DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> Software experts find 'first' mobile virus; not harmful effects yet - Forbes.com
 
 
   
 
Jump | Free Trial Issue
Search Quote
HOME PAGE FOR THE WORLD'S BUSINESS LEADERS
 
Home > Technology > Wireless
 
  


Wireless
Software experts find 'first' mobile virus; not harmful effects yet
, 06.16.04, 11:07 AM ET

PARIS, Jun 15, 2004 (AFX-Asia via COMTEX) -- What is being described as the first ever computer virus that can infect mobile phones has been discovered, anti-virus software developers said on Tuesday, adding that up until now it has had no harmful effect.

The French unit of the Russian security software developer Kaspersky Labs said that that virus -- called Cabir -- appears to have been developed by an international group specialising in creating viruses which try to show "that no technology is reliable and safe from their attacks".

Cabir infects the Symbian operating system that is used in several makes of mobiles, notably the Nokia brand, and propagates through the new bluetooth wireless technology that is in several new mobile phones.

If the virus succeeds in penetrating the phone, it writes the inscription 'Caribe' on the screen and is then activated every time that the phone is turned on.

It is able to scan for phones that are also using the Bluetooth technology and is able to send a copy of itself to the first handset that it finds.

According to the anti-virus software developer F-Secure, the discovery of Cabir is proof that the technologies are now available to create viruses for mobile phones and that they are now known to the writers of computer viruses.

Anti-virus experts have been warning for months that mobile phone viruses are set to multiply, given the increasingly diverse uses of mobile phones.

cad/sjw/ga





News Headlines | More From Forbes.com | Special Reports
   
Subscriptions >

Free Trial Issue of Forbes Forbes Gift Subscription
Subscribe To Newsletters Subscriber Customer Service




    


 
 
CEO Book Club more >
Book Review
Without A Dinar To Your Name
Book Review
Homer 2.0
Amanda Ernst
Margaret Atwood reveals the other side of "The Odyssey."

Search Books

 
 
Advanced Search
 
 
New & Notable
 
 

 
  
 
    


 
SitemapHelpContact UsInvestment NewslettersForbes ConferencesForbes MagazinesForbes Autos
Ad Information   Forbes.com Wireless   RSS   Reprints/Permissions   Subscriber Services  
© 2005 Forbes.com Inc.™   All Rights Reserved   Privacy Statement   Terms, Conditions and Notices


Stock quotes are delayed at least 15 minutes for Nasdaq, at least 20 minutes for NYSE/AMEX. U.S. indexes are delayed at least 15 minutes with the exception of Nasdaq, Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 which are 2 minutes delayed.


Powered By