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Sir James Clark RossBritish explorer

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James Clark Ross.[Credits : Hulton Archive/Getty Images]British naval officer who carried out important magnetic surveys in the Arctic and Antarctic and discovered the Ross Sea and the Victoria Land region of Antarctica.

Sir James Ross, plaster cast of a medallion by Bernhard Smith, c. 1842–48[Credits : Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London]Between 1819 and 1827 Ross accompanied Sir William E. Parry’s Arctic voyages. On the second Arctic expedition of his uncle, Sir John Ross, he located the north magnetic pole on June 1, 1831. His own Antarctic expedition of 1839–43 was undertaken to conduct magnetic observations and to reach the south magnetic pole. Commanding the Erebus and Terror, he discovered the Ross Sea in 1841 and, while sailing toward the position assigned to the magnetic pole, also discovered Victoria Land. He wintered at Hobart, Tasmania, and in November 1841 sailed again for Antarctica. He charted part of the coast of Graham Land and sailed around the Weddell Sea ice. Knighted following his return to England (1843), he published A Voyage of Discovery and Research in the Southern and Antarctic Regions (1847).

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Sir James Clark Ross

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