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REME MUSEUM of TECHNOLOGY



THE WEAPONS COLLECTION

Self-Loading and Automatic Pistols

Please note that the weapons listed are not on display at the Museum

 
Weapon No 224
Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) Model 1908

REME Weapon 224 - Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) Model 1908

One of the best known pistols in the world, this Luger fires the 9 mm parabellum cartridge which is the most widely used sub-machine gun and pistol cartridge in the world. This pistol was adopted by the German Army in 1908 and remained their standard pistol until 1938. There are at least thirty five different variations of the Luger in existence, including numerous variations of this basic P'08 which were used by the German Army. The Luger was first adopted as a service pistol by Switzerland in 1900, that particular model being chambered for the bottle-necked 7.65 mm Luger cartridge.

 
Weapon No 225
Czech 7.62 mm M27 Pistol

REME Weapon 225 - Czech 7.62 mm M27 Pistol

The Model 27 was made in the largest quantity of all the pre-World War 2 Czech automatic pistols. It was extensively used by the Germans, who called it the Pistol 27(t). During World War 2, this weapon was made by Bohmische Waffenfabrik AG in Prague, but had German inspection markings. Manufacture of this pistol with certain modifications was continued by Czechoslovakia after the war.

 
Weapon No 226
Pistol 7.65 mm 'Ortgies'

REME Weapon 226 - Pistol 7.65 mm 'Ortgies'

Made in calibre 6.35 mm, 7.65 mm and 9 mm, these pocket pistols, produced by the Deutsche Werke Arms Factory at Erfurt, were very popular in North, Central and South America.

 
Weapon No 248
Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) (Pair)

REME Weapon 248 - Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) (Pair) REME Weapon 248 - Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) (Pair)

These German Luger pistols were manufactured by 'Deutsche Waffen und Munitions Fabriken' (DWM) in 1917. They are the 1908 long barrelled pattern, having a barrel 8 inches in length and a tangent sight, which were frequently issued with a 32nd 'snail' magazine. The pistols first made their appearance towards the end of World War 1 and are made of P'08 components with the exception of the barrel and sights. This pistol is no longer a standard pistol in any country because it is prone to stoppages when mud or sand gets into the action. A calibre .22 inch version has, however, been produced by 'ERMA' in West Germany.

 
Weapon No 249
Pistol .45 inch Colt Automatic M1911

REME Weapon 249 - Pistol .45 inch Colt Automatic M1911

A government model developed from Browning design. It is a much more reliable pistol than the Luger under muddy or sandy conditions, due to the fact that it does not have so much of its working mechanism exposed. The United States adopted this pistol in 1911 and most of the production was by Colt, but Springfield Armory was tooled up to produce it prior to 1914. When the United States entered World War 1 they had 55,553 of these pistols on hand. During this war it was produced by Colt and Remington Arms and eight other contracted firms. Springfield turned over to producing M1903 rifles.

 
Weapon No 250
Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum)

REME Weapon 250 - Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum)

This is the same as Weapon No 224 having a 4 inch barrel. This model was manufactured in 1940 and does not bear the DWM monogram, so it may well have been made elsewhere.

 
Weapon No 251
Pistol 9 mm Corto Beretta M1934

REME Weapon 251 - Pistol 9 mm Corto Beretta M1934

Earlier versions of these pistols were originally chambered for the Glisenti cartridge which is a higher powered cartridge than the one used with this Corto Beretta. This is a finely made weapon and was very popular with the Italian Army in World War 2, as well as with US troops who managed to acquire them in one way or another. Specimens marked 'RE' (Regio Esercito) or 'Royal Army' were Italian Army issue. Some were marked 'PS', which means Police or Carabinieri issue.

 
Weapon No 252
Pistol 6.35 mm Mauser MOD 1910

REME Weapon 252 - Pistol 6.35 mm Mauser MOD 1910

A German pistol produced by Waffenfabrik Mauser AG Oberndorf AN, is a pocket size version of the Mauser 7.65 mm Model 1910. This pistol is one of the best made and finished pistols ever produced. It is accurate and effective within the limits of its cartridge at much greater ranges than any other pistol of this calibre.

 
Weapon No 253
Pistol 6.35 mm 'Le Francais'

REME Weapon 253 - Pistol 6.35 mm 'Le Francais'

A French pistol manufactured by Manufacture Francaise d'Armes et Cycles de St Etienne. It is the original civil version of the 'Le Francais' and was in use prior to 1928. It is basically a blowback operated pistol with a difference. When the slide recoils it carries out the operations of extraction, ejection and reloading, but it does not recock the weapon. A long pull on the trigger is necessary to cock and fire the pistol. This model is known as the 'Staff Officer'.

 
Weapon No 254
Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) Mauser

REME Weapon 254 - Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) Mauser
REME Weapon 254 - Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) Mauser

Known as the Model 1916, this was in fact the 1912 Mauser, chambered and altered to accommodate the 9 mm Luger Service cartridge, the original calibre having been 7.63 mm. Mechanically and in appearance, the 7.63 mm and the 9 mm are the same. As a quick means of identification, the Model 1916 has the figure '9' carved or painted on the grips. This was issued during World War 2 and was equipped with a shoulder stock which also served as a holster. This was also produced by 'Waffenfabrik Mauser AG Oberndorf'.

 
Weapon No 255
Pistol 8 mm Type 94

REME Weapon 255 - Pistol 8 mm Type 94

In 1934 a new 8 mm pistol was introduced in Japan. This weapon was apparently intended principally for export sale, but was used as a service pistol during World War 2. This pistol is mainly distinguished by having an externally mounted extension bar sear. This renders the pistol most dangerous because this sear bar can be operated by very light hand pressure. Most of these pistols are of poor quality manufacture.

 
Weapon No 256
Pistol 7.65 mm Webley Automatic

REME Weapon 256 - Pistol 7.65 mm Webley Automatic

This English automatic (self-loading) pistol was the official Metropolitan Police model, the standard weapon of the London City Police, and widely used throughout the Empire. It was manufactured by Webley & Scott Ltd of London and Birmingham. It was also made in .25 inch calibre. The calibre .25 inch pistol had no sights. These pistols have since been replaced by heavier calibre revolvers.

 
Weapon No 257
Pistol 7.65 mm Walther PPK

REME Weapon 257 - Pistol 7.65 mm Walther PPK

A smaller version of the Walther Model PP (Police Pistol) introduced by Karl Walther of Zella Mehlis in 1929. This smaller model was issued as the PPK (Police Pistol 'Kriminal'), indicating an arm for use by detectives who carry their arms concealed. This smaller model made its appearance in 1931. These Walther pistols manufactured before World War 2 were without doubt the world's best finished pistols.

 
Weapon No 258
Pistol 7.63 mm Mauser MOD '98

REME Weapon 258 - Pistol 7.63 mm Mauser MOD '98

This Mauser pistol is just one of twenty-seven different models of German designed and made pistols (not including .22 inch calibre pistols) that were approved for Service use by the German forces between 1914 and 1945. This particular model first appeared in 1895 using the bottle necked 7.63 mm (calibre .30 inch Mauser cartridge). This cartridge was used extensively in World War 2, which indicates that there were a considerable quantity of these pistols in service at that time.

 
Weapon No 259
Pistol .32 inch (Centre Fire) 'Le Protector'

REME Weapon 259 - Pistol .32 inch (Centre Fire) 'Le Protector'

This pistol is seven shot, rotary action and mechanically operated. It was introduced by Jacques Edmond Turbiaux of Paris in 1882. It is chambered for 5.5 mm or .32 inch centre fire cartridges. It carries the inscription 'The Protector' on the right hand side. This one was made by the Chicago Fire Arms Co and is known in the United States as the Chicago pistol.

 
Weapon No 261
Pistol 9 mm (Steyr) M12

REME Weapon 261 - Pistol 9 mm (Steyr) M12

The Steyr Model 12 pistol was the most widely used of the various pistols used by the Austro-Hungarian Forces in World War 1. It was also used by Rumania and by the Germans. The official Austrian Army nomenclature for this arm was Selbstiade Pistol M12. During World War 2, the Germans re-barrelled a number of these weapons for the 9 mm Parabellum cartridge. These can be identified by '08' stamped on the slide. Although there were about 250,000 of the pistols made they are no longer used as Service pistols anywhere in the world. Manufacture of these pistols ceased in 1919.

 
Weapon No 262
Pistol 7.65 mm Frommer Stop Model 19

REME Weapon 262 - Pistol 7.65 mm Frommer Stop Model 19

Although Hungary was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and in general used the standard weapons of that Empire, because of local development capabilities and probably local politics, the Hungarians used a different pistol during World War 1, which was this model. The designation Model 19 is rather unusual since it appeared in 1912 and was adopted by the Hungarian Army (Honved) prior to World War 1. It was manufactured by Fegyvergyan at Budapest. It is not a good design for a Service weapon, being somewhat delicate. This model was also used by the Hungarian police.

 
Weapon No 263
Pistol 6.35 mm M1930

REME Weapon 263 - Pistol 6.35 mm M1930

Made by J P Sauer & Son of Suhl, this is a somewhat streamlined version of the original Sauer. The grip is shaped to fit the hand in a style later used in the M38. This model has a signal pin which protrudes from the rear when the pistol is loaded and cocked. Some of these will also be found where the slide and body are made of lightweight duralumin.

 
Weapon No 264
Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) Walther P38

REME Weapon 264 - Pistol 9 mm (Parabellum) Walther P38

These pistols were adopted in 1938 and, as originally made for the German Army, bore the Walther marking. During the war, however, German code letters were used to identify the makers, ie 'ac' for Walther, 'cyq' for Spree Werke, 'byf' and 'svw' for Mauser, 'dov' for Brunn (Bmo) and 'ch' for FN. This pistol bears the code letters 'cyq' which indicates it was made by Spree Werke during World War 2.

 
Weapon No 265
Pistol 7.65 mm (Mauser) Model 1910

REME Weapon 265 - Pistol 7.65 mm (Mauser) Model 1910

Used extensively by German troops during World War I and, among others, by SS Police units during World War 2. It was also widely distributed through commercial channels. This is the 7.65 mm version of Weapon No 252.

 
Weapon No 266
Pistol 6.35 mm (Pocket) Haenel

REME Weapon 266 - Pistol 6.35 mm (Pocket) Haenel

These Haenel range of arms were made under patents of Hugo Schmeisser who designed the famous German Sub-Machine (or 'Burp') guns of World War 2. They are of good materials and workmanship, but are not particularly unusual.

 
Weapon No 442
Pistol 7.65 mm Walther Model 4

REME Weapon 442 - Pistol 7.65 mm Walther Model 4

A nine-shot pistol which came into service in 1910 and gained widespread popularity. Very similar to the Model 3 (1910).

 
Weapon No 452
Colt Automatic Pistol .455 inch M1911 Al

REME Weapon 452 - Colt Automatic Pistol .455 inch M1911 Al

A holster model designed strictly for military use yet achieving a wide acceptance with peace officers and sportsmen where a heavy arm automatic is required. This model was developed from the older .45 inch automatic (old or military model).

 
Weapon No 453
Colt Semi-Automatic Pistol Model 1903 .32 inch

REME Weapon 453 - Colt Semi-Automatic Pistol Model 1903 .32 inch

This pistol, designed by John M Browning, was manufactured by Colt up to 1945. An externally identical pistol, the Model 1908, was made in .38 inch (9 mm) calibre and was also made up to 1945. Both had barrels with six groove rifling.

 
Weapon No 456
Browning FN Automatic Pistol 7.65 mm

REME Weapon 456 - Browning FN Automatic Pistol 7.65 mm

Believed to be the 1910 model designed by J M Browning and manufactured by FN in Belgium. A pocket semi-automatic pistol, with some models being supplied with dual barrels of calibre 7.65 and 9 mm. These barrels are stamped with the calibre size over the chamber. The magazine holds 7 rounds.

 
Weapon No 468
Pistol Auto .22 'Star'

REME Weapon 468 - Pistol Auto .22 'Star'

A commercial .22 target pistol of Spanish origin.

 
Weapon No 469
Pistol Auto 6.35 mm

REME Weapon 469 - Pistol Auto 6.35 mm

A fine example of the elementary blowback Vest Pocket Pistol using the 6.3 mm cartridge. It has an internal striker, detachable box type magazine and a small thumb safety catch. It was manufactured by Carl Walthen and only a few were ever made in this small calibre.

 
Weapon No 484
Pistol 7.65 mm F/N

REME Weapon 484 - Pistol 7.65 mm F/N

Similar to Weapon No 456.

 
Weapons No 487 to 491
Pistol 7.65 mm Walther DP

REME Weapon 487 - Pistol 7.65 mm Walther DP REME Weapon 488 - Pistol 7.65 mm Walther DP REME Weapon 489 - Pistol 7.65 mm Walther DP
REME Weapon 490 - Pistol 7.65 mm Walther DP REME Weapon 491 - Pistol 7.65 mm Walther DP

These Walther pistols are the same as Weapon No 257 and have been modified for Drill purpose (hence DP).

 
Weapons No 493 to 495, 497 to 499 and 501
Pistol Walther PPK

REME Weapon 493 - Pistol Walther PPK REME Weapon 494 - Pistol Walther PPK REME Weapon 495 - Pistol Walther PPK
REME Weapon 497 - Pistol Walther PPK REME Weapon 498 - Pistol Walther PPK REME Weapon 499 - Pistol Walther PPK
REME Weapon 501 - Pistol Walther PPK

This development of the earlier PP (Polizei Pistole) was produced from about 1930. The designation is believed to be an abbreviation of Polizei Pistole, Kriminal (roughly translated as Police Pistol for Detectives). The PPK was made in small numbers in 6.35 mm calibre, but the common types are in 7.65 mm or 9 mm (short). The latter is a much shorter round than the 9 mm Parabellum. There is also a .22 inch version of the pistol. The Museum's collection includes some PPKs modified for instructional purposes (drill purposes hence DP, Weapon Nos 487 to 491) and some working weapons although some of these are damaged and await restoration.

Similar to Weapon No 224.

 
Weapon No 500
Pistol Walther Model PPK 7.65 mm

REME Weapon 500 - Pistol Walther Model PPK 7.65 mm

Serial Number - 360018k, Museum Number - E:02.0157.02

 
Weapon No 510
Pistol Walther P38

REME Weapon 510 - Pistol Walther P38

Similar to Weapon No 264.

 
Weapons No 513 and 513A
Pistol Beretta 9 mm Model 1934

REME Weapon 513 - Pistol Beretta 9 mm Model 1934 REME Weapon 513A - Pistol Beretta 9 mm Model 1934

Similar to Weapon No 251.

Serial Number - 611049, Museum Number - E:02.0157.04

 
Weapon No 597
Pistol .22

REME Weapon 597 - Pistol .22

Manufactured in the USA.

 
Weapon No 600
Pistol .22 Luger

REME Weapon 600 - Pistol .22 Luger

Manufactured in the USA.

 
Weapon No 602
Pistol 9 mm Browning No 2 Mk I

REME Weapon 602 - Pistol 9 mm Browning No 2 Mk I

Marked "MK. 1* BROWNING-FN. 9MM INGLIS CANADA".

 
Weapon No 605
Pistol Luger 9 mm

REME Weapon 605 - Pistol Luger 9 mm

No details.

Serial Number - 24, Museum Number - E:02.0157.05

 
Weapon No A:2001.4391
Walther 7.65 mm

REME Weapon A:2001.4391 - Walther 7.65 mm

No details.

Serial Number - 318561P, Museum Number - A:2001.4391

 
Weapon No E:01.0255.01
Browning

REME Weapon E:01.0255.01 - Browning

Manufactured in Argentina.

Serial Number - 03-102181, Museum Number - E:01.0255.01

 
Weapon No E:03.0695
Rheinmetall 7.65 mm Dreyse

REME Weapon E:03.0695 - Rheinmetall 7.65 mm Dreyse

The pistol was designed by Louis Schmeisser in 1905-06 and placed on the market in 1907. The first model to appear was in 7.65 mm ACP chambering. The pistol was striker fired, the tail of the firing pin acting as a 'cocked' indicator, by protruding through the rear of the breech block. The frame, receiver and slide can be pivoted on a pin in front of the trigger guard, the assembly being locked into the firing position by a catch at the rear end of the frame.

Museum Number - E:03.0695

 

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Page produced by Peter Eldred - Last updated 14 February 2009