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Solovyov
Credit - www.spacefacts.de
Anatoliy Yakovlevich Solovyov Russian Pilot Cosmonaut. Born 16 January 1948. Record number of spacewalks and time spent on space walks. 651 cumulative days in space.

Personal: Male, Married, Two children. Born in Riga, Riga, Latvia. Soviet Air Force Soviet Air Force Soviet Air Force

Astronaut Career

Astronaut Group: Air Force Group 6 - 1976. Inactive Entered space service: 1 December 1978. Left space service: 2 February 1999. Number of Flights: 5.00. Total Time: 651.00 days. Number of EVAs: 16. Total EVA Time: 3.24 days.

Official NASA Biography - 1997

NAME: Anatoly Yakovlevich Solovyev
Pilot-Cosmonaut, Colonel. Resides in Star City.

BIRTHPLACE AND DATE:
Born January 16, 1948, in Riga.

PARENTS:
Yakov Mikhailovich Solovyev, father, deceased in 1980. Antonia Pavlovna Soloveva, mother, resides in Riga.

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION:
Brown hair, blue eyes; 5 feet 5 inches; 179 pounds.

EDUCATION:
Graduated from the Lenin Komsomol Chernigov Higher Military Aviation School in 1972.

MARITAL STATUS:
Married to Natalya Vasilyevna Solovyeva (nee Katyshevtseva).

CHILDREN:
Two sons, Gennady in 1975, and Illya in 1980.

HONORS:
Awarded the Order of Lenin and the "Gold Star" medal, the Order of the October Revolution, the Order of the Friendship of Peoples, and six Armed Forces medals.

EXPERIENCE:
Anatoly Yakovlevich Solovyev served from 1972 to 1976 as a senior pilot and group commander in the Far Eastern Military District. Since August 1976, he has been a student-cosmonaut at the Yuri A. Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center. In January 1979, he completed general space training. He is a test pilot third class and a test cosmonaut. From 1979 to 1984, he underwent training for a flight aboard the Soyuz-T transport vehicle and the Salyut-7 and Mir orbital stations as part of a group. In 1981, he was made part of a stand-by crew as a commander of a primary expedition. In 1987, he was the commander of a back-up Soviet-Sylian crew for an expedition that visited the Mir Station. His first flight in 1988, lasted 9 days and was performed as part of an international Soviet-Bulgalian crew comprised of A.Y. Solovyev, B.P. Savinykh. and A. Aleksandrov, of Bulgaria. From February 11 to August 9, 1990, Colonel Solovyev accomplished a long-duration (179-day) flight aboard th At present, he is the commander of the back-up Russian crew of the Mir-18 expedition on the Soyuz-TM-21 spacecraft as part of the Mir-Shuttle program.
Soyuz TM-9
Baladin and Solovyov aboard Mir....
Credit- RKK Energia

Call sign: Rodnik (Spring - water spring)


Solovyov Spaceflight Log

  • 7 June 1988 Flight: Mir EP-2. Flight Up: Soyuz TM-5. Flight Back: Soyuz TM-4. Flight Time: 9.84 days.
  • 11 February 1990 Flight: Mir EO-6. Flight Up: Soyuz TM-9. Flight Back: Soyuz TM-9. Flight Time: 179.05 days.
  • 27 July 1992 Flight: Mir EO-12. Flight Up: Soyuz TM-15. Flight Back: Soyuz TM-15. Flight Time: 188.90 days.
  • 27 June 1995 Flight: Mir EO-19. Flight Up: STS-71. Flight Back: Soyuz TM-21. Flight Time: 75.47 days.
  • 5 August 1997 Flight: Mir EO-24. Flight Up: Soyuz TM-26. Flight Back: Soyuz TM-26. Flight Time: 197.73 days.

Solovyov Chronology

23 August 1976 - Soviet Air Force Cosmonaut Training Group 6 selected..


1986 Early - Soyuz T-15A (cancelled). Final expedition to Salyut 7 station was cancelled when control was lost.
1986 June - Soyuz T-15B (cancelled). Planned second crew to opeate TKS-3 military experiments aboard Salyut 7 before control of the station was lost. Salyut 7 and Cosmos 1686 burned up in the atmosphere together in a fiery show over Argentina on February 7, 1991.
1986 September - Soyuz T-15C (cancelled). Cancelled all-female flight to be launched on International Woman's Day, to have docked with Mir or Salyut 7. Breakdown of Salyut 7, exhaustion of stock of Soyuz T spacecraft, and official resistance led to cancellation of the mission. Officially cancelled due to birth of Savitskaya's baby. No female cosmonauts would be in training again until a decade later.
22 July 1987 - Soyuz TM-3. Manned three crew. Transported to the Mir orbital space station a Soviet-Syrian crew comprising cosmonauts A S Viktorenko, A P Aleksandrov and M A Faris to conduct joint research and experiments with cosmonauts Y Romanenko and A Laveykin. Maneuvered from initial 231 X 217 km orbit to Mir's 311 X 359 km orbit. Docked with rear Mir port at 3:30 GMT 24 July. Undocked with rear port 30 July and docked to forward port.
7 June 1988 - Soyuz TM-5. Transported to the Mir orbital station a Soviet/Bulgarian crew comprising cosmonauts A Y Solovyev, V P Savinykh and A P Aleksandrov (Bulgaria) to conduct joint research and experiments with cosmonauts V G Titov and M K Manarov. Interim orbit 343 x 282 km. Maneuvered to Mir's 355 x 349 km orbit. Docked 15:57 GMT 9 June to Mir's aft port. Moved to forward port 18 June.
17 June 1988 - Landing of Soyuz TM-4. Undocked 06:18 GMT 17 June 88. Soyuz TM-4 landed at 10:13 GMT, 202 km from Dzehezkazgan, with the crew of Aleksandrov Aleksandr, Savinykh and Solovyov aboard.
5 September 1989 - Soyuz TM-8. Manned two crew. Mir Expedition EO-05. Docked with Mir 8 September. Transported to the Mir orbital station a team consisting of A S Viktorenko, commander of the spacecraft, and A A Serebrov, on-board engineer, to carry out scientific and technological research and experiments. Flight cost 80 million rubles. Expected return 25 million rubles net profit.
11 February 1990 - Soyuz TM-9. Manned two crew. Mir Expedition EO-06. Docked with Mir. Transported to the Mir orbital station a crew comprising the cosmonauts A Y Solovyov and A N Balandin to conduct an extensive programme of geophysical and astrophysical research, experiments on biology and biotechnology and work on space materials science.
17 July 1990 - EVA Mir EO-6-1. Repaired Soyuz TM-9 insulation rip.
26 July 1990 - EVA Mir EO-6-2. Dismantled equipment. Temporarily closed damaged hatch.
9 August 1990 - Landing of Soyuz TM-9. Soyuz TM-9 landed at 07:35 GMT, 70 km from Arkalyk at 50 deg 51'E 67 deg 17' N.
1991 End - Soyuz TM-14A (cancelled). Soyuz TM-13 and TM-14 crews were reshuffled extensively due to commercial seat bookings by Austria and Germany and the necessity of flying a Kazakh-born cosmonaut as part of the Baikonur rental agreement. This was the original crew assignment. The Kazakh researchers were moved to the earlier Soyuz TM-13 flight.
17 March 1992 - Soyuz TM-14. Mir Expedition EO-11. Joint flight with Germany. Docked at the Kvant rear port at 12:33 GMT on March 19.
27 July 1992 - Soyuz TM-15. Mir Expedition EO-12. Russian astronauts Solovyov and Avdeev and French astronaut Tognini were inserted into an initial 190 x 200 km orbit inclined 51.6 deg. Later on July 27 they maneuvered to a 223 x 343 km orbit, and on July 28 docked with Mir in its 405 x 410 km orbit.
3 September 1992 - EVA Mir EO-12-1. Began installation of VDU thruster pod on Sofora tower.
7 September 1992 - EVA Mir EO-12-2. Continued installation of VDU thruster pod on Sofora tower.
11 September 1992 - EVA Mir EO-12-3. Completed installation of VDU thruster pod on Sofora tower.
15 September 1992 - EVA Mir EO-12-4. Installed Kurs docking system antenna on Kristall module.
1 February 1993 - Landing of Soyuz TM-15. Aleksandr Solovyov and Sergey Avdeyev undocked from the Mir complex aboard Soyuz TM-15 on February 1 and landed the same day in Kazakhstan after six months in space at 03:47 GMT. Soyuz TM-15's flight was an in-orbit record for a Soyuz spaceship - 188 days 21 h 39 m.
3 October 1994 - Soyuz TM-20. Mir Expedition EO-17. Docked at the Mir forward port at 00:28 on 1994 October 6. The Mir crew of Viktorenko, Kondakova and Polyakov boarded Soyuz TM-20 on January 11, and undocked from Mir's front port at 09:00 GMT. The spacecraft withdrew to about two hundred metres from Mir and then redocked in a test of the automatic Kurs system, which had failed in Progress M-24's attempted docking. Redocking came at 09:25 GMT.
27 June 1995 - STS-71. Mir Expedition EO-19. Transferred Budarin, Solovyov to Mir, returned Soyuz TM-21 crew to Earth. After undocking from Mir on July 4, Atlantis spent several days on orbit, carrying out medical research work with the Spacelab-Mir module in the cargo bay. Payloads: Shuttle/Mir Mission 1, Spacelab-Mir, IMAX camera, Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX).
14 July 1995 - EVA Mir EO-19-1. Repaired solar array. Inspected exterior of station.
19 July 1995 - EVA Mir EO-19-2. Retrieved TREK detector.
21 July 1995 - EVA Mir EO-19-3. Installed Miras spectrometer.
11 September 1995 - Landing of Soyuz TM-21. Soyuz TM-21 landed at 06:52 GMT with the crew of Budarin and Solovyov aboard.
5 August 1997 - Soyuz TM-26. Mir Expedition EO-24. The Soyuz docked manually at 17:02 GMT August 7. Over the next six months the crew undertook seven internal and external spacewalks to repair the crippled space station.
22 August 1997 - EVA Mir EO-24-1. Connected Spektr power cables. Surveyed interior of depressurised Spektr module. Retrieved equipment and belongings from module.
6 September 1997 - EVA Mir EO-24-2. Inspected exterior of Spektr. Moved solar arrays.
20 October 1997 - EVA Mir EO-24-3. Installed new hatch to reconnect Spektr solar array cable with Mir power bus.
3 November 1997 - EVA Mir EO-24-4. Removed solar array from Kvant module.
6 November 1997 - EVA Mir EO-24-5. Installed solar array.
9 January 1998 - EVA Mir EO-24-6. Recovered equipment; began repairs on leaky Kvant-2 airlock. Examination of airlock indicated cause was loose belt, resulting in 10 mm gap.
14 January 1998 - EVA Mir EO-24-7. Inspected station exterior.
19 February 1998 - Landing of Soyuz TM-26. Solovyov and Vinogradov together with French astronaut Eyharts (launched aboard Soyuz TM-27) undocked from the forward port on Mir at 05:52 GMT on February 19, 1998, fired their deorbit engines at 08:16 GMT and landed in Kazakstan at 50 deg 11 N, 67 deg 31 E at 09:10 GMT.

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