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Alexander (V)

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 antipopebyname Peter Of Candia, Italian Pietro Di Candia, original Greek name Petros Philargos

antipope from 1409 to 1410.

Alexander became a Franciscan theologian and then archbishop of Milan (1402). Pope Innocent VII appointed him cardinal (1405) and papal legate to Lombardy. Unanimously elected by the invalid Council of Pisa in 1409 when he was 70 years old, Alexander was pope for only 10 months. It was hoped that his election would swiftly terminate the Great Western Schism of 1378–1417, but the council did not persuade Pope Gregory XII and the antipope Benedict XIII to resign. A condominium of three popes resulted. In 1410 Alexander sent to Archbishop Zbynek of Prague a bull which ordered the burning of Wycliffe’s heretical works. Alexander died mysteriously, some professing—though without proof—that he was poisoned by his successor, the antipope John XXIII.

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