hanging wall

 geology

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Aspects of this topic are discussed in the following places at Britannica.

Assorted References

  • formation of cirques ( in glacial landform: Cirques, tarns, U-shaped valleys, arêtes, and horns )

    ...glacial valleys are occupied by one or several cirques (or corries). A cirque is an amphitheatre-shaped hollow with the open end facing down-valley. The back is formed by an arcuate cliff called the headwall. In an ideal cirque, the headwall is semicircular in plan view. This situation, however, is generally found only in cirques cut into flat plateaus. More common are headwalls angular in map...

  • mineral deposits ( in mining: Delineation )

    ...described by its dip (the angle that it makes with the horizontal) and its strike (the position it takes with respect to the four points of the compass). Rock lying above the ore body is called the hanging wall, and rock located below the ore body is called the footwall.

  • structure of faults ( in fault )

    ...be relatively uniform, it may differ considerably along its length from place to place. When rocks slip past each other in faulting, the upper or overlying block along the fault plane is called the hanging wall, or headwall; the block below is called the footwall. The fault strike is the direction of the line of intersection between the fault plane and the surface of the Earth. The dip of a...

Citations

MLA Style:

"hanging wall." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2009. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 17 Feb. 2009 <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/254322/hanging-wall>.

APA Style:

hanging wall. (2009). In Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved February 17, 2009, from Encyclopædia Britannica Online: http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/254322/hanging-wall

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