COUNTING DOWN TO COUNTDOWN IV: THE GREAT DISASTER AND THE ATOM - NEWSARAMA





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Old 04-19-2007, 02:38 PM   #1
MattBrady
 
COUNTING DOWN TO COUNTDOWN IV: THE GREAT DISASTER AND THE ATOM

Kamandi and the Great Disaster!
by Tim Janson

When Jack Kirby left Marvel Comics to go to rival DC, he was given almost unparalleled creative freedom to create his Fourth World series of titles consisting of The New Gods, The Forever People, and Mister Miracle. None of those titles made it past issue #18. It was another Kirby creation that would achieve the most success, Kamandi the Last Boy on Earth premiered in November, 1972 and would through 1978 for a total of 59 issues.

Kirby was certainly influenced by the Planet of the Apes films as the world now is not ruled by men, but by intelligent, talking animals, divided by species into various tribes, each controlling major portions of the world. Humans are now considered animals. Kirby even plays tribute to the first Planet of the Apes film on the cover of Kamandi #1, showing a ruined, flooded New York with the Statue of Liberty in the background.

Kamandi was set in a in a future Earth time period known as Earth A.D. (After Disaster). The first part of Kamandi�s life was spent in a military bunker named �Command D�, hence the character�s name. He grew up and was educated by his grandfather who dies in the first issue, leaving Kamandi to fend for himself in the harsh world.

What this great disaster was is never fully explained. It could have been a World War III scenario as radiation plays a part in the series, but there are also hints of a world wide natural disaster. In Kamandi #16, we get perhaps our best clues about the Great Disaster. Kamandi is captured by the apes who are keeping humans as test subjects for their experiments. One ape scientist finds the old journal of a Dr. Michael Grant who writes about his creation of the Cortexin formula, but also records the mounting disaster that is taking place in the world mentioning, ��the terrible sounds of the disaster�I can hear the cries of the wounded and the dying�we�ve been struck a mammoth blow! The end has come!� Powerful stuff from Kirby! It is then recorded that the Cortexin mixed with the water supply, which gave rise to the intelligent animals.

Kamandi would have adventures that would take him literally around the world meetings new allies and making new foes. Kirby left after issue #40 to return back to Marvel but the title would still run for another couple of years. That�s hardly the end of the story however�In 1975, DC began publishing a title called Hercules Unbound. Written by Gerry Conway, the short-lived series was set within the same future Earth A.D. timeline of Kamandi and guest-starred The Atomic Knights who also became tied-in with the Great Disaster/Nuclear War scenario.

In 1985, Crisis on Infinite Earths comes along, further complicating matters. The entire Great Disaster scenario is basically eliminated from DC continuity and now OMAC (One Man Army Corps) another Kirby creation, is discovered to have been Kamandi�s grandfather. In the revised, Post-Crisis world, the boy who would have been Kamandi instead grows up to become Tommy Tomorrow, a 21st Century Sci-fi hero who made his debut back in 1947�25years before Kamandi #1!

DC gives one last nod to Kamandi and the Great Disaster in the Battle of Bludhaven series from 2006. Bludhaven was destroyed when the chemical giant Chemo was dropped on the city during Infinite Crisis. The city is walled up for protection and various super-powered factions including the Teen Titans, Freedom�s Ring, The Nuclear Family and the Atomic Knights, fight for control within. After the remains of Bludhaven are destroyed by Captain Atom, the Atomic Knights are seen entering into a large underground bunker�a bunker named Command D.

Makes you think, doesn�t it?

Split Atoms
by J. Caleb Mozzocco

DC�s Silver Age superhero renaissance had a pretty basic formula driving it�Take a Golden Age hero�s name, give it to a brand-new character and update his costume and back-story with a more modern sci-fi twist. It worked for The Flash and Green Lantern and, to a somewhat lesser degree, The Atom.

While the Golden Age Atom was simply a short, powerless college kind with a cape, mask and severe Napoleon complex, this second Atom had the power to shrink to the size of his namesake.

First appearing in 1961�s Showcase #34, Doctor Ray Palmer was a physics professor at improbably named college Ivy University, located in improbably named college town Ivy Town. He had discovered a fragment of a white dwarf star and was experimenting with size-reduction. One day while trapped in a cave, he used the fragment and one of his experimental lenses to shrink, the mineral-infused cave water and other x-factors allowing him to change size safely (Comic book physics. Don�t ask).

He later fashioned a special size-changing belt, glove-mounted controls and a special costume that could shrink with him, and which was only visible when he shrank less than six inches high. He could thus wear it at all times, allowing for quick changes. Okay, maybe it didn�t make a lot of sense (Again, comic book physics � either that, or it was really pinching him somewhere and he just didn�t let on), but it was a great costume design, one of the all-time greats and most widely liked (Kid Flash�s might be its only serious competition in a costume popularity contest).

Smallness might not seem to be all that great a power compared to, say, super-speed or invisibility, but the Atom retained his mass at tiny size, so his little fist packed the same amount of punch as if he were a full-grown, 180-pound man. He also had the ability to travel through phone lines by riding on the electronic impulses (again � yeah, yeah. ).

Between protecting Ivy Town from menaces like the �Plant Master� (The Floronic Man) and Chronos the Time Thief (Whose costume was as lame as Atom�s was cool; in fact, it�s one of those costumes that is so lame it�s actually awesome) in his own title, the Atom was one of the Justice League�s earliest recruits.

Attending meetings in a special tiny flying chair that would allow the Tiny Titan to look his fellow Leaguers in the eyes, he developed close friendships with fellow scientist Barry Allen and Hawkman, who often allowed him to perch on their shoulders.

He served with the League through the end of the Satellite Era, after which point his life got a little weird�er.

He spent some time living among the miniscule Katarthans in a rainforest, during which time he adopted a slightly different costume (including a loincloth) and wooed their queen (As chronicled in early �80s series and specials Sword of the Atom, most of which featured art by Gil Kane).

Palmer got a new costume and a slightly different set of rules for his powers in late �80s seriesThe Power of the Atom (written by Roger Stern and Tom Peyer, with pencil art by Dwayne Turner and Graham Nolan), and around the same time he was drawn into Amanda Waller�s version of the Suicide Squad, when another Mighty Mite, Adam Cray, was operating under the name of The Atom.

During Zero Hour, Palmer was temporarily de-aged, and adopted another new costume (including a vest with very �90s action pockets) to lead the brand-new group of Teen Titans consisting of new heroes Risk, Argent, Joto and Prysm (This short-lived, 24-issue series was launched in �96, and was written and penciled by Dan Jurgens).

The League sought to recruit the Atom out of his post-Titans semi-retirement during the Watchtower Era, but he refused. He did come to their aid when needed, particularly against a devious luck machine and an Amazo android, and pretty much whenever they needed a super-physicist�s assistance. When the League was lost in the Obsidian Age and presumed dead, the Atom was one of the heroes who united under Nightwing to form a replacement League. When the heroes returned, he stayed on through the murder of Sue Dibny, a case that took a huge personal toll on Palmer.

As was revealed during Identity Crisis, Palmer�s ex-wife Jean Loring used his tech to brutally murder Sue Dibny in what she claimed was an attempt to scare the Leaguers into showing more affection for their various loved ones, so she could win Ray back. No, her plan didn�t really make any sense as she explained it (Perhaps the judge thought it made so little sense that she was ruled criminally insane, as she ended up in Arkham Asylum�at least until an Eclipso diamond found her, but that�s another feature).

After leaving his wife at Arkham, Palmer shrank out of sight. After one last visit to Hawkman to ask his old friend not to look for him, Palmer disappeared and hasn�t been seen since.

Which isn�t to say there isn�t an Atom running around Ivy Town. Ryan Choi was a young, Chinese scientist who had been communicating with Palmer for year through the mail. When Palmer�s teaching position at Ivy opened up, Choi took it, and found himself living in Palmer�s house, teaching Palmer�s classes and, after discovering a size-changing belt, becoming the all-new Atom.

Choi�s stint as the Atom began in Brave New World #1, and continued in the All-New Atom, written by Gail Simone and based on �concepts� provided by Grant Morrison (it�s currently on its issue tenth issue). The book has been somewhat troubled, going through three different pencil artists before hitting it�s ninth issue, and often seeming more than a tad rushed.

Thus far in his short career, the Atom has fought a cancer god, a shrinky serial killer, a race of tiny aliens with an interesting syntax, a Linear Man and Wonder Woman villainess Giganta. He�s also rescued the president of the United States� life, made friends with some fellow eccentric scientists, moved in with a giant floating head, had a ringside seat for a battle between the forces of magic and science, traveled to the far future and, perhaps most challenging, he traveled back home to rescue an old crush from his high school bullies, who are now undead. A trade collection, entitled The All-New Atom: My Life in Miniature, is scheduled for May, presumably to help newcomers catch-up with the Atoms as the �Search For Ray Palmer� ramps up in Countdown.

Tim and Caleb are valuable members of the Best Shots team and ShotgunReviews.com
 
Old 04-19-2007, 02:46 PM   #2
OM
 
...Holy frack! First pos[SLAP!]OW!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Janson
Kirby was certainly influenced by the Planet of the Apes films as the world now is not ruled by men, but by intelligent, talking animals, divided by species into various tribes, each controlling major portions of the world. Humans are now considered animals. Kirby even plays tribute to the first Planet of the Apes film on the cover of Kamandi #1, showing a ruined, flooded New York with the Statue of Liberty in the background.
...Yeah, but it's that "homage" that's gotten Jack a lot of undeserved accusations of having "ripped off" the POTA movies. The truth of the matter is that Kamandi actually had a more convoluted road to creation. Of major note are the following facts:
  • The name "Kamandi" was actually recycled from a newspaper strip idea Kirby had once pitched, entitled "Kamandi of the Caves", which according to sources who've seen the few sample panels, was more along the lines of Devil Dinosaur meets Bomba The Jungle Boy. Jack had also stated years later that had this strip not been rejected, this early "Kamandi" would have met with talking, intelligent animals and reptiles.
  • The talking animal concept showed up in Alarming Tales # 1 in 1957, in a story called "The Last Enemy." In this story, Jack tells of a man who jumps to the year 2514, where humans are extinct and Earth is ruled by tigers, dogs, and rats, all of whom are intelligent. Many of these intelligent animals are drawn with almost the same anthropomorphic body structures as he would impliment in Kamandi.
  • According to several sources, the actual pitch for Kamandi didn't come from Jack, but from then-DC publisher Carmine Infantino. Apparently it came about as part of the efforts to redirect Jack away from the Fourth World books towards something more "understandable" by Carmine and his cronies. What Carmine reportedly pitched was for Jack to do a complete knock-off of POTA, and to comply Jack apparently combined his earlier concepts into what became Kamandi: The Last Boy On Earth.
...Still, the Statue "homage", as well as the first issue's "Holy Bomb" sequence, do little to dissuade readers from the "knock-off" accusations. But in Jack's defense, he took Kamandi where no Ape had gone before - or was allowed to, seeing as how they blew up the Planet of the Apes to appease Charleton Heston's phobia of sequels - and dragged along Lions, Tigers and Bears, oh my! It was a wild ride that was so rich in untapped concepts that it should have come to no surprise that the book lasted as long as it did after Jack went back to Marvel. Sales on the book were still safely above the cancellation point when the "DC Implosion" killed it unceremoneously.\

Bottom Line: In anticipation of an uninformed Pack retort , while Fourth World was without question Jack's true Magnum Opus, Kamandi was his crown jewel in his "Let's take a joyride through Armageddon and check out all the tourist traps along the way with the kids!" crown.

Hey, Jack was, and still *is*, the King of Comics. He's entitled to wear as many different crowns as he can fit on his head if he wants!

-----

...On a side note, I noticed that Tim didn't mention the two At Earth's End minis from a few years back. Not that I blame him, because they were seriously horrid. Definitely not a feather in Tom Veitch's cap, and best forgotten as an attempt more to use Kamandi to rip off A Boy and his Dog than Jack was accused of using the Last Boy on Earth to swipe the Apes films.

Last edited by OM : 04-19-2007 at 03:23 PM.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 02:57 PM   #3
KoozyK
 
they need to release a cheap collection of kamandi for us poor consumers.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 02:58 PM   #4
The Monarch
 
I'm going to definately give some thought to picking up the Atom trade in May. Not the biggest fan (...no pun intended really..) but I'm all for backing up whatever Ms Simone is writing.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:12 PM   #5
HomerCow
 
These features were excellent. Since I used to be strictly a Marvel fan, I didn't know a majority of the information in these 4 articles.

If I may, I'd like to request more of these articles for future storylines as well. I can only imagine how helpful history articles would have been for the characters of 52 before that series started shipping.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:15 PM   #6
delawarejoel
 
I have been re-reading the 40-issue Kirby run on Kamandi and I think there is no series that better exemplifies what good could happen when Kirby had the space and time to breathe and really tell a story. The problem for Jack's greatest creations, like Fourth World and Eternals, is that they were cancelled before they really had a chance to get going in many ways - Jack's vision went much further than the average comic editor's patience, I think. In Kamandi, we have the one example of Jack having the time to complete a great deal of his vision for the series. Some of the space issues later in the series are some of the creepiest comic books ever, like "Soyuz Survivor" and the stories where aliens are taking some of the earth's great artifacts away into space with them. Gerry Conway tried very hard to maintain the tone and scope of the series but ultimately it failed. I will be interested to see what Countdown does with this chunk of DCU mythology, though after the intensely boring Omac miniseries recently completed, I dont hold out a lot of hope.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:15 PM   #7
Kamandi2
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattBrady
Kirby was certainly influenced by the Planet of the Apes films as the world now is not ruled by men, but by intelligent, talking animals, divided by species into various tribes, each controlling major portions of the world. Humans are now considered animals.

That's not true. Kirby first published the world shown in Kamandi in the first issue of Alarming Tales in September 1957.

If anything, it is Kirby who inspired Planet of the Apes. The Planet of the Apes movie was based on a book called Monkey Planet by Pierre Boulle (published in 1963). So Kirby's world of the Great Disaster predated any version of the Planet of the Apes by 6 years.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:22 PM   #8
Zach Adams
 
I hope that Countdown manages to boost the Atom's sales; it's one of the three best superhero titles coming from DC (I'd have a hard time choosing between it, Checkmate and Stormwatch PHD), and all three are underperforming. Hell, I'd go so far as to say that out of all the 'legacy' heroes we've gotten in the last 4 years (Bart Allen as Kid Flash/Flash instead of Impulse, Jaime Reyes, et al.) only Ryan Choi and maybe Jason Rusch are the equals of their predecessors.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:22 PM   #9
Dirtbagjeff
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoozyK
they need to release a cheap collection of kamandi for us poor consumers.


I damn well secound . Either a showcase or just two massive trades.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:24 PM   #10
Kolimar
 
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattBrady
Kamandi and the Great Disaster!
by Tim Janson

Ah, this brings back some very good memories. Very nice article.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:26 PM   #11
OM
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HomerCow
If I may, I'd like to request more of these articles for future storylines as well. I can only imagine how helpful history articles would have been for the characters of 52 before that series started shipping.
...I'll second that, especially if it'll piss off all those wankers with the short attention spans who constantly whine some pissant mantra about how comics "shouldn't require research into back issues" in order to understand what's going on.

Screw those punks. This sort of article is Newsarama at its finest, and the more we have of them, the better!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zach Adams
I hope that Countdown manages to boost the Atom's sales; it's one of the three best superhero titles coming from DC (I'd have a hard time choosing between it, Checkmate and Stormwatch PHD), and all three are underperforming.
...I dropped Checkmate when Alan Scott left. The book is starting to turn into another Amanda Waller frackfest, and to be totally honest while Ostrander was writing her she was a great character. Now I personally would go so far as to kiss Warren Ellis' hairy butt in public if DC would simply kill the fat bitch off as messily as possible. As for Stormwatch, I never got into any of those Mildstorm books. Ever.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zach Adams
Hell, I'd go so far as to say that out of all the 'legacy' heroes we've gotten in the last 4 years (Bart Allen as Kid Flash/Flash instead of Impulse, Jaime Reyes, et al.) only Ryan Choi and maybe Jason Rusch are the equals of their predecessors.
...As I've stated before, the reason Ryan's working as well as he is at being the Atom is that he's also taking the best aspects of Ray Palmer and putting a current-style spin on them. It's a new guy in the suit, but you get the same familiar feel. Jason couldn't accomplish this even with Martin Stein along for the ride because he was a totally different character than Ronnie Raymond. On the other hand, Jamie Reyes is completely on the opposite end of the spectrum from Ted Kord, but then again the spin on the Scarab is just as distanced. And the fact that both aspects are interesting allows one to appreciate this revamp/reimage/relaunch without feeling guilty while still mourning the loss of Ted at the hands of a Didio-controlled Max Lord.

...As for Bart...well, let's face it: The whole Flash relaunch was a textbook example of why you should never fix something if it isn't broken. Flash wasn't broken, and there was no reason to shuffle off Wally, Linda and the twins whatsoever. And to make matters worse, while Bart's first bout with accellerated aging worked fine for Impulse, jumping him from Impulse/Kid Flash to an adult Flash required way, way, WAY too much Suspension of Disbelief. Where we should have had stories of Wally and Linda raising the twins, and Bart continuing to mature at a normal rate under Jay and Joan's fostering, we got Bart upchucked out of the now-gone Speed Force, without any real explanation of where he's been and what happened to him. Just like the Wonder Woman relaunch, it was half-baked and poorly orchestrated by a pair of writers who were recruited from TV - the guys who did the Flash TV series, IIRC - and they didn't even last six issues before being replaced. This was clearly a post-IC relaunch that didn't work, and rather than throwing new writers at the book in an attempt to bandage up the package of Bart as The Flash, Didio needs to admit that DC has f'ucked up, do an arc big enough for a TPB, and restore the book back to its former glory in that arc by bringing back the previous status quo. And yeah, that means Bart going back to Kid Flash.

Q: Did anyone get final sales tallies for OMAC? Considering the lack of comment on the possibility of a regular series, I'm inclined to suspect that it didn't do as well as DC had hoped...

Last edited by OM : 04-19-2007 at 04:02 PM.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:30 PM   #12
Kolimar
 
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by OM
...Holy frack! First pos[SLAP!]OW!

...Yeah, but it's that "homage" that's gotten Jack a lot of undeserved accusations of having "ripped off" the POTA movies. The truth of the matter is that Kamandi actually had a more convoluted road to creation. Of major note are the following facts:
  • The name "Kamandi" was actually recycled from a newspaper strip idea Kirby had once pitched, entitled "Kamandi of the Caves", which according to sources who've seen the few sample panels, was more along the lines of Devil Dinosaur meets Bomba The Jungle Boy. Jack had also stated years later that had this strip not been rejected, this early "Kamandi" would have met with talking, intelligent animals and reptiles.
  • The talking animal concept showed up in Alarming Tales # 1 in 1957, in a story called "The Last Enemy." In this story, Jack tells of a man who jumps to the year 2514, where humans are extinct and Earth is ruled by tigers, dogs, and rats, all of whom are intelligent. Many of these intelligent animals are drawn with almost the same anthropomorphic body structures as he would impliment in Kamandi.
  • According to several sources, the actual pitch for Kamandi didn't come from Jack, but from then-DC publisher Carmine Infantino. Apparently it came about as part of the efforts to redirect Jack away from the Fourth World books towards something more "understandable" by Carmine and his cronies. What Carmine reportedly pitched was for Jack to do a complete knock-off of POTA, and to comply Jack apparently combined his earlier concepts into what became Kamandi: The Last Boy On Earth.
...Still, the Statue "homage", as well as the first issue's "Holy Bomb" sequence, do little to dissuade readers from the "knock-off" accusations. But in Jack's defense, he took Kamandi where no Ape had gone before - or was allowed to, seeing as how they blew up the Planet of the Apes to appease Charleton Heston's phobia of sequels - and dragged along Lions, Tigers and Bears, oh my! It was a wild ride that was so rich in untapped concepts that it should have come to no surprise that the book lasted as long as it did after Jack went back to Marvel. Sales on the book were still safely above the cancellation point when the "DC Implosion" killed it unceremoneously.\

Bottom Line: In anticipation of an uninformed Pack retort , while Fourth World was without question Jack's true Magnum Opus, Kamandi was his crown jewel in his "Let's take a joyride through Armageddon and check out all the tourist traps along the way with the kids!" crown.

Hey, Jack was, and still *is*, the King of Comics. He's entitled to wear as many different crowns as he can fit on his head if he wants!

-----

...On a side note, I noticed that Tim didn't mention the two At Earth's End minis from a few years back. Not that I blame him, because they were seriously horrid. Definitely not a feather in Tom Veitch's cap, and best forgotten as an attempt more to use Kamandi to rip off A Boy and his Dog than Jack was accused of using the Last Boy on Earth to swipe the Apes films.

Great post, OM.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:32 PM   #13
Justin M. Campbell
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KoozyK
they need to release a cheap collection of kamandi for us poor consumers.

There's a DC Archives edition that covers most of the Kamandi material created by Kirby.

A trade of his OMAC work would be nice, though.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:33 PM   #14
Kolimar
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by OM
...I'll second that, especially if it'll piss off all those wankers with the short attention spans who constantly whine some pissant mantra about how comics "shouldn't require research into back issues" in order to understand what's going on.

Screw those punks. This sort of article is Newsarama at its finest, and the more we have of them, the better!

Hell yeah!!! Stop saying things that make me agree with you!!
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:33 PM   #15
Stressfactor
 
I've been saying this ever since Identitity Crisis... Jean Loring's plan DOES make sense if you look at the woman herself... She was almost always portrayed as career-driven and in-charge. She also said and did some nasty stuff to Ray which led up to the divorce and beyond.

In order to get Ray back SHE would have to HUMBLE herself. She would have to go to him and SAY "I made a mistake. I'm sorry." She's never struck me as the type to do that. The way she managed to get it all to play out she made RAY admit he still loved her and then she GRACIOUSLY accepted him back... She never had to say a word of apology.


That being said -- although I still like Ray, the adventures of Ryan Choi-Atom have been wacked out fun and I seriously hope Choi ends up dating Giganta... that would just be too rich to pass up. Gail's writing on this series has been NOTHING expected or anticipated and there are curveballs aplenty that come right out of left field in the most delightful and delicious way.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:36 PM   #16
Kolimar
 
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattBrady
(Again, comic book physics � either that, or it was really pinching him somewhere and he just didn�t let on),

*Laughing out loud here*
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:41 PM   #17
von Doom, M.D.
 
I'm waiting for a Darkseid-focused article, as these have been simply fabulous. I'm completely convinced that DC is going to destroy the world and just start fresh on one of the other multiversal worlds.

Also, with Countdown being a more active title, what with it taking place in the present and crossing over to other books, does anyone else think that may be the reason why the price was jacked up a bit (beyond the obvious answer of 52 offering our balls to DC, and them refusing to let go), since it's not as vital to follow each issue. Since it is less rigid than 52, and more open-ended, I think it's not as important that every issue must be purchased, less we wallow in confusion and ignorance when the Final Crisis drops next summer.

I'm still going to buy every issue, but unlike the 52 weeks of 52, I don't think each and every one of the months of Countdown are going to be as vitally important to the overall story.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:42 PM   #18
Greg Spira
 
When I was a young lad, Kamandi was my favorite comic. It was the first comic I ever went back and bought all the back issues of. I remember being crushed when it was canceled, and I still haven't seen the issued that was "published" in Canceled Comic Calvacade. I've always wanted to a real revival attempted (the one attempt at a revival in a mini-series that was done, while not terrible in and of itself, was totally devoid of the spirit of the original Kamandi)

As a result of Kamandi (which lead me back to the Fourth World), I got to know Kirby's DC stuff long before I knew any of his earlier stuff, and I still think that his DC stuff was the most imaginative work of his career.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:44 PM   #19
Squashua
 
You neglected to mention, or forgot, or disregarded (as DC probably has) the Kamandi situation during the Superboy series, where Kon-El takes on the Kamandi role. It ties Kamandi to Cadmus in some ways that are probably ret-conned since.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:45 PM   #20
Kolimar
 
Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattBrady
Chronos the Time Thief (Whose costume was as lame as Atom�s was cool; in fact, it�s one of those costumes that is so lame it�s actually awesome)

Agreed.
 
Old 04-19-2007, 03:57 PM   #21
nightw1ng
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MattBrady
He later fashioned a special size-changing belt, glove-mounted controls and a special costume that could shrink with him, and which was only visible when he shrank less than six inches high. He could thus wear it at all times, allowing for quick changes. Okay, maybe it didn�t make a lot of sense (Again, comic book physics � either that, or it was really pinching him somewhere and he just didn�t let on), but it was a great costume design, one of the all-time greats and most widely liked (Kid Flash�s might be its only serious competition in a costume popularity contest).
since when has the Atom's or Kid Flash's costumes ever been one of the most popular and greatest costumes ever?
 
Old 04-19-2007, 04:08 PM   #22
sebzero11
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squashua
You neglected to mention, or forgot, or disregarded (as DC probably has) the Kamandi situation during the Superboy series, where Kon-El takes on the Kamandi role. It ties Kamandi to Cadmus in some ways that are probably ret-conned since.
Yeah, I was gonna mention those, too. They were some great issues. Grummett even used a Kirby-esque style. In fact, it was during those same issues that S-boy encountered the Forever People. And during Young Justice they had the Super-Cycle and met the Forever people again. And let's not forget S-boy 1million, where the future Superboy had a very Kirby-OMAC thing goin' on.
In fact, it's a shame if that law-suit is keeping S-boy outta the DC universe, 'cause he was totally inundated in the Fourth World there for a while.

::sigh::
 
Old 04-19-2007, 04:59 PM   #23
saulres
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Spira
When I was a young lad, Kamandi was my favorite comic.

Kamandi was the first non-Harvey, non-Archie comic I ever picked up, one issue before it was cancelled. I just kept seeing it everywhere I went, so I figured it was a sign. And it was. Shortly thereafter was the Brave and Bold w/Kamandi, and that got me into Batman and the whole DC universe. I eventually found all issues as back issues.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Spira
I still haven't seen the issued that was "published" in Canceled Comic Calvacade.

Then I have some good news for you!:

http://www.thecomicshop.com.au/site2...page2.html#top

Scroll down on that page for not one, but BOTH of the CCC Kamandi tales

Someone pointed that out to me on another board, and now I'm pleased to share the excitement
 
Old 04-19-2007, 05:02 PM   #24
JoeZhang
 
There also a couple of "at Earth's end" elseworld series that are best left forgotten...
 
Old 04-19-2007, 05:14 PM   #25
TheGrayHulk
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamandi2
That's not true. Kirby first published the world shown in Kamandi in the first issue of Alarming Tales in September 1957.

If anything, it is Kirby who inspired Planet of the Apes. The Planet of the Apes movie was based on a book called Monkey Planet by Pierre Boulle (published in 1963). So Kirby's world of the Great Disaster predated any version of the Planet of the Apes by 6 years.

The Pierre Boulle book is actually called "Planet Of The Apes" in French: "La Planete Des Singes".
 
 
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