A moment of moral clarity

As Lebanese leaders cheer return of a child-murderer, Israel mourns its two soldiers

GIL TROY, Getty Images

Published: Friday, July 18

How do you welcome a child murderer as a hero?

Depending on the tone, this question becomes an attempt to clarify, or an expression of outrage. Stated calmly, "How do you welcome a child murderer as a hero?" can be a factual question - such as the one that faced Lebanese leaders this week as they proceeded to celebrate the freeing of Samir Kuntar from an Israeli prison, where he had been held since 1979 for murdering 4-year-old Einat Haran, her father Danny Haran, and a policeman.

Stated angrily, "How do you welcome a child murderer as a hero?" is the question Israelis are asking - and the rest of the civilized world should be asking, too.

Lebanese citizens cheer the release of five prisoners and the return of the bodies of 199 Lebanese.View Larger Image View Larger Image

Lebanese citizens cheer the release of five prisoners and the return of the bodies of 199 Lebanese.

Paula Bronstein, Getty Images
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On the night of April 22, 1979, Kuntar, working with three other terrorists, took Danny and Einat hostage, marching them to the Mediterranean beach after seizing them in their home in the coastal city of Nahariya. After shooting Danny in front of his daughter, then drowning him to make sure he was dead, Kuntar turned on Einat. Swinging his rifle butt, he smashed the 4-year-old's head against the rocks, until she too died.

Adding to the horror, Einat's mother, Smadar, hiding in a crawl space, accidentally smothered 2-year-old Yael Haran while trying to stifle her whimpering.

Any civilized court of law would hold the attackers responsible for the toddler's death, too. Judging by the euphoria in Lebanon and in the Palestinian territories this week, by the terrorists' barbaric, topsy-turvy immoral logic, the additional carnage enhances Kuntar's heroic status.

Of course, this kind of language is terribly impolite. We Westerners are not supposed to call ourselves "civilized" and deem others "barbaric." For decades now we have been told that such terms are too judgmental, too culturally-determined, too imperialistic, too arrogant.

We have been so sensitized and issues have become so relativized many of us have lost our moral bearings. We have to call Kuntar a "militant," a "fighter" but not a "terrorist." We are supposed to explore Kuntar's motivations.

And besides, whatever his motives, we are expected to excuse his crimes by pointing to equally heinous Western sins, or the religious-cultural-nationalist foundations for his actions.

And yet, occasionally, illuminating moments of moral clarity shine through the haze of amoral theorizing that emanates from our finest campuses, that is disseminated by our most technologically sophisticated media. We all witnessed such a moment this week with Israel's heart-breaking prisoner exchange.

As the two coffins bearing the bodies of Eldad Regev and Ehud Goldwasser arrived in Israel from Lebanon, the nation of Israel plunged into mourning. These two young men became the entire country's collective children. Strangers who had never met either of them wept bitterly, sharing the pain of the family and the friends, remembering other losses, fearing more tragedies in the future.

By contrast, the massive celebrations in Lebanon for Kuntar and four other terrorists revealed not only the thuggery of Hezbollah but the descent of Lebanon itself. Rolling out the red carpet for a murderer, dispatching the country's top leaders to greet someone who crushed a 4-year-old's skull, declaring a national day of celebration, revealed just how thoroughly the Lebanese leadership had succumbed to the brutal sensibilities of Hassan Nasrallah and his Hezbollah terrorists.

 
 

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