Le Mans Series

Media's corner Competitor's corner Flux RSS
  • Home
  • Presentation
  • Michelin Energy Endurance Challenge

Michelin Energy Endurance Challenge

Michelin Energy Endurance Challenge

Michelin Energy Endurance Challenge

For the past two years, Michelin, which has very close ties to endurance, in association with the Le Mans Series and the 24 Hours of Le Mans, has developed the "Michelin Energy Endurance Challenge" Trophy (MEEC). The MEEC awards the teams that make the best use of the fuel used during the race. The ranking is based on the Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) calculated at the end of each race. A bonus for the series that drives to be the emblem of a new form of motor racing where self respect and respect for others and of course of the environment are the recognised values of endurance racing.

The Energy Efficiency Index (IRE) is the ratio between the car’s average speed (S, excluding pit stops) and its average fuel consumption (C) in the course of the race in question.

Formula: S/C = EEI
Example*: 130kph/10 litres per 100km = 13

The winning crew of each race will be invited on the LMS podium to receive the MEEC trophy. The MEEC championship leader is easily identifiable by the number “1” decal visible on his car. New in 2008, the chassis which totals the highest number of points of the MEEC championship will win an official entry to the 2009 Le Mans 24Hours.

The "Michelin Energy Endurance Challenge" is looking to become what was once the Index of Performance that had nearly as much importance as the overall standings...

Le Mans, a technological laboratory

On May 29, 1923, 32 cars lined up ‘to emphasize the road going qualities of the vehicles in the manufacturer catalogues'. The first 24 Hours of Le Mans race was created and was already, under the direction of the three originators journalist Charles Faroux, industrialist Emile Coquille and Secretary General of the very influential Club de l’Ouest Georges Durand, the automobile testing laboratory with the first subject being endurance. This first race was won by a Chenard Walcker equipped with Michelin tyres.

Since this first edition, the 24 Hours of Le Mans have never let up in being a dynamic laboratory for the automobile industry. One notable example is headlights that have immensely improved over the years with the necessity of having an efficient system for racing at night at Le Mans. Disc brakes were first used on an automobile in 1953 at Le Mans, the result of collaboration between engineers at Jaguar and Dunlop. This innovation was rewarded with a victory in its first attempt and since has become the standard in automobile production. Let's also remind that the first appearance of the diesel in Le Mans was by 1949-1950! In 1951, the Michelin radial tyre does its first appearance in competition, equipping a Lancia B20 and a Renault 4CV, both of these cars winning their respective categories.

* Fuel consumption will be converted into Joules/km to take into account the different fuel types used.