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The Centre for Health and Anger Management The Centre for Health and Anger Management
 
Frequently asked questions about our counseling services

Frequently Asked Questions - Counseling

  1. Are your counseling services covered by extended health insurance or OHIP?
  2. What times are your offices open for appointments?
  3. How long are sessions?
  4. How do I pay?
  5. When do I pay?
  6. How long will it take?
  7. Do I need a referral?
  8. What are your fees for service?

Frequently Asked Questions - Naturopathic Medicine

  1. Is Naturopathic medicine covered by OHIP?
  2. Can my Naturopathic doctor perform blood work and laboratory tests?
  3. How is a Naturopathic doctor (ND) or Naturopath different from a Medical doctor (MD)?
  4. What can my Naturopathic doctor treat?
  5. What are the limitations of naturopathic care?
  6. What can I expect from a typical naturopathic visit?
  7. How is a Naturopathic doctor different from a Homeopath, a ‘Doctor of natural medicine’ (DNM), or other ‘holistic practitioners’?
  8. Is naturopathic medicine scientific?

  1. Are your counseling services covered by extended health insurance or OHIP?

    We offer affordable services to suit your needs. While counseling is not covered by OHIP, our centre allows for the coverage by most extended health benefits. Contact us to see how we can best accommodate you.

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  2. What time are your offices open for appointments?

    Appointments may be scheduled for weekdays, and evenings. Some weekend appointments may be available to suit your individual needs.

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  3. How long are sessions?

    Generally sessions last for an hour, but it is possible to make longer sessions depending on an individuals need.

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  4. How do I pay?

    Payments can be made by cash, cheque, Visa and Mastercard, debit is available at the Burlington location.
     

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  5. When do I pay?

    Payments are collected at the end of every session.

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  6. How long will it take?

    The length of treatment is dependent on each individual, therefore it is not possible to give a specific length of treatment for most individuals. It is something we can discuss on an individual basis.

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  7. Do I need a referral?

    We do not require you to have a referral although some insurance companies do. Please check with your extended health care provider where applicable.

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  8. What are your fees for service?

    For clients who require a Psychologist to supervise their file, the fee per session is $150.00. For those who do not require a Psychologist to supervise their file, the fee per session is $125.00.

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  1. Is Naturopathic medicine covered by OHIP?

    In Ontario, although services provided by a naturopathic doctor are not covered by OHIP, most private health insurance plans will provide coverage. Check your benefits package for details.

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  2. Can my Naturopathic doctor perform blood work and laboratory tests?

    Naturopathic doctors can draw blood and perform the same tests that medical doctors have available to them. They can also perform naturopathic tests on blood, urine, saliva, and hair that are not generally offered in a medical practice. The Centre for Health is pleased to offer on-site blood draws, as well as urine, saliva, and hair tests. OHIP does not cover tests ordered by naturopathic doctors, therefore, patients are required to pay for any tests performed. Costs will vary depending on the test(s).

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  3. How is a Naturopathic doctor (ND) or Naturopath different from a Medical doctor (MD)?

    Naturopathic doctors and Medical doctors undergo very similar levels of training. Both are required to complete an undergraduate degree at university before completing further training at either naturopathic college or medical school. Naturopathic and conventional medicine can complement each other and can be combined to provide optimal care for patients. Medical doctors are trained to treat symptoms and specific illnesses with surgery and pharmaceuticals. Naturopathic doctors are trained to treat the whole person with natural therapies and preventative medicine. Naturopathic doctors receive extensive training in nutritional medicine and lifestyle counseling, along with botanical, Traditional Chinese, and homeopathic medicines and physical therapies. Medical doctors are proficient at treating timely and emergent conditions; however, due to time restrictions and current doctor shortages MDs may be unable to spend as much time with you as your Naturopathic doctor.

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  4. What can my Naturopathic doctor treat?

    Naturopathic doctors are primary care practitioners, much like family physicians. Naturopathic doctors are experienced at treating a variety of conditions ranging from acute conditions such as colds, flus, ear infections, and acute musculoskeletal pain, to chronic conditions, such as arthritis. Psychological issues such as depression, and anxiety are also treated by NDs. For individuals who choose to have a Medical doctor for primary care, a Naturopathic doctor can provide complementary therapy.

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  5. What are the limitations of naturopathic care?

    Naturopathic doctors are not able to perform surgery or set broken bones. As well, they cannot be considered primary care practitioners for obstetric care or for infants under 6-weeks of age; however, they can still provide complementary care to a woman and her infant during these times.

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  6. What can I expect from a typical naturopathic visit?

    Your first visit with a Naturopathic doctor at the Centre for Health is 90 minutes in length. Your Naturopathic doctor will take the time to conduct a detailed intake that examines all areas of your health, which not only includes your main health concerns, but also your diet, stress levels, and lifestyle. The more information you can give your doctor, the better an individualized treatment plan can be developed for you. Your Naturopathic doctor will perform a general physical examination on the first or second visit. Subsequent visits range from 30 - 60 minutes depending on the treatment program. A typical naturopathic treatment program will include in-depth nutritional and lifestyle counseling, as well as the inclusion of other modalities such as acupuncture, botanical or homeopathic medicines, or physical therapy if necessary.
    A Naturopathic doctor will take the time to investigate the underlying cause of any symptoms, and to educate you about how you can take personal responsibility for your own health. You will work in partnership with your Naturopathic doctor to develop a customized treatment program. Your naturopathic doctor is also trained to refer you to another healthcare provider when necessary.

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  7. How is a Naturopathic doctor different from a Homeopath, a ‘Doctor of natural medicine’ (DNM), or other ‘holistic practitioners’?

    The most important difference between NDs and other alternative practitioners is education and regulation. Naturopathic doctors the only practitioners who are licensed professionals. In Ontario, NDs are licensed under the Drugless Practitioners Act (DPA). NDs are required to have a minimum of 3 years of pre-medical studies at university followed by four years of full time academic and clinical training at an accredited naturopathic medical school. They are members of their provincial regulatory body and can use the designation ND. The terms herbalist, natural therapist, homeopath, DNM, and holistic practitioner are not protected by the law and people with different levels of training can all use these titles and are not subject to regulatory processes.
    When seeking a professional in natural therapies, it is important to know whether your practitioner is licensed and therefore regulated in Ontario. This guarantees that these professionals have been well educated and extensively trained in their field, and are recognized by the government and the healthcare community.

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  8. Is naturopathic medicine scientific?

    Yes. Naturopathic medicine has its own unique body of knowledge. It incorporates scientific advances from medical disciplines throughout the world with the wisdom from traditional medical models. Many naturopathic medical therapies have been scientifically validated, especially in the areas of clinical nutrition and botanical medicine. The research departments of naturopathic medical schools conduct on-going research examining naturopathic therapeutics and practice.

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