Smithsonian Jazz


Jazz Class

Jazz Class Home | Groovin' to Jazz (ages 8-13) |
Groovin' to Jazz (ages 12-15) | Duke Ellington |
Ella Fitzgerald | Louis Armstrong | Benny Carter |
What Is Jazz | Jazz 365 | Teacher Lesson Plans |
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Welcome! Hey jazz cats! Check out the cool jazz tunes and stories about jazz musicians we have here for you! Visit “Jazz Classes” to hear the elegant Duke Ellington, the scat singer extraordinaire Ella Fitzgerald, Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong, and swingin’ Benny Carter. There is also a cool Duke Ellington Interactive lesson. For those of you who want to find out more about jazz, click on “What is Jazz” to answer your questions.
 

Groovin' to Jazz Icon Do you know how to groove? Develop your jazz chops (skills in playing or singing jazz) and have a great time while you’re at it. You will find thirty-one hip recordings by all the jazz greats right here. Teachers can download lesson plans and worksheets to go with the recordings, too. To start groovin’ click below:
Groovin' to Jazz (ages 8-13)
Groovin' to Jazz (ages 12-15)

Teachers: Groovin’ to Jazz includes thirty-one original recordings with lesson plans designed for intermediate level (ages 8-13) and middle level (ages 13-15) students. Some lessons have worksheets to go with them. Most lessons are designed for teachers with limited resources and space. You will need a computer with access to the Internet so you can play the recordings for your class. Some lessons include links to websites with additional activities or recordings. If you decide to use the sixteen intermediate or fifteen middle level recordings/lessons, you should teach them in the sequence presented here because lessons build upon each other and develop jazz skills. So get your students groovin’ to jazz by clicking here.

Take Note

Come learn about Duke Ellington and his amazing contribution to the world of jazz. In this interactive module, students will be introduced to the legendary musician and composer. Follow the lessons and and answer the questions as you go along. At the end of the lesson is a Duke Ellington juke box! Take the Class

Jazz Classes

Duke Ellington Duke Ellington
Duke Ellington was one of America's greatest composers and a brilliant bandleader and pianist. In every respect, he was one of a kind. Learn about his life in "Duke's Match Game" and explore his music in "Duke's Music Class."

Ella Fitzgerald Ella Fitzgerald
Singer Ella Fitzgerald became known as "The First Lady of Song." She won over fans of jazz and popular song. Learn about her life in "Ella's Match Game" and explore her music in "Ella's Singing Class."

Louie Armstrong Louis Armstrong
American musician had a greater influence than trumpeter and singer Louis Armstrong. He became one of America's most beloved celebrities. Learn about his life in "Louis's Match Game" and explore his music in "Louis's Music Class." Or download the Louis Armstrong Education Kit (grades 5-12) for a more comprehensive introduction to Armstrong.

Benny Carter Benny Carter
Benny Carter was a "Renaissance man" of music: composer, arranger, trumpeter, and saxophonist, who was still writing music in his 90s. Learn about his life in "Benny's Matching Game" and explore his music in "Benny's Music Class."

What is Jazz? What is Jazz
Do you know what jazz is? What city it emerged from? What year the music was first recorded? What jazz musicians place a high value on? Find out the answers in "What is Jazz?"

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This Day in Jazz History


August 17
Pianist/composer Duke Pearson born 1932 in Atlanta, GA.
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Bassist George Duvivier born 1920 in New York, NY.
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Pianist Paul Bley records Floater with bassist Steve Swallow ansd drummer Pete LaRoca, 1962.

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This site is made possible by America's Jazz Heritage,
A Partnership of the Lila Wallace-Reader's Digest Fund
and the Smithsonian Institution. As well as the U.S. Department of Education