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Goalkeeper Glove Cut Guide

Overview

This document is intended to give a guide to the various goalkeeper glove cuts available on the market. As it is only a guide it covers the most known cuts. Variants have been noted where possible but some brands may have modified a particular cut for themselves. It is also possible that other cuts have either been or currently used by one or more brands. We have tried to keep the examples given for each style current as of the 2005 range product ranges. However, some
older glove models have been used as examples when warranted. Photographs of some the example glove models have been used where possible and where permission has been obtained by the manufacturer.

The Basic Cuts

Flat Palm Glove

Also known as

  • Traditional cut
  • Perimeter seam cut
  • Box cut
  • Expanse Cut

Description

Probably the most popular glove cut, especially in North America. This palm of this style is usually made of a single piece of latex. This style of cut has gussets between the palm and the backhand. If you look at how each finger is constructed it looks like a box (hence name of box-cut used by some) as it consists of the backhand on top, two side gussets and the palm on bottom. The stitching that attaches the latex palm to the gussets is done so that the seam is on the exterior of the glove.

This style of glove typically fits looser than many other styles and glove fingers can twist during catching. Those that prefer a snug fit but still want a traditional gloves often wear a glove that one half to one full size smaller than their normal size.

This is also the most popular cut used for finger protection gloves.

Examples

  • Flat Palm Example flat palm

Known Variants

  • Flat palm with surround cut (see below)
  • Flat palm with no external gussets (palm and backhand on outside seams are sewn together)

Roll-Finger Glove

Also known as

• Gunn cut
• Wrap cut

Description

This style has gained popularity in recent years. It is very popular with goalkeepers in Great Britain. This style does not use gussets. Instead the palm is attached directly to the backhand, which results in the latex rolled or wrapped around the fingers. This style fits snugger than traditional flat palm. It also has the best ball contact as the cut ensures that latex is always in contact with the ball when catching or throwing. As a result many consider this to provide better ‘feel’ when catching. Some however find that it feels bulkier than the other styles.

This style is also popular with female keepers as it fits snugger than Flatpalms.

Examples

  • roll finger

Other Examples

  • Reusch Serie A III
  • Puma King Exec Roll

Known Variants

  • Roll palm with surround cut (see below)

Negative Cut Glove

Also known as

  • Internal-stitched
  • Inverted-stitched

Description

A popular glove cut choice in Europe, especially in Germany. It is similar to the Flat-palm cut in that the palm is made of a single piece of latex.. This style of cut also has gussets between the palm and the backhand. The difference is that the stitching that attaches the latex palm to the gussets is done so that the seam is on the interior of the glove. As a result of this glove style fits snugger than a traditional flat palm, many consider it offer better ‘feel’ when catching and throwing. It fingers are not prone to twisting which results in better latex to ball contact when catching.

Those with slimmer hands may prefer this cut. In fact, this style has been known to be marketed as a women’s cut because it fits slimmer hands better than a traditional cut glove.

Examples

  • negative cut

Other Examples

  • Reusch Bundesliga
  • Puma King Exec IC

The Variant Cuts

Surround Cut

Description

There are a few variants of this cut and the style is dependent on the glove company that has produced it. In general the palm of the glove wraps around the outside of the hand (pinky side) and forms part or the entire backhand. The result is that the palm and backhand are formed using
a single piece of latex with much less stitching used. This style has been used with Flat, roll and negative cut styles. The advantage of this cut is that there are fewer seams on the glove making it more comfortable. It also is more suitable for wider hands as it is not as snug as a roll-finger or flat palm. Keepers will often move down a half-size to obtain the snugness and comfort level that they desire when using this glove style.

Examples

  • Surround Cut

Other Examples

  • Stanno Grip

Roll-Index Cut

Description

This is a useful cut that combines the best features of a flat-palm and a rollfinger glove. Like a roll-finger it is made of two pieces of latex. The Index
finger is rolled like a normal roll-fingered glove but the remaining three fingers are constructed like a traditional flat-palm. This cut ensures that the latex on index finger is always in contact with the ball when catching or throwing the ball. It also fits snugger than a traditional flat palm.

Volume Cut

Also known as

  • Webb cut

Description

This is a variant of a flat-palm glove. The fingers typically become wider towards the tips of the finger than they are at base of the hand. The advantage to this cut is that it there is more latex on the ball when catching. The disadvantage is that is has a looser fit than a traditional flat palmed glove.

Examples

  • Reusch Volume
  • Umbro Webb

Reverse-Roll

Also known as

  • 360

Description

This is a flat-palm glove but does not have any gussets. Instead the backhand rolls around the fingers and is sewn to the flat palm. The advantage to this cut is that it has a snugger fit than a traditional flat-palmed glove.

Examples

  • Uhlsport Absolutegrip 360

Bowl-Cut

Also known as

  • Precurved
  • Arc

Description

Typically a flat-palm glove where the palm is cut shorter than the backhand. This makes the glove curve in such a way that it is already formed a natural catching position. The advantage to this cut is that the glove is already in a catching position which some keepers find more comfortable than a traditional non-curved palm.

Examples

  • Reusch Pro Bowl

Variants

Some roll-finger gloves are also pre-curved. This is less common than a pre-curved flat-palm

Credits

Photographs used in this document are the property of the glove’s respective manufacturer with the exception of those taken by TheGloveBag.com. These are the photos in Figures 1 through 4. Photographs of SELLS goalkeeper gloves are used with permission from Sells Goalkeeper Products Inc.

Photographs of Sondico goalkeeper gloves are used with permission of Sondico USA Inc.

TheGloveBag.com would like to thanks SELLS and Sondico USA for their support and the use of their photographs.

Revision History
Last Modified: 28-March-2006

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