About IID




Board Agenda

Imperial Valley Weather History / Back
IID - Local Forecast with Jim Christopherson -


Our desert environment, with it's often extreme temperatures, affects both the way we efficiently distribute Energy and Water, and your consumption of these precious natural resources. 

Everyday Weather
California's southernmost desert often has summer temperatures well over 100 degrees, however from late October until mid-April the temperature is relatively mild--sometimes even cold! The sun doesn't necessarily shine all of every day, but it comes closer to doing so in our area than in any other place in the United States. Even in December and January, our Valley's averages more than eight hours of sunshine a day.
 

Historic Temperatures
The lowest minimum temperature ever recorded in the Imperial Valley was 16 degrees on January 22, 1937. The highest maximum temperature ever recorded was 121 degrees on July 28, 1995. The lowest maximum temperature was 42 degrees, recorded on January 24, 1949, and the highest minimum temperature was 92 degrees on June 30, 1946. The highest monthly mean temperature was 95.9 degrees, recorded in August 1969 and the lowest mean temperature was 42.3 degrees in February 1939.   

Rainfall
The 85-year average annual rainfall is 2.93 inches with June being the driest month. Since 1914, there has only been measurable rainfall three times during the month of June: 0.04 of an inch on June 2, 1948; 0.01 of an inch on June 18, 1988; and 0.01 of an inch on June 7, 1997. Only "trace" rainfall was recorded in 1918, 1922, 1924, 1929, 1930, 1932 and 1972.

The highest rainfall in one day was recorded on September 6, 1939, when 4.08 inches was measured. The total for the month, 7.06 inches, made September 1939 the month with the highest rainfall on record. The year 1939 was also the highest year on record with 8.52 inches. The lowest annual rainfall record was in 1956 with 0.16 of an inch.

Snow
The only recorded snowfall of consequence occurred on December 12, 1932. Snow began falling at 8:45 p.m. and by 5 a.m. the following day, 2½ inches had been recorded. In the southwest portion of Imperial Valley, four inches of snow was reported that day. This was the only snowfall of record to cover the entire valley.

 


Record Rainfall in Inches 1914-2004

RRII-1-1a.pdf


Max/Min Temperatures 1914-2004

MMT-1-2a.pdf


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