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Last Updated: Tuesday, 13 December 2005, 21:22 GMT
Ex-minister fined for being drunk
Stephen Twigg
Mr Twigg was schools minister before losing his seat
Ex-minister Stephen Twigg has been given a £50 fixed penalty notice after being arrested for being drunk.

Mr Twigg was arrested at 1915 GMT on Monday in central London for being drunk and incapable in a public place and taken to Marylebone police station.

He was given a fixed penalty notice and released just before 2330 GMT.

The former schools minister, who lost his seat in May, and was best known for toppling Michael Portillo at the 1997 election, said he "felt like an idiot".

Regrets

A spokeswoman for Scotland Yard said: "At 7.19pm a 38-year-old was arrested in Orchard Street, W1, for being drunk and incapable in a public place.

"He was taken to Marylebone Police Station. He was issued with a fixed penalty notice for being drunk in a public place."

Mr Twigg said he had been at an office Christmas party where "rather a lot of wine was consumed".

"I had had a lot to drink and I think it [the police action] was sensible. I have no complaints whatsoever. I take full responsibility for my actions," he said.

"I think I will be a lot more careful in the future. I feel like an idiot today. I very much regret it."

Portillo victory fame

Mr Twigg said police officers had taken him to the station after seeing him "stumble" on his way home.

After his surprise victory over Mr Portillo in 1997, which came to be seen as a symbol of Tony Blair's landslide victory, Mr Twigg rose through the ranks to be schools minister.

But earlier this year, he narrowly lost his Enfield South seat to Conservative candidate David Burrowes.

He has been working as the chairman of Blairite think tank Progress and is director of the Foreign Policy Centre.


SEE ALSO:
Portillo's tips for ousted Twigg
07 May 05 |  Election 2005
Minister Twigg beaten by Tories
06 May 05 |  England



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