Syngenta ABSW Science Writers' Awards
Syngenta ABSW Science Writers' Awards
 
Winners 2003
 
     
 

Glaxo Wellcome ABSW 
Science Writers' Awards 2003

 

The ABSW Science Writers' Awards for 2003 were presented at a ceremony on 1 July at The Royal Society, London, by Pallab Ghosh, Chairman of the Association of British Science Writers (ABSW) and Science Correspondent, BBC News, and Dr Alastair Benbow, Vice President  & European Medical Director of GlaxoSmithKline, the major sponsor of the Awards.

The ABSW Science Writers' Awards seek to set standards of excellence in science journalism. They are presented across seven categories to the writers and broadcasters who, in the opinion of an independent panel of judges, have produced the highest quality science journalism each year, and highlighted important scientific issues with bravery and flair. The Awards, of £2,000 each, are supported by GlaxoSmithKline, the Medical Research Council, the Royal Society and the Wellcome Trust.  

Commenting on the Awards, Pallab Ghosh said, We encouraged entrants to think about the pieces they entered this year, to pick the work that raised itself above the staple diet of processed diary, journal and press release generated material, and we received some really outstanding entries. But we need to go further: as science journalists it is our responsibility to challenge and push the boundaries of science reporting, and we'd like to see even more entries submitted that do this next year."

 
The best feature on science subject in a national or regional newspaper

Ben Goldacre
for 'Never Mind the Facts' which was published in Guardian Life on 11 December 2003

 
The best feature on science subject in a specialist periodical
Claire Ainsworth
for 'The Stranger Within', which was published in New Scientist on 15 November 2003
 
The best investigative journalism on a science subject:

James Randerson
for 'Betrayal of Innocence', which was published in New Scientist on 20 September 2003

 
The best scripted/edited radio programme on a science subject
Andrew Luck-Baker
for 'Discovery: Monstrous Science - Giant Squid', which was broadcast on BBC World Service on 10 September 2003
 
The best television programme on a science subject

Carlo Massarella
for 'DNA (Episode 3): The Human Race', a Windfall Films production which was broadcast on Channel 4 on 22 March 2003

 
The best science writing on the World Wide Web

No award was made in this category.

 
The best communication of science in a non-science context
John Byrne and Adam Hart-Davis
for 'Taking the Piss Out of London', which was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 and World Service on 9 July 2003.
 

The Judging Panel for the 2003 Awards was chaired by Pallab Ghosh and comprised:

Steve Connor - The Independent and Independent on Sunday
Professor Elizabeth Fisher -  The Institute of Neurology, UCL
Dr Susan Jebb - MRC Human Nutrition Research
Nicola Jones - Nature
Dr Toby Murcott -  Ketoe Communications
Dr Jim Thomas - University of Sheffield
Erika Wright - BBC Radio Science Unit

 
 
© ABSW 2005