always seen a level playing field. He believes there is an obvious power that comes from having lots of acts, including international ones, on a label, yet “maybe we spend our money a lot wiser”. “The more records we sell, the more the finances come through,” he says. “And we are selling a lot of records which means we can compete in stronger markets.” He remains adamant that WA will continue to be the base for Jarrah Records, believing that “you can’t take over the world from here but you can look after Australia”. Next year will, however, include a couple of months in New York to begin work on the world domination project.

Incidentally, the rewards are there for the artist who can make it independently. According to Philip, an artist on a major label might receive $2 to $3 per album sold and from that they have to pay back the advance they received to make the album (generally not less than $100,000). “There are a lot of occasions where bands with fairly big names do not recoup their money back for the company,” says Philip. Independent artists who are responsible for the manufacture and marketing of their own CDs can make $10 to $12 per album sold. “If the record has been made cheaply, an artist can still make a profit from selling 5000 to 10,000 copies,” he says. Sunrise Over Sea has sold 170,000 copies to date. Ditto for The Waifs’ last release Up All Night. You do the maths.

For his part, John Butler is taking the accolades in his stride. “I guess the best thing is that you get to share your music and your art and your heart with so many people,” he says. “To inspire by example and be inspired by people –  it is an honour to be able to have that position.”

Six years ago he was busking to handfuls of shoppers in Fremantle Markets, this year arenas across Australia were pasting up “sold out” stickers within days. For John, though, the size of the audience doesn’t matter.

“ It just matters that there is an intimacy between the artist and the audience,” he says. “There needs to be a connection and respect from both of us towards each other and where there is that intimacy, you can really go on a journey with the audience. You can play really soft and they will listen and then play really full-on numbers and we will all go together.”

Katy Steele from Little Birdy sums up the feeling that there has been a little stardust in the WA ozone of late. “There has just been so many amazing things happening,” she says. “It is always just about the music but if you can do something a bit more special than the average band, that’s the thing. I am just rolling with it but we are making the music that we want to make and having fun. It is wicked.”
 
 
 
BAILEY TELLS ALL
  THIS ARTICLE BY SIMON COLLINS WAS PUBLISHED IN THE WEST AUSTRALIAN ON FRIDAY JANUARY 14 2005.
Download a PDF version of this media release.

BAILEY TELLS ALL

The brains behind the success of John Butler Trio, The Waifs, Little Birdy, Regurgitator, Jebediah, 1200 Techniques and Eskimo Joe will share their secrets at the DIY Global Revolution conference, which is the centrepiece industry event of the WAMi Festival, Conference and Awards.

Inspired by the independent success stories of Butler and The Waifs, Carolyn Bailey is producing the conference, which will be held at the Monkey Bar on Saturday February 26 from 10am – 4pm.

Bailey’s background includes co-producing the Countdown Australian Music Awards for the ABC, producing Saturday Morning Live for Channel 7 and working as a consultant to the Austin, Texas Chamber of Commerce during start up of the South by South-West Conference and for Austrade in New York.

Speakers at the DIY Global Revolution include MGM chief executive Sebastian Chase, Butler/Waifs/Little Birdy manager Phil Stevens, Regurgitator manager Paul Curtis, Jebediah/Rhibosome manager Heath Bradby, veteran rock journo Ritchie York, Australian bureau chief for Billboard magazine Christie Eliezer and many more.The conference will examine three main areas under the headings, DIY Global Revolution, Income Streams in the New Economy and So You Wanna Own A Record Company. Basically the event will help create a roadmap for survival in this era of merging majors, thriving indies and digital music.

 
 
 
ONATHON - PAUL CURTIS PROJECT WITH KEN WEST
  WHATISMUSICONATHON?
TOURING:  MELBOURNE / SYDNEY / BRISBANE – MARCH 2005


FEATURING:  THE RESIDENTS / CHICKS ON SPEED
/ PAN SONIC / SUNN O))) / BLACK DICE / & more tbc

WHATISMUSIC? emerged in 1994 as a much-needed festival of shows to expose unusual contemporary musical forms that were otherwise unknown to the general public at that time.

Now in 2005, in addition to the usual WHATISMUSIC? shows, there will be a key headline event known as WHATISMUSICONATHON?

to be held:

MELBOURNE: THE FORUM – FRIDAY 4th MARCH

MELBOURNE: THE FORUM – SATURDAY 5TH MARCH

SYDNEY: LUNA PARK BIG TOP – TUESDAY 8TH MARCH

BRISBANE: POWERHOUSE – SATURDAY 12TH MARCH

A single ticket shall gain entry to multiple spaces of diverse entertainments in the WHATISMUSIC? tradition – a cavalcade of performing artists challenging all preconceptions as to what in fact constitutes music.

As well as supreme audio/visual pioneers THE RESIDENTS closing the show with a 90 minute+ performance, attendees shall be entertained & challenged by artists as diverse as CHICKS ON SPEED, PAN SONIC, SUNN O))), BLACK DICE – as well as many others yet to be announced.

A truly Global event, performers are traveling from all points of the World including Finland, Germany, New Zealand, USA, Japan to join Australian artists with a shared vision to create this truly unique entertainment event.

Tickets $77 plus booking fee – ON SALE: FRIDAY 21st JANUARY.

More acts to be announced – more information at: www.whatismusic.com

WHATISMUSICONATHON?  

2005 – TICKET OUTLETS
ALL TICKETS ON SALE FRIDAY 21st JANUARY

MELBOURNE: THE FORUM – FRIDAY 4th and SATURDAY 5th MARCH

The Forum / Missing Link / Synaesthesia / Metropolis / Ticketek and online at www.whatismusic.com

SYDNEY: LUNA PARK BIG TOP – TUESDAY 8TH MARCH
Red Eye Records (City) / Egg Records (Newtown) / Ticketek and online at www.whatismusic.com

BRISBANE: POWERHOUSE – SATURDAY 12TH MARCH
Powerhouse / Skinny’s / Rockinghorse / Egg Records / Ticketek and online at www.whatismusic.com

WHATISMUSIC? originally emerged in 1994 as a much-needed platform to expose unusual contemporary musical forms that were otherwise unknown to the general public at that point in time. Simultaneously, it challenged the prevailing preconceptions as to what in fact constituted music. Under the auspices of it's original convenors, Oren Ambarchi and Robbie Avenaim, WHATISMUSIC? has developed from a modest exercise featuring Australian-based aural Artists to a now-Annual event of International significance - featuring a broad selection of Global performers accordingly. Major moments to date have been provided by: Whitehouse, Pan Sonic, Mu Mesons, jad fair, Fennesz, The Boredoms & Merzbow - to name just a few. Many of these and other Artists previously included in WHATISMUSIC? have been well & truly off the radar of popular music audiences in general. Until now, their modest missions remained obscure to many - existing plankton-like in the vast ocean of available music in this mass-marketing age.

Now, on the occasion of it's 10th expose, WHATISMUSIC? is joining forces with CONSUME's Paul Curtis, BIG DAY OUT's Ken West and RED EYE/BLACK EYE RECORDS' John Foy to present an even more varied and higher profiled festival. As well as the more intimate shows presented in the usual WHAT IS MUSIC? manner, each visited city shall feature a key headline event repeated over two nights - to be known as the WHATISMUSICONATHON?

The organisers are pleased to announce that each ONATHON show in it's inaugural year shall be concluded with a performance by aural/visual pioneers THE RESIDENTS.

There are many, many more acts to be unveiled - stay tuned for further announcements in JANUARY 2005 or visit the website: www.whatismusic.com

 
 
 
STORIES FROM THE REVOLUTION
 

PREFACE
In order to best tell our story, WAM has developed this Stories from the Revolution document. Please contact Sarah Thomas WAM Publicist should you wish to develop one of these stories.

WAMi DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION Conference STORIES FROM THE REVOLUTION
Identified and outlined by conference producer Carolyn Bailey

• THE DIY FORMULA: DRIVE YOUR OWN DESTINY
• FLIPPING THE PYRAMID
• DO IT YOURSELF WILL ALWAYS MEAN DO IT WITH OTHERS
• ARTIST CENTRED BUSINESS
• PERTH OR PARIS
• TECHNOLOGY INCREASING THE VALUE OF COPYRIGHT
• YAHOO TO COMPETE WITH I-TUNES
• LAWYERS GUNS AND MONEY
• MUSIC: THE GUARANTEED INDUSTRY
• MUSIC: AS A CREATIVE INDUSTRY
• SO YOU WANNA OWN A RECORD COMPANY
• THE ESSENTIAL INDEPENDENT
• NAME ONE THING YOU WOULD CHANGE IN THE AUSTRALIAN MUSIC INDUSTRY
• LIST THREE ESSENTIAL TOOLS FOR DOING MUSIC BUSINESS WITH THE WORLD
• WHY DON’T WE SHARE OUR INFORMATION
• EXPO UPCLOSE AND LIVE LARGE FORMAT GARY PETERS PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION
• HOW THE CONFERENCE WILL WORK
• PRODUCER STATEMENT
• PRODUCER CV

THE DIY FORMULA: DRIVE YOUR OWN DESTINY
Any conference cast member could be asked this question i.e. what do you think is the best DIY formula for success in the music business?

FLIPPING THE PYRAMID Sebastian Chase.
Leading edge thinking from the person who is not just talking about an idea, but from the person who has actually achieved building an infrastructure to provide for Australia’s DIY revolution to take place. MGM is the distribution service of choice for leading Australian independents, look at the charts on the AIR web site and see how much Australian independent product is distributed by MGM.

The pyramid represents the power structure of the major music industry. This structure sets up a control model with relatively few people at the top determining the fate of many at the bottom who want in. When DIY services are created and provided for artists and their business partners, the major record companies lose control and are no longer the gatekeepers to music industry success. Instead this power structure is inverted. Once the many are given access to manufacturing and distribution they are given the means to make their own way and be judged only by the market.

This is enormously empowering. Instead of expending business energy and resources attracting A&R attention of the major industry, energy is focused on building an artist centred business formula that will provide for market success. By learning how to DIY in the domestic market, artists with their business partners learn skills required for global success. DIY is an opportunity to drive their own development in self-invented, and self-initiated ways.

The major global industry does not object. Independents have always been one of their primary search tools for new talent, the fact that the talent is now coming as self structured independent record labels presents no problem, in fact the independent record label in many ways makes doing business with an artist easier. The label knows the talent intimately, so the major does not have to do this. The major can just deal with label expecting the label to meet and keep all agreements. New language is being created to deal with this shift. In what is becoming a standard agreement, the majors offer the independents an up streaming deal.

This is where the major supports the independent with all of its manufacturing and distribution requirements on the agreement that should the artist on the label reach a certain pre-set level of success, the independent has to relinquish the artist over to the major in some significant kind of way. This probably isn’t a bad thing either if this is what was agreed to in the first place, as it provides for everyone doing what they do best.

Competing with the major players in the music industry is very much a David and Goliath scenario, yet Philip has always seen a level playing field. He believes there is an obvious power that comes from having lots of acts, including international ones, on a label, yet “maybe we spend our money a lot wiser”. “The more records we sell, the more the finances come through,” he says. “And we are selling a lot of records which means we can compete in stronger markets.” He remains adamant that WA will continue to be the base for Jarrah Records, believing that “you can’t take over the world from here but you can look after Australia”. Next year will, however, include a couple of months in New York to begin work on the world domination project.

Incidentally, the rewards are there for the artist who can make it independently. According to Philip, an artist on a major label might receive $2 to $3 per album sold and from that they have to pay back the advance they received to make the album (generally not less than $100,000). “There are a lot of occasions where bands with fairly big names do not recoup their money back for the company,” says Philip. Independent artists who are responsible for the manufacture and marketing of their own CDs can make $10 to $12 per album sold. “If the record has been made cheaply, an artist can still make a profit from selling 5000 to 10,000 copies,” he says. Sunrise Over Sea has sold 170,000 copies to date. Ditto for The Waifs’ last release Up All Night. You do the maths (Splendid Isolation, Scoop Magazine)


DO IT YOURSELF WILL ALWAYS MEAN DO IT WITH OTHERS Sebastian Chase

ARTIST CENTRED BUSINESS Philip Stevens
Any analysis of music business success has to start with great talent. Once great talent exists then it is up to the business side of the equation to keep focused on the talent and provide the best business support possible always in the artist’s best interest.

PERTH OR PARIS Philip Stevens
In a recent snap shot on WA music Sarah Szabo wrote the following in the spring issue of Scoop .. if you believe the glossies, so is Perth in general. “Is Perth the new Paris?” asked Australian Vogue, citing an extraordinary number of West Australians like John Butler as leading the scene in the music and entertainment world. Even The Bulletin, a magazine with its pen more firmly poised on politics than pop, has seen fit to comment on our rising stocks (and we’re talking musical, not financial). Hype and hyperbole go hand in hand with the territory, yet we do seem to have come across all renaissances. The irony is, for Philip to attend DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION he had to choose: PERTH or PARIS. Paris is where his business had him placed at this point of the time map. However, Philip has chosen to fly all day Friday so he can attend the conference. Why would he do this? What is the value in the conference he sees so important that he would leave Paris and fly all day to be here.

TECHNOLOGY INCREASING THE VALUE OF COPYRIGHT

Brian Boys YAHOO, Peter Higgs CIRAC, Sebastian Chase MGM
Because technology will increase the total amount of music consumed (i.e. listened to and bought), income formulas for artist will be redefined mostly because there will be so many more vehicles to carry music. Ring tones are a perfect example of income stream that was entirely underestimated prior to impact.

YAHOO TO COMPETE WITH i-TUNES
The Economist quoting Jupiter Research is predicting YAHOO to compete with i- Tunes by the end of 2005. Ask Brian what this will mean to Australian rights holders in the big picture over time.

SO YOU WANNA OWN A RECORD COMPANY
Philip Stevens from Jarrah, David Vodicka from Rubber Records, Heath Bradby from Redline Records, Andrew from Head, Bruce Milne started Au go, Philip Mortlock from Origin or include some local labels Littlebigman, Zip, Embryo, Qstik, Sic2, Nefarious etc

At a local WA level MGM Distribution are saying to the people who come to them for manufacturing and distribution services that they would prefer to be dealing with bands who have an existing record label behind them. This is because the label will know how to overcome many of the predictable obstacles and barriers in establishing a new act, and will know how to move through the levels.
Potential stories/interviews: Heath Bradby and/or Andrew on why they formed their labels as both have different stories. Heath: At home. Jebediah move from major to DIY. :and away: Export motivation.

THE ESSENTIAL INDEPENDENT

Ask any successful independent MD who has created a sustainable label what they see as their best formula for creating and sustaining an independent record label. This is all about empowering people who have already recognised what drives them and who have a chance of creating an income stream. When it comes to building essential future infrastructure for music business in this state, there is no greater essential knowledge than exploring and identifying the best business structures or models for independent record companies.

John Butler and The Waifs had been putting in the hard yards for years, touring, releasing records and building up a grassroots fan base. Their shared folksy roots had seen them cross paths in Perth’s small-knit music community and a friendship was formed. Jarrah Records was created in 2002 at Philip’s suggestion, essentially to release albums in the US. (Splendid Isolation, Scoop Magazine)

LAWYERS GUNS AND MONEY (Entry Law) Mike Tucak, Kate Switajewski, Stu Copeland
Music and the Law
The Western Australian Music Industry is presenting a law segment at the one day WAMi Conference 2005 DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION February 26.

There’s considerable interest in this area because legal rights form the means by which recording artists protect their ability to derive an income from their work over time. Mike Tucak, author of the soon to be launched online essential law resource on the WAM web site (February 4), will be joined by Eskimo Joe's lawyer Kate Switajewski (Senior Associate, Kelly & Co) in delivering a presentation on predictable steps towards protecting and retaining rights as essential knowledge. Blackstone Society student Stu Copeland, who is soon to release recorded product of his own, will co-host the segment. Peter Higgs, Intellectual Property and New Technology, Clayton Utz, was once bass player for Perth band The Dugites and will deliver a keynote address on New Income Streams in the New Economy.

MUSIC: THE GURANTEED INDUSTRY Peter Karpin MD BMG, Philip Mortlock Origin, David Vodicka, Rubber Records
Because music can be distributed digitally regardless of how the hardware changes, music can reach every corner of the earth. How many other industries can stand up and say “our future is guaranteed, we know demand for our product will always exist’. This puts music where it should be, as a sustaining force of life on earth.

EXPO UPCLOSE AND LIVE LARGE FORMAT GARY PETERS PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION
This large format photographic exhibition will present live music shots taken by Gary Peters, a Perth photographer throughout the late 70’s early 80’s. It’s a retrospective of local and international talent shot in Perth. We will see a very young Michael Hutchens, Mark Lizotte before he was Diesel and more.

HOW THE CONFERENCE WILL WORK producer
WAMi 2005 DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION one day conference has been designed for WAM by media producer Carolyn Bailey to provide insight into how to derive an income from contemporary music in one day.

Australian independent record industry minds who are credited with contributing to or driving the current successful careers of such artists as The John Butler Trio, The Waifs, Joel Turner, 1200 Techniques, Regurgitator, Jebediah, Rhibosome, Little Birdy and Eskimo Joe will be providing insights, tips and clues.

Because tertiary degrees and professions lead into the music business, tertiary students from law, business and arts management will be contributing their expertise by co-hosting at the conference.

Photographic and visual arts students will be invited to a special workshop to explore the DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION EXPO Up Close and Live Gary Peters large format photographic exhibition. Because people who want to derive an income from contemporary music are at different points in their career, the conference is at the Monkey Bar with various levels of knowledge presented in two separate areas.

The Amplifier Bar audience will be people who are either just starting out or people who are already rolling but have not got as far as a distribution, publishing or a record deal nor have they formed an independent label; or for people who want specific industry insight. In one day they will hear about how to achieve a successful grant, the tricks of the trade when it comes to manufacturing marketing and touring, and most importantly for future income form an understanding about what is involved in creating and protecting legal rights at an entry law level (from Feb 4 refer to WAM web site for entry law info)

The Monkey Bar audience will be people who are already achieving but are at the point where they are considering creating an independent record label as a business structure for driving their own DIY destiny and success, or for people who want to know about new income streams in the ever expanding new world where music meets technology. This is the space where the audience will hear leading industry predictions and forecasts for the future so this is the ‘must be’ space for any person with an interest, professional or otherwise, in the future of music as a business as new paradigms are defined and successful DIY models explored.

Why Global?
Paul Bodlovich, the executive director of the WA Music Industry Association (WAMI), believes Perth’s isolation factor is an important element in the equation. “West Australians generally are very outward looking people,” he says. “We feel that we are inherently more isolated so we actually absorb a lot more of the world’s culture than people who live in places that they think are the centre of the earth.” John Butler agrees. “Perth’s isolation is a real special thing, it helps breed something unique,” he says. “Look at Australia’s animals – we have really different and interesting animals because we are isolated and we have an interesting outlook on music for the same reason.”

Although Paul believes that WAMI itself and WA’s contemporary music funding, administered by ArtsWA, have certainly assisted a number of bands with opportunities, “the simple fact is that we are actually just producing really good bands, particularly over the past few years”. (from Splendid Isolation, Scoop Magazine)


PRODUCER STATEMENT
"DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION WAMi Conference 2005, will bring together Australia's music industry visionaries and highest calibre practitioners to specifically analyse, advise and project successful pathways towards a sustainable income for Western Australian contemporary music artists now and in the future. The people who will share this knowledge are either those who are directly driving or participating in the current success of artists such as The John Butler Trio, The Waifs, Little Birdy, Joel Turner, Regurgitator, Jebediah, Rhibosome, 1200 Techniques and Eskimo Joe; or those who have been invited to provide expert guidance towards how income will be derived in the global future market where music meets technology. DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION is the first time such directed knowledge has been provided and is a story of celebration about what can be achieved when music business is done on an artist centred basis. DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION will identify the formula and business structure behind how The John Butler Trio achieved national and international success without the involvement of a major record company. As a business achievement, this is a major first and deserves significant recognition. By providing specific insight into the kind of expertise and thinking required to produce and create a success of this kind, DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION aims to provide inspiration, resources and pathways to empower Western Australian artist to seek and build their own DIY future income. Knowledge will also be provided at entry level on essential law, grants, manufacturing, marketing and touring."

PRODUCER CV
DIY GLOBAL REVOLUTION has been created and produced for WAM by Carolyn (James) Bailey in collaboration with Sebastian Chase MGM, WAM staff, Luke Rinaldi MMF, and Stu Watters AIR. Carolyn's various credits include producer major market commercial radio, co producer Countdown Australian Music Awards as an ARIA / ABC-TV collaboration, as consultant to Austin Texas Chamber of Commerce provided 'first steps' towards SXSW event, as representative of Export Music Australia and as consultant Austrade New York coordinated Australian presentation at New York New Music Seminar, sound track consultant to producer Jan Chapman for 'Sweet and Sour' drama series ABC-TV achieving 5 top ten hits and a top 10 album including no favoured nations agreement which provided excellent income for years to all the artists involved, lecturer Music Business and Technology New York, University, producer College Satellite Network into 400 campuses across the USA including Hoodoo Gurus and Midnight Oil, producer Saturday Morning Live (Network 7).

 
 
 
RITCHIE YORKE INTERVIEW
 

RITCHIE YORKE INTERVIEW by Mike Wafer, X-Press Magazine 3/2/05
This article can also be found at http://www.xpressmag.com.au/archives/2005/02/ritchie_yorke.php

Download a PDF version of this media release.

Ritchie Yorke's resume is humbling to say the least. In his career as a music journalist and radio DJ he has been the editor of Rolling Stone, regularly published in the LA Times, Chicago Daily News, Boston Globe, Houston Post, Detroit Free Press, NME, Melody Maker, has written liner notes on albums for some of the most esteemed artists in history (The Beatles, Buddy Holly, Aretha Franklin, and BB King to name but four) has won just about every award they make, and has been a sought-after writer and advisor on a great number of books, films, and just about everything else.

All of this, however, means is inconsequential when compared to what Ritchie Yorke's spirit has, and still does, achieve. His way of thinking and his absolute resolve to ensure that his knowledge and wealth of ideas don't become private property is stunning. His willingness to share this very well-learned point of view is indicative of how he feels about music and its ever-changing role within the ever-changing music industry. A spokesman for the artist, the broker, and the buyer, his views take into account the value of art and its value once it has been dragged into the world of commerce that is the music industry.

A 'common sense should prevail' kinda guy, Yorke has the kind of mind (and ability to allow it to transfer to ink) that represents an epoch of 'art versus commercial reality' that has sadly been buried under 20 years of graph paper and stained by the blood of a million corporate cocaine nosebleeds. It is a way of thinking that is starting to re-emerge, gain strength, and become loud enough so that it cannot be ignored. To believe the industry can return to the principles on which it was originally formed by spirits such as Ritchie Yorke may seem like a daydream to most, but the few that know beyond any doubt that it is entirely possible are growing in numbers, and thanks to the pro-activity of people like Yorke they are learning a few handy tricks as they go.

By MIKE WAFER

Ritchie Yorke will appear at the WAMi Conference 2005 DIY Global Revolution, along with a great many of the music industry's forward-thinkers, to be held at the Monkey Bar on Saturday, February 26. Tickets are on sale now.

You are very outspoken against people who market music as a commodity and not art, is the most obvious pitfall of this mentality, and the one that hurts music the most, that it means the music will never be supported by any genuine love or faith?
Exactly. That it's marketed as 'really good' and therefore that it should win. You think of the people from Atlantic Records when they were making records, it really mattered that you knew it was not a commodity - it was a piece of culture, a piece of art something very special. I suppose it is inevitable that what's evolved has evolved... if you're going to follow the film industry model, which would probably more grotesquely emotionless than the music industry, pandering to change the details of peoples lives to suit some old or focused groups idea of what the hell it should be. I suppose it was inevitable. I just think it is a pity and hope the total devotion to the marketing cause that we see now will lead to the rebirth of a whole bunch of independents who will do it for the music and find the right artists.

You mean you see this revolution of marketing-over-music coming around to bite itself on the arse?
I think it can, and I think it will in time. In fact I think it already is in some ways. There's a fairly large disinterest in the sort of music that's been created in the last few years, obviously I don't mean all music - there's always something different and there's always quite a lot we just never hear about. The main thrust of the business is boy band members going solo, and all of this has not really created much of a talent. The artists that are now most popular in the business are nowhere near as talented as those that were 20 / 30 years ago whatever, with the odd exception.

The significant difference I see from an artist point of view is it's a very loose application of the word 'artist' but these people you're talking about, music is not written for the artist it's written for the market, and if you keep spoon-feeding people they will just get bored of the same thing.
Well that's happening in some areas, which is a pity really. It goes in cycles... it always has, and you have to reckon it will probably come around. It's just that the whole thrust of it is the big companies and the three and a half companies left - whatever it is now - soon to be two and a half now with EMI and Warner merges being talked about again. It's just that less is not better as far as distribution and so on goes, and that is why it's so significant in Australia that MGM have become as successful as they have. They have forged such a new and important way to get music to the punters and word has been solidified in John Butler, and The Waifs' emergence, and for them to launch John Butler's last album at number one without chainsaw support or questionable accounting practices... it was done as a victory for independent music.

Does that remind you of the way it used to be?
Yeah, it was more like that, something was good. John Butler has an incredible story... how he put the time in and worked and worked up an audience so nothing could stop that record... people knew. It was a given that it was going to be good, or certainly good enough that people would buy it, and they were able to build up that band name loyalty and use the marketing aspects of things, but it was ultimately fiercely independent and on their own terms, and again it didn't depend on radio support which certain things like that do depend on. It was purely that a lot of people liked this guy and where he was coming from, so the moment his record came out they grabbed it.

Do you agree that a great deal of the marketing-over-music trend is a result of music journalists who are more interested in toeing the line for the perks and kickbacks than being honest and critical?
That's true. There is that, and because of the way radio's gone I think it's important that print serves a role in pointing out to people some good music they might not know about otherwise. I really think it's important that the rock print media draws people to records that aren't going to get on the radio. That doesn't mean ignore people who are successful, but just that you try and go out of your way to get people plugged into things that are really good that they wouldn't find out through the normal course of events. I think that's a role you could play that's really appreciative.

Do you see the same principles you were talking about in regards to independent labels applying to public broadcasting radio stations? A resurgence of independent radio and an independent radio listenership?
I would love to see it, but I haven't seen much of it yet. I think the essential problem with radio in Australia is that as long you're charging people to buy licences you're getting people with the deepest pockets, not people with any idea of what music could be or what exposing Australian music can do for the country. I totally oppose the concept of selling licences... they're public airwaves - they belong to all of us. The only ones that can really afford them are purely buying them because they've got a lot of money, and then playing the narrowest range of music, taking no risks and, in short, play nothing that isn't already established... playing songs that have been heard before. That mentality creates a boredom and that's not healthy.

Speaking of radio, I've read several instances where you've been compared to John Peel. Given your thoughts on radio I imagine you were a great admirer of his.
I was a big admirer of John's, especially because John was so open minded and 'bring it on'. He exposed people to new things and got things going. I had the great privilege of being on underground radio when it was launched in Canada in 1968 / 69. I had a gig doing shows on the first FM rock broadcast from Canada. It can be an incredibly powerful medium, but unfortunately it got formatted like AM radio so ultimately where it is now is not that exciting.

The amount of weight people have put in your opinions over the years almost seems a little misguided when they have clearly missed your point of 'think for yourself, go out and explore for yourself'.
Yeah I encourage that definitely. I'm not big on the gabble, and I don't like judging things all that much. I'm not a huge fan of reviewing because I think it's better to turn people on to good things and let them know what the artist's intent was, or what they were trying to achieve with it, rather than just be negative or critical just for the sake of it.

There are two kinds of critical people really; there are critical people who point out their own alternate interpretation of a record, and there are critical people who are criticising purely to give themselves some sort of elevated position.
Yeah, that's bullshit isn't it. Have you have read anyone that can be consistently right? Everyone's taste is different, and we all bring to a record as much as it brings to us, and it's sort of pointless to be making judgements when they're only really subjective.

When you listen to new music do you ever have the ability to switch your head off and just listen?
Generally if you just play something and let it happen over the course of other things the songs stand up for themselves. If you listen to intently it can be difficult with new stuff because you might reject it or whatever. I find if you let it come in slowly through the keyhole rather than the whole door, if you hear it in the background, then it starts to wrap itself around you or piss you off... one way or the other. It takes a fair bit of listening and there's so much music you don't get much chance to do that, but the better the record it generally tends to need you to listen to it fully to get the idea of what's really out there.

It's interesting you say that... is there a greater volume of music being released than there was 10 or 20 years ago?
I think so, yeah. But there's a lot more independent stuff coming through too. Don't you find things turn up from little places - this studio or that little company? That's all good... it's good to see stuff out of the major loop. I just know one way or another if there is more or not it seems to be increasing.

With the independent labels starting to pick up do you see there being a resurgence of an underground?
There could be, maybe with the technological developments we can start to see the evolution of a bit of a pirate, satellite radio station where people offshore or elsewhere can program what they want and shoot it round on the Internet. That could open up a few doors. I would like to see more influence from satellite radio really. I'm all for more radio, I just think we're not well served by the small amount there is... there's a great need for more diversity.

Do you see the Internet as being a great art provider?
It should be. There's no reason why not. The music industry made its biggest mistake in history when it didn't embrace the Internet properly and viewed it as something to try and profit off. It was something they should have embraced and connected with and used like radio is used, but because they thought they could get a piece of the action it sort of screwed the whole thing up really.

Do you think it was economics that led the majors to view the internet as the devil?
Yeah I think so, because they wouldn't take it on board... they wouldn't step forward to meet it. They just stood there and they wanted to keep everything and not give anything back. Wouldn't it have been smart with new albums to make one track available on the Internet so people can hear what they're about, as a taster sort of thing, rather than just use it as a promo medium to expose things and get people onto stuff? Rather than prevent people hearing music with this battle against downloading for free.?

I totally agree. For servicing our own bands my friend and I have just started an independent label we called Major Label and our little slogan is 'going out of business and blaming it on the internet since 1995'. That's their whole schtick... it's hilarious and sad at the same time.
That is hilarious and pretty true. I don't think the internet is the major problem the music industry has to face at all, and I think it was symptomatic and it's obviously going to happen with technology and so on but that's not the big. It's the fact they didn't embrace it properly and deal with it and they tried to sue fans or music enthusiasts because they're downloading, that is insane.

Were you vocal about that around the time of the Napster litigation?
I tried to be. There's only so much you can get into a Sunday paper about those sorts of things. Certainly I think it's all wrong and they've got it wrong, but it's wrong also that people now in this generation think that you should get music free. Everything costs something and I'm a believer in protecting copyright so nothing's for free, but there's got to be a better way to enforce it than the one they found. It seems that music industry has moved to a mode where they don't even want retail, because its too hard. They'd rather not have to deal with it, and just sell to people directly... yet they could have done just that with the internet originally! I suppose they didn't want to and now they're trying to do it. I think we'd miss retail. I like going into record stores and having a look around... I like the tactile experience of looking at something.

The time where people mostly bought singles, do you miss that? Do you have any vision of it coming back around?
I do, first of all I thought singles were the greatest thing, and I reflect back on those Motown singles - the ones that really ripped your heart when you first heard them - and I miss that day. On the other hand I fought in the early days on FM radio for the right for artists to be heard in their own context... in other words Stairway To Heaven runs 7 minutes or so - if you want to play that song then that's how you play it. You don't play a three minute, edited, straight version of it. So I saw the albums as a greater medium through which artists could work, where they wouldn't be confined to three minutes and repeating choruses, and all that bullshit related to popular music. A free form for their expression is very important. However, as things have developed and the way we see ourselves now with the internet, and downloading, and the I-Pod thing, I think songs are going to become as important as they were initially, because people aren't going to buy 10 songs they don't know so, they're buying off the internet song-by-song. They're going to buy the songs they want and like, so I see the re-emergence of single songs as a very big part of the future.

It's the whole mentality that's different. Younger people like yourself think of an album as all these songs together, and that's great, but there was a time when albums were just a couple of singles and B-side, and few other things in between. They were never made as 10 great songs that maybe did or didn't connect at concerts... it's just expanding. I do feel this is a year of individual songs, with the way the internet is starting to go now, but the industry has to embrace it and make the music available on a song-by-song basis for that to start happening.

Anything is possible. It's also probable that, because we are in in the very beginnings of things like IPods, that CDs and records will become second to having a song on a device.
That would appear to be where it's going. I'm not thrilled about that really, because we talk about the tactile experience of going to a record shop and getting an album and whatever ,and the whole package is obviously going, but yeah there is definitely a bone in that direction, but I struggle with that myself.

I think creative artists behind the would always want that product. Part of the joy of creating a record is holding it in your hands.
Yeah, because that's the logical end result. The whole exercise is a wonderful thing... record a whole bunch of songs and then get them in the right order... what a trip that is. Think about the great records you love, and the mood that can be created from the order, then to create a package to put it in... I'd be sorry to see that go myself.

 
 
 
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