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"Snow drifts up to ten feet high, intense cold and forty-mile winds immobilized central and northern New Jersey yesterday [December 12, 1960] in one of the worst storms within memory."
An account of the December 11-12, 1960 blizzard in Clarence Dean, "2 Jersey Regions Are Immobilized," The New York Times, December 13, 1960, p.1.

"Baltimore is almost completely storm bound as the result of the heaviest fall of snow in twenty-four hours that the city has experienced since 1872."
An account of the January 27-29, 1922 "Knickerbocker Storm" in "Baltimore's Worst Storm in 50 Years," The New York Times, January 29, 1922, p.1.

"Information reaching the Pennsylvania Railroad officials here [Philadelphia] last night [January 28, 1922] was that the snow along the Pennsylvania lines out of Washington was three feet deep on the level and that the high wind had thrown up drifts on the tracks from twelve to sixteen feet deep.  The railroad men call it the worst storm they have ever seen between this city [Philadelphia] and Washington."
An account of the January 27-29, 1922 "Knickerbocker Storm" in "Storm Dislocates Railroad Traffic," The New York Times, January 29, 1922, p.1.

"This storm ordinarily should have gone from Florida to New York in thirty-six hours.  It has taken three days... [T]he movement of the storm northward has been so slow that it did not begin to snow in Philadelphia and New York until noon today [January 28, 1922]."
Professor Charles L. Mitchell of the Weather Bureau describing the January 27-29, 1922 "Knickerbocker Storm" in "Snow Overwhelms Capital,"
The New York Times, January 29, 1922, p.2.

"The disturbance was reported forming Thursday [January 26, 1922] over Florida... The disturbance began to move Thursday slowly northeast along the coast.  Its centre was off the Georgia coast yesterday morning [January 27, 1922].  Last night [January 27, 1922] its centre was near and off Cape Hatteras. Tonight [January 28, 1922] its centre will be off the New Jersey coast."
Professor Charles L. Mitchell of the Weather Bureau describing the January 27-29, 1922 "Knickerbocker Storm" in "Snow Overwhelms Capital," The New York Times, January 29, 1922, p.2.

"The mild winter of 1983 suddenly turned on the Eastern Seaboard with a vengeance... One of the worst blizzards in history dumped up to three feet of snow along a path stretching from the hills of North Carolina to the coast of New England."
"The Blizzard of '83,"
Newsweek, February 21, 1983, p.29.

"Howling winds and near-zero visibility marooned scores of motorists as the massive storm--punctuated by an eerie display of lightning and thunder--largely closed down the nation's capital and filled New York's Fifth Avenue with cross-country skiers."
"The Blizzard of '83,"
Newsweek, February 21, 1983, p.29.

"An April blizzard brought new meaning Tuesday [April 6, 1982] to what poet T.S. Eliot once called 'the cruelest month' as the metropolitan area [New York City metropolitan area] was buried under nearly a foot of swirling spring snow."
Phil Reisman 3rd, "April blizzard was a first,"
Today, April 7, 1982, p.A1.

"With winter still 10 long weeks away, a rare October snowstorm swept across the metropolitan area [NYC area]..., burying parts of upstate New York and New Jersey under a white blanket up to three inches deep..."
An account of the October 10, 1979 snowfall in the Northeast in Donald Singleton, "It's autumn of our discontent as snow & cold winterize area,"
Daily News, October 11, 1979, p.3.

"The latest spring snowstorm ever recorded in the New York metropolitan region blustered over much of the Northeast yesterday [May 9, 1977], closing schools, snarling traffic and cloaking newly plowed fields and the delicate blossoms of May in a harsh reprise of winter."
An account of the May 9-10, 1977 snowfall in the Northeast in "The Last Hurrah of a Feisty Winter Brings the Latest Spring Snow Ever,"
The New York Times, May 10, 1977, p.55.

"In New York City, snow fell briefly in midmorning and in the early afternoon as a day of intermittent rain, sleet and hail passed drearily."
A description of the May 9, 1977 snowfall in New York City in "The Last Hurrah of a Feisty Winter Brings the Latest Spring Snow Ever,"
The New York Times, May 10, 1977, p.55.
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