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Volume 335:281-283 July 25, 1996 Number 4
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Physical and Emotional Problems of Elite Female Gymnasts

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Within the past five years, two U.S. female gymnasts at the Olympic level, Christy Henrich and Julissa Gomez, died from medical problems related to their sport. Christy died from complications of anorexia nervosa and Julissa from complications of spinal trauma due to a vaulting injury.

In this Olympic year, it is timely to discuss the psychological and physical problems associated with competitive women's gymnastics. Women's gymnastics provides a useful framework for viewing worrisome trends in other competitive youth sports. In the United States, organized athletic programs involve at least 20 million children and adolescents each year, with more than 2 . . . [Full Text of this Article]

Physical Injuries

The Female-Athlete Triad

Issues of Identity

Elite Gymnastics and the Potential for Abuse

The Need for Coaching Standards

The Goal: Preventing Harm to Elite Athletes

References


Related Letters:

Physical and Emotional Problems of Elite Female Gymnasts
Dresler C. M., Forbes K., O'Connor P. J., Lewis R. D., Glueck M. A., Tofler I. R., Stryer B. K., Micheli L. J., Herman L. R.
Extract | Full Text  
N Engl J Med 1997; 336:140-142, Jan 9, 1997. Correspondence

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