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STS-92: Home | The Crew | Cargo | Timeline | EVA

STS-92 Extravehicular Activities

Following mating to the International Space Station, a combination of Extravehicular Activities, or EVAs, and Intravehicular Activities, or IVAs, were performed to accomplish the major mission objectives. IMAX filming documented assembly activities. Learn more about the EVAs required to build the station.

EVA Astronauts and Suit ID
Leroy Chiao: Solid red stripes
William S. McArthur Jr.: Solid white
Jeff Wisoff: Vertical red stripes
Michael Lopez-Alegria: Diagonal red stripes

EVA 1
Leroy Chiao, William S. McArthur Jr.
Actual Time: 6 hours, 28 minutes
Actual Start Time: 9:27 a.m. CDT, Oct. 15, 2000
Actual End Time: 3:55 p.m. CDT, Oct. 15, 2000
International Space Station space walk
51st space shuttle space walk
Total Space Walk Time on the Space Station: 48 hours, 43 minutes

The S-band Antenna Support Assembly was relocated on the Z1 Truss. The Z1 starboard bulkhead thermal shrouds were removed and stowed. The port Extravehicular Tool Storage Devices were released and transferred from the Spacelab Logistics Pallet to the Z1 Truss. The Z1-to-Node 1 umbilicals, or cables, were connected. The Space-to-Ground Antenna dish was installed onto the boom and the boom was deployed.

STS-92 (Flight 3A) video clip -- Animation showing Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 and Z1 Truss in Discovery's payload bay with narration. Also shows astronaut in Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory training for space walk one.

Media Player Format - 28K / 56K
Real Video Format - 28K / 56K

EVA 2
Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria
Actual Time: 7 hours, 7 minutes
Actual Start Time: 9:15 a.m. CDT, Oct. 16, 2000
Actual End Time: 4:22 p.m. CDT, Oct. 16, 2000
8th International Space Station space walk
52nd space shuttle space walk
Total Space Walk Time on the Space Station: 55 hours, 50 minutes

Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 was grappled by the shuttle's robotic arm and installed on the Unity Connecting Module nadir port. The primary and secondary cable bundles were connected between the Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 and the Unity Module. Also, latches were opened on the Z1 Truss upon which the U.S. Solar Arrays will be attached during STS-97.

STS-92 (Flight 3A) video clip -- Space walk two, including Pressurized Mating Adapter 3 Installation and Neutral Buoyancy Lab training video with narration.

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EVA 3
Leroy Chiao, William S. McArthur Jr.
Actual Time: 6 hours, 48 minutes
Actual Start Time: 9:30 a.m. CDT, Oct. 17, 2000
Actual End Time: 4:18 p.m. CDT, Oct. 17, 2000
9th International Space Station space walk
53rd space shuttle space walk
Total Space Walk Time on the Space Station: 62 hours, 38 minutes

Two DC-to-DC Converter Unit-Heat Pipes were installed on Z1. The Z1 keel pin assembly was then relocated to another location on Z1. The Z1/P6 launch locks were removed, then the Assembly Power Converter Units jumpers were also removed from the Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 to allow for installation of four Z1 cables. The starboard Extravehicular Tool Storage Device was released and transferred from the Spacelab Logistics Pallet to the Z1 Truss.

STS-92 (Flight 3A) video clip -- Space walk three, including payload bay layout, DC-to-DC Converter Unit heat pipe box installation and Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory training video with narration.

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EVA 4
Jeff Wisoff, Michael Lopez-Alegria
Actual Time: 6 hours, 56 minutes
Actual Start Time: 10 a.m. CDT, Oct. 18, 2000
Actual End Time: 4:56 p.m. CDT, Oct. 18, 2000
10th International Space Station space walk
54th space shuttle space walk
Total Space Walk Time on the Space Station: 69 hours, 34 minutes

A grapple fixture on the Z1 Truss was removed. The Z1 utility tray was deployed and its umbilical launch restraints released. The Z1 Manual Berthing Mechanism latches was cycled and opened. Wisoff and Lopez-Alegria performed one safety protocol test -- a flight evaluation of SAFER, which means "simplified aid for EVA rescue".

STS-92 (Flight 3A) video clip -- Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue flight demonstration with narration.

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EVA Team
IMAGE: Astronaut Jeff Wisoff
During the fourth STS-92 space walk Astronaut Jeff Wisoff participates in the SAFER exercise. SAFER stands for simplified aid for EVA rescue.
Hardware
IMAGE: Z-1 Truss
The Z-1 Truss, which is shown atop the Unity module, and a Pressurized Mating Adapter will be the first major U.S. elements flown to the space station aboard the shuttle since the launch of the Unity element in December 1998.
Related Links
*Wardrobe for Space
*Preparing for the ISS
*EVA Chronology PDF (3.5M)
*EVA Reference Data (820 Kb)
*Preflight Mission Videos

Curator: Kim Dismukes | Responsible NASA Official: John Ira Petty | Updated: 10/15/2003
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