The Picture Stone from Havor in Hablingbo

The Picture Stone from Hunninge at Klinte
The Picture Stone from Väskinde Cemetary The Picture Stone from Levide Parish Church
The Picture Stone from Havor in Hablingbo The Picture Stone from Bopparve in Alva
The Picture Stone from Martebo Parish Church The Picture Stone from Ire in Hellvi
The Picture Stone from Austers at Hangvar A Further Picture Stone from Ire in Hellvi
The Picture Stone from Sanda The Picture Stone from Broa in Halla
The Picture Stone from Smiss at När The Picture Stone from Smiss in Stenkyrka
The Picture Stones from Larsarve at Eskelhem The Picture Stone from Laxare in Boge
Picture stones from Smiss at Garda The Picture Stones from Sjonhem Parish Church
The Picture Stone from Ardre
 

The stone was recovered from a burial site and has been dated to 400–600 A.D. The whorl has been replaced by the symbol which can often be seen today at our roadsides. It is the official sign for places of great cultural interest or an ancient monument. In ancient times, this quatrefoil loop was most probably a magic protective symbol; even in those days, the shape may well have represented infinity or eternity.

  Beneath the central motif two elegantly stylized serpent-like creatures are vying for a common prey with wide-open jaws. The stone is edged by borders resembling waves with foaming spray. Or maybe they represent a type of serpent with wide-open jaws, playing tongues and long, flying hair. These figures

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are common in art from classical antiquity, but the vegetative creepers and jumping dolphins have been replaced in the Gotlandic picture stone art by other symbols, more familiar to the islanders.