Robert F. Almeder

ralmeder@gsu.edu






CURRICULUM VITAE



NAME: Robert F. Almeder



EDUCATION: University of Pennsylvania Ph.D. (1969)

PhD. THESIS: "The Metaphysical and Logical Realism of Charles Peirce"

Director: M. G. Murphey



EXPERIENCE: Assistant Professor in Philosophy

SUNY at Oswego 1967-72



Associate Professor in Philosophy

Georgia State University 1972-80



Professor in Philosophy

Georgia State University 1980 -



COURSES TAUGHT:

Epistemology, Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Mind, Ethics, Medical Ethics, Business Ethics, Logic, Introduction to Philosophy, Philosophy of Language, Modern Philosophy, and Contemporary Philosophy.



SPECIALTIES:

Epistemology, Philosophy of Science, Metaphysics, Ethics, Medical Ethics and Business Ethics.



AWARDS:

Georgia State University Alumni Distinguished Professor Award for College of Arts and Sciences (1984) and for University (l995) ( These are also Teaching Awards)

Recipient of Outstanding Educator of America Award (1973) (teaching award)

Recipient of National Fellowship Award from the Council for Philosophical Studies.(This award was granted for the study of logic and philosophy of science at Stanford University during the summer of 1967--financed by NSF and Carnegie Foundation.)

Recipient of two SUNY research Grants, and two Georgia Endowment for the Humanities Grants to conduct Public Conferences on Bioethical Issues. Also received NSF/CDC Grant for Research Project on The Method of Quantitative Risk Assessment.













MISCELLANEOUS:

Editor of The American Philosophical Quarterly. (1998----)

Co-Editor of annual book series Biomedical Ethics Reviews (1983-- present)

Member of the following editorial boards:



The American Philosophical Quarterly (1978-1998)

Public Affairs Quarterly (l995-present)

The History of Philosophy Quarterly (1983-l994)

The Journal of Value Inquiry (l991- present)

The Journal of Business Ethics (l983-l996)

The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society:

A Quarterly Journal of American Philosophy (l980-present)

The International Journal of Applied Philosophy (l982-present)

Journal of Philosophical Research. (1980-present)





President of the Charles S. Peirce Society (1980)

President of the Georgia Philosophical Association (1980)

Visiting Professor at the University of Pittsburgh (Senior Fellow of the Center for the Philosophy of Science, 1984-85 and l988-89)

Distinguished Visiting Professor in Ethics for the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of North Carolina (Spring Semester l989)

Fulbright Senior Lecturer Award to lecture in Israel on epistemology at Tel Aviv University (Fall Semester 1992)

Visiting Professor to lecture in epistemology and applied ethics at The University of South Africa. (August, l994)

Research Associate at Centre de Recherche En Epistemologie Appliquee in the Ecole Polytechnique, The National Research Center in Science and the Social Sciences, Paris, France ( Appointment beginning Fall, l996)

Member of Fulbright Commission's Discipline Committee on Philosophy

(l993-l996) (Chairman of Committee l994-l995, l995-l996)

APA Referee for the Machette Prize in Philosophy (l99l)

Member of the American Philosophical Association Committee on Philosophy and Medicine (l982-1986)

Member of Advisory Staff for Eastern Division of APA Program Committee (Three-year appointment beginning Jan. l990).

Editorial consultant and referee for Plenum Publishing Corporation, Humana Press, Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Macmillan, Oxford University Press, Cambridge University Press, University of Pittsburgh Press, University of California Press, and Rowman and Littlefield.

Research Grant Proposal Reviewer for NEH and NSF

NEH Panelist for Conference Grants, 1985, l988.

Director for the Center for Technology and the Humanities, Georgia State University, 1985-88













PUBLICATIONS:

Books:

The Philosophy of Charles S. Peirce: A Critical Introduction (The American Philosophical Quarterly Library. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1980; and Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1980), 218 pages.



Blind Realism: An Essay on Human Knowledge and Natural Science. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, (Nov. l991) 261 pages. (Paper edition: l997)



Harmless Naturalism. Chicago, Illinois: Open Court. ( March l998)



Death and Personal Survival. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield,

(Spring l992), 291 pages.

Human Happiness and Morality: A Brief Introduction to Ethics. Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Press (Dec. 2000)

Glossary of Epistemology and Philosophy of Science (co-authored with James Fetzer) New York: Paragon Press (l992).

Business Ethics: Corporate Values and Society (co-edited with M. Snoeyenbos and J. Humber), Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Press, (revised edition l992)

Biomedical Ethics and the Law (co-edited with J. Humber), 2nd edition revised (New York: Plenum Press, 1979), 700 pages.



Praxis and Reason: Studies in the Philosophy of Nicholas Rescher (New York: The University Press of America, 1982).



Beyond Death: The Evidence for Life After Death. Springfield, Ill.: Charles C Thomas, (l987) Translated into Japanese (l991).

Biomedical Ethics Reviews 1983 (co-edited with James Humber) ( New York:

Humana Publishing Corporation, l983). The following books, also co-edited with J. Humber, were published by Humana Press in the year indicated:



BiomedicaL Ethics Reviews 1984.

Biomedical Ethics Reviews l985.

Quantitative Risk Assessment (Biomedial Ethics Reviews l986)

Biomedical Ethics Reviews l987.

AIDS and Ethics (Biomedical Ethics Reviews l988)

Biomedical Ethics Reviews l989.

Biomedical Ethics Reviews l990.

Biomedical Ethics Reviews l99l.

Biomedical Ethics Reviews l992.

Physician-Assisted Death l993.

Allocating Health-Care Resources l994.

Reproduction, Technology and Rights. l995

What is Disease ? l996

Issues in Alternative Medicine. l997

Human Cloning: 1998

Is there a Right to Die . 2000



Essays: (a) In the areas of Epistemology and Philosophy of Science:

1. "Peirce on Meaning," Synthese (vol. 41, 1979), pp. 1-26; and reprinted in The Relevance of Charles Peirce, ed. by Eugene Freeman, Hegler Institute: San Jose, California: 1983.



2. "Science and Idealism," Philosophy of Science (June 1973), pp. 242-254.



3. Scientific Progress and Peircean Utopian Realism," Erkenntnis 20 (1983), pp. 253-280.



4. "Fallibilism, Coherence and Realism," Synthese 68 (August 1986) pp. 213-223.



5. "Blind Realism," Erkenntnis 26 (January l987) pp.57-101



6. "Fallibilism and the Ultimate Irreversible Opinion," in Studies in Epistemology, The American Philosophical Quarterly Monograph Series, vol. 9 (January 1975), pp. 33-54.



7. "Defeasibility and Scepticism," The Australasian Journal of Philosophy (December 1973), pp. 237-244.



8. "Truth and Evidence," The Philosophical Quarterly (October 1974), pp. 364-68. Reprinted in Knowing and the Known, edited by Kenneth Lucey, (Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Press. (l996).



9. "On Seeing the Truth: A Reply," The Philosophical Quarterly (May 1976), pp. 163-65.



10. "Defending Gettier-type Counterexamples," The Australasian Journal of Philosophy (April 1975), pp. 58-60.



11. "The Invalidity of the Gettier-type Counterexamples," Philosophia vol. 13, No. 1-2, (September 1983) pp. 67-74.



12. "On Being Justified in Believing False Propositions," Philosophia, vol. 15, #3 ( May 1985) pp. 271-282.



13. "Reliabilism and Goldman's Theory of Justification" (Co-authored with F. Hogg) Philosophia (Fall 1989) pp. 165-188.



14. "Scientific Realism and Explanation," The American Philosophical Quarterly.(October l989) pp. 173-187.



15. "On Naturalizing Epistemology," The American Philosophical Quarterly. (October l990). pp.263-281. Revised and reprinted in Foundations of Philosophy of Science: Contemporary Developments. ed. James Fetzer ( New York: Paragon Press, l992), and Readings in Epistemology. ed J. Crumley. Mayfair Press.1998.



16. "Vacuous Truth", Synthese vol. 85. (Dec. l990). pp.1-19



17. "Defining Justification and Naturalizing Epistemology,"

Philosophy and Phenomenological Research (October l994)



18. "Justification and Truth Value: A Reply," Philosophia vol. 17,

No. 3, (August 1987) 33-38



19. "Dretske's Dreadful Question", Philosophia vol. 24, nos. 3-4(Oct.l996)



20. "Externalism and Justification", Philosophia vol. 24, nos. 3-4 (Oct.l996)



21. "Recent Work on Error", Philosophia (vol. 27. Fall. l998) 1-60



22. "Carnap and Quine on Empiricism" History of Philosophy Quarterly (Spring l997)



23. "Mannison on Inexplicable Knowledge and Belief" (coauthored with R.

Arrington), The Australasian Journal of Philosophy (April 1977), pp. 87-90. See also Mannison's reply (August 1977).



24. "Basic Knowledge and Justification," Canadian Journal of Philosophy vol. 13, No. 1, (March 1983) pp. 115-127.



25. "A Definition of Pragmatism," The History of Philosophy Quarterly,

(January, 1986) pp. 79-89. Reprinted in Pragmatik: Handbuch Pragmatischen Denkens, vol. 2, edited by H. Stachowiak, Felix Meiner, Verlag, Hamburg, 1987.



26. "Rescherian Epistemology," in Praxis and Reason: Studies in the Philosophy of Nicholas Rescher, ed. by R. Almeder (New York: University Press of America, 1982. 3-22

27. "The Limits of Natural Science" in Science at Century's End: Philosophical Questions on the Progress and Limits of Science. 40-60. Edited by Martin Carrier,Gerald J. Massey, and Laura Ruetsche. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2000.

28. "Common Sense and the Foundations of Knowledge," Man and World: An International Philosophical Review (August, l974) pp.254-70



29. "Two Concepts of Knowledge and the Justified-True-Belief Thesis," Proceedings of the VIII Interamerican Congress of Philosophy Brasilia (1972).*



30. "Rescher" in A Companion to Epistemology (eds.J.Dancy and E. Sosa, Oxford: Basil Blackwell, l992)

---------- (b) In the area of Peirce Studies and American Philosophy:

31. "Peircean Fallibilism," The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy (Winter 1982).

32. "Peirce's Theory of Perception," (Spring 1968), pp. 99-110.The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy



33. Charles S. Peirce and the Existence ofthe External World,"The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy (Spring 1978).



34. "Peirce's Epistemological Realism," The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy (Winter 1975).



35. "The Idealism of Charles S. Peirce," The Journal of the History of Philosophy (January 1971), pp. 477-484.



36. "Peirce's Pragmatism and Scotistic Realism," The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society; A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy (Winter 1975), pp. 3-18.



37. "Peirce's Thirteen Theories of Truth," The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy (Winter, 1985).



38. "Peirce's Scientific Realism", The History of Philosophy Quarterly

(Dec.l989) and to be reprinted in Idealistic Elements in Philosophy of Science, eds. Rescher and Rockmore, l990.



39. "Peirce" in The Blackwell Companion to the Philosophers. ed. R.L.Arrington. (Spring l999)



-----------(c) In the area of Business Ethics, Bioethics, Environmental Ethics, etc.:



40. "The Ethics of Profit: Reflections on Corporate Responsibility," Business and Society (January 1980). Reprinted in (1) Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Economic Issues (first 7 editions beginning in l981; and also in (2) Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Social Issues (third edition), 1984. Both volumes published by the Dushkin Publishing Group, Guilford, Conn. Revised and expanded version of the same occurs under the title of "Morality in the Marketplace: Reflections on the Friedman Doctrine" in Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Moral Issues.( 8th, editions) Dushkin Publishing Group, Guilford, Conn. l998.

41. "Ethics in the Marketplace," in Business Ethics: Corporate Values and Society, ed. by Snoeyenbos, Humber and Almeder, Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Press, 1983. Reprinted in Strategies for Argument (first edition, l989) ed. S. Hirshberg, Macmillan, New York; and in Ethics and Life, eds Englehardt and Schneltskopf, Wm. C. Brown and Co. Dubuque, Iowa: l99l



42. "Gift-Giving in the Marketplace," in Business Ethics: Corporate Values and Society, ed. by Snoeyenbos, Humber and Almeder, Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Press, 1983. Reprinted in Ethical Issues in Engineering, ed. by Deborah Johnson, (Prentice Hall, Clifton; N.J.: 1988).



43. "The Ethics of Hiring" (Co-authored with M. Snoeyenbos), in Business Ethics: Corporate Values and Society, ed. by Snoeyenbos, Humber and Almeder, Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Press, 1983 and l992

44. "In Defense of Sharks: Moral Issues in Hostile Liquidating Takeovers" (co-authored with David Carey) in The Journal of Business Ethics (July l99l), and reprinted in Business Ethics: Corporate Values and Society (revised edition) by Snoeyenbos, Humber and Almeder (eds) Prometheus Press (l992).Also reprinted in Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Economic Issues. eds. Swartz and Bonello. (6th edition) Dushkin Publishers, Guilford, Conn. l992.





45. "The Moral Right to Know in the Workplace" (co-authored with J.D. Millar) in Business Ethics: Corporate Values and Society, (2nd edition) by Snoeyenbos, Humber and Almeder, (eds) Buffalo, N.Y.: Prometheus Press, (forthcoming in l992)

46. "Churning: Ethical And Legal Issues," (co-authored with Milton Snoeyenbos) Business And Professional Ethics Journal. (Summer 1988)



47. "On the Role of Moral Considerations in the Allocation of Exotic Medical Lifesaving Therapy," in Biomedical Ethics and the Law, eds. Humber and Almeder (2nd edition, Plenum Press, 1979), pp. 543-553.

48. "Public Policy and Health Care Distribution," in Biomedical Ethics Reviews 83, ed.by Humber and Almeder (New York: Humana Publishing Corp., 1983).

49. "Quantitative Risk Assessment and the Notion of Acceptable Risk." (co-authored with James Humber) in Biomedical Ethics Reviews, 1986 (Humana Press, 1987).



50. "Quantitative Risk-Assessment: Objectivity and the Hired Gun Assessor", in Chemical Risk and Occupational Health:. edited by Mark Smith, David Christiani and, Karl Kelsey. (Auburn Press, Westport, Conn. l994) 187-196.



51. "Materialism and Aging in America," Journal of Aging and Human Development (March 1983).



52. "Introduction to Ethical Theory" (co-authored with J. Humber), in Biomedical Ethics and the Law, eds. Humber and Almeder (2nd ed. Plenum Press, 1979).



53. "On the Harmony of Confucian and Taoist Moral Attitudes," The Journal of Chinese Philosophy (January 1980).



___________ (d) In the area of Metaphysics (mind-body problem) etc:



54. "Reincarnation", in What Survives?: The Possibility of Life Beyond Biological Death, ed. by J. Doore, J. B. Tarcher Publishing Co.: l990).



55. "On `Past Tongues Remembered'" The Sceptical Inquirer (Summer 1988)



56. "Reincarnation", a chapter in Readings for Writers, 7th edition, edited by McCuen and Winkler, (San Diego, Calif: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Oct. l99l) and also reprinted in Rhetoric Made Plain, First Edition. editors Winkler and McCuen, Harcourt Brace, Fort Worth, Texas, l995). Both reprints are from the first chapter of Beyond Death.



57. "Death is Not the End" in An Introduction to Modern Philosophy, eds. Castell et al., 6th edition, (New York, MacMillan l993) This is edited

version of sections occurring in Death and Personal Survival.



58. "Beloff's Reservations on Reincarnation" Proceedings of the 40th International Conference of the Parapsychology Foundation (Fall l994)

59. "Almeder Versus Coleman on Survival" Journal of the Society for Psychical Research. (July l994)



60. "Recent Responses to Survival Research" Journal for Scientific Exploration (Winter l997) 495-534



61. "A Critique of Arguments Offered Against Reincarnation", Journal for Scientific Explorations ( Fall l997)



62. "On Reincarnation: A Reply to Hales, Philosophia. (Dec. 2000)Vol .28

Nos.1-4 . 14 pages



63. "Liberal Feminism and Academic Feminism", Public Affairs Quarterly

(October l994)

64. "On the Indirect Justification of Use Analysis," The Proceedings of the New

York State Philosophical Society (Spring 1972).



Review Essay: Methodological Pragmatism (by N. Rescher), The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy (Spring 1979).



Review Essay: Scientific Progress (Rescher), Philosophical Inquiry (Spring 1980).



Review Essay: Philosophical Standardism (Rescher) Philosophia. (Fall l997)



Review Essay: Revolutions and Reconstructions in the Philosophy of Science (by Mary Hesse), Man and World (15:207, 1982).



Review Essay: The Limits of Science (by N. Rescher), Idealistic Studies (September 1986).



Review Essay: Whitehead's Ontology (J. Lango), The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy (1974).



Review Essay: Ethical Principles in Biomedicine (by Beauchamp and Childress) in System and Nature, (1981).



Review Essay: Can Science Be Saved? by Morris Goran, in The Quarterly Review of Biology (1982).



Review Essay: The Writings of Charles Peirce (edited by Max Fisch), The Journal of the History of Philosophy (Fall 1984).



Review Essay: Science as Cognitive Process (by Rubenstein, Laughlin, and McManus) in Synthese (Winter 1987).



Review Essay: Children Who Remember Previous Lives, by Ian Stevenson in Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research. (January l990) 22-32



Review Essay: Peirce on Truth (by C. Mysak) in Review of Metaphysics (sept. l992)

Review Essay: The Rediscovery of Mind (by John Searle) in Journal of Scientific Exploration (Fall. l995)



Review Essay: The Walls of Plato's Cave (by John Smythies) in Journal of Scientific Exploration (Spring l996)



Review Essay: The Conscious Mind ( by David Chalmers) in Journal of Scientific Exploration (Winter l998)



Review Essay: Where Biology and Reincarnation Intersect ( by Ian Stevenson) in Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research. ( Fall l999)





DELIVERED PAPERS:



"Defeasibility and Scepticism" at the Western Divisional Meeting of the American Philosophical Association; Richard Hull, commentator (Chicago 1973).



"On the Role of Moral Considerations in the Allocation of Exotic Medical Lifesaving Therapy," at the Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association; Barbara MacKinnon, commentator (San Francisco, March 1978).



"Basic Knowledge and Evidence," at the Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association (Baltimore 1982).



"Clarke on Scepticism" (commentary) Eastern Division Meeting of American Philosophical Association (Boston, l990)



"Siegel on Instrumental Normativity" (commentary) Eastern Division Meeting of APA

(Washington, l992)



"Justification and Naturalized Epistemology" Pacific Division Meeting of APA ( San Francisco. l993)



"Quine and Peirce on Meaning" at the American Philosophical Association Meeting before the Charles S. Peirce Society (Washington, D.C., 1977).



"Blind Realism" at Workshop Conference on Scientific Realism held at University of Pittsburgh, May, 1985.



"The Realism of Charles Peirce," at the American Philosophical Association Meeting before the Charles Peirce Society (Boston, 1967).



"The Idealism of Charles S. Peirce," at the American Philosophical Association Meeting before the Charles S. Peirce Society (Phil-adelphia, 1970).



"On Scientific Revolutions," at the Symposium on Scientific Revolutions at Bloomsburgh State College (Bloomsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1971).



"Two Concepts of Knowledge and the Justified-True-Belief Thesis," VIII International Congress of Philosophy (Brasilia, 1972).*



"On the Indirect Justification of Use Analysis," at the Spring Meeting of the New York State Philosophical Association (Cazanovia, 1972).



"Truth and Evidence," at the annual meeting of the Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology (Tampa, 1972).



"Peirce on Knowledge and Truth," XV World Congress of Philosophy (Varna, Bulgaria, 1973).*



"Fallibilism and the Ultimate Irreversible Opinion," at the American Philosophical Association Meeting before the Charles S. Peirce Society (Atlanta, 1973).



"Basic Knowledge," at the annual meeting of the Southern Society for Philosophy and Psychology (New Orleans, 1973).



"Ontology and Use Analysis," at the Spring meeting of the Georgia Philosophical Association (Macon, 1973).



"Death and Dying," at A.A.A.S. sponsored Symposium on Moral Issues and Science, Fernbank Science Center (August 1977).



"Experimenting with Human Subjects," before the Scientific Research Society of America, Center for Disease Control Chapter, Atlanta, Georgia, 1981.



"Allocating Scarce Hospital Care," The Grady Memorial Hospital (before the medical staff), May 1982.



"Informed Consent," Columbus Medical Center (May 1984).



"Corporate Responsibility: The Nestle Case," at Conference on Ethics and Enterprise, State University College at Oswego, October 20, 1982.



"The Very idea of Business Ethics," before the Intown Business Club

(Atlanta, January 30, 1985).



"On the Impossibility of Justification," invited paper at conference held on epistemology in Dubrovnik, Yugoslavia. (Summer l989)



"On Evidence for Reincarnation" invited paper at the American Psychological Association (Summer l989)



Papers read at several Universities (including the Universities of Toronto, Ohio State, Denison University, Harvard University, University of Frankfurt (Wolfgang Goethe University), University of Pittsburgh, University of Virginia, Syracuse University, Bowling Green, SUNY at Buffalo, Kentucky, Georgia, South Carolina, Drexel Institute, LeMoyne College, University of Pennsylvania, Georgia Medical College, Texas A&M, Southern Methodist University, Emory School of Medicine, Florida State University, Miami University of Ohio, Tel Aviv University, Ben Gurion University, Haifa University, University of South Africa, University of the Witwatersrand, University of Capetown, University of Aberdeen ( Scotland), University of the West Indies, Hamilton College, Ecole Polytechnique in Paris, University of Bloomsburg (Provost's Lecture) and before various groups (including the staff at the Georgia Mental Retardation Center, The Emory Biomedical Ethics Group, The Centers for Disease Control)

Delivered the Baccalaureate Address: "On Human Success," to the graduating class of Berkmar High School (Lilburn, Georgia, Spring 1978).



Delivered Honors Day Convocation Address: "On Human Excellence," at Georgia State University (Spring 1984).



Directed three major conferences in Applied Ethics (Biomedical Ethics and Business Ethics) sponsored variously by NEH, NSF, and NIOSH.



MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS:



The American Philosophical Association

The Charles S. Peirce Society

The Society for Scientific Exploration





COMMITTEE ASSIGNMENTS:



SUNY (Oswego)

Student Philosophy Club Advisor (1969-71)

College Committee on Advisement and Placement (1970)

Vice Chairman of Departmental Promotion Committee (1970)

Chairman of Departmental Selection Committee (1970)

Departmental Representative to Faculty Assembly

Coordinator of Departmental Philosophy Colloquium (1968-69)



Georgia State University



Chairman of Advisory Group to Student Philosophy Club (1972-73)

Chairman, Committee on Committees (1974)

College Graduate Curriculum Committee (1980)

College Graduate Committee

University Committee on Academic Discipline (1973)

University Standards Committee (1974)

Chairman of Tenure and Promotion Committee (1974)

Committee on Faculty Evaluation

Divisional Bylaws Committee (1975)

Director of Graduate Studies (departmental, 1976-78)

Departmental Executive Committee (1976-92)

University Public Service Committee (1980)

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee of the College of Arts and Sciences (1980-1983)

Chairman of Undergraduate Curriculum Committee for the College of Arts and Sciences (1982-1983)

Graduate Curriculum Committee of the College of Arts and Sciences (1979-1982)

Chairman of the Graduate Curriculum Committee of the College of Arts and Sciences (1981-1983)

Department of Philosophy Committee on Standards for Promotion and Tenure to Full Professor (1984)

Institutional Review Board for Research with Human Subjects

(1986 - l99l)

College of Arts and Sciences Advisory Committee on Promotion and Tenure. l989-1991 (Chaired Committee in l990-91)

College of Arts and Sciences Grievance Committee. (l989 - 90)

Faculty Affairs Committee and Faculty Senate. (l990 - 92)





(Works on, references to, R. Almeder's published works)



1. William Hoffman, "Almeder on Truth and Evidence," The Philosophical Quarterly (January 1975), pp. 59-61.



2. Peter Klein, Certainty: A Refutation of Scepticism, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1981, pp. 59-61.



3. Don Mannison, "Knowing and Believing: A Reply," Australasian Journal of Philosophy (vol. 55, 1977), pp. 147-148.



4. Ilkka Niiluoto, "Scientific Progress," Synthese (vol. , 1980), pp. 1-25.



5. Douglas Odegaard, "Can A Justified Belief Be False?", The Canadian Journal of Philosophy (vol. 6, n. 3, 1976), pp. 561-568.



6. George Pappas and Marshal Swain, Essays on Knowledge and Justification, Ithaca, Cornell University Press, 1978, pp. 12-13.



7. Paul Moser, "On Basic Knowledge, Without Justification," Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 15, Number 2, June 1985, pp. 305-310.



8. Nicholas Rescher, "A Reply to Robert Almeder," in Praxis and Reason: Studies in the Philosophy of Nicholas Rescher, ed. R. Almeder, University Press of America, 1982, pp. 22 ff. See also p. 159n in Rescher's Cognitive Systematization (Blackwell, 1979).

9. Robert K. Shope, The Analysis of Knowing: A Decade of Research, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983, pp. 26-31, 33, 47-48, 178.



10. Marshall Swain, Reasons and Knowledge, Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1981, p. 106.



11. Douglas Odegard, Knowledge and Scepticism, Totowa, N.J.: Roman and Littlefield, 1982, pp. 67ff.



12. Douglas Odegard, "Complete Justification and Truth", Philosophia (Winter 1987).



13. Alvin Goldman, "Reply to Almeder and Hogg", Philosophia, (Fall l989)



14. Fred Dretske, "Dretske's Awful Answer" Philosophia ( Spring l994)



14. Sarah Thomason, "Reply to Robert Almeder". The Sceptical Inquirer,(Summer l988).



15. James Bennet, "Peirce and the Logic of Fallibilism," The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society (Fall, 1982), pp. 357-365.





16. S. Rosenthal, "On the Epistemological Significance of What Peirce is Not," The Charles S. Peirce Society (Winter, 1979), pp. 19-25.



17. S. Rosenthal, "On the Metaphysical Significance of What Peirce is Not," Southern Journal of Philosophy (XXI, 1974), pp. 455ff.



18. Denis Sullivan, "Peirce's Notion of Pre-Perceptual Cognition: A Reinterpretation," The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society (Spring, 1986), pp. 188-196.



19. M. Raposa, "Habits and Essences," The Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society (Spring, 1984) Vol. XX, No. 2, pp. 147ff.



20. Eugene Mills, "Is Naturalized Epistemology Incoherent", APA Colloquium Paper (Pacific Division l992); Commentator: William Talbott. (This is a colloquim on an argument which I offered in "Naturalised Epistemology".



21. James Fetzer, Philosophy of Science (New York: Paragon Press, l992) p.153



22. Steven Hales, "Evidence and the Afterlife". Philosophia ( forthcoming 1999)



23. Steven Hales, "Reply to Almeder". Philosophia. (forthcoming 1999)



24 Ph.D Dissertation: Marat Bac, Univ. Of British Columbia. Discussion on Blind Realism 1998



25. Marat Bac, " Propositional Knowledge and the Enigma of Realism" Philosphia. Vol. 278

nos.1-2, March 1999.



26. Ph.D Dissertation at Univ. Of Pitt.( 1999) on Realism. ( contains two chapters discussion my work in Blind Realism and Gettier-type counterexamples.



Reviews of Major Book Publications:



I. The Philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce: A Critical Introduction (Basil Blackwell, l980) As is apparent in numerous reviews, the book is uniformly strongly reviewed and in one extended review in a premier philosophical journal, Nous, the book is characterized as the best available introduction to Peirce's philosophy. In ending his review the author said:



"No other book shows so clearly why anyone interested in fundamental problems in philosophy should take Peirce seriously. For that reason, it is, in my view, the best available introduction to his work." ( Nous, Nov. l983, p. 711)





II. Blind Realism: An Essay on Human Knowledge and Natural Science (Rowman and Littlefield, l992). To date, at least six reviews have appeared. Four of the reviews (see attached) are brief and very positive, and a fourth, which appears in vol. 24 (nos 3-4 (Dec.l995) in Philosophia, is an extended critical discussion in which the reviewer asserts, among other positive items, that



"At first glance, Blind Realism seems to present a rather simple and straightforward thesis. That semblance is quite false. The book is more along the lines of a complete overhaul of knowledge, realism and natural science. Its scope is very wide, and yet bears ramifications that urge the reader to consider questions of significant depth. Almeder ensures adequate coverage of his topic's wide horizons by embedding the central thesis of Blind Realism in between a recasting of the traditional propositional theory of knowledge on the one hand, and a far-sighted utopian view of science on the other. Thus the book carefully constructs its total view from the ground level of a conception of human knowledge up to the top level perspective of the whole of the scientific enterprise."



and near the end of the discussion, the same reviewer says

"Blind Realism is thought-provoking, forcefully yet meticulously argued, and packs considerable punch overall. In the opinion of this reviewer, Blind Realism is an excellent contribution to its field, a work of singular importance for the simple fact that it is the only defensible version of scientific realism that exists " (Philosophia vol.24, nos 3-4(D Dec. l995 (Spring l995)... see attached review).



Another reviewer has said of Blind Realism:



"His (Almeder's) arguments are clear, well-informed, provocative, and deserve consideration, especially by realists who are committed to truth as correspondence. Moreover, in the course of developing his arguments, he has helpful things to say in favor of basic knowledge and the dependence of our nonbasic knowledge on our being able to justify a belief." (Canadian Philosophical Reviews, April-October l992 p.227)



Also Paul Moser, the editor of the series in which Blind Realism appears says, in part



"Almeder's manuscript is highly competent, original and ambitious. It develops an intriguing theory of knowledge that provides a distinctive alternative to the prominent views in circulation, and that bears, in an original way, on some controversial issues in philosophy of science. The book will attract much attention from epistemologists and from other philosophers concerned with realism and scientific progress.. The book is well written, well organized, and in touch with much of the important literature in epistemology and philosophy of science. It is an important addition to the current literature on epistemology and realism...

Almeder shows awareness of, and replies to, most of the likely objections to his position. This is one of the book's virtues".... ( see attached review)

A reviewer for The Review of Metaphysics says:



" Blind realism is exceptionally clearly written, and is densely packed with arguments. The book is clearly the result of years of careful thought, and should interest a wide variety of epistemologists and philosophers of science." ( Cory Juhl, Univ.of Texas at Austin June l994)



A reviewer for Choice says:



"The opening chapters will severely challenge philosophers wedded to verificationism and the correspondence theory of truth. Almeder shows that by jettisoning these notions, one can arrive at a sense of "knowing" that avoids many sources of skepticism....In any case, this technically sophisticated yet readable book is recommended to any academic library......(Stephen Fuller. Nov. l992)





III. Death and Personal Survival: The Evidence for Life After Death (Rowman and Littlefield, l992). One reviewer has said:



...Many dabblers in mysticism might be ready to discount Almeder's Death and Personal Survival by the time they have finished the Table of Contents. But quite to the contrary, Almeder's work is carefully researched and argued meticulously in the best philosophical style....He is, of course, aware that he is not only taking on a monumental task, but is facing a very skeptical audience, as this book is aimed at academics. Thus the argumentation is painstakingly detailed and repetitious--even tedious at times-- and an unusual lot of work is spent on responding to anticipated and actual skeptical reactions. Almeder thinks that the evidence and arguments he provides are strong enough that it would be irrational to withhold belief in some form of personal post-mortem survival (ix). An Extraordinary claim indeed.



...Almeder has hand-picked carefully only the most air-tight and persuasive cases as evidence, and indeed points out potential flaws in some of them himself.....Almeder provides powerful arguments in every case that the alternative explanations will not hold up. (Carl Hahn. Canadian Philosophical Reviews. August 1993. pp. 129-130)



Another reviewer has said:



It is out of fashion today for a professional philosopher to believe in personal survival, and it is certainly out of fashion to contend that this is the most rational position to take given the best available evidence. Nevertheless, this is precisely Almeder's position and he does an excellent job in establishing it.....

Wisely bypassing the provocative but relatively weak evidence coming from past-lives therapy, Almeder focuses on the research of Ian Stevenson and his critics, especially Paul Edwards whose four part attack on reincarnation (Free Inquiry l987) is widely cited as a proof text for the dismissal of Stevenson's work. Almeder's critique of Edwards-- and through him Ian Wilson, William Roll, and C.T.K. Chari--is devastating....

As one moves through the chapters that follow, the reader is treated to an exceptionally careful, dispassionate and thorough analysis of cases and issues. I was repeatedly impressed by Almeder's comprehensive grasp of the literature he treats, the evenhandedness of his presentation, and his relentless probing for weakness on both sides of the issues. There are no strawmen here, and the sceptics position is always fully developed and carefully considered....Death and Personal Survival has set a new standard of critical excellence for discussing what is an increasingly important and controversial body of evidence. Any subsequent discussion on these matters must take into account Almeder's contribution." (Chris Bache, Professor of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Youngstown State University, in Dialogue and Alliance (forthcoming).



Also John Beloff (Professor of Psychology, University of Edinburgh) for the Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, of which he is the editor, says of Death and Personal Survival in his published review:



The upshot (of Almeder's efforts) is a very good book indeed, which should be compulsory reading for anyone wishing to argue the case for or against survival. Indeed, it would be amusing to see how a `blanket skeptic' such as John Schumaker ( see above) would attempt to cope with it.( April l993)



And, in concluding her recent review of Death and Personal Survival, another reviewer says:



It seems to me impossible to read this book without developing respect for its author. Almeder clearly has wrestled as honestly as he could with his own will to believe. He has collated all the skeptical arguments against accepting pro-survival cases that he could find or that Braude and Stevenson proposed to him. He confronts each argument and tries, at painful length, to consider it dispassionately and to evaluate its plausibility. He concludes that several are strong and have not been disproved but that none is persuasive. If the reader's judgment of what is plausible does not coincide with his, this demonstrates the fairness of his presentation. ( Gertrude Schmeidler, Professor of Psychology CCNY, Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research. vol.88, Jan. 1994. p.70)



Otherwise the available informal reviews solicited by the publisher ( and appearing on the back of the paperback edition) from philosophers not recommended by the author read:



1. "Almeder provides the most sustained argument for survival, especially reincarnation, in the contemporary literature, carefully examining the empirical evidence, the skeptics responses, and the philosophical objections to survival. The book is a goldmine as a resource for all aspects of the survival question. I recommend the book for everyone" (Hoyte Edge, Professor of Philosophy, Rollins College)



2. "Almeder's new work is absorbing and audacious and deserves to be read carefully and widely. His description of what he counts as good evidence for survival is vivid and well organized." (James Wheatley, Professor of Philosophy, University of Toronto)



3. "I have read Robert Almeder's Death and Personal Survival with great interest and appreciation. The book has developed excellently, and I am happy to have you quote me as saying:

`Robert Almeder has clearly summarized an extensive

body of evidence and argued its merits with the skill of a professional philosopher' " (Ian Stevenson, Carlson Professor of Psychiatry, Univ. of Virginia School of Medicine)



4. "Almeder's book is a thoughtful and informed response to the usual superficial dismissals of the evidence within the academic community. Unlike many academics who have the hubris to publish their views on the subject after only the most cursory examination of the material, Almeder understands the issues and has studied the evidence very closely" (Stephen Braude, Professor of Philosophy, Univ. of Maryland)

5.



I know of no negative reviews of any of the above books.





IV. Beyond Death (Charles C. Thomas, l987) Translated into Japanese (l988).I do not include this book for review because it was originally intended for a non-academic audience and is superseded by Death and Personal Survival which is on the same topic but written for a different audience, namely, the more academic and thoughtful. In any event I know of only two reviews of Beyond Death. One was strong and written by Ian Stevenson who reviewed it as an excellent book and also said in the course of noting several spelling mistakes in the final ms:

"As a professional philosopher, Almeder has the training and skill with which to expose the assumptions that entrap many skeptics and prevent them from appraising the better evidence of psychical phenomena fairly..... He seems to me to refute ably the argument that we must understand the process of life after death before we can accept the evidence for it....Given the limits of length and of detail that he set himself, I think Almeder has admirably succeeded in his task. If a skeptical scientist or philosopher were to express willingness, despite whatever biases, to spend two or three hours reading about the evidence for life after death, I should recommend this book to that person.If this philosopher or scientist were to follow my advice, he or she would almost certainly thank me afterward and wish to read still more about the subject of survival of death." (I. Stevenson, Carlson Professor of Psychiatry, Univ. of Virginia, Journal of the American Society for Psychical Research. Vol.83, 1989. 57-59)

The other review of Beyond Death, offered by a Mr. Coleman who reviewed the book for The Journal of the Society for Psychical Research (l990), claimed that the book left out too many interesting cases and failed to discuss sufficiently deeply the cases offered. He was less than enthusiastic about the ms. Even so, Death and Personal Survival is the book that should be examined because it very much supersedes Beyond Death in scope and critical appraisal. On the question of personal survival after death, I would not recommend Beyond Death to anybody rather than Death and Personal Survival. They are two very different books on the same topic.





V. Of the book Harmless Naturalism (Open Court Press, l998) one referee ( and also the editor of the Rowman and Littlefield series on Epistemology and Philosophy of Science, said:



"An important original contribution to the contemporary debate over naturalism in epistemology. Well organized, clearly written, and uniformly nontechnical , this book engages the most significant recent literature on epistemological naturalism, criticizes the most prominent versions of such naturalism, and develops an important new approach to naturalism in epistemology" (--- Paul Moser, Author of Philosophy After Objectivity )



A second reviewer, says:

"Harmless Naturalism is a well-written, up-to-date, and superbly argued book on a fascinating and crucial topic in modern philosophy. It is highly scholarly, thorough, and professionally put together, and it deals the bolder forms of naturalized epistemology a blow that may be mortal." (--- Barry Smith, Author of Austrian Philosophy)



A third reviewer has said:

"Almeder's book contains an exceptionally clear discussion of naturalized epistemology. In particular, his arguments against the Replacement Thesis appear to produce serious difficulties for that widely-held position" ( ----Paul Humphreys. Author of Chances of Explanation.)





6. Of the more recent book Human Happiness and Morality ( Prometheus Press, Dec.1999) one reviewer has said:



" Using plain language and simple arguments, Almeder considers some of the deepest questions about how we should live. In this accessible introduction to the subject, readers are helped to think about their own moral commitments and prospects of happiness. The approach is guided by reason and common sense. It is a welcome response to the cult of unreason that attacks the very possibility of morality and happiness" John Kekes, Professor of Philosophy, Editor of Philosophy and Public Affairs.



and another has said:

Robert Almeder's brief introduction to ethics is a welcome edition to works geared toward the curious as well as the more well-read in ethics. It is written in a lively and readable style, covers in a clear way al the essential issues, and has some distinctive things to say about happiness and morality." Kai Nielsen, Professor of Philosophy, University of Calgary.



********************************************************





Other Comments on the Published Work:



a. Most of the essays published are in premier philosophy journals (with distinguished editorial boards blindly refereeing papers) including Synthese, The American Philosophical Quarterly, The Australasian Journal of Philosophy, The Philosophical Quarterly, The History of Philosophy Quarterly, The Journal of the History of Philosophy, Erkenntnis, Philosophy of Science, Philosophia, The Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, The Journal of Business Ethics, Business and Society, Public Affairs Quarterly, The Journal of Chinese Philosophy. Many of them have been the subject of further journal discussion.



b. Many (eighteen) of the published essays (along with sections of books published) have been reprinted (and some frequently) in various collections or anthologies; one argument in one of the essays was the topic of an APA Colloquium (Pacific Division. l992) and The Pacific Division of the APA scheduled an "Author Meets Critics" Colloquium on Blind Realism for the l995 annual meeting in San Francisco. (Commentators: George Pappas and Douglas Winblad.) This same book was the subject of a symposium held by the Society for Realism and Anti-Realism at the annual meeting of the Eastern Division of the APA in Washington, l996. The work in epistemology is often discussed and evaluated in other books on epistemology.


Revised 3/4/2002