March 4, 2009 - Though there have only been two games in the series (and the last one was released nearly two decades ago), David Crane's A Boy and His Blob had developed enough of a following for Majesco to attempt a revival in the current generation of console systems. The fruits of the labor come in the form of A Boy and His Blob for the Nintendo Wii, a project developed by WayForward and set for release later this year.

We recently had the opportunity to find out more about this ambitious project by throwing questions at the team responsible for the Wii revival. On hand to answer our inquires were Sean Velasco, Director; Marc Gomez, Art Director; Robert Koshak, Lead Programmer; Larry Holdaway, Gameplay Programmer; and Robb Alvey, Producer.




IGN: Boy and His Blob isn't a series we thought we'd be writing about anytime soon. Where did this rebirth come from? Does the series have any specific link to the previous Boy and His Blob franchise, or is this a full-on reboot?

Robb Alvey: Kevin Ray and Joey Sutton at Majesco had been urging us to bring them proposals for a long time, but the 'rebirth' comes mostly from the fantastical mind of WayForward's Director Sean Velasco, a fan of the original game, and felt it was a title whose time had come to be re-imagined. Matt Bozon, our Creative Director knew about Sean's passion for the property and about Majesco's interest in working together, so he connected the dots. I'll let Sean and the team elaborate on that…

Sean Velasco: We started brewing ideas about this game shortly after Contra 4 was completed. In the pantheon of games, A Boy and His Blob is a title that I thought had a ton of potential. We thought about the refinements in game play that we could take advantage of, with WayForward's signature animation completing a drastically fresh presentation. I developed a pitch from these ideas, we had a terrific meeting at E3 and a few weeks later the rest would become history.

We want to make sure people know this is not a remake! It's not Resident Evil GC, it's not Metroid Zero Mission. It's a whole new game that is more "inspired by" the original than anything else.

IGN: Where did the idea for the game originate? Was this a franchise Majesco wanted to bring back to life, or did this come from the game's developer specifically? What team is working on the game?

Sean Velasco: I came up with the pitch, which WayForward brought to Majesco. They loved the concept, so we got started right away. I am very grateful to them; they have been a dream to work with!

Robb Alvey: It's a franchise that Majesco has wanted to breathe new life into for some time, but it needed the right development team to re-birth it. Sean's passion for the title and WayForward's strength in 2D platform games seemed like a natural fit to resurrect A Boy and His Blob.



IGN: Is David Crane involved in any way with the project?

Robb Alvey: You can say that David is here "in spirit" every time we play the original NES game as reference, but he is not involved with the day-to-day development of the Wii title.

IGN: It's been nearly 20 years since the game's sequel on Game Boy, and even longer since the original release back in 1989. Is the same concept still there? Boy meets Blob. Boy thinks he loves Blob. Boy uses Blob as his slave?

Sean Velasco: How cynical! You've actually hit on a major component of the game, which is the friendship between the boy and blob. We have taken measures to make sure that the pair are truly delighted with one another, even though the boy "uses" the blob to get around.

Marc Gomez: With the new younger design for the boy, I wanted them to have this mutual need for each other. One can't progress without the other.

Robert Koshak: Wow, you've just described Seans(the boy), feelings for the whole programming team(the blob).

Larry Holdaway: To be fair, the blob does get all of those jellybeans for his trouble.

Robb Alvey: Slave? Well, perhaps…. If you're slightly sick and twisted!

IGN: From what we've seen so far, the Boy and His Blob Wii uses jellybeans to transform Blob, correct? What types of things can it transform into? Ladder, ball,… city-ruining-super-gigantic-robot?

Sean Velasco: Who told you!? We have a good mix of blob transformations that should each be useful in their own context. Classics like the hole have returned, which lets you punch a hole in the ground and fall below. We've also added some crazy new transformations like a big ball that the boy can bounce around on.