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California Highways

Routes 57 through 64

 
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Click here for a key to the symbols used. "LRN" refers to the Pre-1964 Legislative Route Number. "US" refers to a US Shield signed route. "I" refers to an Eisenhower Interstate signed route. "Route" usually indicates a state shield signed route, but said route may be signed as US or I. Previous Federal Aid (pre-1992) categories: Federal Aid Interstate (FAI); Federal Aid Primary (FAP); Federal Aid Urban (FAU); and Federal Aid Secondary (FAS). Current Functional Classifications (used for aid purposes): Principal Arterial (PA); Minor Arterial (MA); Collector (Col); Rural Minor Collector/Local Road (RMC/LR). Note that ISTEA repealed the previous Federal-Aid System, effective in 1992, and established the functional classification system for all public roads.


Quickindex

57 · 58 · 59 · 60 · 61 · 62 · 63 · 64


State Shield

State Route 57



Routing
  1. From Route 1 near Huntington Beach to Route 22 near Santa Ana.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment is as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This route was proposed, but unconstructed before 1964. It was LRN 273. This route was defined in 1959.

     

    Naming

    This segment is named the "Orange Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 17, Chapter 157, in 1969. It was named because it traverses the community of Orange, CA, which was founded in 1873 (the county was created in 1889). The city was probably named to advertise one of the principal products of the district, although it may also have been named after one of the fifty-odd other Oranges in the U.S.

    The South Street overcrossing is named the "Jim Dowling Memorial Bridge". This is an unofficial name, as Caltrans signed it before the Assembly Bill passed, and the bill was then dropped. It was named in memory of Jim Downing, a victim of a drunk limosine driver around 1984 at the age of 26.

     

    Status

    Toll Road Unconstructed. This segment was at one time planned for pilot toll road project. It would have been a 4-lane, 11.2 mile extension located within the Santa Ana Flood Control Channel right-of-way. Recently, the Orange County Transportation Authority voted its support for the toll road portion of Route 57. However, on 1/3/2001, a Caltrans spokesman announced that it is "very unlikely" that the department would extend a 10-year-old toll franchise agreement for the proposed SR-57 Extension project. However, the OCTA revisited the idea in early 2003. Supervisor Chris Norby, who sits on the OCTA board of directors, wants to fast-track a $1.1-million study to determine whether the 57 Extension is practical from engineering and political standpoints.

    According to the Los Angeles Times in November 2005, Orange County transportation officials recently voted to extend Route 57 southwest along the Santa Ana River to I-405. With this vote, the OCTA board voted to hire a consultant to prepare a three-month feasibility study for a double-deck freeway above the river. The proposal still faces likely opposition from the Army Corps of Engineers, neighborhoods and proponents of a park along the river. Extending the freeway down the Santa Ana River would take commuters 6.5 miles through Santa Ana and Fountain Valley. An extension has been discussed for years. But past proposals focused on routing a six-lane freeway through neighborhoods and shopping centers in Santa Ana. Plans to build an extension above the river, instead, materialized about the same time, in 1986. One proposal called for building piers thrust into the Santa Ana River to serve as pillars for the freeway. There also has been talk about building the extension as a tollway, connecting it to the San Joaquin Hills tollway in Costa Mesa. Any proposal involving a route above the river will involve the Army Corps of Engineers, which has major flood-control jurisdiction over the river. According to a corps spokesman in Los Angeles, any plan for a freeway above a flood control channel has an uphill battle, due to impacts on the flood channel. In October 2007, the study reported its result. The study showed that the proposed eight-mile route above the Santa Ana River connecting to the San Diego Freeway would cost about $2 billion. The study identified no funding for the route, and the extension was not included among projects under Measure M, a half-cent local sales tax for transportation improvements. It also found that using a route for the extension down the river is possible but there are other challenges, such as the impacts to the environment and the neighboring communities. Santa Ana officials feel that the transportation benefits would be outweighed by the negative environmental impacts effects and reduced the quality of life for city residents.

     

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  2. From Route 5 near Santa Ana to Route 210 near San Dimas.

    As of November 24, 2002, the portion from I-10 to I-210/Route 210 was signed as Route 57. Previously, this segment had been signed as part of I-210.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as the segment "Route 5 near Santa Ana to Route 210 near Route 10 and Pomona, passing near Industry." Note that the Route 210 referred to in this segment is the former I-10/I-210 junction in Pomona, not the current I-210/Route 57 junction in San Dimas.

    In 1965, Section 1371 split this into two segments: "(b) Route 5 near Santa Ana to Route 60 near Industry. (c) Route 60 near Industry to Route 210 near Route 10 and Pomona."

    In 1998, AB 2388 (Chapter 221) recombined these segments, and renumbered former Route 210 between the I-10 (near Pomona) to the I-210/Former Route 30 jct (near San Dimas) portion as Route 57, creating the current definition.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    It does not appear that all of this route was defined as such before 1964:

    1. The portion of this route between Route 5 (then US 101, LRN 2) and US 91 (LRN 43) is similar to what was LRN 180. However, LRN 180 is the same routing as 1964-1981 Route 250. LRN 180 was defined in 1933.

    2. The portion of the route between US 91 and the Brea Canyon/Tonner Canyon junction appears not to have been a legislative route.

    3. The portion of the route between the Brea Canyon/Tonner Canyon junction and eventual Route 60 was LRN 19. Note that LRN 19 may have applied to the surface street routing of Route 57 as well. It is unclear how/if this route was signed. This was defined in 1931.

    4. The portion between Route 60 and I-10 appears to have been LRN 272, and was only proposed, with the routing undetermined. This was defined in 1959.

    5. The segment from I-10 to I-210 near San Dimas was part of Route 71, and was LRN 240, defined in 1959.

     

    Status

    Improvements to this segment are planned through the 2007 Corridor Improvement Mobility Account allocations. Specifically, $70 million was approved to widen the route NB from Route 91 to Lambert Rd., and just over $20 million to widen the route NB from Katella Ave to Lincoln Ave. However, $36 million to add a NB lane from Lambert Rd. to L.A. Cty. line was not recommended.

    [Brea Widening]In January 2009, the CTC approved for future consideration of funding a project to construct roadway improvements that include the construction of an additional northbound lane from Orangethorpe Avenue to Lambert Road passing through the cities of Placentia, Fullerton and Brea. Specifically, the project will construct roadway improvements to a 5.0 mile long section of Route 57 in Orange County. The improvements will include the construction of an additional northbound lane. The project is programmed with corridor mobility improvement account (CMIA) funds and Orange County Measure “M” funds. The total estimated project cost is $140,000,000. It is estimated to begin construction in Fiscal Year 2009-10. The scope as described for the preferred alternative is consistent with the project scope set forth in the approved CMIA project baseline agreement.

    In July 2009, the CTC approved the transfer of deleted CMIA funding for Route 91 to Route 57 projects. The transfer would add $54,548,000 CMIA to widen northbound Route 57 from 0.4 mile north of Route 91 to 0.1 mile north of Lambert Road project (PPNO 3788), resulting in a total of $124,548,000 CMIA programmed on this project. The additional CMIA funds will replace local Measure M funds programmed for construction. OCTA is also adding $2,751,000 in local funds for right of way support and capital cost increases due to the addition of 22 parcels needed for temporary construction easements. The additional right of way need was based on the preferred alternative selected during the environmental process. The second project will add $14,606,000 CMIA to the widen northbound Route 57 from 0.3 mile south of Katella Avenue to 0.3 mile north of Lincoln Avenue project (PPNO 3829), resulting in a total of $34,692,000 CMIA programmed on this project. The additional funds from CMIA will replace local Measure M funds programmed for construction.

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 90 to Route 60 near Industry.

     

    Commuter Lanes

    Commuter lanes exist between Route 5 and the junction with Route 60 in Los Angeles County. These lanes in Orange County opened in June 1992; the lanes in Los Angeles County opened in November 1997. There is also a HOV interchange with Route 91 that is primary commute directions only: SB Route 57 to WB Route 91, and EB Route 91 to NB Route 57. In February 2007, the HOV transition from NB Route 57 to EB Route 60, and WB Route 60 to SB Route 57 opened after three years of disruptive construction.

     

    Naming

    This segment is named the "Orange Freeway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution No. 17, Chapter 157, in 1969. The first segment opened in 1969; the last segment in 1976.

    The segment between Orangethorpe Avenue and Yorba Linda Boulevard in Orange County is named the "CHP Officer Don J. Burt Memorial Highway.". California Highway Patrol Officer Don J. Burt, a dedicated officer, was killed while in the line of duty on the evening of July 13, 1996, when he was fatally shot by a suspect during a traffic stop on State Highway Route 57. Officer Burt is remembered as a dedicated officer with an infectious sense of humor that endeared him to friends, colleagues, and his supervisors. He was only 25 years old at the time of his death, and left behind a wife, son, and his parents. He came from a line of law enforcement officers, including his father, father-in-law, and brother-in-law. An estimated 4,500 police officers and other mourners, including officers from Maryland and New Jersey, attended his funeral, including then Governor Pete Wilson. The highway was named to remind us of the sacrifices California Highway Patrol and other peace officers make on a daily basis. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 7, Chaptered 7/2/2003, Chapter 80.

    The portion of Route 57 from the Orange County Line to the Pathfinder Road exit in the City of Diamond Bar is named the “Mayor Bob Zirbes Memorial Freeway”. This segment was named in memory of Robert "Bob" Zirbes, an immensely respected member of the Diamond Bar City Council. Bob served as Chairman of the Diamond Bar Planning Commission for a year prior to being elected to the Diamond Bar City Council in 2001, and was reelected to a second term in 2005 and distinguished himself as Mayor from 2003 to 2004. Throughout his years on the city council, Bob worked diligently to address the concerns and needs of the residents of the area and improve the quality of life for future generations. Through his dedication and perseverance, the City of Diamond Bar redefined its Code Enforcement Program and created a proactive approach to property regulations enforcement, known as the Neighborhood Improvement Program. Bob was the driving force behind the creation of the Home Improvement Program to financially assist homeowners with home repairs. He also worked tirelessly behind the scenes to promote economic growth for the City of Diamond Bar, which includes the newly completed Village Center, highlighted by the recent opening of a Target store and the new Brookfield residential community. Prior to his election to the city council, Bob served as President of the Diamond Bar Improvement Association, a nonprofit community betterment organization, where he spearheaded several community service-based efforts, including the annual Paint the Town project. Bob was also a member of several boards and committees, including the City's Sports Park Task Force, Library Task Force, Tres Hermanos Conservation Authority, Walnut Valley Rotary Club, and Miss Diamond Bar Pageant, and was also very involved in the American Youth Soccer Organization program, where he was a referee even when his own children had long outgrown the program. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 82, Resolution Chapter 78, on 7/8/2008.

    The interchange with I-210 (i.e., the former Route 30/Route 210 interchange) is named the "Police Officer Louie Pompei Memorial Interchange". Louis ("Louie") A. Pompei was born August 4, 1964, in Shenandoah, Pennsylvania. He was a physical fitness buff, and body builder, who earned a silver medal in the bodybuilding competition of the 1994 California Police Olympics, and who was a runner on the Glendora-Monrovia-Arcadia Police relay team, which annually competes in the Baker to Vegas 120-mile Challenge Cup relay race. He graduated from Mansfield University, Pennsylvania, in 1986 with a BA degree in Criminal Justice Administration; and was hired as a Police Officer trainee by the Glendora Police Department on October 12, 1987. He graduated from the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Academy on March 4, 1988, and worked in the Patrol Division of the Glendora Police Department from 1988 to 1992 where he developed an enthusiasm for working narcotics cases, working as a narcotics investigator in the Detective Division of the Glendora Police Department from 1992 to 1995. During this time, he was assigned to a position with L.A. IMPACT, a major crimes multijurisdictional task force, composed of officers from agencies throughout the county, primarily dedicated to investigating major drug suppliers through southern California. On June 9, 2002, while off duty in a Vons Market in Via Verde, Officer Pompei attempted to stop an armed robbery takeover in which a box boy was being pistol whipped, and was killed in a fire fight. His colleagues remember him for his love of life, contagious enthusiasm, positive and outgoing attitude, and generous, helpful, and dependable personality. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 64, Chapter 105, on August 8, 2002. Surprisingly, the resolution refers to the Route 30/Route 210 interchange, even thought at the time of passage, Route 30 no longer existed. I guess the legislative analyst missed finding that error.

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined on July 1, 1964, this was a continuous route from Route 5 to Route 210. However, originally Route 210 ended at the I-10 junction near Pomona. In 1998, the definition of Route 210 was changed to continue along former Route 30; and Route 57 was extended along the former Route 210 segment between Pomona and San Dimas.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Route 57 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 57 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route; (2) and (3) are constructed to freeway standards. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

exitinfo.gif
  • Cal-NExUS Exit Numbering: Route 57
  • Western Exit Guide: Route 57 (Jeff Stapleton)

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 57:

  • Total Length (1995): 19 miles traversable; 12 mile unconstructed. Note that this milage count does not include the milage that was formerly Route 210 between I-10 and current Route 210 (former Route 30).
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 125,000 to 230,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 1; Urbanized: 30.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 19 mi. It is likely the former Route 210 segment is FAI milage.
  • Functional Classification (this does not include the former Route 210 milage): Prin. Arterial: 19 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Orange, Los Angeles.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that eventually became LRN 57 was first defined in 1915 by Chapter 748, which authorized survey, location, and estimate of cost of a state highway "from a point on the present located state highway in Kern County S of Bakersfield to the town of Nordhoff, Ventura County" (Nordhoff appears to have been a former name for Ojai). The 1919 Third Bond Act authorized a route from Santa Maria to Freemans via Bakersfield. In 1935, the route was codified as:

"[LRN 2] near Santa Maria to [LRN 23] near Freeman via Bakersfield and Walker Pass"

This routing remained unchanged until the 1963 renumbering. It was signed as follows:

  1. Between US 101 (LRN 2) and 7 mi NW of Ventucopa, it was signed as Route 166.

  2. Between 7 mi NW of Ventucopa and Maricopa, it was cosigned as Route 33/Route 166.

  3. Between Maricopa and 6 mi N of Wheeler Ridge, the route was originally cosigned as Route 33/Route 166, and is present-day Route 166 (the Route 33 designation having been removed when US 399 was decomissioned)

  4. The route appers to have been discontiguous between 6 mi N of Wheeler Ridge and Bakersfield.

  5. Between Bakersfield and US 6 (LRN 23), the route was signed as Route 178 (no change post-1964).


State Shield

State Route 58



Routing
  1. From Route 101 near Santa Margarita to Route 33.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 58, but was signed as Route 178. It was defined in 1933.


  2. From Route 33 to Route 43.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 58, but was signed as Route 178. It was also defined in 1933.

     

    Naming

    "Carrisa" Highway to Route 33; "Bakersfield-McKittrick Highway" to Route 43. Bakersfield is named after Colonel Thomas Baker, who tried to develop a waterway from Kern Lake to San Francisco Bay in the early 1860s had a corral here know as "Baker's field." In 1868 the name was transferred to the city.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] From Route 5 to Route 43. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  3. From Route 43 to Route 99.

    Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Bakersfield or the County of Kern the portion of Route 58 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city or county agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment: (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 58 shall cease to be a state highway. (3) The portion of Route 58 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81. (4) For the portion of Route 58 that is relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Bakersfield or the County of Kern shall install and maintain within the jurisdiction of the city signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 58. Added by AB 1858, Chapter 315, September 18, 2006.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    In 2006, Chapter 315 permitted relinquishment of the portion of this route in Bakersfield.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This segment was LRN 58, but was signed as Route 178. This was also defined in 1933.

     

    Naming

    "Rosedale" Highway

     

    Status

    This segement is under intense discussion regarding upgrading it to freeway. There are a number of potential alignments, all of which are controversial. In August 2001, an alignment was selected. The Kern River Freeway/Parkway would run from the Renfro Road/Stockdale Highway intersection to Route 178 along the Kern River and just south of Truxton Avenue, and a new freeway along the 7th Standard Road corridor between Route 99 and I-5. Final adoption of the 7th Standard freeway hinges on its incorporation into the General Plans of the Cities of Bakersfield and Shafter. Part of the Southern Beltway has also been approved by the City of Bakersfield, which adopted a partial alignment along the Engle Road corridor in 2001.

    Note that there are no plans to relocate Route 58 off Rosedale Highway. There are plans to transfer jursidiction over Rosedale Highway to the city of Bakersfield. When this transfer occurs, the route will still be signed as Route 58 but will be relinquished to the City. Relocation of Route 58, in this particular question to the Westside Pkwy or North Beltway most likely will not occur, because these facilities will be designed as local freeways.

    In October 2008, the CTC received a notice of preparation of an EIR regarding these routes. The study will evaluate a range of alternative route alignments for Route 58 as a limited access facility from its current terminus at Route 99 to Route 5. Upon completion of the Environmental Impact Report (EIR), a proposed route adoption will be presented to the Commission. The EIR will be divided into three segments:

    (1) Eastern Connection – Connection of Westside Parkway to existing Route 58

    (2) Westside Parkway – Mohawk Street to Heath Road, 6 Phases

    (3) Western Segment – Heath Road to Route 5

    The entire corridor is not fully funded. Funding for the Eastern Connection has been identified in the Regional Transportation Plan, but the project is currently not programmed. Estimated total cost of this segment is $650 million, with construction estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2015. Phase 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the Westside Parkway project are fully funded in the 2008 State Transportation Improvement Program. Estimated cost, capital and support, is $234 million. Phases 5 and 6 are currently not programmed. The Western Segment is currently not programmed. The Westside Parkway and Western Segment portions have been previously addressed in CEQA and NEPA environmental documents; however, the Eastern Connection remains to be evaluated. This EIR will incorporate by reference the previously analyzed segments to revalidate these segments and evaluate current conditions and impacts of the Eastern Connection segment. This EIR and the subsequent route adoption would incorporate the Westside Parkway into the State Highway System after environmental evaluation of impacts to air, noise and traffic volumes. The Westside Parkway will begin construction in phases in FY 2008-09 utilizing the previous EIR. The Western Segment does not have an estimated start construction date.

    There are six alternatives being considered:

    (A) Alternative A proposes to construct a new freeway west of the Route 58/Route 99 interchange. The alignment would travel in a westerly direction for approximately one mile on the south side of Stockdale Highway, at which point it would turn in a northwesterly direction and span the Carrier Canal, Truxtun Avenue, and the Kern River. The proposed route would then connect to the Westside Parkway alignment between Mohawk Street and Coffee Road. The total length of the project from the existing Route 99/Route 58 interchange to Route 5 utilizing Alternative A would be approximately 16.31 miles.

    (B) Alternative B proposes to construct a new freeway west of the Route 58/Route 99 interchange. The alignment would travel in a westerly direction for approximately one-half mile on the south side of Stockdale Highway, at which point it would turn to the northwest, span the Carrier Canal, Truxtun Avenue, and the Kern River. Alternative B would connect to the Westside Parkway alignment at the Mohawk Street interchange. The total length of the project from the existing Route 99/Route 58 interchange to Route 5 utilizing Alternative B is approximately 16.61 miles.

    (C) Alternative C proposes to connect existing Route 58 to the Westside Parkway by means of routing new lanes adjacent and parallel to existing Route 99. These additional lanes would run parallel to and independent of Route 99. Movements between Route 58, Route 99 and the Westside Parkway would likely be facilitated by braided ramps and freeway-to-freeway connector ramps. The total length of the project from Route 99 to Route 5 utilizing Alternative C is approximately 18.51 miles.

    (D) Alternative D proposes to construct a new freeway in the vicinity of Union Avenue (Route 204). The roadway would extend north from Route 58 for approximately one mile, where it would turn to the west and run parallel to the Burlington Northern Santa Fe railroad tracks. Alternative D would connect to the Westside Parkway alignment at the new interchange at Mohawk Street. The total length of the project from Route 58 at Union Avenue to Route 5 is approximately 18.98 miles.

    (No Build) The “No Build” alternative would not construct any improvements. Route 58 – East would continue to end at Route 99 where it would jog to the north to tie into Route 58 – West (Rosedale Highway). The Westside Parkway would be constructed as a local facility but would not connect to Route 58, Route 99, or Route 5.

    (M) Alternative M would evaluate Transit and Transportation Systems Management (TSM) improvements. TSM focuses on low capital, environmentally-responsive improvements that maximize efficiency of existing facilities. An example of TSM improvements would be providing signal interconnects to facilitate the flow of traffic or providing bus turn-out bays to minimize the interruption of buses along a specific route. Specific transit and TSM measures have not been developed at this point. Preliminary traffic data is required to determine the most effective transit and TSM measures. Once the traffic data is available it would be determined if transit and TSM improvements would be separate alternatives or if it is more effective to evaluate a single alternative that includes both transit and TSM improvements.

    2007 CMIA. Two projects were submitted to the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account for funding: widening the route to 6 lanes between Route 99 and Cottonwood Rd. ($62,300K) and widening the Rosedale Hwy to 6 lanes from Allen Rd to Route 99 ($20,871K requested). Neither were recommended for funding.

    In his 2006 Strategic Growth Plan, Governor Schwartzenegger proposed a comprehensive Route 58 project. It converts over thirty miles of two-lane conventional highway to four-lane expressway and constructs an interchange at the Route 58/US 395 junction.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • National Corridor Infrastructure Improvement Program #7: Widening of Rosedale Highway between Route 43 and Route 99 in Bakersfield, and widening of Route 178 between Route 99 and D Street in Bakersfield. $60,000,000.

    Westside Parkway

    The "Kern River Freeway/Parkway" is also known as the Westside Parkway. The City of Bakersfield is the lead agency for this project. Construction is currently programmed for the 2006- 2007 Fiscal Year. The following information is derived from Slide Show Slide Show for for the Bakersfield the Bakersfield Systems Study Alternative No. 15 Systems Study Alternative No. 15 prepared by the Bakersfield Dept of Public Works. The City of Bakersfield also maintains the Bakersfield Freeways site on the project. Note that there are no plans to make these freeways part of the state highway system.

    The Westside Parkway follows a similar route to the Kern River Freeway Project that Caltrans had been working on for many years. Caltrans completed a Tier 1 Environmental Document for the Kern River Freeway Project, which allows the City to now acquire right of way for the Westside Parkway Project. The Tier 1 Document also provides the City a base from which to develop the Tier 2 or Construction Level Environmental Document for the Westside Parkway. Starting at the west end of the project at Heath Road, the Westside Parkway is planned to begin as a four lane divided highway. However, the right of way being acquired for the Westside Parkway will ultimately allow 8 lanes to be constructed, and bridges and other structures are planned to be constructed for this ultimate 8 lane width even if not all the lanes are constructed initially. The Parkway will be at grade (not elevated or depressed) at Heath Road and there will be a signalized intersection with Heath Road. There will also be a signalized intersection at Stockdale Highway, but this will be the last traffic signal on the Westside Parkway. Exit ramps will exist at Allen Road, Calloway Drive, Coffee Road, and Mohawk Street. As the Parkway continues east, it will go under Renfro Road. Whether the Westside Parkway is depressed and Renfro Road remains at its current grade, or whether the Parkway remains at grade and Renfro is elevated, or whether there is a mixture of these two scenarios is currently being analyzed as part of the Tier 2 Environmental Document.

    Continuing east, the Parkway remains at grade and crosses the Rosedale Rio Bravo Water Recharge Area. At Allen Road, the Westside Parkway is currently planned to be at grade with Allen Road elevated to go over the Parkway. The Allen Road interchange has been designed to be offset to the east, minimizing the amount of land needed from the Rosedale Rio Bravo Water Storage District for the Westside Parkway. The City is also purchasing property along the south side of the Westside Parkway east of Allen Road that will be provided to the Rosedale Rio Bravo Water Storage District for groundwater recharge. This additional recharge area is to replace the District recharge property west of Allen Road needed for the Westside Parkway. At Allen Road, the Westside Parkway is planned to expand to 6 lanes as it continues east. As the Parkway approaches Jewetta Avenue, it is planned to start becoming depressed below existing grade. Jewetta will go over the Parkway and will be elevated about 10 feet above existing grade, and the Westside Parkway will be depressed about 12 feet below existing grade at the Jewetta crossing. Calloway Drive is also planned to go over the Westside Parkway. It is hoped that the Westside Parkway can be depressed in this area and Calloway can remain at its existing grade. But studies regarding shallow groundwater in the area are currently underway, and these studies could result in the parkway not being able to be entirely depressed and which would require Calloway to be partially elevated.

    East from Calloway, the Westside Parkway is currently proposed to remain at existing grade until it begins to approach Coffee Road. At Coffee Road, the Parkway would be elevated and go over existing Coffee Road. It is planned to continue elevated and cross over the Friant-Kern Canal. The westbound off ramp is planned to exit onto Brimhall Road as shown. After crossing the Friant-Kern Canal, the Parkway will continue east and south of the Shell Refinery. A portion of the Cross Valley Canal is planned to be realigned in this area to allow for the Parkway construction.

    At Mohawk Street the Westside Parkway will probably be at grade with Mohawk going over the Parkway. The extension of Mohawk Street between Rosedale Highway and Truxtun Avenue is currently planned for construction in 2005, prior to the Westside Parkway beginning construction in 2006. Mohawk is planned to have 6 lanes and a median island, and will go under the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe (BN&SF) railroad tracks and over the Parkway, the Cross Valley Canal, and the Kern River.

    The Parkway will then continue east across the Kern River where it will tie in with Truxtun Avenue just west of Route 99. The first phase of the Westside Parkway construction will be at the east end of the project from either Truxtun Avenue or Mohawk Street, to either Coffee Road or Calloway Drive. The next phases will continue construction west to Allen Road, and then on to Heath Road. The entire project is currently slated to be complete by 2009.

    In August 2008, the CTC approved using Proposition 1B funds for Phase 2 of the Westside Parkway. This involved construction of a new 6 lane expressway in Bakersfield, from Mohawk Street to Coffee Road. The funding would be used to complete right of way acquisition to construct new facility with 6 lanes, connecting Mohawk Street and Coffee Road, and to provide east/west traffic congestion relief, improved traffic operations, providing new access, and improved safety conditions.

     

     

    Other WWW Links

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.


  4. From Route 99 to Route 15 near Barstow via Bakersfield and Mojave.

    Upon a determination by the commission that it is in the best interests of the state to do so, the commission may, upon terms and conditions approved by it, relinquish to the City of Bakersfield or the County of Kern the portion of Route 58 that is located within the city limits of that city if the city or county agrees to accept it. The following conditions shall apply upon relinquishment: (1) The relinquishment shall become effective on the date following the county recorder's recordation of the relinquishment resolution containing the commission's approval of the terms and conditions of the relinquishment. (2) On and after the effective date of the relinquishment, the relinquished portion of Route 58 shall cease to be a state highway. (3) The portion of Route 58 relinquished under this subdivision shall be ineligible for future adoption under Section 81. (4) For the portion of Route 58 that is relinquished under this subdivision, the City of Bakersfield or the County of Kern shall install and maintain within the jurisdiction of the city signs directing motorists to the continuation of Route 58. Added by AB 1858, Chapter 315, September 18, 2006.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

    In 2006, Chapter 315 permitted relinquishment of the portion of this route in Bakersfield.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This segment was LRN 58, but was signed as US 466. The portion between Route 99 and Route 14 was defined in 1931; the remainder (to Route 15) was defined in 1919.

     

    Status

    In September 2003, a new four lane freeway bypass near the town of Mojave. Diamond interchanges are located at each end and at Route 14. The bypass begins just east of the junction of Route 58 and Randsburg Cutoff Road and ends near Airport Road a couple of miles east of Mojave at Route 58. This may eventually be a continuation of I-40. According to Caltrans, the old routing will become Business Route 58. An interchange is being built at the south end of the Mojave Bypass for WB Route 58 to SB Route 14 and NB Route 14 to EB Route 58 movements. This will create a single stop light for those most common movements at the existing Route 14/Route 58 intersection. For other movements, you will travel north on Route 14 all the way to Route 58 through Mojave. There are currently insufficient traffic volumes for a Route 14 freeway to the Route 58 freeway.

    The Mojave Bypass will end on its eastern end at California City Blvd., about where the current freeway alignment begins west of Boron. This means that Route 58 will be full freeway from Bakersfield (Route 99) to the Kern County / San Bernardino County line EXCEPT for two at-grade intersections west of Tehachapi. Specifically, there is a 2-lane segment of Route 58 that runs about 4 miles of both sides of Kramer Junction (Route 58/US 395 intersection). However, this isn't all there yet, as Paul D. DeRocco reports that the bypass ends at around 25th St. in Mojave, and there remain four or five at-grade intersections before the freeway starts up again just east of California City Blvd.

    There are also plans to have an interchange with 20 Mule Team Parkway on the new Route 58 freeway.

    There is then a portion of 4-lane expressway (10 miles or so), and then 2-lane highway through Hinkley, and just past Lenwood Road west of Barstow. Caltrans proposes to construct a 4-lane divided freeway/expressway to close the 10-mile gap from 2.8 miles west of Hidden River Road (PM 21.8 ) to 0.7 miles east of Lenwood Road (PM 31.1). There is currently an environmental study in process.

    The new portion of the Route 58 freeway then begins, from ½ mile east of Lenwood Road to I-15. Caltrans has begun the process of scoping out the Hinkley section of Route 58 for upgrade to 4-lane expressway and the portion surrounding Kramer Junction won't be too far behind. In 2007, funding for construction of the Hinkley 4-lane expressway ($130,400K) was requested from the Corridor Mobility Improvement Account (CMIA), but the project was non-recommended.

    There are also plans for widening and realigning a 13-mile segment of Route 58 centered on Kramer Junction, where Route 58 intersects with US 395, in San Bernardino County. This section of Route 58 is currently a non-standard 2-lane highway between a 4-lane freeway to the west and a 4-lane expressway to the east, and the project would close this gap. This 2-lane segment includes an at-grade signalized intersection at Route 58/US 395 (Kramer Junction), an at-grade crossing of the Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) railroad west of that intersection, and numerous uncontrolled at-grade driveway and street access points. There is also an at-grade railroad crossing on US 395 north of the Route 58/US 395 intersection that slows traffic and contributes to accidents when traffic backs up during train crossings.

    Near Barstow, the new Route 58 interchange has been completed, and the old interchange is now signed as plain old "Old Highway 58"—no shield, no nothing. The old routing was up for relinquishment in April 2004. According to Joe Rouse, the original plan was to build a freeway tying in with the then-existing highway just west of Barstow (about ¾ mile E of where Community Blvd ends at Old Hwy 58). A large interchange and short freeway spur was built on I-15 as part of that. This spur ended at Main Street and the interchange was signed as such. When the new Route 58 freeway was completed southwest of Barstow, this interchange was removed and replaced with an extension of L Street and a new diamond interchange.

    The October 2004 CTC agenda showed a resolution to relinquish right of way in the County of Kern, between Business Route 58 West to 1.9 km east of Br 58 East, consisting of reconstructed and relocated county roads, frontage roads and cul-de-sacs. The County, by cooperative agreement, dated October 8, 2002, waived the 90-day notice requirement and agreed to accept title upon relinquishment by the State. ([PDF] ref)

    The April 2005 CTC agenda showed a resolution to relinquish right of way in the City of Barstow, between Irwin Road and I-15, consisting of superseded highway right of way.

    In September 2006, the CTC considered a resolution to relinquish right of way in the County of Kern, near Mojave, at Randsburg Cutoff Road and along Business Route 58, from 2.7 miles northerly of State Route 14 to about 4.8 miles easterly of State Route 14, consisting of superseded highway. (6-Ker-58-PM 107.5 and 108.9/117.8)

    The July 2005 CTC agenda showed a funding request in Mojave from 4.1 kilometer west of West Junction Route 14 to west Junction Route 14, and from east Junction Route 14 to 6.8 km east of east Junction Route 14 to rehabilitate Route 58 for relinquishment.

     

    Naming

    The segment of this route between Route 99 and Route 184 is named the "Rosa Parks Highway". This highway was named to honor Rosa Parks on her 89th birthday. Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913, in Tuskegee, Alabama. On December 1, 1955, she was arrested in Montgomery, Alabama for refusing to give up her seat on a bus to a white man. This will for equal rights was considered the start of the equal rights movements, and was the impetus for a boycott of Montgomery buses, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., by approximately 42,000 African-Americans for 381 days. This boycott let to the United States Supreme Court ruling that Montgomery's segregation law was unconstitutional on November 13, 1956; on December 20, 1956, Montgomery officials were ordered to desegregate buses. As a result of this event, Rosa Parks has been considered to be the "Mother of the Modern Day Civil Rights Movement". Her courage and conviction laid the foundation for equal rights for all Americans and for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. She was also the first woman to join the Montgomery chapter of the NAACP, and was an active volunteer for the Montgomery Voters League. She cofounded the Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development in 1987 to motivate and direct youth to achieve their highest potential through the "Pathways to Freedom" program. She is the recipient of many awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the Congressional Gold Medal of Honor, and the first International Freedom Conductor Award from the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 134, Chapter 110, on August 15, 2002.

    The segment of this route between Route 184 and the Kern County/San Bernadino county line is named the Kern County Korean War Veterans Memorial Highway. It was named in honor of the Veterans of the Korean War from Kern County. From June 25, 1950, until July 27, 1953, the United States was involved in a bloody conflict with North Korea and China following the North Korean invasion of South Korea. Of the 1,789,000 Americans that served in Korea for the purpose of preventing the Communist takeover of South Korea, 36,516 Americans died, 103,284 were wounded, 7,245 were prisoners of war, and 8,176 are still unaccounted for. There were 42 Kern County military personnel killed in action in Korea, three died while missing, two died while captured, and six died from wounds, and approximately 8,120 Korean War veterans lived in Kern County as of 2004. In 2004, thirty-six Korean veterans organized as the Korean War Veterans Association (KWVA), Charles N. Bikakis Chapter, P.O. Box 10133, Bakersfield, CA 93389-0133. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 209, Chapter 194, September 16, 2004.

    In Bakersfield, this is named the "Bakersfield-Tehachapi Highway", based on its endpoints.

     

    Business Routes
    • Bakersfield: Edison Highway
    • Tehachapi: Between Exit 148 (Route 202) and Exit 151, along Tehachapi Boulevard.

     

    Named Structures

    This route also has the following Safety Roadside Rest Areas:

    • Boron, in Kern County, 3.9 mi W of Boron.

    Additionally, at Post Mile 18.3 in San Bernardino County, there is a memorial to CHP Officer Kenneth L. Archer and Officer Robert G. Carey. California Highway Patrol Officer Robert G. Carey was piloting a departmental helicopter on February 24, 1982, in response to an emergency call of a downed aircraft in the Harper Lake area north of Route 58, when he and his fellow officer, flight observer Kenneth L. Archer, gave their lives in the line of duty as their helicopter crashed at Harper Lake. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 174, Chapter 143, September 18, 2000.

     

    Business Routes

    Boron: Twenty Mule Team Blvd.

     

    National Trails

    The segment of this route from Bakersfield to Route 155 was historically named the "Lions Trail".

     

    Scenic Highway

    [SHC 263.4] From Route 14 near Mojave to Route 15 near Barstow.

     

    Freeway

    [SHC 253.4] Entire portion. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

exitinfo.gif
  • Cal-NExUS Exit Numbering: Route 58
  • Western Exit Guide: Route 58 (Jeff Stapleton)

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

US Highway Shield This was a portion of US 466. Between US 101 and Bakersfield, US 466 consisted of the present-day Route 41 and Route 46. Between Bakersfield and the Nevada border, US 466 ran concurrant with US 91, now I-15.

Route 58 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 58 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Other WWW Links

 

Interstate Submissions

Submitted for inclusion in the interstate system in 1956 and 1968; not accepted either time. Route 58 is constructed to freeway standards from the jct of Route 99 in Bakersfield to 19 miles east to the jct with Route 223, and begins again as freeway at a point .5 miles east of the Route 223 intersection to approximately 1 mile before Tehachapi Pass. Freeway begins again near the Edwards Air Force base for approximately 19 miles to a point east of Boron.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

This route was designated as a "Blue Star Memorial Highway" by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 203, Ch. 324 in 1969.

 


Overall statistics for Route 58:

  • Total Length (1995): 241 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 290 to 63,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 216; Sm. Urban 7; Urbanized: 17.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 236 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 241 mi.
  • These statistics represent the highway as of 1994. At that time, there was a 5 mile unconstructed adopted routing in Barstow that replaced the traverable highway. Once that routing was completed, the route would be reduced to 235 miles. I estimate that this would reduce the Urbanized milage by 6 miles, and would similarly reduce the FAP milage.
  • Counties Traversed: San Luis Obispo, Kern, San Bernardino.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.13] Between Route 5 and Route 15.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that became LRN 58 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as the route from Mojave to Needles via Barstow. In 1925, Chapter 279 authorized the highway commission “...to acquire necessary rights of way and to construct and maintain a highway, which shall constitute and be a state highway, extending from Needles or from a point to be selected by the California Highway Commission upon the route of the state highway extending from San Bernardino to Needles in the county of San Bernardino to a point to be selected by the California Highway Commission and the state of Arizona opposite the town of Topock, Arizona or at such other point thereon as may be selected by said California Highway Commission...”

In 1931, Chapter 82 authorized extension of the route from Bakersfield to Mojave. In 1933, the route was extended further, from [LRN 2] near Santa Margarita to [LRN 4] near Bakersfield. By 1935, the route was codified in the highway code as follows:

[LRN 2] near Santa Margarita to the Arizona State Line near Topock Arizona via Bakersfield, Mojave, Barstow, and Needles

Later in 1935, it was amended by Chapter 513 to add the following, "together with an extension from a point on such [LRN 58] near Needles easterly by the most direct and practicable route to the Arizona-California line at the Colorado River, including a bridge over and across said river to be constructed, owned, operated, and maintained jointly with the state of Arizona". This definition remained until the renumbering in 1963.

The route was signed as Route 178 between US 101 (LRN 2) and Bakersfield, as US 466 between Bakersfield and Barstow, and as US 66 between Barstow and the Arizona border. After 1964, this routing was signed as Route 58 between Santa Margarita (US 101) and Barstow. Between Barstow and the Arizona line, portions were the unsigned National Trails Highway ("old US 66"), and portions were I-40. It should be noted that this is one of the few routes where the pre-1963 legislative route number was the post 1963 signed route number.


State Shield

State Route 59



Routing
  1. From Route 152 northerly to Route 99 near Merced.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 123, and was signed as Route 59. LRN 123 was defined in 1933.

    Route 59 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 59 between 1934 and 1964.

     

    Status

    There are plans to widen this to a four lane expressway near Merced. The EIR was completed in September 2002 per CTC Agenda.


  2. From Route 99 near Merced to Snelling.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    This was LRN 123, and was signed as Route 59. LRN 123 was defined in 1933. Evidently, there were plans to extend this North of Snelling, but this never made it into the legislative definition.

    Route 59 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 59 between 1934 and 1964.

     

    Status

    In June 2007, the CTC considered a project in Merced County to make roadway improvements near Snelling. This project is fully funded in the 2006 State Highway Operation and Protection Program. The total estimated project cost is $5,352,000. Construction is estimated to begin in Fiscal Year 2008-09. The project will involve construction activities in the environmentally sensitive habitat of the California tiger salamander and vernal pool fairy shrimp, both federally listed threatened species. Due to these factors, a Mitigated Negative Declaration is being completed for this project.

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Status

County Route Shield From Snelling, a County Route J59 continues N to Route 120. This is likely signed for continuity with Route 59.

 


Overall statistics for Route 59:

  • Total Length (1995): 34 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,500 to 14,900
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 29; Urbanized: 5.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 3 mi; FAS: 31 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 2 mi; Minor Arterial: 16 mi; Collector: 16 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Madera, Merced.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 59 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as running from Lancaster to Baileys. In 1931, Chapter 82 extended it from from [LRN 31] near Cajon Pass to [LRN 23] near Lancaster. In 1933, it was extended further, from [LRN 31] near Cajon Pass to [LRN 43] via Lake Arrowhead. In 1935, it was codified into the state highway code as follows:

  1. [LRN 4] near Gorman to Bailey's
  2. Bailey's to [LRN 23] near Lancaster
  3. [LRN 23] near Lancaster to [LRN 31] near Cajon Pass
  4. [LRN 31] near Cajon Pass to [LRN 43] via Lake Arrowhead

In 1957, Chapter 36 changed the description and combined the first three segments, giving "[LRN 4] near Gorman to [LRN 31] near Cajon Pass"

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 4 near Gorman to LRN 31 near Cajon Pass.

    This was signed as Route 138. It also includes the proposed "Metropolitan Bypass" routing of Route 138 (unconstructed), as well as what is present-day signed Route 138 (but legislative Route 48) between present-day Route 138 and Route 14. This was cosigned with Route 2 from near Wrightwood to the Cajon Pass.

  2. From LRN 31 near Cajon Pass to LRN 43 via Lake Arrowhead.

    This was signed as Route 2 between Cajon Pass and Route 18. This is present-day Route 138.


State Shield

State Route 60



Routing
  1. From Route 10 near the Los Angeles River in Los Angeles to Route 215 in Riverside via Pomona.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    As defined in 1963, this segment ran from "Route 10 near Soto Street in Los Angeles to Route 395 via Pomona and Riverside."

    In 1968, Chapter 282 changed the western end to reflect various reroutings and redesignations that occured in downtown Los Angeles, making the origin "Route 10 near the Los Angeles River in Los Angeles"

    In 1969, Chapter 294 changed the reference to "Route 395" to "Route 15".

    In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed the reference to "Route 15" to "Route 194"

    In 1982, Chapter 681 changed the reference to "Route 194" to "Route 215".

    In 1986, Chapter 928 changed the definition of the terminus of this segment to "Route 215 in Riverside via Pomona"

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This routing was originally signed as follows:

    1. (Pre-San Bernadino Freeway): US 60/US 70/US 99 out of downtown Los Angeles along Valley Blvd to Holt. This was LRN 77 as far as the Valley/Garvey junction. The remainder of the route may have been LRN 77 at one time, but was no longer part of the state highway system by 1963. LRN 77 was defined in 1931. The route started at US 101 near the current "San Bernardino Split". US 70 was added in 1935. The terminus moved W to the "Four-Level Interchange" (i.e., the present-day Route 110/US 101 junction), and US 99 was cosigned, in 1947. In 1958, the terminus was pushed back to the split.

      The route then continued, with the same signage, S on Arroyo Ave to Bellview to 5th Avenue in Pomona, E along 5th, then E along California St. and Ontario Blvd. This was LRN 19, defined in 1931.

    2. (Post-San Bernadino Freeway; pre-Pomona Freeway): Between downtown Los Angeles and the junction with Route 71. This was LRN 26, defined in 1931. At one time, this was routed as just US 60 along Valley Blvd, with a portion along Main Street in La Puente. During this time, US 99 was routed along US 66. A later routing would cosign US 60 with US 70 and US 99 along Garvey.

      The route then continued, with the same signage, S on Route 71 to 5th Avenue in Pomona, then E along California St. and Ontario Blvd. This was LRN 19, defined in 1931.

    3. (Post-Pomona Freeway) The proposed freeway routing of this segment was LRN 172 between downtown Los Angeles and the US 60/Route 57 S junction. LRN 172 was defined in 1933. This is now signed as Route 60.

    4. As US 60 between Route 57 near Pomona and what is now the Route 215 junction just W of Riverside. That junction was originally the US 91/US 395 junction. This segment was LRN 19, and is present-day Route 60. This portion of LRN 19 was defined in 1931. At one point, this ran along Sunnymead Blvd. in Moreno Valley.

    Note the implication of the above: US 60 was signed after 1931.

     

    Status

    A small section of this route was up for relinquishment on the February 2003 CTC agenda: the section near PM 11.0 in the City of South El Monte. This is probably a section of the original routing.

    There is a significant project to reconstruct the Route 91/I-215/Route 60 interchange. Details may be found here. The project includes rebuilding the Spruce Street bridge; relocating the existing eastbound on-ramp to Route 60 from Orange Street to Main Street; and widening the existing highway undercrossing bridges at University Avenue, Mission Inn Avenue and Third Street. There are also plans to replace the existing southbound (to I-215) loop ramp with a direct freeway-to-freeway connector, as well as replacing the northbound to westbound (to Route 91) loop ramp with a direct freeway-to-freeway connector. There are also plans to remove the existing I-215 southbound off-ramp and northbound on-ramp at Spruce Street. These ramps will be relocated to Route 91 as an eastbound off-ramp and a westbound on-ramp at the new Spruce Street overcrossing bridge. The project will also realign East La Cadena Drive between 1st and Spruce Street, and provide a grade separation at the railroad crossing, as well as realigning West La Cadena Drive to accommodate the new interchange connectors. The Route 91 main line will be widened, and auxiliary lanes added between University and the 60/91/215 interchange. Additionally, I-215 (Route 60) will be widened from the 60/91/215 interchange to the 60/215 junction, including extending the existing carpool lanes from University Avenue to the 60/215 junction, and providing auxiliary lanes leading to and departing from the new freeway connectors. The existing I-215 (Route 60) Blaine Street, Iowa Avenue and Linden Street overcrossing bridges will be reconstructed to span the new freeway widening, and the existing I-215 (Route 60) Blaine Street, University Avenue and Central Avenue/Watkins Drive interchanges will be improved, including ramp widening. Sycamore Canyon Boulevard will be realigned at Central Avenue. The project will construct a new interchange at Martin Luther King Boulevard, and remove the existing El Cerrito Drive interchange. The existing railroad overhead bridges at Down Street and Chicago Avenue will be widened. At the 60/215 junction, a truck by-pass connector will be constructed from southbound I-215 to eastbound Route 60 and southbound I-215. On Route 60, the existing Day Street interchange will be modified. On I-215, the Box Springs Road interchange will be rebuilt with an overcrossing bridge. Lastly, there will be a a concrete barrier on northbound I-215 at the junction to westbound Route 60. This project has taken three years, cost over $317-million, and should conclude in Spring 2008. Caltrans officials plan to open two new connector ramps by the end of 2007, including one that soars 72 feet high and measures just over a mile long.

    In April 2007, the CTC considered a request for a new connection at Valley Way. This would be an interchange to Route 60 in the county of Riverside, at Post Mile 7.5. The existing connection has difficulties due to increasing traffic volumes on Route 60 and congestion at the Valley Way interchange. This project will revise the connection to Route 60 at Valley Way. The Commission adopted the portion of Route 60 in the vicinity of Valley Way as a freeway on November 28, 1941. The existing route is a sixlane facility west of the Valley Way interchange and an eight-lane facility east of the Valley Way interchange. Future widening to ten lanes is planned west of the Valley Way interchange to accommodate high occupancy vehicle lanes. In August 1992, a Project Study Report (PSR) was approved to modify the existing Valley Way interchange. The Project Report was approved on July 12, 2005. Route 60, including the Valley Way interchange, was constructed to freeway standards in 1962. The continuing urbanization of Riverside County has placed more demand on the Valley Way ramps to and from Route 60. This project will remove the existing eastbound diamond exit ramp at Valley Way and construct a new eastbound exit hook ramp one-half mile west of Valley Way connecting to the Mission Boulevard/Byrne Road intersection. A new eastbound entrance hook ramp will be constructed adjacent to the new eastbound exit hook ramp. The existing eastbound diamond entrance ramp at Valley Way will remain in operation. The revised interchange at Valley Way will be an elongated interchange. The proposed improvements will increase the capacity of the existing interchange and considerably improve interchange operations.

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #587: Construct the Diamond Bar On-Off Ramp at Lemon Ave on Route 60. $9,600,000.

     

     

    Commuter Lanes

    In San Bernardino County, HOV lanes exist between the Los Angeles County line and the Riverside County line. These opened in February 1997, require two or more occupants, and are always in operation.

    HOV lanes are planned, under construction or opened as follows:

    • I-605 to Brea Canyon.
    • Brea Canyon to Route 57 NB. This will include a direct HOV-to-HOV connector.
    • Route 57 NB to the San Bernardino County line.
    • From I-15 to Valley Way. This is TCRP Project #63. $200K for the funding of this project was on the September 2002 CTC agenda. $21K of Phase 4 funding was on the March 2005 CTC agenda. This addition will provide the missing portion between the completed westerly section from the Los Angeles County line to the I-15 junction and the currently under construction section, between Valley Way and I-215. The project involves adding 2 HOV and 2 mixed-flow lanes, widening 5 undercrossings and 1 overhead. Construction is scheduled to be completed in October, 2007. This project appears to have had significant cost overruns, at least according to the September 2005 CTC agenda.
    • From Valley Way to Route 215.

    According to Don Hagstrom in May 2003, Caltrans has announced the beginning of a long-awaited project to connect the two carpool (HOV) lanes between the northbound Route 57 (Orange) Freeway and the eastbound Route 60 (Pomona) Freeway. It is unclear if this is a two-way connector.

    According to the Los Angeles Times in September 2006, Caltrans was set to begin creating the HOV lanes between the Route 57 and I-605 freeways in January 2007. The $100-million project includes sound walls. Caltrans will use the existing freeway median for the new lanes. Construction began in early 2006 to add 7½ miles of carpool lanes between Route 91 and the Valley Way exit in Riverside County. The new lanes will cost an estimated $55 million and are slated to open in late 2007. This may be one of the phases of TCRP #63. By 2010, there should be 48 miles of continuous HOV lanes through Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside counties. As of April 2007, the completion date had been changed to 2011.

     

    Business Routes

    Riverside: Mission Blvd and University Avenue appears to be the old Route 60 Business Loop. There may be some signs remaining.

     

    Naming

    The I-5/I-10/Route 60/US 101 interchange, commonly referred to as the East Los Angeles Interchange, is named the “Medal of Honor Recipient , Eugene A. Obregon, USMC, Memorial Interchange” (it was originally named the “Marine Private First Class Eugene A. Obregon Interchange”). This interchange was named in memory of Medal of Honor Recipient Eugene A. Obregon, USMC. While serving as an ammunition carrier with Golf Company, Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment, First Marine Division (Reinforced), during the Korean War, PFC Obregon was killed in action on September 26, 1950. The machine-gun squad of Private Obregon was temporarily pinned down by hostile fire; and during this time, he observed a fellow marine fall wounded in the line of fire. Armed only with a pistol, Private Obregon unhesitantly dashed from his cover position to the side of the fallen marine. Firing his pistol with one hand as he ran, Private Obregon grasped his comrade by the arm, and despite the great peril to himself, dragged the marine to the side of the road. Still under enemy fire, Private Obregon was bandaging the marine's wounds when hostile troops began approaching their position. Quickly seizing the wounded marine's rifle, Private Obregon placed his own body as a shield in front of the wounded marine and lay there firing accurately and effectively into the approaching enemy troops until he, himself, was fatally wounded by enemy machine-gun fire. By his courageous fighting spirit, and loyal devotion to duty, Private Obregon enabled his fellow marines to rescue the wounded marine. By fate and courage, Private Obregon is one of the valiant Mexican Americans to receive the Congressional Medal of Honor, the nation's highest military honor for bravery. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 109, Resolution Chapter 66, on 6/26/2008.

    The segment of Route 60 between its interchange with I-10 at post-mile 0.118 and the Indiana Street overpass at post-mile 1.94 in the City of Los Angeles is named the "Los Angeles Police Officer Steven Gajda Memorial Highway" This segment was named in memory of LAPD Officer Steven Gajda, born on October 30, 1968, in Parkridge, Illinois. Steven Gajda served as a helicopter crew member in the United States Army, and Steven Gajda entered the Los Angeles Police Academy on May 21, 1990, where he earned a reputation as a conscientious cadet. After his appointment as an officer with the Los Angeles Police Department, Steven Gajda was assigned to the department's anti-gang unit, called the Community Resources Against Street Hoodlums (CRASH) unit, which operates in the most violent neighborhoods in Los Angeles. While serving in the CRASH unit, Gajda was shot on December 31, 1997, when identified gang members wanted on murder charges were fleeing the scene of a New Year's Eve disturbance. Steven Gajda died from these injuries the following day, January 1, 1998, his wife's birthday. Steven Gajda was known as an officer who was willing to accept responsibility and for his humor and artistic talents, drawing caricatures that showed life with the CRASH unit, and his spirit always brought support to his fellow officers. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 38, Resolution Chapter 90, on 7/10/2007.

    The segment of Route 60 from I-5 to Route 83 in Chino is named the "Pomona Freeway". It was named by the State Highway Commission on November 15, 1955. The first segment opened in 1965. It was named because it traverses the city of Pomona, CA, which was named in 1875 after the Roman goddess of orchards.

    The segment of Route 60 between I-605 and Rosemead Boulevard, in Los Angeles County is named the "Los Angeles County Deputy Sheriff Jerry Ortiz Memorial Highway". This segment was named in memory of Deputy Jerry Ortiz of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department who was killed in the line of duty on June 24, 2005, in Hawaiian Gardens while conducting an investigation. Deputy Ortiz faithfully served the residents of Los Angeles County as a Gang Enforcement Deputy. He was a resident of Diamond Bar and served in the United States Army from 1988 to 1996. He was also a boxing fan and a member of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department Boxing Team. The designation recognizes the hazardous work, serious responsibility, and strong commitment that Deputy Ortiz willingly accepted during his 15 years as a law enforcement officer. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 27, Resolution Chapter 68, on 7/32007.

    The segment of Route 60 from Milliken Avenue to Euclid Avenue is named the "CYA Counselor Ineasie M. Baker Memorial Freeway". This segment was named in memory of Ineasie M. Baker. Ineasie M. Baker, a graduate of California State University, Fullerton (1975) with a degree in Physical Education, eventually became a correctional officer and was later promoted to a counselor for the California Youth Authority (CYA) She worked for CYA for 13 years, and was highly respected and often worked long hours to fulfill the needs of others. She was known as a "dedicated and inspirational counselor whose main concern was the inmates." On August 9, 1996, Ineasie M. Baker was slain at the Herman G. Stark Youth Correctional Facility, an institution for young adult criminals, where she worked. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 63, Resolution Chapter 115, on 9/12/2005.

    The segment of Route 60 in the City of Pomona, beginning with Phillips Ranch Road and ending at Reservoir Street is named the "CHP Officer Thomas J. Steiner Memorial Highway". This segment was memory of CHP Officer Thomas J. Steiner, who was killed in the line of duty in the afternoon of April 21, 2004. Officer Thomas J. Steiner was slain by an armed assailant while leaving Los Angeles Superior Court in Pomona, and succumbed to his injuries as a result of the assault. Thomas J. Steiner was born on February 14, 1969, in Richmond, Virginia. His family lived in Long Beach, California, where he attended and graduated from Millikan High School. Prior to beginning his career with the CHP, Thomas J. Steiner attended Cal Poly Pomona where he received a Bachelor's Degree in business. He joined the CHP on October 19, 1998. After successfully completing his academy training, he reported to the Santa Fe Springs Area, where he made significant contributions to traffic safety and to the motoring public while assigned to the Santa Fe Springs Area office. He served five years as a sworn peace officer for the California Highway Patrol and was known by his fellow officers for his dedication to the department and to the protection of the citizens of our state. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) 20, Resolution Chapter 2, on 1/31/2006. The actual naming ceremony was held in April 2008.

    The segment from Route 83 to Route 215 is not officially named.


  2. From Route 215 near Moreno Valley to Route 10 near Beaumont.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined as "Route 395 to Beaumont."

    In 1969, Chapter 294 changed the reference to "Route 395" to "Route 15".

    In 1976, Chapter 1354 changed the reference to "Route 15" to "Route 194", and changed the terminus to "Route 10 near Beaumont."

    In 1982, Chapter 681 changed the reference to "Route 194" to "Route 215".

    In 1986, Chapter 928 changed the definition of the origin of this segment to "Route 215 east of Riverside"

    In 1994, Chapter 1220 changed the origin again, this time to "Route 215 near Moreno Valley"

    Riverside International Raceway (which existed from 1959 to 1988 and held NASCAR, IMSA and Indycar/CART events) was located at the Day Street exit off of Route 60, where Moreno Valley Mall now stands. This site can also be accessed via the Eucalyptus Avenue exit off of I-215. A housing development just east of the mall, off of Atlantic Circle, contains several street names after famous racers: (Mario) Andretti Street; (Sir Jack) Brabham Street; (Cale) Yarborough Court; (Roger) Penske Street; (Dan) Gurney Place; (John) Surtees Court; and (Mark) Donohue Court.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    US Highway Shield This segment was signed as US 60, and was LRN 19, defined in 1931.

     

    Status

    The SAFETEA-LU act, enacted in August 2005 as the reauthorization of TEA-21, provided the following expenditures on or near this route:

    • High Priority Project #2153: Design and construct new interchange at Potrero Blvd and Route 60 in Beaumont. $1,600,000.

     

     

    Commuter Lanes

    HOV lanes are planned from the E Route 215 junction to Redlands Blvd.

     

    Naming

    This segment of Route 60 is named the "Moreno Valley Freeway". It was named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 45, Chapter 103, in 1989.

     

    Named Structures

    The Nason Street Interchange in Moreno Valley is named the "Sonny Bono Memorial Interchange". As if you didn't know the story, Sonny Bono left his boyhood home in Detroit, Michigan for Hollywood, California at a young age to become a star in show business. His quest led him to a laborer's job as a meat truck driver and deliveryman and then in promotions for a record company. Sonny Bono parlayed those jobs into an opportunity to showcase his ability as a showman and entertainer. Those talents eventually led to a career of fame as a recording and television star as part of the duo Sonny and Cher. Later, Sonny Bono pursued another dream as a restaurant owner in Palm Springs. His concern on behalf of his community as a businessman led him to public service eventually leading to his election as Mayor of Palm Springs in 1988. Sonny Bono's public service career eventually led him to the halls of the Congress of the United States in 1994 as the Representative from the Coachella Valley and Western Riverside County areas of southern California. Sonny Bono's achievements as a Congressman brought needed national attention to the environmental needs of the Salton Sea; he also worked on behalf of bringing the needed federal funding for transportation and infrastructure projects for the Coachella Valley, leading to funding for significant highway improvements throughout the Coachella Valley and Riverside County. Named by Senate Concurrent Resolution 99, Chapter 160, on September 20, 2000.

exitinfo.gif
  • Cal-NExUS Exit Numbering: Route 60
  • Western Exit Guide: Route 60 (Jeff Stapleton)

 

Other WWW Links

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

US 60 was signed as part of the original signage of US routes in the mid-1930s. It originally continued to the Nevada state line concurrant with US 70 along LRN 26 and LRN 64.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. All of part (1) and the portion of part (2) from Route 215 to Beaumont is constructed to freeway standards. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 60:

  • Total Length (1995): 70 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 28,500 to 237,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 7; Sm. Urban 2; Urbanized: 61.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 70 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 70 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Riverside.

According to the Los Angeles Times in September 2006: An average of 341,000 vehicles a day drove past the Route 57 interchange in Diamond Bar in 2005, up from 287,000 in 1995. In Moreno Valley, 69,000 vehicles passed the Perris Boulevard exit in 2005, an increase of 24,000 vehicles a day since 1995. More than 1,200 drivers a day on average used the carpool lanes on the Route 60 in Los Angeles County during the morning rush hour in 2005, according to a Caltrans report.

 

National Trails

De Anza Auto Route This route is part of the De Anza National Historic Trail.

US Highway Shield The portion of this route from Moreno/Beaumont to Blythe (and likely beyond into Arizona) was part of the "Jack Rabbit Trail".

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 60 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as running from San Juan Capistranto to Oxnard. In 1925, Chapter 309 extended the route via an act that directed the department “...to acquire necessary rights of way and to construct and maintain a highway, which shall constitute and be a state highway, and to take over any existing public highway along the route hereinafter designated as a part of said state highway, from the town of Oxnard to a point to be selected by the state highway commission at or near the town of El Rio, Ventura county, upon the state highway extending from Los Angeles to Ventura.”

In 1935, the route was codified into the highway code as:

[LRN 2] near El Rio via Oxnard to [LRN 2] south of San Juan Capestrano

In 1957, Chapter 1911 softened the definition to delete the "via Oxnard".

This route ran from LRN 2 (US 101) near El Rio to LRN 2 (US 101) S of San Juan Capistrano. It was originally signed (1935) as Route 3; when signage for alternate US highways was introduced it was resigned as US 101A. In 1964, it became part of Route 1.


State Shield

State Route 61



Routing

From Route 84 near Newark to Route 580 near Albany via the vicinity of San Leandro and Oakland International Airport and via Alameda.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

In 1963, this route was defined as "(a) Route 84 near Newark to Route 17 in Oakland near Seventh and Harrison Streets via the vicinity of San Leandro and Oakland International Airport and via Alameda. (b) Route 17 near West Grand Avenue in Oakland to Route 17 near Albany."

In 1965, Chapter 1371 added the following to Route 61, a change that was made moot by Chapter 1372:

361.1 Upon the completion of the additional subterranian tube between the cities of Oakland and Alameda, in the vicinity of Webster Street, to be used in connection with the Posey Tube, both of which tubes are included in the description of Route 61, the department may by executive order, rule or regulation, designate both of said tubes and the approaches leading to or from the nearest state highway or city street as one-way highways, and thereafter restrict said tubes and approaches to one-way traffic proceedings in opposite directions as to each other. Upon the placing of signs notifying the public of such restrictions, any person who willfully fails to observe such sign is guilty of a misdemeanor.

361.2 Because of the statewide interest in navigation, the state will hold and save the United States of America free and harmless from liability for damages to the parallel tubes between the Cities of Oakland and Alameda included in the description of Route 61 due to the initial dredging work and subsequent maintenance dredging in an area within 50 feet of said tubes in connection with the deepening of the Oakland Estuary by the Corps of Engineerings of the United States Army and the Director of Finance shall execute an agreement so to do with the proper representatives of the United States of America.

In 1965, Chapter 1372 made the following changes: the portion from Alameda to Route 17 (present-day I-580) was transferred to Route 260, the portion from Route 17 (present-day I-580) to Route 80 was deleted, and the portion from Alameda to Route 80 was added. This left the definition as "Route 84 near Newark to Route 17 near Albany via the vicinity of San Leandro and Oakland International Airport and via Alameda."

In 1984, Chapter 409 changed the reference to "Route 17" to "Route 580".

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Before the 1964 renumbering, this routing was unsigned. However, it had three LRNs: It was LRN 257, defined in 1959, between present-day I-580 and Route 260; LRN 226, defined in 1947, between Route 260 and a point SE of Jones Avenue (junction LRN 258 (unsigned), now unsigned Route 13); and LRN 258 (defined in 1959) between this point and Route 17 (LRN 69; now I-880).

Route 61 was not signed as part of the 1934 state route signage.

 

Status

Unconstructed This currently ends at Route 880 and Route 112; the remainder S to Route 84 is unconstructed. However, all of Route 112 between Route 61 and Route 185 is signed as Route 61, making it appear that Route 61 continues to Route 185.

Technically, the segment from Route 260 to I-580 is unconstructed, and that the SHC does not allow this to be constructed as a freeway N of Hegenberger Road. However, Route 260 (the Posey Tube) is signed in its entirety (from Route 61 to I-880) as Route 61. For information on the portion formerly on Webster Street and the Posey Tubes, see Route 260.

 

Naming

This is "Webster" Street and "Doolittle" Drive. Other names are Central Avenue, Encinal Avenue, Broadway, and Otis Drive.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 


Overall statistics for Route 61:

  • Total Length (1995): 7 miles traversable; 24 miles unconstructed.
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 12,700 to 39,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 6; Sm. Urban 0; Urbanized: 25.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAU: 7 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 6.8 mi; Minor Arterial: 0.2 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Alameda.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that became LRN 61 was first defined, to some extent, in 1915, when Chapter 704 defined the Pasadena State Highway: "to connect the La Cañada valley with the Antelope Valley...starting 2 mi NE of La Cañada thence following N and NW-ly the Arroyo Seco to a point E of Hoyt Ranch; thence NE-ly following Tujunga Cyn and Mill Creek to Tie Cyn; thence NW-ly by way of Kennedy Springs to Vincent.". However, the act only funded locating and surveying the route.

In 1919, the Third Bond Act allocated funds for a route from La Canada to Mt. Wilson Road via Arroyo Seco. In 1931, the route was extended by Chapter 82 from Red Box Divide to Pine Flats ([LRN 61] to [LRN 62]). In 1933, it was extended further, with segments from San Fernando Road to [LRN 9] via Verdugo Road and from [LRN 61] to [LRN 59] via Los Angeles County Park. In 1935, the route was codified as:

  1. [LRN 4], San Fernando Road, to [LRN 9] via Verdugo Road
  2. [LRN 9] at La Canada to [LRN 59] via Arroyo Seco, Red Box Divide, and Los Angeles County Park

In 1937, Chapter 841 changed "at La Canada" to "near La Canada".

In 1957, Chapter 1911 combined the two segments and simplified the definition to be "[LRN 162] near Avenue 36 (i.e., Route 2 slightly NE of US 99) in Los Angeles to [LRN 59] (Route 138) via Glendale and Wrightwood."

This route ran along Verdugo Road between San Fernando Road and Foothill and was signed as Route 2. North from Foothill, it was Angeles Crest Highway over the mountain to meet up with Route 138, still signed as Route 2.


State Shield

State Route 62



Routing

From Route 10 near Whitewater to the Arizona state line near Earp via Morongo Valley, the vicinity of Yucca Valley, Twentynine Palms, Rice, and Vidal Junction.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

As defined in 1963, Route 62 was the route from "Route 10 near White Water to Utah Trail Road in the town of Twentynine Palms via Morongo Valley and the vicinity of Yucca Valley."

In 1970, Chapter 1473 extended the route to the Arizona state line near Earp via Morongo Valley, the vicinity of Yucca Valley, Twentynine Palms, Rice, and Vidal Junction.

In 1981, Chapter 292 fixed a typographical error, changing "White Water" to "Whitewater"

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

This routing was LRN 187 between US 60/US 70/US 99 (LRN 26) and Yucca Valley. This was defined in two portions: Route 10 to Morongo Valley in 1933; the remainder in 1959.

The route was LRN 218 between Yucca Valley and Twentynine Palms. This was defined in 1961. The remainder of the route was defined in 1970.

Route 62 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 62 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Status

[062 Improvements]TCRP Project #129 will add traffic and pedestrian safety and utility undergrounding projects in the Route 62 right of way. In April 2008, the Town of Yucca Valley requested amending the project to redistribute $600,000 in TCRP funds from Construction to Environmental (PA&ED) and to update the project schedule and funding plan. By constructing safety improvements and utility undergrounding, this project will reduce the accident rate and provide safety improvements for pedestrians and motorists along Route 62 between La Honda Way and Dumosa Avenue in the town of Yucca Valley. Other project improvements include sidewalk construction, associated drainage, and raised medians to prevent unauthorized left turn movements. Eliminating accidents and left turns will result in reduced traffic congestion on Route 62. The Environmental (PA&ED) work began in May 2002. However, work on the project was suspended due to uncertainties with the project funding. When work resumed, it was determined that the previous traffic studies and other analysis had become outdated and would need to be updated. The project is now scheduled for construction in FY 2009/2010.

 

Naming

The portion of this route from I-10 to Route 177 is named the "Twenty-Nine Palms Highway". It was named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 164, Chapter 121, in 1990.

The portion of this route from 5.4 miles west to 4.6 miles east of the intersection with State Highway Route 177 in Riverside County is named the "CHP Officer Daniel J. Muehlhausen Memorial Highway". Named in honor of California Highway Patrol Officer Daniel J. Muehlhausen, badge number 13933, who was killed in the line of duty on June 1, 1997. Officer Muehlhausen was struck by an errant driver while en route to assist a disabled motorist on eastbound Route 62 east of Route 177, and succumbed to his injuries as a result of the this collision. He was born on August 8, 1966, in Hemet, California. He lived in Riverside, California where he attended and graduated from Notre Dame High School. Prior to beginning his career with the California Highway Patrol, Daniel J. Muehlhausen graduated from the University of California, Riverside, with a degree in Philosophy. He joined the CHP on October 17, 1994. After successfully completing his academy training on April 20, 1995, he reported to the Indio area, where he made significant contributions to traffic safety and to the motoring public while assigned to the Indio office of the California Highway Patrol. He served two years as a sworn peace officer for the California Highway Patrol and was known by his fellow officers for his dedication to the department and to the protection of the citizens of this state. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 29, Chaptered 7/8/2003, Chapter 90.

 

Freeway

[SHC 253.4] From Route 10 near Whitewater to Route 247 near Yucca Valley. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Scenic Highway

[SHC 263.1] Entire route.

 

Blue Star Memorial Highway

The portion of Route 62 from its junction with I-10 to Adobe Road in Twenty-nine Palms is designated as a Blue Star Memorial Highway. Designated by Assembly Concurrent Resolution 180, July 16, 2004, Chapter 127.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.13] Entire route.

 

Other WWW Links

 


Overall statistics for Route 62:

  • Total Length (1995): 151 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 1,100 to 36,000
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 131; Sm. Urban 20.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 151 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 46 mi; Minor Arterial: 105 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Riverside, San Bernardino.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 62 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act was the route from Azuza to Pine Flats in San Gabriel Canyon. In 1933, the route was extended from Huntington Beach-Whitter Road near Buena Park to [LRN 9] near Azuza. This was codified in 1935 into the highway code as:

  1. [LRN 171] near Buena Park to [LRN 9] near Azuza
  2. [LRN 9] at Azuza to [LRN 61] via Pine Flats in San Gabriel Canyon

It was quickly amended by Chapter 626 in 1935 to split the first segment (the reason why is unclear):

  1. [LRN 171] near Buena Park to Los Angeles-Orange County Line near La Habra
  2. [LRN 26] near West Covina to [LRN 9] near Azuza
  3. [LRN 9] at Azuza to [LRN 61] via Pine Flats in San Gabriel Canyon

In 1945, Chapter 1269 reverted the 1935 change. But, it didn't last for long, as in 1949, Chapter 1467 removed the segment from [LRN 2] (US 101) to [LRN 26] (US 70), making the definition:

  1. [LRN 171] near Buena Park to [LRN 2] near La Habra
  2. [LRN 26] near West Covina to [LRN 61] via Pine Flats in San Gabriel Canyon

Then, in 1959, the gap was restored, making the definition "[LRN 171] (US 101) near Buena Park to [LRN 61] (Route 2) via San Gabrial Canyon."

This is Route 39. It was signed in 1934.


State Shield

State Route 63



Routing
  1. From Route 137 near Tulare to Route 198.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    This segment remains as defined in 1963.

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    By 1953, this route was signed as Route 63. It was LRN 132, defined in 1933. The route was not signed as part of the 1934 state highway signage.

    Route 63 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 63 between 1934 and 1964.


  2. From Route 198 to Route 180 via the vicinity of Orosi and Orange Cove.


    Post 1964 Signage History

    In 1963, this segment was defined to be "Route 198 to Route 69 via Orosi."

    In 1965, Chapter 1372 deleted the portion (LRN 130) from Orosi to Route 69 (present-day Route 245), and transferred the portion of former Route 226 from Orosi to Orange Cove to Route 63, making the segment "Route 198 to Route 180 via the vicinity of Orosi and Orange Cove." The deleted portion is now CR J40

     

    Pre 1964 Signage History

    By 1953, this route was signed as Route 63. The portion from Orosi to Orange Cove was LRN 132, defined in 1933 (and was briefly signed as Route 226). The portion from Orange Cove to Route 180 is new routing. The route was not signed as part of the 1934 state highway signage.

    Route 63 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 63 between 1934 and 1964.

     

    Naming

    The 1.6 mile portion of Route 63, also known as South Mooney Boulevard, from West Visalia Parkway to Avenue 264 in Visalia is named the "Greatest Generation Memorial Highway" It was named in honor of Visalia's "Greatest Generation", a term used to refer to World War II veterans. Over 413,000 Americans gave their lives to preserve our liberty and freedom during this conflict that ended on August 15, 1945. Visalians were involved abroad in Europe, the Pacific, and at home in contributing towards the eventual victory of the United States. The City of Visalia made a significant contribution to the United States war effort through leasing the Visalia Municipal Airport to the United States Army, which conducted significant operations, including air submarine patrols, at the renamed Visalia Army Air field. The Greatest Generation World War II mural, which is 72 feet wide and 19 feet high and depicts and symbolizes events and people throughout the war, is located at 26572 South Mooney Boulevard, also known as Route 63. Named by Assembly Concurrent Resolution (ACR) 36, Resolution Chapter 78, on 7/17/2009.

Freeway

[SHC 253.1] Entire route. Added to the Freeway and Expressway system in 1959.

 

Interregional Route

[SHC 164.13] Between the north urban limits of Visalia and Route 180.

 


Overall statistics for Route 63:

  • Total Length (1995): 38 miles
  • Average Daily Traffic (1992): 790 to 29,500
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 26; Sm. Urban 4; Urbanized: 8.
  • Previous Federal Aid Milage: FAP: 38 mi.
  • Functional Classification: Prin. Arterial: 13 mi; Minor Arterial: 25 mi.
  • Counties Traversed: Tulare, Fresno.

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 63 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as running from Big Pine to Oasis. In 1931, Chapter 82 extended the route from Oasis to California-Nevada State Line. In 1935, the route was codified into the highway code as the route:

From Big Pine to the Nevada State Line via Oasis

This definition remained unchanged utnil the 1963 renumbering. It is present-day Route 168 to Oasis, and Route 266 from Oasis to the Nevada state line.


Unconstructed

Post 1964 Legislative Route 64



Routing

From Route 1 near Malibu Beach to Route 5 south of San Fernando.

 

Post 1964 Signage History

The definition of this route is unchanged from 1963.

This route isn't signed. It was assigned to what would have been the Malibu Canyon Freeway/Whitnall Freeway (on planning maps in 1965, shown on AAA maps as late as the mid 1980s), which left Route 5 near the Route 170/Route 5 junction, continued across the San Fernando Valley, crossing Van Nuys Blvd near Parthenia, Sepulveda near Chase, ending up about the level of Saticoy or Strathern. Just W of Bell Canyon, it turned to intersect the US 101 Freeway around Hidden Hills. It then crossed the Malibu hills approx. across Malibu Canyon (Las Virgenes) Road. The routing for this was never determined, and there is no assigned traversable route. The limits of the route inventory as of the 1970s was between US 101 and Route 5. The portion between US 101 and Route 1 had its adoption rescinded by the CHC on July 12, 1973.

 

Pre 1964 Signage History

Before 1964, the route allocated to the unconstructed post-1964 Route 64 routing was LRN 265 (defined in 1959). Some planning maps from the mid-1950s show the Whitnall Freeway circling back down into Los Angeles, but there are no corresponding legislative routes as of 1963.

Route 64 was not defined as part of the initial state signage of routes in 1934. It is unclear what (if any) route was signed as Route 64 between 1934 and 1964.

 

Naming

This would have been named the "Malibu Canyon Freeway" for the portion across Malibu Canyon, and the "Whitnall Freeway" for the portion across the San Fernando Valley. Maps based on the 1956 freeway plan show the route dividing at I-405. The Whitnall Freeway continued S (likely as Route 258) to go through Burbank, and then down along Western to Torrance. The remainder of Route 64 then continued to the Route 170/I-5 interchange. This was shown as the "Sunland" freeway.

The Whitnall Freeway was named for Gordon Whitnall, the former Los Angeles city director of planning. Part of the reason for the naming could be that the route ran along Whitnall Highway, an unusual divided street that was laid out in 1927 to be part of a parkway network envisioned to dissect the Valley. In 1913, Gordon Whitnall founded the Los Angeles City Planning Association, and in 1920, he established the Los Angeles City Planning Department. From 1920-1930, he was Director of Planning for Los Angeles, and from 1929-1930 was president of the League of California Cities. From 1932-1935 he was the coordinator of the Committee on Government Simplification for Los Angeles County. In 1941, Gordon and Brysis Whitnall established a planning and government consulting firm in Los Angeles. Gordon Whitnall was an instructor in Planning at the University of Southern California, and a member of the American Society of Planning Officials, the American Institute of Planners, the American Society of Consulting Planners, and the International Fraternity of Lambda Alpha, Los Angeles Chapter.
[Some information from http://rmc.library.cornell.edu/EAD/htmldocs/RMM02880.html]

 


Overall statistics for Route 64:

  • Total Length (1995): 30 miles unconstructed.
  • Milage Classification: Rural: 10; Urbanized: 20.
  • Counties Traversed: Los Angeles

 

Pre-1964 Legislative Route

The route that would become LRN 64 was first defined in the 1919 Third Bond Act as running from Mecca to Blythe. In 1931, Chapter 82 extended the route from Blythe to California-Arizona state line at the Colorado River and [LRN 64] to [LRN 26] near Indio. In 1933, the route was extended further with two segments: (a) [LRN 2] near San Juan Capistrano to [LRN 77] near Lake Elsinore, and (b) [LRN 78] near Perris to [LRN 26] near Indio. Thus, in 1935, the route was codified as:

  1. [LRN 2] near San Juan Capistrano to [LRN 77] near Lake Elsinore
  2. [LRN 78] near Perris to [LRN 26] near Indio
  3. Mecca via Blythe to the Arizona State Line at the Colorado River, and includes that portion of the Colorado River highway bridge (near Ehrenberg, Arizona) which is within the State of California. The department may contract with the state of Arizona, for and on behalf of the State of California for the maintenance of such bridge.
  4. A point on that portion of [LRN 64] specified in subdivision [3] to [LRN 26] near Indio

This definition was rapidly changed by Chapter 274 to make the last segment "A point near Shaver's Summit on that portion..."

In 1951, Chapter 1562 added the segment between LRN 77 near Lake Elsinore and LRN 78 near Perris to LRN 64, thus extending the first segment to terminate at LRN 78 near Perris.

This route was signed as follows:

  1. From LRN 2 (US 101) near San Juan Capistrano to LRN 78 (US 395) near Perris.

    This was Route 74, as was part of the 1934 signage number assignments. The portion between Lake Elsinore and Perris was also signed as US 395 until 1950.

  2. From LRN 78 (US 395) near Perris to LRN 26 (US 60/US 70) near Indio.

    This was originally signed as Route 740 (as of 1934), but was later resigned as Route 74.

  3. From Mecca (LRN 187; Route 111) to Blythe.

    Parts of this were signed as Route 195 sometime after 1934 between Mecca and Shaver's summit; that portion (likely Box Canyon Road) is not currently a state route.

    From Shaver's Summit to Blythe: This was signed as US 60/US 70 from the summit to the Arizona state line, and is present-day I-10.

  4. From a point near Shaver's summit to Route 26 (US 99; present-day Route 86) near Indio, and from Blythe to the Arizona State Line.

    This was cosigned as US 60/US 70, and is present-day I-10.



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