NANPA Activities
NANPA Activities
NANPA Activities
NANPA Activities
NANPA Activities
NANPA Activities
NANPA Activities

About NANPA

NANPA holds overall responsibility for the neutral administration of NANP numbering resources, subject to directives from regulatory authorities in the countries that share the NANP. NANPA's responsibilities include assignment of NANP resources, and, in the U.S. and its territories, coordination of area code relief planning and collection of utilization and forecast data.

NANPA is not a policy-making entity. In making assignment decisions, NANPA follows regulatory directives and industry-developed guidelines. NANPA's responsibilities are defined in Federal Communication Commission (FCC) rules and in comprehensive technical requirements drafted by the telecommunications industry and approved by the FCC.

Since 1997, the FCC has selected the company that serves as NANPA through a competitive bidding process. In 1997, NeuStar (then Lockheed Martin IMS) was selected to serve for a five-year term as NANPA. In 2003, NeuStar was again selected to serve an additional five year term beginning in July, 2003.

Regulatory authorities in various NANP countries have named national administrators to oversee the numbering resources assigned by NANPA for use within their country. NeuStar is the national administrator for the U.S. and its territories. Science Applications International Corp. Canada serves as the Canadian Numbering Administrator. In other participating countries, regulatory authorities either serve as the national administrator or delegate the responsibility to the dominant carrier. NANPA, in its overall coordinating role, consults with and provides assistance to regulatory authorities and national administrators to ensure that numbering resources are used in the best interests of all participants in the North American Numbering Plan.

NANPA costs are allocated to participating countries based on population, and then further adjusted based on NANPA services used by each country. Participants pay only their share of the costs of the NANPA services they require. Regulatory authorities in each participating country determine how to recover these costs. In the U.S., which pays most of the cost, NANPA is funded by the telecommunications industry under an arrangement specified in FCC rules.

© 2008 NeuStar, Inc. Legal Notice | Neutrality (pdf).