Early Jewish Magic HI346

 

Coordinator: Dr Dan Levene

Level: Undergraduate level 3

Credit rating: 4 units

 

Content

There are a variety of different types of Jewish textual sources that can be used for the study of Jewish magic in Late Antiquity, these range from rabbinical rulings, aggadic folk tales, magical recipe books as well as actual amulets which are the practical products of magical praxis. There is a wealth of evidence to show that in the Near East the practice of magic was wide-spread, so much so that some scholars claim it to have been an expression of ‘popular religion’ that was common to all the peoples of the region. This course will include an introduction to the scholarly debates and questions regarding possible definitions of magic in general, with a particular focus on Jewish magic in the Near East in Late Antiquity. While reading a selection of texts in translation a number of issues will be given special attention, these will include: the relation between magic and religion, the relation between magic and mysticism with special reference to Hekhalot literature, attitudes to magic in antiquity, the purpose of magic, its function, who were the sorcerers and who were their clients. Some magical material from other cultures of the same period, especially Babylonian, Egyptian and Hellenistic will be examined in order to assess connections, similarities and differences.

 

Learning and teaching methods

The course will start with an introductory lecture by the tutor that will include a general introduction to the subject, an outline of the progression of the subject matter that will be dealt with over the year and the requirements that will be made of the students. The students will receive a reading list that will be divided into the different areas to be covered. In common with other special subject courses, this course will be delivered primarily through two weekly, one and a half hour seminars, which will be largely student-led. A student will be expected to prepare a presentation for each of the seminars, which will be based on the recommended reading list that is provided for every session. One or two other students will also be expected to respond to the main presentation with a summary of points of one of the sources in that session’s reading list. A general discussion will follow. Seminars will cover both theoretical issues and ideas as well as actual reading and discussion of primary sources. Some seminars might be given over to presentations by visiting speakers. The students will be encouraged to discuss issues that arise during the presentations so as to develop their critical analyses abilities.

 

Contact hours

3 per week for 20 weeks

 

Non-contact hours

18 per week for 20 weeks

 

Total study time

240 hours in each semester, including revision and preparation for submission of assessed work.

 

Method of assessment

Two 4000 word essays 50%

3-hour examination 50%

(* books or articles that are not yet available in the library)

 

Week 1: 

1) Welcome session.

Personal introductions. Provision and tour of course booklet.  Course requirements.  A discussion of tutor and student expectations.

 

2) Introductory lecture to magic in general and specifically to Jewish magic. Approach and methodology.

The session will start with a short introductory lecture in which the students will be encouraged to think about the issues involved in the study of Jewish magic.  This will be followed by a discussion on the methods, skills and resources (books, journals, museums, the web) that are required for the study of this topic. 

How to go about preparing for an essay and presentation.

 

Some useful web-sites:

 

Jewish Magic Bibliography by Alex Jassen and Scott Noegel. The most extensive bibliography on the subject currently available.

 

Meir Bar-Ilan, A Bibliography for Ancient Jewish Magic.

 

Traditions of Magic in Late Antiquity by Gideon Bohak.

 

Cambridge University Library, The Taylor-Schechter Genizah Research Unit.

 

Ancient Magic (The Prayer Of Jacob), (online lecture by J. Davila on 8 April, 1997).

 

Lilith Bibliography.

 

ABZU Guide to resources for the study of the ancient near east available on the internet.

 

Astrology and Judaism in Late Antiquity, A dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of Miami University, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Department of History, by Lester J. Ness, Miami University Oxford, Ohio 1990.

 

 

Apuleius of Madauros, Pro Se De Magia (Apologia) edited with a commentary by Vincent Hunink.

 

 

Week 2:

1) The Anthropological approach to magic; the first half of the twentieth century.

Definitions of magic, its relation to religion and its function within society.  What are the basic questions that we ask ourselves when dealing with the term magic and how do we apply it to the critical study of relevant primary sources?

 

Frazer, G. F. (1922). Chapter III. Sympathetic Magic. The Golden Bough, A Study in Magic and Religion. New York, The Macmillan Company: 11-48.

 

Malinowsky, B. (1948). Chapter V. The Art of Magic and the Power of Faith. Magic Science and Religion and Other Essays. Glencoe: 69-92.

 

Mauss, M. (1972). Chapter 2. A Definition of Magic. A General theory of Magic. London, Boston: 18-25.

 

2) A more critical approach; testing universal ideas about magic.

A critique of Frazier and Malinowsky.  How do ideas about universal definitions of magic fit the evidence?  Practical approaches, test cases.

 

Tambiah, S. J. (1990). Chapter 3. Sir Edward Taylor versus Bronislav Malinowsky: is magic false science or meaningful performance? Magic, Science, Religion, and Scope for Rationality. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press: 42-64.

 

Evans-Pritchard, E. E. (1976). Chapter 1. Witchcraft is an organic and hereditary phenomenon. Witchcraft, Oracles, and Magic among the Azande. Abridged with and introduction by Eva Gillies. Oxford, Clarendon Press: 1-17.

 

Penner, H. H. (1989). Rationality, Ritual, and Science. Religion, Science, and Magic In Concert and in Conflict. J. Neusner. New York/Oxford, Oxford University Press: 11-24.

 

Smith, J. Z. (1995). Trading Places. Ancient Magic and Ritual Power. M. Meyer and P. Mirecki. Leiden, New York, Koln, E. J. Brill: 13-28.

 

Three magical texts:

Montgomery, J. A. (1913). Nos. 21, 22, 23. Aramaic Incantation Texts from Nippur. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, The Museum, Publication of the Babylonian Section. III: 203-204.

 

Betz, H. D. and H. J. Johnson (1992). Sections of PGM VII. The Greek Magical Papyri in Translation, Including the Demotic Spells. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 121.

 

Meyer, M. and P. Mirecki (1995). 83. Spell to make a woman become pregnant. Ancient Magic and Ritual Power. Leiden, New York, Koln, E. J. Brill: 176.

 

Week 3:  Magic in Antiquity I - Egyptian magic.

(‘Ten measures of sorcery descended to the world; Egypt took nine and the rest of the world took one.’ Babylonian Talmud Kiddushin 49b)

1) General survey of Egyptian magic.

What is the evidence for early Egyptian magic? Do the definitions that we have discussed about magic apply in the same way to Egyptian magic?

 

Budge, E. A. W. (1930). Chapter V. Egyptian Amulets. Amulets and Superstitions. New York, Dover Publications: 133-176.

 

Pinch, G. (1994). Egyptian Magic. Magic in Ancient Egypt. London: 9-17.

 

Jacq, C. (1985). Chapter 8: Magic and medicine. Egyptian Magic. Warminster, Aris & Phillips Bolchazy-Carducci: 106-127.

 

Ritner, R. K. (1993). Introduction and chapter 1: Toward a definition of magic; HEKA. The Mechanics of Ancient Egyptian Magical Practice. Chicago, Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago: 1-28.

 

Ritner, R. S. (1995). The Religious, Social, and Legal Parameters of Traditional Egyptian Magic. Ancient Magic and Ritual Power. M. Meyer and P. Mirecki. Leiden, New York, Koln, E. J. Brill: 43-60.

 

2)  A selection of Egyptian magical texts.

Critical analyses of a sample of Egyptian texts.  What were these texts written for?  Can we say anything about the mechanics of the magic in these texts?

 

Lichtheim, M. (1975). Three Tales of Wonder. Ancient Egyptian Literature. Berkley, Los Angeles, London, University of California Press. Volume I, The Old and Middle Kingdoms: 215-222.

 

Parkinson, R. B. (1991). A cursing ritual; Magical spells to protect a child; and Letters to the dead. Voices from Ancient Egypt. London, British Museum Press: 125-126, 129-130 and 142-145.

 

Pritchard, J. B. (1950). Charms against snakes; Curses and threats; Magical protection for a child; and The execration of Asiatic princes. Ancient Near Eastern Texts. Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University Press: 326-329.

 

Week 4:  Magic in Antiquity II – Mesopotamian magic.

1) General introduction to ancient Mesopotamian magic.

What is the evidence for ancient Mesopotamian magic? Do the definitions that we have discussed about magic apply in the same way to Mesopotamian magic?

 

van Binsbergen, W. and F. Wiggermann (1995-99). Magic in history A theoretical perspective, and its application to Ancient Mesopotamia. http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Atrium/2327/gen3/magic.html

 

Abusch, T. (1989). The Demonic Image of the Witch in Standard Babylonian Literature: The Reworking of Popular Conceptions by Learned Exorcist. Religion, Science, and Magic in Concert and in Conflict. J. Neusner. New York/Oxford, Oxford University Press: 27-60.

 

Budge, E. A. W. (1930). Chapter III. Babylonian and Assyrian Amulets. Amulets and Superstitions. New York, Dover Publications: 82-126.

 

Thompson, R. C. (1908). Introduction. Semitic Magic. New York, Ktav: xvii-lxviii.

 

Geller, M. J. (1999). Freud and Mesopotamian Magic. Mesopotamian Magic: Textual, historical, and Interpretative Perspectives. T. Abusch and K. van der Toorn. Groningen, STYX Publications. Ancient Magic and Divination I: 49-55.

 

2) A look at primary sources

Critical analyses of a sample of Mesopotamian texts.  What were these texts written for?  Can we say anything about the mechanics of the magic in these texts?

 

Scurlock, J. A. (1995). Magical Uses of Ancient Mesopotamian Festivals of the Dead. Ancient Magic and Ritual Power. M. Meyer and P. Mirecki. Leiden, New York, Koln, E. J. Brill: 93-107.

 

Geller, M. J. (1989). “A New Piece of Witchcraft.” Studies Sjoberg: 193-205.

 

Abusch, T. (1995). The Socio-Religious Framework of the Babylonian Witchcraft Ceremony Maqlu: Some Observations on the Introductory Section of the Text, Part II. Solving Riddles and Untying Knots. Z. Zevit, S. Gittin and M. Sokoloff. Winona Lake, Indiana, Eisenbrauns: 467-494.

 

Week 5:  Magic in Antiquity III – Greek magic

1) A general introduction to Greek magic.

What is the evidence for Greek magic? Do the definitions that we have discussed about magic apply in the same way to Greek magic?

 

Betz, H. D. (1987). Magic in Greco-Roman Antiquity. The Encyclopedia of Religion vol. 9. 9: 93-97.

 

Betz, H. D. and H. J. Johnson (1992). Introduction to the Greek Magical Papyri; and Introduction to the Demotic Magical Papyri. The Greek Magical Papyri in Translation, Including the Demotic Spells. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: xli-lviii.

 

Fowler, F. L. (1995). “Greek Magic, Greek Religion.” Illinois Classical Studies 20: 1-22.

 

Betz, H. D. (1991). Magic and Mystery in the Greek Magical Papyri. Magika Hiera: ancient Greek magic and religion. C. A. Faraone and D. Obbink. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 244-259.

 

Graf, F. (1995). Excluding the Charming: The Development of the Greek Concept of Magic. Ancient Magic and Ritual Power. M. Meyer and P. Mirecki. Leiden, New York, Koln, E. J. Brill: 29-42.

 

Lieberman, S. (1994). Pleasures and fears. Greek in Jewish Palestine. New York and Jerusalem, The Jewish Theological Seminaryof America: 91-114.

 

2) A look at primary sources.

Critical analyses of a sample of Mesopotamian texts.  What were these texts written for?  Can we say anything about the mechanics of the magic in these texts?

 

Betz, H. D. and H. J. Johnson (1992). PGM I. 1-42, 42-195, PGM VII 385-423, PGM XIII 1-343. The Greek Magical Papyri in Translation, Including the Demotic Spells. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press.

 

Week 6:  Magic in Antiquity IV – Christian magic

1) A general introduction to the concept of magic in early Christianity.

What can be seen as magic within early Christianity? Do the definitions that we have discussed about magic apply in the same way to Christian magic?

 

Barb, A. A. (1963). The Survival of Magic Arts. The conflict between paganism and Christianity. M. Arnaldo. Oxford: 100-125.

 

Meyer, M. and S. R. (1994). Introduction. Ancient Christian Magic.  Coptic Texts of Ritual Power. San Francisco: 1-9.

 

Kee, H. C. (1989). Magic and Messiah. Religion, Science, and Magic In Concert and in Conflict. J. Neusner. New York/Oxford, Oxford University Press: 121-141.

 

Garrett, S. R. (1989). Light on a Dark Subject and Vise Versa: Magic and Magicians in the New Testament. Religion, Science, and Magic In Concert and in Conflict. J. Neusner. New York/Oxford, Oxford University Press: 141-165.

 

Falla, T. C. (1970). “Demons and Demoniacs in the Peshitta Gospels.” Abr Nahrain 9: 43-65.

 

Extra bibliography:

Smith, Morton. (1978). Jesus the magician. London : Gollancz.

 

Hull, J. (1974). Hellenistic magic and the synoptic tradition. London, S.C.M. Press.

 

Sanders, E. P. (1885). Chapter 5: Miracles and Crowds. Jesus and Judaism. London, SCM Press: 157-173.

 

Reminder Students are reminded to hand in a bibliography on this week (week 6) so that it can be photocopied for the rest of the group for the skills session next week (7).

 

2) A look at primary sources.

Critical analyses of a sample of Christian texts.  What were these texts written for?  Can we say anything about the mechanics of the magic in these texts?

 

Gollancz, H. (1898). A Selection of Charms from Syriac Manuscripts. Actes du onzieme congres international des orientalistes, Paris 1897, 4e section: 89-92.

 

Smith, R. (1994). The Coptic book of ritual power from Leiden. Ancient Christian Magic.  Coptic Texts of Ritual Power. M. Meyer and R. Smith. San Francisco, HarperSanFrancisco: 314-322.

 

Montgomery, J. A. (1913). No. 34. Aramaic Incantation Texts from Nippur. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, The Museum, Publications of the Babylonian Section. III: 231-235.

 

Week 7: Judaism – A literary tradition; and skills session.

1) The redaction of the Bible and the Jewish classics.

There will be one presentation about the way in which Judaism constructed and continually reconstructed itself upon its classic literature.  Other Students will be asked to say a few words on the redaction of the Old Testament, the Mishna (oral Torah), the Talmuds and Midrash.

 

Holtz, B. W. (1984). Introduction. Back to the Sources : Reading the Classic Jewish Texts. B. W. Holtz. New York, Simon & Schuster: ?

 

Stemberger, G. (1991). Introduction to the Talmud and Midrash. Edinburgh, T & T Clark.

 

Neusner, J. (1995). The Classics of Judaism. Lousville, Kentucky, Westminster John Knox Press.

 

(1977). Encyclopaedia Judaica, vol.s I-XVI. Jerusalem, Keter Publishing House (1972; CD-ROM Edition, Jerusalem: Judaica Multimedia, 1977).

­Relevant sections:

-. Judaism (Read up to the ‘Middle Ages’).

-. Redaction of the Bible: The Canon, Text, and Editions

-. Midrash.

 

2) Skills session - Bibliographies seminar.

Students bring their bibliographies.  Copies will be made so that the students can look at each other’s book lists. 

 

Week 8: Magic in the Bible.

 

1) Case studies.

 

Schmidt, B. B. (1995). The "Witch" of En-Dor, 1 Samuel 28, and Ancient Near Eastern Necromancy. Ancient Magic and Ritual Power. M. Meyer and P. Mirecki. Leiden, New York, Koln, E. J. Brill: 111-129.

 

Readings: Genesis 41, Daniel 2, Exodus 7-9, 22, Deuteronomy 18 and I Samuel 28.

 

Reminder Students are reminded to hand in notes on an article on this week (week 8) so that it can be photocopied for the rest of the group for the skills session next week (9).

 

2) Overview.

Are there references to magic in the Bible?  Where can such references be seen to be understood as magic by the author and where would it be defined as such only by a modern reader.  How does the information that relates to magic in the Bible correspond to what we know of other such practices in the ancient Near East?

 

(1977). Encyclopaedia Judaica, vol.s I-XVI. Jerusalem, Keter Publishing House. Magic, In The Bible.

 

Segal, J. B. (1976). “Popular Religion in Ancient Israel.” Journal of Jewish Studies XXVII (1): 1-22.

 

Tarragon, Jean-Michel de (1995). Witchcraft, magic, and divination in Canaan and ancient Israel. Civilizations of the Ancient Near East. J. M. Sasson. New York, Charles Scribener's Sons. III: 2071-2081.

 

Davies, T. W. (1898). Magic, Divination, and Demonology Among the Hebrews and their Neighbours. London, James Clarke & CO.: 30-58. (Parkes BZ 1525.D384)

 

Ricks, S. D. (1995). The Magician as Outsider in the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Ancient Magic and Ritual Power. M. Meyer and P. Mirecki. Leiden, New York, Koln, E. J. Brill: 131-143.

 

Week 9:  Magic in the Dead sea scrolls.

1) Overview.

What can be seen as magic within the Qumran community? Do the definitions that we have discussed about magic apply in the same way to the evidence in the Dead sea scrolls?

 

 

Vermes, G. (1995). Introduction. The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English. London, Penguin: 1-90.

 

Alexander, P. S. (1999). The Demonology of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Dead Sea Scrolls after Fifty Years: A Comprehensive Assessment. P. W. Flint and J. C. Vanderkam. Leiden, Boston Koln, Brill. Volume 2: 331-353.

 

Alexander, P. S. (1997). "Wrestling Against Wickedness in High Places": Magic in the World View of the Qumran Community. The Scrolls and the Scriptures. S. E. Porter and C. A. Evans. Sheffield: 318-337.

 

Alexander, P. S. "Magic and Magical Texts." In Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls, edited by L. H. Schiffman and J. C. VanderKam. New York/Oxford. (was forthcoming ?)

 

2) Readings.

 

Vermes, G. (1995). Songs of the Sage (4Q510-11). The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English. London, Penguin: 420-423.

 

Eisenman, R. and M. Wise (1992). An amulet formula against evil spirits (4Q560). The Dead Sea Scrolls Uncovered. Dorset, Rockport, Melbourne, Element: 265-267.

 

Skills session – Taking notes.

 

Week 10: Mythology and Jewish Magic - Enoch

1) Readings

 

Genesis 5:24[1]

 

Alexander, P. S. (1983). III (Hebrew Apocalypse of) Enoch (Late First Century A.D.). The Old Testament Pseudoepigrapha. J. H. Charlesworth. New York, Doubleday. I: 223-316. (first ten pages of text)

 

Isaac, E. (1983). 1 (Ethiopic apocalypse of) Enoch (Second Century B.C. - first Century A.D. The Old Testament Pseudoepigrapha. J. H. Charlesworth. New York, Doubleday. I: 5-90. (chapters 1-6)

 

Ginzberg, L. (1909-1938). III The Ten Generations. The Legends of the Jews. Philadelphia, The Jewish Publication Society of America. I: 105-141.

 

2) Related themes.

 

Stone, M. E. (1978). “The Book of Enoch and Judaism in the Third Century B.C.E.” The Catholic Bible Quarterly 40: 479-492.

 

Alexander, P. (1972). “The Targumim and Early Exegesis of "Sons of God" in Genesis 6.” Journal of Jewish Studies(23): 60-71.

 

Hanson, P. D. (1977). “Rebellion in Heaven, Azazel, and Euhemeristic Heroes in 1 Enoch 6-11.” Journal of Biblical Literature 96(2): 195-223.

 

Molenberg, C. (1984). “A study of the Roles of Shemhiza and Asael in 1 Enoch 6-11.” Journal of Jewish Studies 35: 136-146.

 

Week 11:  Early Jewish Mysticism.

1) Examining some of the sources.

An overview of some of the early Jewish mystical literature.  How does one define the difference between mysticism and magic?

 

Dan, J. (1993). The Ancient Jewish Mysticism. Tel-Aviv.

 

Scholem, G. (1961). Major Trends in Jewish Mysticism. New York, Schocken: 1-79.

 

Kingsley, P. (1992). “Ezekiel by the Grand Canal: between Jewish and Babylonian Tradition.” Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland 3,2(3): 339-346.

 

Dan, J. (1979). The Concept of Knowledge in the Shi'ur Qomah. Studies in Jewish Religious and Intellectual History. S. Stein and R. Loew. Alabama, Published in association with The Institute of Jewish Studies: 67-73.

 

Swartz, M. D. (1996). Chapter 2: Memory, Torah, and Magic. Scholastic Magic: Ritual and Revelation in Early Jewish Mysticism. Princeton , New Jersey, Princeton University Press: 33-50.

 

Song of Songs 5:10 ff; Ezekiel 1.

 

*Gruenwald, I. (1980). Apocalyptic and Merkavah Mysticism. London, Koln.

 

*Janowitz, N. (1989). The Poetics of Ascent: Theories of Language in a Rabbinic Ascent Text. Albany, State University of New York Press.

 

2) Readings.

A critical assessment of some textual material.

 

Blumenthal, D. R. (1978). Chapters 4 & 5. The visionary Ascent Parts One and Two. Understanding Jewish Mysticism: A Source Reader. New York, Ktav: 47-91.

 

Alexander, P. S. (1983). III (Hebrew Apocalypse of) Enoch (Late First Century A.D.). The Old Testament Pseudoepigrapha. J. H. Charlesworth. New York, Doubleday. I.

 

Swartz, M. D. (1996). Scholastic Magic: Ritual and Revelation in Early Jewish Mysticism. Princeton , New Jersey, Princeton University Press: 62-67 and 109-115.

 

Cohen, M. S. (1985). Text selection. The Shi'ur Qomah: Liturgy and Theurgy in Pre-Qabbalistic Jewish Mysticism. Tubingen, Mohr Siebeck: 192-194.

 

Week 12:  Magic in the Talmud.

1) Overview.

 

Seidel, J. (1995). Charming Criminals: Classification of Magic in the Babylonian Talmud. Ancient Magic and Ritual Power. M. Meyer and P. Mirecki. Leiden, New York, Koln, E. J. Brill: 145-166.

 

Geller, M. J. (1991). Akkadian Medicine in the Babylonian Talmud. A Traditional Quest: Essays in Honour of Louis Jacobs. D. Cohn-Sherbock. Sheffield: 102-112.

 

Daiches, S. (1913). Babylonian oil magic in the Talmud and the later Jewish literature, London.

 

Kern-Ulmer, B. (1996). “The Depiction of Magic in Rabbinic Texts: The Rabbinic and the Greek Concept of Magic.” Journal for the Study of Judaism in the Persian, Hellenistic and Roman Period XXVII: 289-303.

 

2) Reading.

 

Gittin 67b-69a in Epstein, I., Ed. (1935-1953). The Babylonian Talmud in English, with Introductions, Translation and Commentary. London, Soncino Press.

 

The Babylonian Talmud, sections from Chagiga 14b and 15a and Sanhedrin 44b.

 

Cohen, A. (1975). Chapter IX. Folk-Lore. Everyman's Talmud. New York, Shocken Books: 260-297.

 

Week 13: Jewish Magic in Late Antiquity: Other Sources.

1) General survey.

Alexander, P. (1986). Incantations and books of magic. The history of the Jewish people in the age of Jesus Christ (175 B.C. -A.D. 135). E. Schürer. Edinburgh. vol. III, pt. I: 341-379.

 

Lightstone, J. N. (1985). Magicians, Holy Men and Rabbis: Patterns of the Sacred in Late Antique Judaism. Approaches to Ancient Judaism. W. C. Green. Atlanta, Georgia, Scholars Press. Volume V.  Studies in Judaism and its Greco-Roman Context: 133-148.

 

Schäfer, P. (1990). “Jewish Magic Literature in Late Antiquity and Early Middle Ages.” Journal of Jewish Studies 41: 75-91

 

Recipe books:

 

Morgan, M. A. (1983). Sepher Ha-Razim: The Book of the Mysteries. Chico, CA, Scholars Press: 1-13.

 

Gaster, M. (1928). The Sword of Moses. Studies and Texts in Folklore, Magic, Mediaeval Romance, Hebrew Apocrypha, and Samaritan Archaeology / Collected and reprinted by Moses Gaster. Prolegomenon by Theodor Gaster. New York, Ktav Publishing House. I, III: 288-337, 69-103.

 

2) Readings.

Critical analyses of the text.

 

Gaster, M. (1928). A selection from The Sword of Moses (provided as handout). Studies and Texts in Folklore, Magic, Mediaeval Romance, Hebrew Apocrypha, and Samaritan Archaeology / Collected and reprinted by Moses Gaster. Prolegomenon by Theodor Gaster. New York, Ktav Publishing House. I, III. (http://www.esotericarchives.com/solomon/sword.htm)

 

Morgan, M. A. (1983). Sepher Ha-Razim: The Book of the Mysteries. Chico, CA, Scholars Press: 17-20, 43-59.

 

Week 14: Jewish Aramaic Magic Bowls

1) Introduction.

The nature of the praxis.  The different types of content in the bowls.  The clients.

 

Neusner, J. (1970). Chapter Six. Other Jews, Other Magicians. A History of the Jews in Babylonia. V. Later Sasanian Times. Leiden, E. J. Brill: 217-243.

 

Montgomery, J. A. (1913). Introduction. Aramaic Incantation Texts from Nippur. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, The Museum, Publications of the Babylonian Section. III: 40-116.

 

Segal, J. B. (2000). Introduction. Catalogue of the Aramaic and Mandaic Incantation Bowls in the British Museum. London, British Museum Press: 21-33.

 

Other books:

 

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1987). Amulets and Magic Bowls, Aramaic Incantations of Late Antiquity. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University.

 

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1993). Magic Spells and Formulae. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University.

 

2) Reading.

 

Montgomery, J. A. (1913). No. 1, 2, 3 and 8. Aramaic Incantation Texts from Nippur. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, The Museum, Publications of the Babylonian Section. III: 117-132 and 154-160.

 

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1987). Bowl no.s 12 and 13. Amulets and Magic Bowls, Aramaic Incantations of Late Antiquity. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University: 188-214.

 

Week 15: Other, Non-Jewish, Magic Bowls.

1) Overview.

 

Montgomery, J. A. (1913). A section of the introduction. Aramaic Incantation Texts from Nippur. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, The Museum, Publications of the Babylonian Section. III: 26-39.

 

Harviainen, T. (1995). Pagan Incantations in Aramaic Incantation Bowls. Studia Aramaica, New Sources and New Approaches. M. J. Geller, J. C. Greeefield and M. P. Weitzman. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 53-60.

 

Harviainen, T. (1993). “Syncretistic and Confessional Features in Mesopotamian Incantation Bowls.” Studia Orientalia(70): 29-37.

 

Shaked, S. (1997). “Popular Religion in Sasanian Babylonia.” Jerusalem Studies in Arabic and Islam(21): 103-117.

 

Reminder Students are reminded to hand in notes in bullet form in preparation for writing up on this week (week 15) so that it can be photocopied for the rest of the group for the skills session next week (16).

 

2) Readings.

 

Montgomery, J. A. (1913). No. 31-40. Aramaic Incantation Texts from Nippur. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, The Museum, Publications of the Babylonian Section. III: 223-255.

 

Week 16: Magic and mysticism.

1) A magical perspective.

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1993). Hekhalot literature and Jewish magic tradition in Palestine and Babylonia a. Jewish Magic and Hekhalot Literature b. The Jewish magic tradition in Palestine and Babylonia. Magic Spells and Formulae. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University: 17-22.

 

Elior, R. (1993). “Mysticism, Magic, and Angelology - The Perception of Angels in Hekhalot Literature.” Jewish Studies Quarterly 1: 3-53.

 

Lesses, Rebecca. "Speaking with Angels: Jewish and Greco-Egyptian Revelatory Adjurations." Harvard Theological Review 89, no. 1 (1996): 41-60.

 

Shaked, S. (1995). “"Peace be Upon You Exalted Angels": On Hekhalot, Liturgy and Incantation Bowls.” Jewish Studies Quarterly 2: 219-235.

 

2) Skills session – Preparing to write up the essay.

 

Week 17: Aggressive magic.
1) Overview.

 

Gager, J. G. (1992). Introduction. Curse Tablets and Binding Spells from the Ancient World. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 3-41.

 

Faraone, C. A. (1991). The Agnostic Context of Early Greek Binding Spells. Magika Hiera, Ancient Greek Magic & Religion. C. A. Faraone and D. Obbink, Oxford: 3-32.

 

Strubbe, J. H. M. (1991). "Cursed be he that moves my bones". Magika Hiera: ancient Greek magic and religion. C. A. Faraone and D. Obbink. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 33-59.

 

Sherwood Fox, W. (1914). “Old Testament Parallels to Tabellae Defixionum.” The American Journal of Semitic Languages and Literatures XXX: 111-124.

 

2) Reading.

 

Levene, D. (1999). “"... and by the name of Jesus ..." An Unpublished Bowl in Jewish Aramaic.” Jewish Studies Quarterly 6(4): 283-308.

 

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1987). Bowl no. 9. Amulets and Magic Bowls, Aramaic Incantations of Late Antiquity. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University: 174-179.

 

Pritchard, J. B. (1950). Hittite incantation against curses. Ancient Near Eastern Texts. Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University Press: 347.

 

 

Week 18: Themes in magic 1.

1) The evil eye.

 

Thomsen, M.-L. (1992). “The Evil Eye in Mesopotamia.” Journal of Near Eastern Studies 51: 19-32.

 

Ulmer, I. (1994). The Evil Eye in the Bible and in Rabbinic Literature. Hoboken.

Martinez, D. (1995). "May she neither eat nor drink": Love Magic and Vows of Abstinence. Ancient Magic and Ritual Power. M. Meyer and P. Mirecki. Leiden, New York, Koln, E. J. Brill: 335-359.

 

2) Lilith.

 

Gaster, M. (1928). Two thousand years of a charm against the child-stealing witch. Studies and Texts in Folklore, Magic, Mediaeval Romance, Hebrew Apocrypha and Samaritan Archaeology. London. II: 1005-1038. (Soton XX(782052.1)

 

Geller, M. J. (1988). “New Duplicates to SBTU II.” Archiv für Orientforschung XXXV: 1-23.

 

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1987). Amulet no. 15 and bowl no. 5. Amulets and Magic Bowls, Aramaic Incantations of Late Antiquity. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University: 104-122 and 158-163.

 

Montgomery, J. A. (1913). No. 42. Aramaic Incantation Texts from Nippur. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, The Museum, Publications of the Babylonian Section. III: 258-264.

 

Week 19: Themes in magic 2.

1) Magic and Medicine.

 

Geller, M. J. (1991). Akkadian Medicine in the Babylonian Talmud. A Traditional Quest: Essays in Honour of Louis Jacobs. D. Cohn-Sherbock. Sheffield: 102-112.

 

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1993). Magic and medicine, and Amulet 19. Magic Spells and Formulae. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University: 31-39, 60-66.

 

Pinch, G. (1994). Medicine and Magic. Magic in Ancient Egypt. London: 133-146.

 

Kee, H. C. (1988). Medicine, Miracle and Magic in New Testament Times. Cambridge.

 

*Stol, M. (1993). Epilepsy in Babylonia. Groningen, STYX Publications.

*Scurlock, J. A. (1991). “Baby Snatching Demons, Restless Souls and the Dangers of Childbirth: Medico-Magical Means of Dealing with some of the Perils of Motherhood in Ancient Mesopotamia.” Incognita 2: 135-183.

 

2) Love and Magic.

 

Winkler, J. J. (1991). The Constraints of Eros. Magika Hiera: ancient Greek magic and religion. C. A. Faraone and D. Obbink. Oxford, Oxford University Press: 214-243.

 

Betz, H. D. and H. J. Johnson (1992). PGM IV. 94-153 and PGM IV. 296-466. The Greek Magical Papyri in Translation, Including the Demotic Spells. Chicago, The University of Chicago Press: 39-40 and 44-47.

 

Montgomery, J. A. (1913). No. 28. Aramaic Incantation Texts from Nippur. Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, The Museum, Publications of the Babylonian Section. III: 213-217.

 

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1987). Amulet 10. Amulets and Magic Bowls, Aramaic Incantations of Late Antiquity. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University: 84-89.

 

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1993). Geniza 22, lines 8-16. Magic Spells and Formulae. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University: 216-219.

 

Lieberman, S. (1994). A comment on the Palestinian Talmud Nazir 7.1, 57a. Greek in Jewish Palestine. New York and Jerusalem, The Jewish Theological Seminary of America: 101(third paragraph).

 

Week 20:

1) Magic in the Geniza.

 

Geniza, Cairo in: (1977). Encyclopaedia Judaica, vol.s I-XVI. Jerusalem, Keter Publishing House (1972; CD-ROM Edition, Jerusalem: Judaica Multimedia, 1977).

 

Schiffman, L. H. and M. D. Swartz (1992). Introduction. Hebrew and Aramaic Incantation Texts from the Cairo Geniza. Sheffield, JSOT Press: 11-62.

 

Naveh, J. and S. Shaked (1993). Geniza 9-14. Magic Spells and Formulae. Jerusalem, the Magness Press, The Hebrew University: 147-171.

 

2) Conclusion and revision.

 



[1] And Enoch walked with God; and he was not;for God took him.