Skip to content
The Open University

Degree

Code
B13
Level
Undergraduate
Made up of
360 credit points

Description

If you’re awarded this degree you’ll have up-to-date knowledge of important concepts and trends in information technology and computing and their context. You’ll be able to apply your knowledge and understanding in practical situations, and will have a range of relevant professional and key skills.

Top

Planning your studies

If you’re new to study or to the OU, we recommend that you start with a course at Level 1. For this degree that would mean starting with at least one of Data, computing and information (M150) and Networked living: exploring information and communication technologies (T175). We strongly recommend that you study both of these Level 1 courses. If you complete this Level 1 work successfully you’ll have a firm foundation for future studies as well as credit points to count towards your degree.

The course groupings below are not meant to imply an order of study. It is important that you look at the descriptions of the individual courses when planning your route through the degree, as some of the courses prepare you to study others.

If you have included the discontinued course M254 in your BSc (Hons) Information Technology and Computing degree then you should note that it was designed for students who studied the discontinued course M206. If you plan to study Object-oriented programming with Java (M255), one of the successor courses of M206, you will need to take Putting Java to work (M257). This is because M254 and M255 are an excluded combination and cannot be counted towards the same Open University qualification.

You can register your intention to study for this degree when you reserve your place on individual courses, or you can ask us at any time to link courses that you have already studied towards the degree. This gives you the flexibility to delay your decision or to change your mind as your studies progress. There is no time limit for obtaining the required credit points for this qualification; however, you should note limitations on individual courses as mentioned below. You must include at least 120 points from OU courses that have not been counted in an OU diploma or other first degree you have been awarded. If you have graduated with an OU BA or BSc degree without honours this requirement is reduced to 60 points.

Top

Career relevance and employability

This degree will put you in a position to pursue a career in information and communications technologies (ICTs), computing and related fields, though you may need to undertake further training or study in order to enter a new career area. It may help you to obtain professional recognition from the British Computer Society (BCS) or the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). You can view or download our  Recognition leaflet 3.3 Professional Engineering Institutions or Recognition Leaflet 3.7 Computing or ask our Student Registration & Enquiry Service for a copy. You can also ask our Student Registration & Enquiry Service for the careers publication OU study and your career if you want to find out more about the process of career development and about sources of careers information and guidance.

For planning your next career steps, visit the OU Careers Advisory Service.

There’s more information about the career relevance of degrees on the national HE Prospects website.

Top

Courses

For this 360-point honours degree you require:

At least 30 points from the following optional courses:

Level 1 optional courses Points Next start
Data, computing and information (M150)

This data, computing and information course explains how computers work, how mechanisms are embedded in hardware and software, and how to write simple programs.

See full description.

30 Oct 2009
Networked living: exploring information and communication technologies (T175)

How do networked systems work? This course looks inside ICTs in contexts like entertainment, transport and health and considers where they might take us next.

See full description.

30 Oct 2009

Or, subject to the eight-year rule below, the discontinued course T171 may be counted instead of T175

And 30 points from the following compulsory course:

Level 2 compulsory course Points Next start
Object-oriented programming with Java (M255)

You’ll start seeing and interacting with graphical objects from the very start on this course, which examines object-oriented programming and the Java programming language.

See full description.

30 Oct 2009

Or, subject to the rules about excluded combinations and the eight-year rule below, the discontinued course M206

And 120 points, including at least 30 at Level 3, from the following optional courses:

Level 2 optional course Points Next start
Communication and information technologies (T215) NEW

Learn about new developments in the digital communication and information technologies that are rapidly transforming modern society.

See full description.

60 Jan 2010
Computers and processors (T224)

This course explores the diversity of computer applications and describes the fundamental components of computer systems, covering topics such as operating systems, processors, and memory.

See full description.

30 Feb 2010
Level 3 optional courses Points Next start
Ebusiness technologies: foundations and practice (T320)

This course explores the driving forces behind developments in ebusiness, introducing the fundamental technologies and protocols upon which new systems and services can be built.

See full description.

30 Feb 2010
Keeping ahead in information and communication technologies (T324)

Investigate how to keep pace with rapid changes in ICT, and how to use ICT successfully in complex systems where people play a major part.

See full description.

30 Feb 2010
Technologies for digital media (T325)

Digital technologies are transforming our experience of media. This course will enable you to understand how, and looks at related social, ethical and legal issues.

See full description.

30 Feb 2010

Or, subject to the rules about excluded combinations and the eight-year rule below, at Level 2 the discontinued courses T209, T223, T293, THD204, at Level 3 the discontinued courses T305, T396, 

And at least 60 points (of which at least 30 points should be at Level 3) from the following optional courses if you studied M206 as the compulsory Level 2 course.

Or at least 90 points (of which at least 30 points should be at Level 3) from the following optional courses if you studied M255 as the compulsory Level 2 course.

Level 2 optional courses Points Next start
Designing applications with Visual Basic (MT264)

Learn to write small applications using Visual Basic Express and object-oriented programming, from a simple traffic survey to more complex, database-linked applications.

See full description.

30 Oct 2009
Putting Java to work (M257)

Learn to use the full power of object-oriented programming language Java, and become well equipped to work on small-scale industrial software projects.

See full description.

20 Oct 2009
together with a further 10 points only from one of:
Team working in distributed environments (M253)

Learn how to work more effectively in ‘virtual’, geographically distributed teams; collaborating with other team members electronically on a team-based, problem-solving project.

See full description.

10 Nov 2009
or any 10-point course with a T in its code except TU170, T180, T181
Software development with Java (M256) *

Discover the fundamentals of an object-oriented approach to software development, using up-to-date analytical techniques and processes essential for specification, design and implementation.

See full description.

30 Jan 2010
Level 3 optional courses Points Next start
Fundamentals of interaction design (M364)

Acquire practical skills and theoretical tools to analyse, design and evaluate interactive products that surround our everyday lives – from websites to drinks dispensers.

See full description.

30 Feb 2010
Natural and artificial intelligence (M366)

Explore one of humanity’s oldest dreams – the creation of intelligent machines – taking in ideas from biology and philosophy as well as computing and technology.

See full description.

30 Feb 2010
Relational databases: theory and practice (M359)

Gain an advanced and detailed insight into relational databases – of direct benefit to those interested in the planning, design and operation of a database.

See full description.

30 Jan 2010
Software engineering with objects (M363) *

Designing, building and testing software systems can be a complicated process. This course offers you the intellectual tools to make the tasks involved easier.

See full description.

30 Feb 2010

Or, subject to the rules about excluded combinations and the eight-year rule below, at Level 2 the discontinued courses M254, M261, MT262, T223, at Level 3 the discontinued courses M301, M358, M360

*You should note that these two courses are likely to be required if you wish to be eligible for consideration for BCS exemption.

And if necessary, at least 30 points at Level 3 from the lists above to ensure that you have at least 90 points at Level 3 from those lists.

And 30 points from the following optional courses:

Level 3 optional courses Points Next start
The information and communication technologies project (T455)

Explore an area of ICT in depth and update your knowledge by developing a project, carrying it out and writing it up without close supervision.

See full description.

30 Feb 2010
The computing project (M450)

The computing project offers practical experience of independent learning and reflective practice, and is a compulsory element of many of our computing and ICT qualifications.

See full description.

30 Feb 2010

Or, subject to the rules about excluded combinations and the eight-year rule below, the discontinued courses TM420, TM421, TM422, TM423, TM424, TM425, TM426, TM427

All the Computing and IT courses listed can count towards the degree for a maximum of eight years after we have stopped presenting them – please see individual course descriptions for future availability.

To complete the 360 points needed for an honours degree, the remaining points up to a maximum of 60 points can be from any OU undergraduate courses. You must ensure that you have the required number of points at each level.

Top

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes of this qualification are described in four areas:

  • Knowledge and understanding
  • Cognitive skills
  • Practical and professional skills
  • Key skills

Read more detailed information about the learning outcomes, and how they are acquired through teaching, learning and assessment methods.

Top

Credit for previous study elsewhere

If you have already completed some successful study at higher education level at another institution we may be able to give you credit for this study that you can count towards this Open University qualification. You can find out more on our Credit Transfer site. If you make a successful claim for transferred credit it may affect your choice of courses so you are advised to investigate this option as soon as possible.

Credit transfer details for this qualification:

Top

Classification of your degree

On successful completion of the required number and type of courses you will be awarded a Bachelor of Science (Honours) Information Technology and Computing degree. Your honours degree will be classified either as first-class honours, upper second-class honours, lower second-class honours or third-class honours. The class of degree is determined by the best grades you achieve in 240 points from those courses above Level 1 listed above. At least 120 of those points must come from courses at Level 3 and will include the grade you achieve in the 30-point project course whether or not it is among your best grades at that level. You will have the opportunity to attend a degree ceremony to collect your award certificate.

Top

Regulations

As a student of The Open University, you should be aware of the content of the Award Regulations and the Student Regulations.

Award Regulations

Student Regulations

The Student Regulations (including the Code of Practice for Student Assessment and the Code of Practice for Student Discipline) are available on our Policy Documents for Students website.

Top

How to register

To register for this qualification, read the description and check you meet any specific requirements (for example, some of our qualifications, require you to be working in a particular environment, or be sponsored by your employer). Then select the course you wish to study first and ensure it is suitable for you before following the registration procedure for that course.

Top

About this page

An undergraduate qualification in Computing and ICT.

Study explained

Credit points
- show how much study is required to complete a course or qualification. One credit point represents roughly 10 hours of study.
Level
- indicates how difficult a course is. Undergraduate study starts at Level 1.
Financial support
- find out if you qualify for support with your fees with our eligibility checker.
Study explained
- all you need to know about studying with the OU.

Got a question?

Contact an adviser in our Student Registration & Enquiry Service
Email or call +44(0) 845 300 60 90

Request a print prospectus

Order a prospectus Order or download a printed prospectus

© The Open University   +44 (0)845 300 60 90   Email us