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Making Lists

 
Somewhat easier to work with than HTML tables —although the layout is less sophisticated— lists present another method of formatting text on web pages. HTML permits you to make several kinds of lists and this section of Iron Spider deals with this in three short and concise tutorials which also contain examples of HTML source code and the resulting effects. In this section you can expect to learn:




Bulleted Lists


Those who have used word processors may be familiar with the bulleted list format which is typically used to make a summary of related titles, ingredients, species, data, etc. You can reproduce this format on your web page using the ul element. The ul element employs a <ul> start tag and and <ul> end tag and must contain at least one or more list items which are placed in between. Each list item is preceded by a <li> start tag of which the </li> end tag is optional...






Numbered Lists


Along with bulleted lists, you can also create numbered or alphabetized lists which are known in HTML as ordered lists. To render an ordered list, you use the ol element which requires both an <ol> start tag and an </ol> end tag. Between these tags you must place at least one or more list items, each of which are preceded by an <li> start tag (end tag is optional)...






Definition Lists


This is a kind of generic form of a bulleted list, the difference being that it is displayed without the 'bullets' and is typically used to render a list of terms and definitions. The definition list uses the dl element of which both the start and end tags are required. In between these are placed at least one <dt> tag and one <dd> tag which render the definition term and the definition data respectively. The end tags for dt element and dd elements are optional...