Chess Articles by David Cohen

All articles written and copyright 2002-9 by David Cohen.

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Index

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

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Betting on Lasker

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

On my recent vacation, I met up with an old classmate in Hong Kong. He took us out to the historic Hong Kong Jockey Club's Happy Valley racetrack, where he is a member. We arrived 10 minutes before the sixth race. The restaurants were booked up, so we had a quick cafeteria style dinner while planning to watch a couple of races. While choosing my meal, I glanced at the racing form. My idea was to pick out a horse with an interesting name and place a small wager on it. I ran my eyes down the list of names, then looked up at my host and exclaimed: "I HAVE to get in a bet on this race!" He knew I just wanted to place one wager during the evening, and there were still several races after the upcoming one. He wondered why the urgency in my voice. I told him, "There's a horse running by the name of Lasker! He was a world chess champion!!". So, we left our dinner to cool and headed for the teller's cage. I put down the minimum bet of 10 Hong Kong dollars (about $1.50) on Lasker to win. We then went back to our table, where our host wanted to finish his dinner while the horses entered the gate and started to run. But I was having none of it; I had to see the whole race. So, we abandoned our meal completely, and headed out into the grandstand to watch the race live.

From directly above the finish line, we had an excellent view of the course, an oval stretched at one end to become shaped like a baseball diamond. The horses run clock-wise, the opposite way from North America. Across the oval, the horses broke from the gate, with my horse near the front, and my friend's horse (he chose 'Classic Reunion' in honour of our get together) running a bit further back. By the first turn, his horse had faded, while mine maintained its pace. At the final turn, the horses all bunch together, and it becomes, well, a horse race. Several horses broke from the pack for the run down the stretch. Lasker was easy to pick out: his jockey was wearing, of course, black and white checkered silk colours. Just before the finish line, Lasker was running in front, so I was pretty happy about my bet for a few seconds. But then the betting favourite came screaming in from the outside lane to win by less than a length. Oh well, pretty good entertainment for a few dollars.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 20, 2009.06.15

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Chess in the Park in Bali

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

I had a couple of encounters with chess during my recent vacation on the island of Bali in Indonesia. There's more tourist traps than tourists there. At one site, a hawker offered me a hand-carved wooden chess set for one US dollar. The villages each have a specialty, such as silverwork, stone carving, or wood carving. In the wood-carving village, you can find several shops devoted to selling chess sets.

In the city of Denpasar, my tour group was given half an hour to wander around the walled grounds of the Bali Museum. I headed up the stairs of a tower for the view from above. My eyes looked over the walls to the tree-filled park across the street. Through the trees I spotted a giant chess set! Well, I don't have to tell you; you know that within minutes I had quit the group and was headed for the park.

The giant chess set was made of plastic pieces. They were being dragged around randomly by a group of noisy, very young children having lots of fun. Nearby, seated at a group of picnic tables, a handful of chess games were being conducted by men of all ages. I watched, hopeful of getting into a game, but none of the players took any notice of me. When a game finished, they only wanted to continue with the same opponent. There was a large group of spectators. Finally, a youth in the crowd approached me and asked in English if I wanted to play. I told him yes, provided that it was only for fun, and not for money. He said yes, his friend wanted to play that way. His friend was another youth, who pulled out a chess board, pieces and clock while we found an empty spot. A crowd quickly gathered around us.

While we played, I chatted with my opponent and his friend. It turns out that the giant chess set was set up for pictures. His friend offered to take my picture by the giant board, but I didn't want to interrupt our game. I did loan him my camera, and he took several pictures of us playing. I promised to email them to my opponent, a visitor from Java who was hanging out in the park all day playing chess.

The whole atmosphere in the park was very friendly. None of the games appeared to be for money. Indonesia is a predominantly Muslim country, so gambling is presumably frowned upon. This appeared to extend to Bali, which is predominantly Hindu. But that didn't stop the park's devotees from trying to make money. My opponent's friend invited me to purchase beverages from a stall set up beside the players. Unfortunately, my time was up, and I had to run back to the tour bus.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 20, 2009.06.15

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Underpromotion - Part 2

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

A slight twist on the theme of underpromotion. Usually, we choose a knight instead of a queen because the knight is the only other piece which can attack different squares from the queen. But in this game, White's advantage at the moment of promotion is so great, that White can choose either piece!

Stanishevsky - Nikonov, correspondence, Russia, 1992

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 e6 4. Bxc6 bxc6 5. d3 g6 6. O-O Bg7 7. e5 Ne7 8. Nc3 O-O 9. Ne4 d5 10. Nxc5 Nf5 11. d4 Rb8 12. Bg5 Qc7 13. b3 Rb6 14. Kh1 a5 15. Qd2 Ba6 16. Rg1 h6 17. Bf6 Bxf6 18. exf6 Kh7 19. g4 Nd6 20. Rae1 Bb5 21. Qf4 Qd8 22. Re3 Ne8

Diagram 1

White's attack is gaining momentum. Black would like to eliminate the spearhead, the P/f6, which is cramping Black's position, as well as cutting off the communication and mobility of the defenders.

23. Nd7 !?

The pawn was attacked twice but only defended once, so White naturally defends it again.

23... Qxd7

In accepting the sacrifice, Black's queen is deflected from the attack on P/f6.

24. Ne5

Gaining time to clear a path for the rook along the 3rd rank.

24... Qd8 25. Nd7

Again!

25... Qxd7 26. Rh3 h5

Only move to stop mate.

27. gxh5 g5

Only move to stop mate.

28. Qxg5 Qd8 29. h6 Qxf6 ??

Capturing the pawn at exactly the wrong moment. It's mate in 4.

If 29... Bf1 (only move to avoid the mating net.) 30. Rh5 (if 30. Rxf1 Qxf6 -+) 30... Be2 31. Rh3 (if 31. Rh4 Bf3+ -+) 31... Bf1 =.

Diagram 2

30. Qg7+ !! Nxg7

If 30... Qxg7 31. hxg7+ Kg8 32. Rh8#.

31. hxg7+ Qh6

If 31... Qh4 32. Rxh4+ Kg8 33. Rh8#; if 31... Kg8 32. Rh8#.

32. gxf8=N+

If 32. gxf8=Q (Normally an underpromotion to a knight is required so that it can check the king, from a square where no other piece could give check. But here Black is in such bad shape that the tempo for check is not needed!) Qxh3 33. Qg7#.

32... Kh8

A final deflection, from guard duty on Q/h6.

33. Rxh6# 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 16, 2009.04.15

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Underpromotion - Part 1

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

This is my third topic on the general theme of strange middle games: the April Fool's joke of chess moves, that move with the strange twist, underpromotion. Usually, you expect your opponent to promote to a queen, the strongest piece. You are not afraid, you are ready for it. But right at that moment, your opponent asks the arbiter for a third knight, and the joke's on you.

Albin Counter Gambit - Lasker Trap

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e5 3. Nc3 exd4 4. Nxd5 c6 5. Nf4 Nf6 6. e3 Bb4+ 7. Bd2 dxe3 8. Bxb4 exf2+ 9. Ke2

If 9. Kxf2 Qb6+ and the double attack on K+B/b4 regains the piece.

9... fxg1=N+

Diagram 1

9... fxg1=Q 10. Qxd8+ Kxd8 11. Rxg1 is not as good. The underpromotion is with check, which forces White to respond, and so White does not have time to make this exchange.

10. Ke1

If 10. Rxg1 Bg4+ skewers the king and wins the Q/d1 on 11. Ke1 Bxd1.

10... Qb6

Protecting N/g1 and remaining a solid piece up.

0-1

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 15, 2009.04.01

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King walk - Part 2

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

Here we go again, taking a stroll with our king in the middle game! This one starts out as a king hunt. The White king is harassed by checks and pins, all the while driven further out into the centre of the board. But it turns out to be safe enough there. Then - still in the middle game - the king takes an active role, helping a pawn to promotion.

G. Michelet - Lionel Kieseritzky
Paris, France, 1844

1. e4 e5 2. f4 exf4 3. Nf3 g5 4. Bc4 g4 5. Ne5 Qh4+ 6. Kf1

The harassment starts, as the White king loses the right to castle.

6... f3 7. d4 Nf6 8. Nc3 Bg7 9. g3 ?

Inviting the Black queen into the hole on h3, to start the king hunt.

9... Qh3+ 10. Kf2 d6 11. Nxf7 Rf8 12. Ng5 Qg2+ 13. Ke3 Bh6 14. Kd3 Nc6 15. a3 Bxg5 16. Bxg5 Nxe4

Black renews the attack with a gamble.

17. Qe1 Bf5 18. Nxe4 f2 19. Qe3 Kd7 20. Bd5 Rae8 21. Raf1

Diagram 1

21... Bxe4+ ?

Black releases the tension by liquidating the pin, with the aim of winning White's queen - only to discover that White can get along just fine without it!

22. Bxe4 Rf3 23. Qxf3 gxf3 24. Bf5+ Re6 25. d5 Ne5+ 26. Ke4 h5 27. dxe6+ Ke8 28. Bf6 h4 29. Bxe5 dxe5 30. Kxe5

Ironically, it is Black's king that is in a mating net.

30... hxg3 31. h3 Qxh1 32. Kf6 Qxf1 33. Bg6+ Kd8 34. e7+ Kd7 35. e8=Q+ Kd6 36. Qe6+ 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 14, 2009.03.15

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King walk - Part 1

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

In the middle game, we usually tuck our king away in the shelter provided by castling. Usually, we do not bring it out voluntarily until the endgame, when it becomes a strong piece. In the endgame, the king can attack without fear of being hunted and chased into a mating net. So, what would possess a player to come up with the idea of willingly taking the king out for a walk in the middle game? Conditions need to be just right. Here, we see a blocked position, good control of the open parts of the board by the attacker, and defenders which are far from the scene of action.

Nigel Short - Jan Timman
Tilburg, Netherlands, 1991

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. Nf3 g6 5. Bc4 Nb6 6. Bb3 Bg7 7. Qe2 Nc6 8. O-O O-O 9. h3 a5 10. a4 dxe5 11. dxe5 Nd4 12. Nxd4 Qxd4 13. Re1

A line of Alekhine's Defence dating to 1978.

13... e6 14. Nd2 Nd5 15. Nf3 Qc5 16. Qe4

Novelty. 16. Bd2 Fievet-Michaud, 1989 0-1.

16... Qb4

White enjoys a space advantage, thanks to the cramping influence of P/e5. Black tries to relieve the pressure by offering to trade pieces. White doesn't bite.

17. Bc4 Nb6 18. b3

Threat: 19. Ba3 skewer along a3-f8 diagonal.

18... Nxc4 19. bxc4 Re8 20. Rd1 Qc5 21. Qh4

Black struggles to complete the development of the queenside pieces. White firms up control of the board by occupying the open d-file. White launches a kingside attack by seeking to eliminate the main defender, the dark-squared bishop.

21... b6 22. Be3 Qc6 23. Bh6 Bh8 24. Rd8 Bb7 25. Rad1 Bg7 26. R8d7 Rf8 27. Bxg7 Kxg7 28. R1d4 Rae8 29. Qf6+ Kg8 30. h4 h5

Diagram 1

31. Kh2 !!

Amazingly, Black is helpless. White's king simply strolls up the board to help deliver mate.

31... Rc8

If 31... Bc8 32. Ng5 Bxd7 (32... Qxd7 33. Rxd7 Bxd7 34. g4 Bxa4 35. gxh5 gxh5 36. Ne4 Kh7 37. Qg5 f5 38. Nf6+ Rxf6 39. exf6) 33. Rf4 Qc5 34. Nxf7 Rxf7 35. Qxf7+ Kh8 36. Qxg6 Qxe5 37. g3 Qg7 38. Qxh5+ Kg8 39. Rg4

32. Kg3 Rce8 33. Kf4 Bc8 34. Kg5

The Black king can't keep the White king from reaching h6 to support Qg7#, since ..Kh7 abandons f7, allowing White's pieces to flood in.

1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 13, 2009.03.01

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Unbalanced material - Part 2

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

In Part 1 (Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Issue # 10-11, February 1, 2009), we saw Anand sacrifice a queen for two minor pieces and the chance to attack the king. It didn't work out. In Part 2, we'll see the same imbalance of material. But here the critical factors favour the attacker: a lead in development, open lines to attack, and the defenders are not on the scene.

Rashid Nezhmetdinov - O. Chernikov
Rostov, USSR, 1962

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 g6 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. Be3 Nf6 7. Bc4 O-O 8. Bb3 Ng4 9. Qxg4 Nxd4 10. Qh4 Qa5 11. O-O Bf6

Diagram 1

White observes that he has a lead in development; the White bishops have open lines to attack, as will the rook once it is lifted to the third rank; and that most of Black's pieces are stranded far from the Black king. All that's left is to eliminate the active Black pieces who can help with the defence.

12. Qxf6 !! Ne2+ 13. Nxe2 exf6

White sacrificed a queen for two minor pieces. White organizes for the attack. With undeveloped and uncoordinated pieces, Black has a much harder time organizing for the defence.

14. Nc3 Re8 15. Nd5 Kg7 16. Bd4 Re6 17. Rad1 d6 18. Rd3 Bd7 19. Rf3 Bb5 20. Bc3 Qd8 21. Nxf6 Be2

White was ready for the next phase of the attack. The R/f1 was not needed, so it could be sacrificed: if 21... Bxf1 22. Ng4+ Kf8 (on 22... Re5 23. Rxf7+ or on 22... f6 23. Bxe6 Be2 24. Bxf6+ Kf8 25. Bxd8+ Bxf3 26. gxf3 Rxd8) 23. Bxe6 Be2 24. Rxf7+ Ke8 25. Nf6+ Qxf6 26. Bxf6)

22. Nxh7+ Kg8 23. Rh3 Re5 24. f4 Bxf1

Black's best chance to survive: 24... Rh5 25. Nf6+ Kf8 26. Nxh5 gxh5

25. Kxf1 Rc8 26. Bd4 b5 27. Ng5 Rc7 28. Bxf7+ Rxf7

Diagram 2

29. Rh8+ !!

A complicated tactic: it is a skewer to win the Q/d8; a deflection of the guardian of R/f7; and a decoy onto h8 to set up the double attack (family fork) which follows. The situation resolves into a won endgame for White.

29... Kxh8 30. Nxf7+ Kh7 31. Nxd8 Rxe4 32. Nc6 Rxf4+ 33. Ke2 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 12, 2009.02.15

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Unbalanced material - Part 1

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

I love playing through chess games where there is a huge material imbalance. Just how much material can a player sacrifice, in exchange for the opportunity to attack? Will it lead to mate? Will it lead to the material being regained with interest, and a won position reached? The situation must resolve itself eventually. But the play between the first sacrifice and the resolution is very entertaining.

Here's an example for you to play through and enjoy.

Viswanathan Anand - Ivan Sokolov
Hoogovens, Wijk aan Zee, Netherlands, 1996

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Ba4 Nf6 5.O-O Be7 6.Re1 b5 7.Bb3 O-O 8.a4 b4 9.d3 d6 10.a5 Bg4 11.Be3 d5 12.Nbd2 h6 13.h3 d4 14.hxg4 dxe3 15.fxe3 Nxg4 16.Bd5 Qd7 17.Nc4 Bf6 18.Nfd2 h5 19.Rf1 Rad8 20.Rf5 g6

Diagram 1

So far, it's been a normal Spanish game: White attacks on the king-side, Black tries for counter-play. But now the game gets crazy!

21.Qxg4 hxg4 22.Rxf6

White receives only 2 minor pieces in return for the sacrificed queen and the chance to attack!

22... Ne7 23.Bxf7+

No retreat; White must continue to attack! If 23... Rxf7 24.Rxf7 Kxf7 25.Nxe5+, 26.Nxd7 winning back the queen and coming out ahead by 2 pawns.

23... Kg7 24.Raf1 Qb5 25.g3 Rd7 26.R1f2 Qc5 27.Nb3 Qa7

27... Qb5 guarding P/e5 would mean equality.

28.Nxe5

White can also try 28.Rxa6 Qxa6 29.Nc5 Qc6 30.Ne6+ Qxe6 (forced since king moves like 30... Kh7 are met by 31.Rh2#) 31.Bxe6 Rxf2 32.Kxf2.

28... Qxe3 29.Nxd7

White regained all of the material and more, but now Black has the chance to counter-attack.

29... Rh8 30.Kg2 Rh3 31.Bxg6 Nxg6 32.Kf1 Rh1+

32... Rxg3 was another way to continue.

33.Kg2 Rd1 34.Rxg6+ Kxg6 35.Ne5+ Kg7 36.Nxg4 Qe1 37.Kf3 Qh1+ 38.Kf4 Rf1 39.Ke3 Qg1 40.Kf3 Rxf2+ 41.Nxf2 Qb1

A tremendous battle, but it's over. There is material equality, but the endgame factors are decisive. Black's queen is mobile, whereas White's knights have limited range. White's passed pawns are not as effective (nor as quick) against the queen as the lone Black outside passed pawn is against the knights.

42.Nd4 Qxb2 43.Nf5+ Kf7 44.Ne3 Qa2 45.d4 Qxa5 46.e5 Qa1 47.Ke4 a5 48.d5 a4 0-1

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 11, 2009.02.01

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Karsh

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

When I saw that Canada had issued a stamp of the famous portrait photographer, Yousuf Karsh, I hoped that we had featured a chess player on a Canadian stamp. Why? Because I knew a little bit of trivia. Karsh had the role of 'A Small Chess Player' in the 1934 Ottawa Little Theatre production of the play See Naples and Die by Elmer Rice. Surely an actor playing the part of a chess player knew how to play chess? Wrong! Back in 1932, Karsh had been introduced to the theatre, where he developed his reputation photographing its actors and patrons. Among them, his future wife, a leading actress who encouraged him to try acting. Here are the results, from his biography Portrait in Light and Shadow: The Life of Yousuf Karsh by Maria Tippett, 2007, House of Anansi Press, p.67.

"His performance was let down by the fact that although the role demanded him to do little more than play a game of chess, it became clear to the audience that the young actor knew nothing about the game. Worse, at the end of the play, when Karsh and his chess partner were scripted to shoot a general, his partner's revolver got lodged in his pocket with the result that he shot himself in the leg."

Yousuf's brother Malak Karsh also became a famous photographer, noted for his photograph which appeared for many years on the back of the Canadian $1 bill. In 1986, I organized a simultaneous chess exhibition on Canada Day in Ottawa. I walked around the circle of chess players: on the outside, chatting with spectators; and on the inside, chatting with the players who were waiting for the master to come around to their boards. I was surprised to hear someone yelling at me - from above! It was Malak, up on a step-ladder, photographing the event. Apparently, I was blocking his view. He shooed me away, but I snuck back into his picture at the far end. You can locate me and a few other Ottawa chess players in the photo printed in his book Ottawa and the National Capital Region, 1990, Key Porter Books, p.139.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 10, 2009.01.15

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2008 Year-End Canadian Chess Rankings

Written and copyright 2009 by David Cohen

Grandmaster Kevin Spraggett, originally from Montreal, Quebec, is the top ranked Canadian chess player at year-end of 2008, for the 7th year in a row (2002-8) and for a record 26th time since 1980.

Woman FIDE Master Yuanling Yuan, of Toronto, Ontario, is the top ranked Canadian female chess player at year-end of 2008. The Grade 9 student topped Canadian Women's Champion and Woman International Master Natalia Khoudgarian, of Toronto, Ontario, who held the top rating for 12 years in a row (1996-2007).

Woman FIDE Master Valeria Gansvind, of Sidney, British Columbia, was higher ranked (top ranked female resident 2002-5), but represents Estonia internationally. Woman Grandmaster and International Master Sophia Polgar, of Toronto, Ontario, was even higher ranked (top ranked female resident 2006-8), but was not active; she represents Hungary internationally.

Top-ranked Canadian players at year-end 1954-2008:

http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/Champions.html#TOPRANK

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 9, 2009.01.01

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Top 10 Finishes by Canadians at the World Youth Championships

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

Canadians have finished in the Top 10 at the World Youth Championships 20 times!

2008
Eric Hansen Under-16 2nd (8/11)
Yelizaveta Orlova Under-14 Girls 9th (7/11)
Jonah Lee Under-8 6th (7.5/11)
Kelly Wang Under-8 Girls 3rd (8/11)

2007
Janak Awatramani Under-8 7th (7.5/11)

2006
Raja Panjwani Under-16 5th (7.5/11)
Shiyam Thavandiran Under-14 10th (7/11)

2005
Mark Bluvshtein Under-18 3rd (8/11)
Hazel Smith Under-14 Girls 9th (7/11)
Nikita Kraiouchkine Under-10 10th (7.5/11)

2003
Yuanling Yuan Under-10 Girls 10th (7/11)

2002
Mark Bluvshtein Under-14 6th (7.5/11)
Shiyam Thavandiran Under-10 4th (8/11)
Alina Sviridovitch Under-10 Girls 5th (8/11)

2001
Mark Bluvshtein Under-14 8th
Hazel Smith Under-10 Girls 9th

2000
Thomas Roussel-Roozmon Under-12 9th

1995
Andrew Ho Under-12 5th (7.5/11)

1986
Jeff Sarwer Under-10 1st
Julia Sarwer Under-10 (female competitors) 1st

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 8, 2008.12.15

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2008 Canadian Chess Player of the Year - Mark Bluvshtein

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

Mark Bluvshtein is the 2008 Canadian Chess Player of the Year in a poll of Canadian chess journalists. The Toronto, Ontario grandmaster is a 3rd year student in the Faculty of Science and Engineering, York University. Mark's accomplishments for 2008 include winning a Grandmaster tournament in Hungary; Top Canadian at international tournaments in Edmonton and Montreal; and representing Canada on Board 1 at the Chess Olympiad in Dresden, Germany.

Fans also voted for their favourite player, resulting in one ballot being cast according to the results. The winner of the fan voting is Shiyam Thavandiran of Toronto, Ontario. Shiyam's accomplishments for 2008 include winning the Canadian Under-16 Chess Championship with a perfect score; 1st place in the Toronto Labour Day Open Chess Tournament; 1st place in the Toronto Thanksgiving Open Chess Tournament including a win over a grandmaster; and 1st place in the UMBRA Olympiad Fundraiser Blitz Tournament.

The purpose of this 6th annual poll of Canadian Chess Journalists is to recognize the achievements of a Canadian chess player in 2008; and to gain some publicity for Canadian chess. A permanent plaque, with the names of all of the past winners, is on display at the offices of The Chess Federation of Canada in Ottawa.

Each journalist had up to 3 votes:

1st place vote - 5 points
2nd place vote - 3 points
3rd place vote - 1 point

It was not necessary to vote for 2nd or 3rd place. Responses were received from 9/11 invited journalists. Again this year was the results of fan voting counting as one ballot.

Here are the results of the fan voting:

Shiyam Thavandiran (47%) 914
Eric Hansen (44%) 862
Raja Panjwani (3%) 62
Kelly Wang (1%) 24
Mark Bluvshtein (1%) 19
Yuanling Yuan (1%) 11
Dina Kagramanov (1%) 10
Kevin Spraggett (0%) 9
Irina Barron (0%) 8
Pascal Charbonneau (0%) 7
Christopher Knox (0%) 7
Thomas Roussel-Roozmon (0%) 7
Igor Zugic (0%) 7
Anton Kovalyov (0%) 5
Nikolay Noritsyn (0%) 5
Jocelyn Coté (0%) 2
Wayne Hynes (0%) 2
Yelizaveta Orlova (0%) 2
Leonid Gerzhoy (0%) 1
Artem Samsonkin (0%) 1

1,965 votes total

Therefore, a ballot is cast as follows: 1st place, 5 points, Shiyam Thavandiran; 2nd place, 3 points, Eric Hansen; 3rd place, 1 point, Raja Panjwani.

Results of voting from all ballots (fans plus Canadian chess journalists):

Mark Bluvshtein (Toronto, ON) 19
Eric Hansen (Calgary, AB) 18
Yuanling Yuan (Toronto, ON) 8
Shiyam Thavandiran (Toronto, ON) 6
Wayne Hynes (Oshawa, ON) 5
Anton Kovalyov (Verdun, QC) 5
Thomas Roussel-Roozmon (Montreal, QC) 5
Igor Zugic (Toronto, ON) 5
Jocelyn Coté (Charlesbourg, QC) 3
Raja Panjwani (Kitchener, ON) 1
Kevin Spraggett (Portugal) 1

Mark Bluvshtein's biography:
http://web.ncf.ca/bw998/canchess.html#BLUVSHTEIN

David Cohen's Canadian Chess homepage:
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html

Canadian Chess Player of the Year
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/Champions.html#PLAYER

Past winners:

2008 Mark Bluvshtein
2007 Nikolay Noritsyn
2006 Kevin Spraggett
2005 Mark Bluvshtein
2004 Mark Bluvshtein
2003 Pascal Charbonneau

Some Canadian Chess players and their accomplishments in 2008:

Barron, Irina (Toronto, ON) - Toronto Women's Champion; Women's Olympiad (Alternate) 5/8.

Bluvshtein, Mark (Toronto, ON) - won a Grandmaster tournament in Hungary; Top Canadian at international tournaments in Edmonton and Montreal; and represented Canada on Board 1 at the Chess Olympiad in Dresden, Germany, scoring 5/9.

Charbonneau, Pascal (New York, USA) - 2nd place, Marshall Chess Club Championship, New York, USA (February); Olympiad (Board 2) 6/9.

Coté, Jocelyn (Charlesbourg, QC) - Canadian Correspondence Champion (tied).

Gerzhoy, Leonid (Toronto, ON) - Top Canadian, 3rd Edmonton International; =2nd 7/9 Jessie Gilbert Celebration Int Coulsdon (ENG); =1st Toronto Thanksgiving Open.

Hansen, Eric (Calgary, AB) - World Open 5/9 International Master Norm; World Youth Championship Under-16 =2nd 8/11. Qualified FIDE Master title by 2300+ rating. Canadian Grade 10 Champion; won Alberta Closed, Open and Under-16 Championships.

Hynes, Wayne (Oshawa, ON) - Canadian Correspondence Champion (tied)(3rd year in a row).

Kaminski, Victor (Calgary, AB) - 5.5/9 =8th, New England Masters, Pawtucket, USA, International Master Norm.

Kagramanov, Dina (Richmond Hill, ON) - Women's Olympiad (Board 3) 5.5/9.

Khoudgarian, Natalia (Toronto, ON) - Women's Olympiad (Board 1) 3.5/9.

Knox, Christopher (Richmond Hill, ON) - Grade 5 Champion (5th year in a row winning National Scholastic Championship for his grade!).

Kovalyov, Anton (Verdun, QC) - =5th/204, XXI Open Internacional de Ajedrez Villa de Benidorm, Spain, 3rd and final Grandmaster Norm; =2nd Top Canadian at Canadian Open Championship.

Lee, Jonah (Richmond, BC) - British Columbia Grade 2 and Under-8 Champion; World Youth Championship Under-8 =6th 7.5/11.

Noritsyn, Nikolay (Richmond Hill, Ontario) - 9/9 1st 2008 Toronto Closed Championship. Olympiad (Alternate) 6/8.

Orlova, Yelizaveta (Toronto, ON) - Canadian Junior Girl Champion; World Youth Championship Under-14 Girls =9th 7/11. Canadian Girls Under-14 Champion (5/5), Ontario Girls Under-16 Champion.

Panjwani, Raja (Kitchener, ON) - 9th North American Invitational, Chicago (USA), =4th; =5th, 5/9 Top Canadian, 3rd Edmonton International (Aug), International Master Norm.

Roussel-Roozmon, Thomas (Montreal, QC) - 5/9, =3rd, 6th International Nancy Festival, France; 8/13; =1st Grandmaster tournament, Budapest, Hungary; Victor Ciocaltea Memorial, Bucharest, Romania 6/11 =4th; Olympiad (Board 4) 6/8.

Samsonkin, Artem (Toronto, ON) - 7.5/9, 1st, 2008 Canadian Junior Championship, Toronto.

Smith, Hazel (Toronto, ON) - Ontario High School Champion. Women's Olympiad (Board 4) 3.5/8.

Spraggett, Kevin (Portugal) - 7/9, =2nd/232, 33rd International Open, Seville, Spain; 6.5/9 =2nd/89 Metz Open, Metz, France; BDO Premier, Haarlem, Netherlands, 2nd 6.5/9.

Tayar, Jonathan (Toronto, ON) - World Open 5/9 International Master Norm, win vs. Grandmaster Nikola Mitkov.

Thavandiran, Shiyam (Toronto, ON) - Canadian Under-16 Champion (7/7); 1st 5/6, Labour Day Open, Toronto; =1st Toronto Thanksgiving Open, win vs. Grandmaster Bator Sambuev; 1st UMBRA Olympiad Fundraiser Blitz.

Tyomkin, Dmitri (Toronto, ON) - 5/6, 1st, Grandmaster tournament, Spain.

Wang, Kelly (Pointe-Claire, QC) - World Youth Championship Under-8 Girls =3rd 8/11. Canadian Under-8 Girls Champion (7/7), Canadian Grade 2 Champion.

Yuan, Yuanling (Toronto, ON) - 6.5/9 2nd, Woman International Master Norm, Pan-American Women's Championship, San Salvador, El Salvador; 4/9 =7th, Woman International Master Norm, 12th North American FIDE Invitational, Chicago (USA); Women's Olympiad (Board 2) 6.5/10.

Ye, Ling Feng (St-Laurent, QC) - Canadian Under-18 Champion (4/4).

Zugic, Igor (Toronto, ON) - Olympiad (Board 3) 7/10.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 8, 2008.12.15

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Canada at the Chess Olympiads

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

History

The Chess Olympiad is a team competition for nations, first held in 1927 at London, England and held every 2 years since 1950. The event is sanctioned by the World Chess Federation (FIDE). In 2006 at Turin, Italy, there were teams from 143 countries. The 38th Chess Olympiad was held at Dresden, Germany, from November 12-25, 2008 with 146 teams from 141 countries (111 teams from 106 countries in the Women's Olympiad).

Canada first participated in the Olympiads in 1939 at Buenos Aires, Argentina, where 14-year old Abe Yanofsky of Winnipeg, Manitoba attracted the world's attention. In 1964 at Tel Aviv, Israel, Yanofsky secured the first Grandmaster title for a player raised in the Commonwealth. Canada has sent a team to every Olympiad since 1964. Canada's best finish at the Olympiad was tied for 7th in 1978 at Buenos Aires, Argentina. Canada finished tied for 8th in 1976 at Haifa, Israel and in 1980 at Valetta, Malta.

Canadians have won individual medals 10 times - Gold: D. Abraham Yanofsky, Board 2, 1939; Frank Anderson, Board 2, 1954, 1958; Silver: Peter Biyiasas, Board 2, 1978; Kevin Spraggett, Board 2, 2000; Bronze: Peter Biyiasas, Board 4, 1972; Jean Hébert, Board 3, 1982; Lawrence Day, Board 3, 1986; Deen Hergott, Alternate 1, 1990; Yan Teplitsky, Board 4, 2002. Lawrence Day has represented Canada at the Olympiads 13 times, followed by D. Abraham Yanofsky (11 times).

The Women's Olympiad was first held in 1957 at Emmen, Netherlands. Canada first participated in the Women's Olympiad in 1974 at Medellin, Columbia, and has sent a team every time since 2000. Canadians have won individual medals 4 times - Gold: Nava Starr, Board 2, 1976; Céline Roos, Board 2, 1984; Bronze: Smilja Vujosevic, Board 1, 1976; Nava Starr, Board 1, 1982. Nava Starr has represented Canada at the Olympiads 12 times.

2008 National Team

Mark Bluvshtein, Toronto, Ontario, student, 3rd year, Faculty of Science and Engineering, York University. Grandmaster. Canadian Scholastic or Youth Champion 6 times. Canadian Open Champion 2005. Represented Canada World Youth Championships 2 times (3rd place, Under-18, 2005). Canadian Chess Player of the Year 2 times (2004-5). Represented Canada at Olympiads 4 times.

Pascal Charbonneau, New York, New York, USA (originally Montreal, Quebec), Institutional Sales/Trading, Electronic Brokerage Systems, LLC (a wholly owned subsidiary of Belzberg Technologies, Inc.). Grandmaster. Canadian Champion 2 times. Canadian Open Champion 2002. Canadian Scholastic or Youth Champion 7 times. 2nd place Pan-American Championship 2003. Represented Canada at World Championship 2004. Canadian Chess Player of the Year 2003. Represented Canada at Olympiads 5 times.

Igor Zugic, Toronto, Ontario, software engineer, Chantry Networks (a Siemens Company). International Master. Canadian Champion 2006. Canadian Scholastic or Youth Champion 4 times. Represented Canada at Olympiads 4 times.

Thomas Roussel-Roozmon, Montreal, Quebec, student, Economics, University of Montreal. International Master Canadian Scholastic or Youth Champion 4 times. Represented Canada at World Under-12 Championship 2000 (9th place). Represented Canada at Olympiads 2 times.

Nikolay Noritsyn, Richmond Hill, Ontario, student, Grade 12. International Master. Canadian Champion (at age 16, second youngest ever). Canadian Under-12 Champion 2003. Canadian Chess Player of the Year 2007.

2008 Women's Team

Natalia Khoudgarian, Toronto, Ontario, Administrative Assistant, Geriatrics & Aging. Woman International Master. Canadian Women's Champion (2 times). Top rated female Canadian at Year-end 12 times in a row (1996-2007). Represented Canada at Women's Olympiad 3 times.

Yuanling Yuan, Toronto, Ontario, student, Grade 9. Woman FIDE Master. 2nd place Pan-American Women's Championship 2008. Represented Canada at Girls Youth World Championship (10th place, Under-10, 2003).

Dina Kagramanov, Richmond Hill, Ontario, student, 4th Year, Faculty of Health, York University. Woman FIDE Master. 1st place Canadian Women's Championship 2006. Represented Canada World Girls Youth Championships 2 times. Represented Canada at Women's Olympiad 2 times.

Hazel Smith, Toronto, Ontario, student, Grade 12. Woman FIDE Master. Canadian Girls Youth Champion 4 times. Represented Canada at Girls Youth World Championship 4 times (9th place 2 times). Represented Canada at Women's Olympiad 2 times.

Irina Barron, Toronto, Ontario, registered nurse, York Central Hospital. Qualified Woman FIDE Master title. Toronto Women's Champion 2008.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 7, 2008.12.01; Olympiad web page on the web site of the Chess Federation of Canada.

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Grand Prix

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

Back in Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, Issue 2 (Sept. 15, 2008), the report on the Scarborough Chess Club's Annual General Meeting mentioned that there would be a Scarborough Chess Club Grand Prix. In chess, a Grand Prix totals a player's tournament scores over the course of a calendar year or chess season (Fall-Spring). Internationally, FIDE recently launched its own Grand Prix series. Locally, the Toronto Grand Prix was launched in 2005 and covered a limited number of major weekend tournaments. Nikolay Noritsyn won or shared first all three years it has been held so far. Two more Canadians have had amazing success playing these circuits: then IM Igor Ivanov won the United States Grand Prix an amazing 9 times, and IM Deen Hergott duplicated this feat at the Eastern Ontario Chess Association (EOCA) Grand Prix.

How did auto racing terminology get adapted for chess? Way back in 1981, (current CFC Governor) Herb Langer had just moved back to the Ottawa Valley town of Arnprior and was helping to run local club tournaments. By 1982, he was looking to attract Ottawa players to a local tournament. Langer had just seen the movie Grand Prix (now available on DVD!) which followed the events of the 1966 auto racing season across Europe and around the world. He suggested adopting this format for the local chess scene. Players from around Eastern Ontario would naturally come to Ottawa for the big weekend tourneys. But by holding some events outside Ottawa, small markets such as Arnprior, Belleville and Smiths Falls would benefit. Players trying to win the season's Grand Prix title could not skip these events, or they would risk falling behind. Langer's suggestion was adopted for 1982-83, and Arnprior held its first Open tournament in the spring of 1983. Amazingly, both the Arnprior Open and the EOCA Grand Prix are still going after 26 consecutive years! As for Langer's idea of a chess Grand Prix, it spread quickly, as the U.S.A. soon adopted the name for its circuit.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 6, 2008.11.15

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Endgame - movie reviews

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

When writers talk about 'playing the game', it's usually chess which they are using to draw a parallel to real life. Most people are familiar with our game. So, when writers want a metaphor for death, or when they are reaching the conclusion of their tale, it is the chess endgame to which they refer.

While searching the Toronto Public Library's catalog, I discovered a videotape called Endgame. Was this a reference to chess? I couldn't resist. It turned out to be a 1957 play by Samuel Beckett, winner of the 1969 Nobel Prize for Literature. He is most famous for his play Waiting for Godot. Endgame is the author's musings about life, voiced through his characters, one of whom feels his life may be drawing to a close. At the end, his monologue includes a few ideas which parallel our game of chess.

"Since that's the way we're playing it, let's play it that way."

"Me to play
Old endgame
Lost of old
Play and lose
And have done with losing."

Not a cheery play, as you might gather from these lines.

When I was searching the TPL catalog, I was actually looking for a 1983 film called Endgame reviewed in En Passant No. 88, Feb. 1988, p.48. It wasn't in the library's collection, but I did turn up the VHS tape at Queen Video's Bloor St.W. location (they keep them around when a film is not on DVD). As pointed out in the original review, there's plenty of parallels to chess here. But unless you enjoy poorly made science fiction flicks (and they do have their fans!), you can skip this one.

In asking around for the 1983 film, I located two additional DVDs with the same title. In 2006, an action film trying to be a murder-mystery called End Game (available Bay St. Video) starred Cuba Gooding Jr. as a Secret Service agent trying to find out who killed the U.S. President. One of the villains says that he enjoys 'playing the game', but there's not much else that refers to games. In 2007, a documentary called Endgame: Blueprint for Global Enslavement (available Suspect Video) tracked the Bilderberg group. The title refers to their alleged plan being in its final stage.

None of these films are suitable for children. The Internet Movie DataBase lists a lot more films called 'Endgame', but that's all I could find locally.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 5, 2008.11.01

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Dangerous Moves - movie review

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

Back in 1985, current Chess Federation of Canada President David Lavin organized the Toronto International Open, and brought in Victor Korchnoi to play. Korchnoi gave a talk on the film Dangerous Moves, which is based on his 1978 World Championship match with Anatoly Karpov. I didn't hear about the film at the time, and only discovered it when researching the tournament's history. Curious, I looked it up at the Toronto Public Library, and was delighted to discover that a circulating copy is available on DVD.

The film was made in Switzerland in French as La Diagonale du fou (subtitles are available) in 1984, and won the 1985 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. It's a real treat in many ways. First, chess and chess players are the subject of a serious drama. Second, the film is well done for how it technically portrays chess on the screen (far better than most films, anyway). Finally, chess players are portrayed in many interesting ways; there is no stereotype here.

I think the latter is achieved in part because the screenwriter borrowed from so many famous chess players and incidents in chess history. The main story is the fictional version of the Korchnoi-Karpov match, and many incidents from this match are used. But the writer also attributes to them the following events which you should recognize: Nimzovich's complaint about the unlit cigar; Botvinnik with his coffee mug; Benko wearing sunglasses to ward off Tal's hypnotic stare; Petrosian's solution to noisy Buenos Aires; and Fischer's fussing over playing conditions just before his match with Spassky.

By the way, you may be confused at the beginning of the film. This is a fictional story. The ages of the main characters are reversed: the fictional champion is old and the challenger is young, whereas in real life, Champion Karpov was much younger than Challenger Korchnoi. Keeping these changes in mind, you should enjoy this film as a fiction, the best I've seen dealing with our world of chess.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 4, 2008.10.15

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Toronto Open Championship Early History

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

In Toronto, we've had a rough time finding good, affordable tournament sites for large Swiss events, not to mention organizers interested in taking on the job. Brian Fiedler made a presentation to the 2008 Greater Toronto Chess League Annual Meeting, where he hoped to put on an excellent 2009 Toronto Open Championship. Now he's at the stage where he'll soon be presenting to sponsors, and so he asked me for the history of the event. This is exactly why I created my Canadian Chess history web site. Unfortunately, I specialize in Canadian national events, and was embarrassed to say that not only had I the winners of the event going back only as far as 1990, but I didn't even know when the first event was held!

I quickly researched the history of the Toronto Open. Here's what I can find so far, my compilation of Toronto Open winners going back to 1967 (the event was not held in 2005 and again so far in 2008):

http://web.ncf.ca/bw998/Champions.html#TORONTO
(scroll down to 'Open')

The first Toronto Open in the current series (at Easter) was held in 1967 at the Scarborough Chess Club and was won by Ivan Theodorovich. There were 34 players in 1967; 68 players in 1968; and 100 players in 1969. From that year on, it was the huge event we are familiar with.

Unfortunately, everything earlier is sketchy. The event was a follow-up to the Scarborough (Easter) Open of 1966 won by Alar Puhm and Milan Zagar over a field of 18 players. The previous Thanksgiving, in the fall of 1965, there was a tourney called the Metro Toronto Open, won by Denis Allan over a field of 28 players. But there must have been earlier events. For example, the CFC statistician's list of events to be rated for 1960 shows a "Toronto Open 1960" run by the Metro Toronto Chess League.

All of these reports came from the only chess publication of the 1950s and 1960s with full Canadian coverage: Canadian Chess Chat. I decided to work my way forward from its start in 1947. Through 1956, there is no mention of a Toronto Open. The Toronto Championship was a round-robin which took place at the local clubs at their regular meetings. We are familiar with this event as the Toronto Closed. In reading the history of this event, I discovered what happened. Participation in the Closed grew, so that it became a multi-sectional event, with the section winners meeting in the finals. Pressure grew to expand the Toronto Championship into an open event. Finally, in 1957, a regular but sad Canadian occurrence: the organization of the League collapsed. With the Championship in jeopardy, a local club stepped up and hosted the first Toronto Open Championship in its place. Again, it took place during regular meetings, but for the first time it was run on the Swiss system. 16 players took part. The winner was the only undefeated player, and a surprise: Dmytro Kulyk, of the Ukrainian Club. Kulyk was a team-mate of Theodorovich in the League club competitions.

Afterwards, there are no further reports. Successive years gave us the Closed (1958, 1959, 1962, 1963, and 1966 onwards) and the Open (1960, 1965, and 1966 onwards). But additional published details of the years 1958-65 don't exist. If you can help, please contact me at bw998-at-freenet.carleton.ca.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 3, 2008.10.01

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Historical Notes on Chess Federation of Canada Fundraising

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

Given the Chess Federation of Canada's financial troubles and need for raising funds, a recent trip to the Archives turned up a few relevant historical notes. The Minutes of the CFC's Annual Meeting in Toronto, June 23, 1945 documented the CFC's first 'Plan for Raising Funds', devised by Leopold Christin and approved by the meeting as a recommendation only. The plan required that CFC membership be required for competitions. The initial fee proposed was in the amount of $1. The interesting part is the allocation of the money: $0.25 for the CFC; $0.25 for the Provincial Association; and $0.50 for the player's club!

I don't know if the plan was implemented, but as of 1954 the membership did receive one tangible benefit from the CFC: an annual rating. Also, until 1967 the membership fee was still $1.

At its 1955 Annual Meeting, the CFC took another major step forward by approving the establishment of a Permanent Trust Fund. The fund retains its principal, and turns the interest over to the CFC. The fund became known as the Chess Foundation of Canada, and has grown considerably since the first $10 donation made by Phil Haley at the CFC's 1956 Annual Meeting.

In 1973, fundraising was again on the CFC's mind, a result of expansion through the purchase of a building, the hiring of a business manager, and the publication of a new magazine. Les Bunning had some important tips regarding potential sponsors: "You have to demonstrate to them that by supporting [the CFC] they will receive increased exposure for their products. Only with this attitude can we expect to receive financial support."

Over the past few months, I helped raise over $18,500 for the CFC from the membership ($10,000 for the Olympiad Fund; $8,000 for general revenues; and $500 for the Chess Foundation of Canada). However, at its 2008 Annual Meeting, the CFC approved a different direction for its future fundraising efforts: a volunteer Fundraising Committee.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 10, No. 1, 2008.09.01

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The Chess Player - movie review

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

The Chess Player (Le Joueur d'Échecs) is a 1927 silent film from France, with English titles. It is a fictional story of a real automaton called The Turk, which was invented by Baron von Kempelen. Using historical characters, including the Baron, and weaving in real incidents from The Turk's career, a fictional account of the creation of the Turk is told. The film is a love story, set against the sweep of historical events: a 1776 uprising of Polish Lithuania against Russian occupation. The director filmed in Poland, and tried to be as historically accurate as possible in the details, from the protocols of royalty to the movements of The Turk.

The film is suitable for all ages, however, parental guidance is needed to explain the actions of the occupying Russian army. DVD extras include a radio interview with Tom Standage, author of The Turk: The Life and Times of the Famous Eighteenth-Century Chess-Playing Machine (2002), in which he reveals the real life motivation for the invention; and a PDF file with the transcript of an interview with the film's director, 40 years after he made the film.

You can rent the DVD in Toronto at Queen Street Video, 480 Bloor St.W.; call ahead at (416) 588-5767 to ensure that it is in and to reserve it. Do not mix it up with The Chess Players, a film from India (reviewed in Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 18, 2006.05.15) which you may want to rent at the same time!

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 24, 2008.08.15

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Chess on the Train

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

In Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 13, 2008.03.01, I reviewed the movie Madame Tutli-Putli, which has a chess scene on board a train. The ride is bumpy, so the chess pieces jump into the air, and land in a new configuration - from which the chess players continue their game!

Well, it turns out that truth is stranger than fiction (if you believe what you read). In the Correspondence Chess League of America's magazine The Chess Correspondent, 1936.05-06, p.19, there is the true story of a fellow observing a chess game being played on a train. The ride is bumpy, and a chess piece gets shuffled off its square. The observer reaches out to replace the piece on its proper square. But it turns out that the train has made a legal move. Not only that, but the player on the move likes it! He exclaims that this was exactly the move he had been searching for to save his lost position!!

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 23, 2008.08.01

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37th Canadian Junior Chess Championship - press release (results)

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

PRESS RELEASE - 2008 Canadian Junior Chess Champion - Artem Samsonkin of Toronto

Artem Samsonkin, of Toronto, Ontario, won the 37th Canadian Junior Chess Championship for the top chess players in Canada under 20 years old, held May 9-13, 2008 in Toronto. Samsonkin, an International Master who emigrated from Belarus in 2007, won the right to represent Canada at the 2008 World Junior Chess Championship to be held in Ankara, Turkey this August. Samsonkin's other achievements include a share of first place in the 2007 Canadian Championship.

Yelizaveta Orlova, of Toronto, Ontario, was the top girl at the 37th Canadian Junior Chess Championship for the top chess players in Canada under 20 years old, held May 9-13, 2008 in Toronto. Orlova, the reigning Canadian and Ontario Girls Under-14 Champion, won the right to represent Canada at the 2008 World Junior Girls Chess Championship to be held in Gaziantep, Turkey this August 2-16.

Background:

The Canadian Junior Chess Championship was created in 1957 to select Canada's representatives to the 4th World Junior Chess Championship which Canada hosted later that year in Toronto, Ontario. The event was revived in 1970 as the most objective way of selecting Canada's representative to the World Junior Chess Championship. It has been held annually since 1972-3. Past winners who have gone on to win the Canadian Chess Championship include Jean Hébert (Montreal, QC); Alexandre Lesiège (Montreal, QC); Ron Livshits (Pickering, ON); and Pascal Charbonneau (Outremont, QC). The event is sanctioned by The Chess Federation of Canada. You can find a list of past winners here:

www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/Champions.html#JUNIOR

The World Junior Chess Championship for players under 20 years old was created in 1951, when Canada was represented by Lionel Joyner of Montreal, Quebec. In 1957, Canada hosted the 4th World Junior Chess Championship in Toronto, Ontario. Initially held every two years, since 1973 it has been an annual event. Past winners include future World Chess Champions Boris Spassky (1955), Anatoly Karpov (1969), Gary Kasparov (1980) and Viswanathan Anand (1987), as well as Scarborough, Ontario born Joel Lautier, who represented France in 1988. The Canadian Junior Chess Champion represents Canada. The 2008 World Junior Chess Championship takes place in Ankara, Turkey from August 2-16. The event is sanctioned by the World Chess Federation (FIDE) (www.fide.com).

The World Junior Girls Chess Championship was established in 1983 and has been run annually since 1985. The top female at the 2008 Canadian Junior Chess Championship has the right to represent Canada, however, full funding for the trip is not available.

For more info on this event, please contact the event organizer:

Michael Barron
President
Greater Toronto Chess League
Phone:
E-mail:
Event Web Site: www.torontochess.org

Event sponsor:
Chess'n Math Association (CMA)
Web Site: www.chess-math.org

For more info on chess in Canada:

Chess Federation of Canada
Phone:
E-mail:
Web Site: www.chess.ca

Quick biography of Artem Samsonkin:
http://web.ncf.ca/bw998/canchess.html#SAMSONKIN

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 18, 2008.05.15

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37th Canadian Junior Chess Championship - press release (advance notice)

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

PRESS RELEASE - upcoming event - Toronto May 9-13, 2008 - Canadian Junior Chess Championship

37th Canadian Junior Chess Championship

Location:

CMA Chess School, 1650 Bayview Ave., Toronto, ON (just south of Eglinton Ave. E.).

Dates & Times:

May 9: Round 1 at 6:30 pm.
May 10, 11, 12: Rounds 2-7 at 1 pm and 6 pm.
May 13: Rounds 8-9 at 9:30 am and 2 pm.

Photos: at the start of each round only.

Player interviews: well before each round; or after each round (games take 3-4 hours).

The top chess players in Canada under 20 years old will compete this May in Toronto for the Canadian Junior Chess Championship title and the right to represent Canada at the 2008 World Junior Chess Championship to be held in Ankara, Turkey this August.

Background:

The Canadian Junior Chess Championship was created in 1957 to select Canada's representatives to the 4th World Junior Chess Championship which Canada hosted later that year in Toronto, Ontario. The event was revived in 1970 as the most objective way of selecting Canada's representative to the World Junior Chess Championship. It has been held annually since 1972-3. Past winners who have gone on to win the Canadian Chess Championship include Jean Hébert (Montreal, QC); Alexandre Lesiège (Montreal, QC); Ron Livshits (Pickering, ON); and Pascal Charbonneau (Outremont, QC). The event is sanctioned by The Chess Federation of Canada. You can find a list of past winners here:

www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/Champions.html#JUNIOR

The World Junior Chess Championship for players under 20 years old was created in 1951, when Canada was represented by Lionel Joyner of Montreal, Quebec. In 1957, Canada hosted the 4th World Junior Chess Championship in Toronto, Ontario. Initially held every two years, since 1973 it has been an annual event. Past winners include future World Chess Champions Boris Spassky (1955), Anatoly Karpov (1969), Gary Kasparov (1980) and Viswanathan Anand (1987), as well as Scarborough, Ontario born Joel Lautier, who represented France in 1988. The Canadian Junior Chess Champion represents Canada. The 2008 World Junior Chess Championship takes place in Ankara, Turkey from August 2-16. The event is sanctioned by the World Chess Federation (FIDE) (www.fide.com).

The World Junior Girls Chess Championship was established in 1983 and has been run annually since 1985. The top female at the 2008 Canadian Junior Chess Championship has the right to represent Canada, however, full funding for the trip is not available.

For more info on this event, please contact the event organizer:

Michael Barron
President
Greater Toronto Chess League
Phone:
E-mail:
Event Web Site: www.torontochess.org

Event sponsor:
Chess'n Math Association (CMA)
Web Site: www.chess-math.org

For more info on chess in Canada:

Chess Federation of Canada
Phone:
E-mail:
Web Site: www.chess.ca

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 17, 2008.05.01

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A Bit of Fry and Laurie - review

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

Popular British comedians Stephen Fry & Hugh Laurie teamed up for four years on their own British comedy show, available for rent locally at Queen Street Video (3 locations) and Bay Street Video. Season 4 (1994) has a couple of mentions of chess. In Episode 2, a list of difficult things someone had accomplished includes 'making a Grandmaster Norm at chess'. You can really see the extent to which chess has again become part of British culture in Episode 6. It starts with a scene where Fry & Laurie are playing chess. The chess moves, body movements, and eye motions are all perfect. Even the chessboard is set up correctly, the position and the moves make sense, and the players' chess thoughts match. We hear their thoughts in their heads on how the game is going. Then they realize that it's time to do the show. But instead of switching over to talk to the viewers, they switch over in their thoughts only. We continue to hear their thoughts. Only now instead of their thoughts being on the strategy of the game, their thoughts are their introduction of their show to the viewers. It all unfolds in their heads, rather than out loud! The scene runs for about one minute. It has clean language and can be watched by all ages. However, the episode, and the whole season (DVD), are not for kids.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 14, 2008.03.15

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Madame Tutli-Putli - movie review

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

Madame Tutli-Putli is the National Film Board (NFB)'s Canadian made Academy Award nominee for the best animated short film of 2007. The film is weird, and whether you like it or not will be very personal. Normally, when I write these reviews, I don't describe the chess part of the film in detail. In this case, I'm not going to wish this film on anyone, so I'll just go ahead and describe what for me is its only redeeming feature, the chess scene. It's near the beginning of the film, so you won't have to watch further if the film is not to your tastes.

The title character boards the night train. We soon meet the people she is forced to share her compartment with. Among them are two men playing chess. The train ride is bumpy. On two occasions, the chess pieces jump into the air. They jump so high, that they come off the board - and land again in a new configuration. Normal chess players would simply reset the position from memory. But the chess players in the story continue from the new positions! Because of the changes in fortune, one of them is not happy. An interesting scene, but it's a short film, and that's all there is.

You can watch the film on the internet (http://www.cbc.ca/tutli/), or in Toronto at the NFB's Mediatheque (http://www.nfb.ca/mediatheque), 150 John Street (corner Richmond St. W.), 4 blocks from the Osgoode Subway Station (free until March 31, 2008) - check their website for hours of operation.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 13, 2008.03.01

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Winning Streaks in Chess

Written and copyright 2008 by David Cohen

With the New England Patriots completing a perfect season (16-0) in the National Football League, sports reporters naturally compare their feat to winning streaks in other sports. Not surprisingly, in North America chess gets left out. So let's correct that here with a look at the perfect accomplishments of three players: D. Abraham (Abe) Yanofsky of Winnipeg; Laszlo (Leslie) Witt of Hungary, Montreal and Toronto; and the American, Robert (Bobby) Fischer.

D. Abraham Yanofsky

Abe Yanofsky put up a picket fence, which is how a row of ones for victories looks on the cross-table, to win the Canadian Closed Championship with a perfect score of 11-0 - not once, but twice!! In 1943, New Brunswick hosted its first national championship, as Yanofsky, serving in the Canadian Navy during World War Two, joined players from Quebec to meet the best of the Maritime provinces at Dalhousie. Montrealer Charles Smith put up the most resistance with their last round battle for first place, only falling into a combination on move 56.

Charles Smith - D. Abraham Yanofsky
Canadian Championship, Dalhousie, New Brunswick, Round 11, 1943
1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 d5 4. Nf3 c6 5. cxd5 cxd5 6. Nc3 Bg7 7. Bg2 Nc6 8. O-O O-O 9. b3 Bf5 10. Bb2 Qc8 11. Rc1 Bh3 12. Ne5 Bxg2 13. Kxg2 Qe8 14. Nxc6 Qxc6 15. Na4 Qd6 16. Nc5 b6 17. Nd3 Rac8 18. Qd2 Ne4 19. Qe3 Bf6 20. Rxc8 Rxc8 21. Rc1 Rxc1 22. Qxc1 Qd7 23. Qe3 h5 24. Ne5 Qc8 25. Qd3 Kg7 26. Nf3 Qf5 27. Bc1 h4 28. h3 hxg3 29. fxg3 g5 30. g4 Qc8 31. Bb2 e6 32. Nd2 Nd6 33. Nf3 Qc7 34. Nd2 Qc6 35. Kf3 Qc7 36. Kg2 Be7 37. e4 dxe4 38. Nxe4 Nxe4 39. Qxe4 Bf6 40. Qd3 Qc6+ 41. Kf2 Qh1 42. Qc3 Qh2+ 43. Ke1 b5 44. a3 Qg2 45. Kd1 Qe4 46. Kc1 Qd5 47. Qe3 a5 48. Kc2 Kg8 49. Kc1 a4 50. bxa4 Qc4+ 51. Kb1 Qxa4 52. Kc1 Qc4+ 53. Kd2 Kf8 54. Qg3 Qd5 55. Qe3 e5 56. Kd3 Qb3+ 57. Bc3 exd4 0-1

Amazingly, at Montreal in 1959, IM (and future GM) Yanofsky duplicated his feat against a stronger field, including IM Frank Anderson, that took their best shots at him.

Lionel Joyner - D. Abraham Yanofsky
Canadian Championship, Montreal, Quebec, Round 7, 1959
1. c4 Nf6 2. Nc3 g6 3. e4 d6 4. d4 Bg7 5. f3 e5 6. Nge2 O-O 7. Bg5 c6 8. Qd2 Qe8 9. d5 cxd5 10. cxd5 Na6 11. g4 b5 12. Ng3 Rb8 13. h4 b4 14. Nd1 Nc5 15. h5 Qa4 16. Bh6 Rb7 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. Nf5+ Bxf5 19. exf5 b3 20. hxg6 fxg6 21. Qh6+ Kg8 22. g5 Nxd5 23. fxg6 hxg6 24. Qh8+ Kf7 25. Qh7+ Ke8 26. Qxg6+ Rbf7 27. Nc3 Nxc3 28. bxc3 Qa5 29. Kd2 b2 30. Rb1 Na4 31. Qd3 a6 32. Rh3 Rc7 33. f4 Nxc3 34. Qg6+ Kd8 35. Qxd6+ Rd7 36. Qxd7+ Kxd7 37. Rxc3 Rxf4 38. Be2 Rf2 0-1

Laszlo Witt

In 1962, Laszlo Witt won the 4th Canadian Open Chess Championship with a perfect 9-0! Here's a battle against Mark Schulman of Winnipeg, recorded in the tournament book edited by Ron F. Rodgers.

Mark Schulman - Laszlo Witt
Canadian Open Championship, Ottawa, Ontario, Round 3, 1962.08.28
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 Nbd7 7. Bc4 e6 8. f4 Qc7 9. Bb3 b5 10. Qf3 Bb7 11. a3 Nxe4 12. Nxe4 Nc5 13. Qc3 Bxe4 14. O-O Qb7 15. Rae1 Nxb3 16. Qxb3 d5 17. Kh1 Bd6 18. Qh3 Qd7 19. f5 e5 20. Ne6 f6 21. Be3 Rc8 22. c3 Qf7 23. Bb6 Ke7 24. Qe3 Bxf5 25. Nxg7 Qxg7 26. Rxf5 Rhg8 27. Qf2 Ke6 28. Rf1 Be7 29. Be3 Qg6 30. Ba7 Rc6 31. Qf3 Rc4 32. Qh3 Qg4 33. Qxg4 Rcxg4 34. g3 Re4 35. Rh5 Rg7 36. Rh6 Re2 37. Bb6 Rxb2 0-1

Robert Fischer

Bobby Fischer equalled Yanofsky's feats by winning the 1963-4 USA Chess Championship with a perfect 11-0. In Round 3, he beat IM (and future GM) Robert Byrne with Black in 21 moves. In Round 10, he beat GM Pal Benko, again in 21 moves, with a famous demonstration of the interference tactic on move 19.

Robert Fischer - Pal Benko
1963-4 USA Championship, New York, NY, USA, Round 10, 1963.12.15
1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nc3 d6 4. f4 Nf6 5. Nf3 O-O 6. Bd3 Bg4 7. h3 Bxf3 8. Qxf3 Nc6 9. Be3 e5 10. dxe5 dxe5 11. f5 gxf5 12. Qxf5 Nd4 13. Qf2 Ne8 14. O-O Nd6 15. Qg3 Kh8 16. Qg4 c6 17. Qh5 Qe8 18. Bxd4 exd4 19. Rf6 Kg8 20. e5 h6 21. Ne2 1-0

Bobby Fischer also set the record for consecutive victories in Grandmaster competition, with 19 wins in a row in 1970-1. During the last six rounds of the Palma de Mallorca Interzonal competition, part of the World Chess Championship cycle of qualifications, Fischer rolled over Rubinetti, Uhlmann, Taimanov, Suttles, Mecking and Gligoric. His games were full of energy and initiative. Against Canada's Suttles, notice how he delays the recapture of a pawn by five moves, using the time to attack and develop simultaneously (rather than play 24... Qxf4).

Duncan Suttles - Robert Fischer
Interzonal, Palma de Mallorca, Spain, Round 20, 1970.12.07
1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. d4 d6 4. c4 Nb6 5. exd6 cxd6 6. Be3 g6 7. d5 Bg7 8. Bd4 Bxd4 9. Qxd4 O-O 10. Nc3 e5 11. Qd2 f5 12. Nf3 N8d7 13. O-O-O Qf6 14. Qh6 Qe7 15. Re1 e4 16. Nd2 Ne5 17. h3 Nbd7 18. Qe3 Qh4 19. g3 Qf6 20. Kb1 Nc5 21. f4 exf3 22. Nxf3 f4 23. gxf4 Nxf3 24. Qxf3 Qh4 25. Be2 Bf5+ 26. Ka1 Rae8 27. Rc1 Be4 28. Nxe4 Rxe4 29. Rh2 Rfxf4 30. Qc3 Qe7 31. Bf1 Re3 32. Qd2 Ref3 33. Re2 Qf6 34. Bg2 Rf2 35. Rce1 Rxe2 36. Rxe2 Rxc4 37. Qe3 Qe5 38. Kb1 Qxe3 39. Rxe3 Rf4 40. Bf3 h5 41. Kc2 Kf7 42. Kd2 Rb4 43. Kc3 Rh4 44. b4 Nd7 45. Be2 Nf6 46. Rf3 Kg7 47. Rd3 g5 48. a3 g4 49. Bf1 Ne4+ 50. Kc2 Nf2 51. Re3 gxh3 52. Re7+ Kf8 0-1

Fischer then crushed Mark Taimanov 6-0 in the quarter-finals of the next stage of the World Chess Championship, the Candidates Matches, held in Vancouver in 1971. In the semi-finals, he similarly crushed Bent Larsen 6-0. In the finals, he beat Tigran Petrosian in the first game of their match, before Petrosian finally halted Fischer's streak with a victory in Game 2. Fischer went on to beat Petrosian in the match, and followed with a successful challenge for the title, against Boris Spassky in 1972.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 10, 2008.01.15

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Canadian Chess Hall of Fame - Inductees 2007 John Cherriman, 2008 Cyril Large

Written and copyright 2007 by David Cohen

The Canadian Chess Hall of Fame was created in 2000 to recognize the achievements and contributions of members of the Canadian chess community (web site: http://web.ncf.ca/bw998/canchess.html#FAME). Here are brief biographies of the selections for 2007 and 2008.

2007 John Cherriman
(1823-1908)

John Cherriman emigrated from his native England to take up the post of Lecturer, later Assistant Professor, of Mathematics, at the University of Toronto, 1850-3. He served as Director, Canadian Magnetic Observatory (located on the campus), 1853-5. He became Professor and Chair of Mathematics & Natural Philosophy (now called Physics), from 1853 until his retirement in 1875. Cherriman then moved to Ottawa, where he applied his mathematical skills in the federal public service as the first Superintendent of Insurance, 1875-85. After his second retirement, he returned to England, where he died.

Cherriman was active in the Toronto community. He was a militia Lieutenant in the University Rifle Corps; later, Captain in the Queen's Own Rifles. In 1882, Cherriman became a charter member of the Royal Society of Canada.

In the chess community, he was like-wise active. In 1872, he was elected the first President of the Canadian Chess Association (CCA, which later became the Chess Federation of Canada). Cherriman organized the first two Canadian correspondence chess tournaments, in 1873-4 and 1874-5. He was chess editor of the Toronto Globe newspaper until his move to Ottawa. It was there, at the CCA's annual congress in 1884, that he defeated Johannes Zukertort in a simultaneous exhibition given by Zukertort.

2008 Cyril Large

93 year-old Cyril Large, of Nanaimo, BC, taught chess to children on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, in the 1960s and 1970s. His main achievement was the organization of annual school chess tournaments, which grew to involve 6,625 players from 162 schools by 1976. Equally notable was his choice and involvement of local sponsors: a B.C. fruit juice producer, and CFAX radio station. When I talked to Cyril Large in 2004, he was in his 90s and still played one game of chess every evening with his wife, also in her 90s! Lynn Stringer (Hall of Fame, 2004) recently presented Mr. Large with his Hall of Fame plaque.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 9, 2008.01.01

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2007 Year-End Canadian Chess Rankings

Written and copyright 2007 by David Cohen

Grandmaster Kevin Spraggett, originally from Montreal, Quebec, is the top ranked Canadian chess player at year-end of 2007, for the 6th time in a row (2002-7) and for a record 25th time since 1980.

Canadian Women's Champion and Woman International Master Natalia Khoudgarian, of Toronto, Ontario, is the top ranked Canadian female chess player at year-end of 2007, for the 12th year in a row (1996-2007). Woman FIDE Master Valeria Gansvind, of Sidney, British Columbia, was higher ranked (top ranked female resident 2002-5), but represents Estonia internationally. Woman Grandmaster and International Master Sophia Polgar, of Toronto, Ontario, was even higher ranked (top ranked female resident 2006-7), but was not active; she represents Hungary internationally.

Top-ranked Canadian players at year-end 1973-2007:

http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/Champions.html#TOPRANK

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 9, 2008.01.01

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2007 Canadian Chess Player of the Year - Nikolay Noritsyn

Written and copyright 2007 by David Cohen

Nikolay Noritsyn, 16, of Richmond Hill, Ontario, is the 2007 Canadian Chess Player of the Year in a poll of Canadian chess journalists. New this year in the 5th annual poll was the results of fan voting were counted as one ballot.

The purpose of this 5th annual poll of Canadian Chess Journalists is to recognize the achievements of a Canadian chess player in 2007; and to gain some publicity for Canadian chess. A permanent plaque with the names of all of the past winners, is on display at the offices of The Chess Federation of Canada in Ottawa.

Each journalist had up to 3 votes:

1st place vote - 5 points 2nd place vote - 3 points 3rd place vote - 1 point

It was not necessary to vote for 2nd or 3rd place. Responses were received from 6/11 invited journalists, plus the results of fan voting counted for one ballot. Here are the results:

Nikolay Noritsyn (Richmond Hill, ON) 21
Alexander Ugge (Keswick, ON) 8
Alexandra Botez (Port Moody, BC) 6
Wayne Hynes (Oshawa, ON) 5
Thomas Roussel-Roozmon (Laval, QC) 4
Jean Hébert (Montreal, QC) 3
Kevin Spraggett (Portugal) 3
Natalia Khoudgarian (Toronto, ON) 1
Tomas Krnan (Burlington, ON) 1

Nikolay Noritsyn's biography:
http://web.ncf.ca/bw998/canchess.html#NORITSYN

David Cohen's Canadian Chess homepage:
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html

Canadian Chess Player of the Year
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/Champions.html#PLAYER

Past winners:

2007 Nikolay Noritsyn
2006 Kevin Spraggett
2005 Mark Bluvshtein
2004 Mark Bluvshtein
2003 Pascal Charbonneau

Some Canadian Chess players and their accomplishments in 2007:

Alexandra Botez - qualified WCM title, won North American Girls Under 12 Championship. 1st place Canadian Girls Under 12 Championship.

Bindi Cheng - 1st IM Norm: 2007 Canadian Open Championship; qualified FM title after 2007 Quebec Open Championship.

Leonid Gerzhoy - 2007 Canadian Junior Champion.

Jean Hébert - 1st place 2007 Canadian Championship.

Wayne Hynes - 2006 Canadian Correspondence Champion, 2nd year in a row.

Natalia Khoudgarian - 2007 Canadian Women's Champion, 2nd year in a row. Will likely be 12th year in a row as Top Ranked Female Canadian.

Christopher Knox - 2007 Canadian Grade 4 Champion, 4th year in a row he won the national Championship for his grade (plus 2003 provincial Kindergarden Champion, for which there were no national finals).

Anton Kovalyov - IM Norm performances at 2007 Canadian Open Championship and 2007 Quebec Open Championship.

Tomas Krnan - Top Canadian at 2007 Canadian Open Championship.

Ron Livshits - 1st place 2007 Canadian Championship.

Nikolay Noritsyn - 2007 Canadian Champion; 2nd youngest ever, at age 16. IM Norm: 2007 Canadian Open Championship.

Thomas Roussel-Roozmon - 1st GM Norm: 2007 Quebec Open.

Artem Samsonkin - 1st place 2007 Canadian Championship.

Kevin Spraggett - 2nd place Calvia Open. 23rd/116 at Americas Continental Championship. Will likely be 6th year in a row as Top Ranked Canadian, and for the 25th time out of the past 28 years.

Alexander Ugge - undefeated +3 =11 in 21st World Correspondence Chess Championship Final; will finish in 2nd or 3rd place.

Igor Zugic - drew Michael Adams at 2007 World Cup

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 9, 2008.01.01

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16-year old Canadian Chess Champions

Written and copyright 2007 by David Cohen

In August, 2007, Nikolay Noritsyn won the Canadian Championship, just a couple of months past his 16th birthday. Nikolay thus becomes the second youngest Canadian chess champion, joining three other 16-year old champions.

Alexandre Lesiège

In May, 1992, nine months after his 16th birthday, IM Alexandre Lesiège won the title by one point, defeating the favourite, second place-finisher GM Kevin Spraggett. The notes are based on my translation of notes by Alexandre Lesiège in Sur les sentiers d'Alexandre Lesiège, Grandmaître International d'échecs by Jean-Pierre Rhéaume, 1999.

IM Alexandre Lesiège - GM Kevin Spraggett
Canadian Championship, Kingston, Ontario, 1992.05

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 d6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. g3 O-O 6. Bg2 c6 7. O-O Qa5 8. h3 Be6 9. Qd3 Qa6 10. b3 d5 11. Ne5 dxc4 12. Nxc4 Rd8 13. Rd1 Nbd7 14. e4 b5

Spraggett offered a draw. Lesiège calculated, and saw that Black was better in all of the variations. But then he mistakenly thought White was better in one variation, so he played on.

15. Nd2 Nc5 16. Qc2 Rxd4 17. Ne2 Rdd8 18. Qxc5 Nd7 19. Qa3 Qb6

This was the move that Lesiège admitted overlooking; Black threatens to trap White's queen by ..b4, ..Nc5. He responds with "the only chance." Black gets into severe time trouble, and is forced to play the last 20 moves in about 2 minutes.

20. e5 Nxe5 21. Nf4 Nd3 22. Nxd3 Rxd3 23. Rb1 Rad8 24. Qxe7 Rxg3 25. Qxd8+ Qxd8 26. fxg3 Qd3 27. Ba3 b4 28. Nf1 Qb5 29. Bb2 h5 30. Bxg7 Kxg7 31. h4 c5 32. Bd5 Bxd5 33. Rxd5 Qc6 34. Ne3 a5 35. Rc1 Qe6 36. Kf2 Qf6+ 37. Ke2 a4 38. bxa4 Qa6+ 39. Kf3 Qxa4 40. Rc2 c4 41. Rxc4 Qxa2 42. Rxb4 1-0

Daniel Abraham Yanofsky

In October, 1941, future Grandmaster Abe Yanofsky won his first of a record eight Canadian Championship titles competing in his home town of Winnipeg, Manitoba, more than six months past his 16th birthday. He scored 9.5/11. Here is his first round encounter with the eventual second-place finisher, defending champion Maurice Fox.

Maurice Fox - D. Abraham Yanofsky
Canadian Championship, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Round 1, 1941.10

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 f5 3. exf5 Nc6 4. Bb5 Qf6 5. O-O Nge7 6. Re1 d6 7. d4 Bd7 8. dxe5 dxe5 9. Bxc6 Nxc6 10. Nc3 Qxf5 11. Nxe5 Nxe5 12. f4 O-O-O 13. Rxe5 Qg6 14. Be3 Bc6 15. Qe2 Bd6 16. Rg5 Qf6 17. Nb5 Bxb5 18. Rxb5 Rhe8 19. Qf3 c6 20. Rb3 Qf5 21. Rd3 Rxe3 22. Rxe3 Bc5 23. b4 Bb6 24. c4 Bd4 25. Rae1 Re8 26. Kf1 Bxe3 27. Rxe3 Qb1+ 28. Kf2 Qxa2+ 29. Re2 Rxe2+ 30. Qxe2 Qxe2+ 31. Kxe2 b6 32. Kd3 Kd7 33. b5 Kc7 34. g4 Kb7 35. Kd4 cxb5 36. cxb5 a5 37. bxa6+ Kxa6 38. f5 Kb7 39. Kd5 Kc7 40. Ke6 b5 41. Kf7 b4 42. Kxg7 b3 43. f6 b2 44. f7 b1=Q 45. f8=Q Qg6+ 46. Kh8 Qxg4 1/2-1/2

Nicholas MacLeod

For the youngest Canadian chess champion ever, we must go way back to the 13th Canadian Championship of 1886, held in Quebec City, Quebec. Playing in his home town, Nicholas MacLeod finished first in the tournament which started just two weeks after his 16th birthday.

Lawrence Day, in his Toronto Star chess column of September 1, gives only the opening moves of MacLeod's first encounter at New York, 1889, with the tournament winner, Mikhail Chigorin. Here is the full struggle, with the notes based on notes by World Champion Wilhelm Steinitz in his tournament book of 1891.

Mikhail Chigorin - Nicholas MacLeod
6th American Chess Congress, New York, NY, USA, 1889.04.13

1. e4 b6 2. d4 Bb7 3. Bd3 Nf6 4. f3

An early attack is impossible in a closed game, so best is to fortify the centre pawns.

d6 5. Nh3 e6 6. O-O Nc6 7. c3 Be7 8. Be3 h6

Weakens the kingside.

9. Nd2 Nh7 10. f4 d5 11. e5

Advantageous to advance the pawn, since P/d5 blocks the Black light-squared bishop, and no pieces can enter at e4.

Qd7 12. Qh5 Bf8 13. f5

Beginning an attack that yields a pawn. The game is practically decided, because of the disparity of play between the two opponents.

O-O-O 14. Nf4 Kb8 15. fxe6 fxe6 16. Bxh7 Rxh7 17. Qg6 Rh8 18. Nxe6 Re8 19. Nf4 Nd8 20. Rf3 c5 21. Raf1 cxd4 22. cxd4 Ba6 23. Rc1 Ne6 24. Nxe6 Rxe6 25. Qf7 Re7 26. Qf4 Re6 27. a3 g5 28. Qf7 Be7 29. Rf6 !?

Even though the outcome was never in doubt.

Bc8 30. Rxc8+ !? Qxc8 31. Qxe6 Bxf6 32. Qxf6 Ka8 33. h3 g4 34. hxg4 Rf8 35. Qd6 Rd8 36. Qe7 Rg8 37. Qf7 Qxg4 38. Qxd5+ Kb8 39. e6 Qg3 40. Nf1 Qg6 41. Bf4+ 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 4, 2007.10.15

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Chess in the British Comedies

Written and copyright 2007 by David Cohen

Two episodes of British comedy shows appearing soon on Toronto television will feature chess scenes. Mulberry is a comedy about a servant who encourages the elderly lady of the house to break out of her shell and live what's left of her life to the fullest. Episode #12, A Musical Evening, has the title character playing chess with a couple of the others in the household. Waiting for God is a comedy about 'growing old disgracefully' in a retirement home. Episode #11, The Thief, starts with two seniors playing a game of chess on the patio. There are great shots of the body language and expressions of Graham Crowden and Stephanie Cole, as he ponders and she urges him to move. Both shows end their chess scenes in similar fashion, with the loser not taking it very well.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 9, No. 4, 2007.10.15

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1st Board of Jewish Education Team Chess Championship 2006

Written and copyright 2007 by David Cohen

Chess Institute of Canada organized and directed the first team chess championship for Jewish Day and Supplementary schools from Ontario during the Chanukah holiday on Sunday, December 17, sponsored by the UJA Federation Board of Jewish Education of Greater Toronto. 14 teams attended. The awards were presented by the Guest of the tournament, International Master Sophia Polgar.

Prize winners:

Grades K-12

1st: CHAT (Richmond Hill) (Coby Bergman, Joseph Israelov, Daniel Ostromich, Leon Perelman).

Grades K-6

1st: Leo Baeck (Elliot Kaufman, Rebecca Giblon, Melissa Giblon, Jeffrey Gould).

2nd: Associated Hebrew Middle School (North York) Danilack (Simon Gladstone, David Ripsman, Dan Amar, Dan Poliwoda); Associated Hebrew (Toronto) Posluns (Ben Sterlin, Noah Koven, Sam Baranek, Benjamin Herman); Downtown Jewish Community School (Jordan Hofmann, Kevin Kadak, Harris Lechtzier, Tera Hofmann); United Synagogue D.S. (Brent Marks, Benjamin Raubvogel, Jacob Raubvogel, Zac Goldkind).

Grades K-3

1st: Paul Penna Downtown Jewish Day School 'A' (Gavriel Swayze, Samuel Brooks, Aviva Ripstein, Jacob Shekter).

2nd: Paul Penna Downtown Jewish Day School 'C' (Jake Katz, Kohava Mendelsohn, Jesse Shrier, Jonah Dayton); Paul Penna Downtown Jewish Day School 'D' (Dov Beck-Levine, Rachel Brooks, Zachary Freeman); Paul Penna Downtown Jewish Day School 'E' (Benjamin Beiles, Anna Sarick-Whiteside, Rowan Davidson).

Individual results are available on the Chess'n Math Association web site.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 8, No. 9, 2007.01.01

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2006 Year-End Canadian Chess Rankings

Written and copyright 2007 by David Cohen

Grandmaster Kevin Spraggett, originally from Montreal, Quebec, is the top ranked Canadian chess player at year-end of 2006, for the 5th time in a row (2002-6) and for a record 24th time since 1980. Spraggett also obtained the highest ever international chess rating for a Canadian through his play abroad. Canadian Champion and International Master Igor Zugic, of Toronto, Ontario, was the highest ranked Canadian active in Canada during 2006.

Canadian Women's Champion and Woman International Master Natalia Khoudgarian, of Toronto, Ontario, is the top ranked Canadian female chess player at year-end of 2006, for the 11th year in a row (1996-2006). Woman FIDE Master Valeria Gansvind, of Sidney, British Columbia, was higher ranked (top ranked female resident 2002-5), but represents Estonia internationally. Woman Grandmaster and International Master Sophia Polgar, of Toronto, Ontario, was even higher ranked (top ranked female resident 2006), but was not active; she represents Hungary internationally.

Top-ranked Canadian players at year-end 1973-2006

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 8, No. 9, 2007.01.01

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2006 Canadian Chess Player of the Year - Kevin Spraggett

Written and copyright 2006 by David Cohen

Congratulations to Kevin Spraggett, our 2006 Canadian Chess Player of the Year!!

The purpose of this annual poll of Canadian Chess Journalists is to recognize the achievements of a Canadian chess player in 2006; and to gain some publicity for Canadian chess. A permanent plaque with the names of all of the past winners, is on display at the offices of The Chess Federation of Canada in Ottawa.

Each journalist had up to 3 votes:

1st place vote - 5 points
2nd place vote - 3 points
3rd place vote - 1 point

It was not necessary to vote for 2nd or 3rd place. Responses were received from 9/11 invited journalists, 7 of whom voted. Here are the results:

Kevin Spraggett - 23
Igor Zugic - 15
Pascal Charbonneau - 5
Zoltan Sarosy - 5
Nikolay Noritsyn - 3
Tomas Krnan - 2
Mark Bluvshtein - 1
Raja Panjwani - 1

Kevin Spraggett's biography:
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html#SPRAGGETTK

David Cohen's Canadian Chess homepage:
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html

Canadian Chess Player of the Year
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/Champions.html#PLAYER

Past winners:

2006 Kevin Spraggett
2005 Mark Bluvshtein
2004 Mark Bluvshtein
2003 Pascal Charbonneau

Some Canadian Chess players and their accomplishments in 2006:
(includes events from late 2005, after the 2005 Player of the Year voting)

Valerian Adam - Qualified IM title.

Mark Bluvshtein - 2nd place 2006 Canadian Closed Championship.

Pascal Charbonneau - Qualified Grandmaster title with 3rd and final GM Norm; Winner, Winter Chicago FIDE Invitational 2006 with undefeated 6/9 (+3 =6); Board 1 on Baltimore Kingfishers team, United States Chess League Champions 2005; United States Chess League Most Valuable Player 2005; 2nd place 2006 Canadian Closed Championship.

Bindi Cheng - 2006 Canadian Junior Champion.

Leonid Gerzhoy - besides crushing everyone in Toronto, he had excellent performances at 2006 Canadian Open Championship (=3rd) and 2006 Canadian Closed Championship (=2nd, Brilliancy Prize).

Natalia Khoudagarian - 2006 Canadian Women's Champion, her first championship win after 10 years as highest rated female chess player in Canada.

Tomas Krnan - 2nd place 2006 Montreal International.

Vicente Lee - Qualified IM title at 2006 Canadian Closed Championship.

Nikolay Noritsyn - 3rd and final IM Norm at 2006 Canadian Open Championship.

Raja Panjwani - =5th at 2006 World Under-16 Championship, IM Norm.

Zoltan Sarosy - IMC reached age 100, playing correspondence chess by e-mail since 2001!

Kevin Spraggett - continued excellent performances in Europe. Achieved 2600 FIDE rating, the highest ever by a Canadian.

Jonathan Tayar - Qualified FM title at 2006 Canadian Closed Championship; represented Canada at World Under-18 Championship.

Shiyam Thavandiran - Qualified FM title at 2006 Canadian Closed Championship; 10th place finish at World Under-14 Championship.

Alexander Ugge - +1 =8 so far in World Correspondence Chess Championship Final 21.

Igor Zugic - 2006 Canadian Closed Champion.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 8, No. 8, 2006.12.15

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Chess for Charity

Written and copyright 2006 by David Cohen

Volunteers from the federal government department of Industry Canada organized a Chess for Charity (United Way) event on Thursday, October 19, at 240 Sparks Street, Ottawa, Ontario. Chess'n Math Association (CMA) / Chess Shop Ottawa was a main sponsor, providing the chess sets and prizes. Over $450 was raised. Events included blitz chess by Miladin Djerkovic; a simultaneous exhibition by junior Karoly Szalay (only 1 loss); and play on the giant chess set provided by CMA.

The main event was an 8 board blindfold simultaneous exhibition by FM Hans Jung of Kitchener, Ontario. Hans persevered for 6 hours against strong opposition, scoring one win. At this point, after 30 moves, the players agreed that Hans could remove the blindfold so that everyone could finish up in friendly fashion face-to-face and go home! Hans scored a further +3 =2 -2, for a final total of +4 =2 -2.

Wins against Hans: Maher Saleh; and Peter Czerny / Marc Labelle (who continued for Peter when he had to leave).
Draws against Hans: Andrew Chouinard and Tim Bouma.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 8, No. 5, 2006.11.01

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Canadian Wins International Chess Tournament

Written and copyright 2006 by David Cohen

David Cohen of Toronto, Ontario, finished in clear first place in his first International Correspondence Chess Federation (ICCF) event, an 'Open' category round-robin played by Web Server, scoring 5.5/6 against players from England, Slovenia, Germany, Denmark, Spain, and Switzerland.

To view the cross-table and games:

Visit the ICCF WebChess web site: http://www.iccf-webchess.com/.
Click on 'Tables and results'.
Click on 'WS Open Class (WS/O)'.
Click on 'WS/O/011'.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 19, 2006.06.01

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2006 Canadian Chess Hall of Fame Inductee - Zoltan Sarosy

Written and copyright 2006 by David Cohen

Zoltan Sarosy

Correspondence game with Zoltan Sarosy’s favourite move:

Leon Kempen - Zoltan Sarosy
Pacific Area Team Tournament 4, Australia - Canada, Board 3, Correspondence, ICCF, 1999
1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e6 6. Nf3 Bb4 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Bd2 Nc6 9. Bd3 O-O 10. a3 Be7 11. O-O Bf6 12. Qe2 Nde7 13. Qe4 Ng6 14. Be3 Bd7 15. Rfd1 Qa5 16. Qg4 Nce7 17. Ne4 Rfd8 18. Nxf6+ gxf6 19. Nd2 Bc6 20. Rac1 f5 21. Qg5 Qd5 22. Nf3 Ba4 23. Qf6 f4 24. Bxf4 Nxf4 25. Bxh7+ Kxh7 26. Qxf7+ Kh8 27. Qxf4 Bxd1 28. Qh6+ Kg8 29. Ne5 Bc2 30. h4 Ng6 31. Rxc2 Nxe5 32. Rc5 Qxd4 33. Qg5+ Kf7 34. Rxe5 Rh8 35. Re3 Rag8 36. Rf3+ Ke8 37. Qb5+ Qd7 38. Qc4 Rh5 39. g3 Qc6 40. Qe2 Rxh4 41. Kg2 Re4 42. Qd1 Rg5 0-1

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 18, 2006.05.15

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The Chess Players - Movie Review

Written and copyright 2006 by David Cohen

The Chess Players, 1977, directed by Satyajit Ray, with English subtitles, is now available on DVD. Beautifully filmed in India, the film chronicles the continuous chess match between two friends. It is set against the backdrop of the British Empire's conquest of India in the 1850s. The players contend with the simultaneous off-the-board matches in their daily lives: the British general against their city's ruler; and themselves against their chess-widow wives. The emotions and actions of the chess players will be familiar to all of you; they are portrayed excellently in the film. I highly recommend the film, but watch it with your partner at your own risk!

If you are in Toronto, Ontario, it's available at Queen St. Video, regular titles - call ahead and get on the waiting list if it's not in.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 18, 2006.05.15

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Stephen Leacock

Written and copyright 2006 by David Cohen

I was browsing an updated list of chess stamps from countries around the world, when I came across a new entry: Canada! The stamp was from 1969, honouring humour writer Stephen Leacock. It turns out that he wrote a short story, "Pawn to King's Four", which describes a typical evening in a stuffy, old-fashioned chess club. Some quotes: "All chess players think of opening on the Queen's side but never do. Life ends too soon."; and "... said ... with a deep sigh. I knew he had been thinking of something that he daren't risk. All chess is one long regret." You can check it out at the Toronto Public Library, in a collection called "Happy Stories, Just To Laugh At".

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 14, 2006.03.15

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Alexander Ugge

Written and copyright 2006 by David Cohen

There have been rapid developments in the world of correspondence chess (CC) in the past year. Originally played by mail, CC evolved through e-mail and on to a new phase: play by web server. Players log-in to a central server and make their moves on-screen. At last, no more lost moves, illegal moves, ambiguous moves, or excuses!

In Canada, the Canadian CC Championship was played for the first time by webserver. The results were quick to arrive: Wayne Hynes clinched first place within a year of the start of the tournament. In fact, within a few months of each other, first place was decided in four consecutive Canadian CC Championships, as all of the previous events slowly wrapped up.

On the international scene, Alexander Ugge of Keswick, Ontario, had an excellent year in 2005. He made his final norm for, and received, the title Correspondence Grandmaster, becoming only the fifth Canadian to do so. He won a Candidates section in the 22nd World CC Championship cycle, qualifying for the Finals. Finally, he commenced play in the Finals of the 21st World CC Championship.

You can find out more about Canadian CC here:

http://correspondencechess.com/ccca/

You can find out more about international web server CC here:

http://www.iccf-webchess.com/

From CHECK! #554, 2005.12:

A. Kazoks - Alexander Ugge
21st World Correspondence Championship - Candidates
1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nc6 5. Nc3 Qc7 6. g3 a6 7. Bg2 Nf6 8. O-O Bc5 9. Nb3 Ba7 10. Bg5 Ne5 11. Bxf6 gxf6 12. Qh5 b5 13. Qh6 Ke7 14. Rad1 b4 15. Ne2 a5 16. Nbd4 Ba6 17. Rfe1 Rag8 18. Nf4 Rg5 19. Nh3
19... Bxd4 20. Rxd4
{If 20. Nxg5 Bxf2+ 21. Kxf2 Ng4+ 22. Kf3 Nxh6.}
20... Qxc2 21. Rdd1
{If 21. Nxg5 Ng4 with a double attack on h6 and f2.}
21... Rhg8 22. Qxh7 Nd3 23. Rxd3 Qxd3 24. Nxg5 Rxg5 25. h4 Qd2 26. hxg5 Qxe1+ 27. Kh2 Qxf2 28. Qg7 Be2 29. Kh3 Bh5
0-1
[Cohen, David]

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 12, 2006.02.15

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2005 Year-End Canadian Chess Rankings

Written and copyright 2006 by David Cohen

Grandmaster Kevin Spraggett, originally from Montreal, Quebec, is the top ranked Canadian chess player at year-end of 2005, for the 4th time in a row (2002-5) and for a record 23rd time since 1980. He is rated 2612.

Woman International Master Natalia Khoudgarian, of Toronto, Ontario, is the top ranked Canadian female chess player at year-end of 2005, for the 10th year in a row (1996-2005). She is rated 2265.

List of top-ranked Canadian players at year-end from 1973-2005

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 9, 2006.01.01

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2005 Canadian Chess Player of the Year - Mark Bluvshtein

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

Mark Bluvshtein, 17, a Toronto Grade 12 student and chess International Grandmaster, was voted 2005 Canadian Chess Player of the Year. This is the second year in a row Bluvshtein has won the award.

In 2005, Bluvshtein tied for first place at the Canadian Open Chess Championship in Edmonton, Alberta. Bluvshtein also won the Canadian Under-18 Year-Old Chess Championship in Victoria, British Columbia; and finished tied for 3rd place at the World Under-18 Year-Old Chess Championship in Belfort, France.

Chess journalists representing newpapers and chess magazines across the country were asked to vote for the #1, #2 and #3 Canadian Chess Player of the Year for 2005.

Voting method:

1st place vote - 5 points
2nd place vote - 3 points
3rd place vote - 1 point

Voting results (10 of 11 invited journalists responded):

Mark Bluvshtein (Toronto, Ontario): 23 points
Nikolay Noritsyn (Richmond Hill, Ontario): 17
Alexander Ugge (Keswick, Ontario): 11
Tomas Krnan (Oakville, Ontario): 8
Zhe Quan (Richmond Hill, Ontario): 8
Sebastian Predescu (Ottawa, Ontario): 1

Highlights of Canadian chess player accomplishments in 2005:

Mark Bluvshtein - Tied for first place at the Canadian Open Chess Championship; won the Canadian Under-18 Year-Old Chess Championship; and tied for 3rd place at the World Under-18 Year-Old Chess Championship.

Tomas Krnan - Made final qualifying Norm towards the International Master title.

Nikolay Noritsyn - Made two qualifying Norms towards the International Master title in back-to-back tournaments.

Zhe Quan - Made 3rd and final qualifying Norm towards the International Master title.

Kevin Spraggett (Portugal) - Continued excellent international results, including strong finish at Pan-American Championship (0.5 points from advancing to World Cup).

Shiyam Thavandiran (Toronto, Ontario) - Canadian Junior Chess Champion with a score of 8.5/9; at age 12 (Grade 6), the youngest to ever win the title.

Alexander Ugge - Qualified for the Correspondence International Grandmaster title; qualified for the World Correspondence Chess Championship finals.

Canadian Chess Player of the Year - List of Winners

2005 Mark Bluvshtein
2004 Mark Bluvshtein
2003 Pascal Charbonneau

Survey conducted by David Cohen.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 6, 2005.11.15; and British Columbia Chess Federation E-mail Bulletin #82.

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Big Blunders in Chess

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

Here are some of the biggest blunders ever made in master chess games.

Game 1

This game was played in a match for the World Championship. At the time of the game, Challenger Bronstein was leading 3-2 after 5 games of the 24 game match. Here's what happened:

David Bronstein - Mikhail Botvinnik
World Championship Match, Moscow, USSR, 1951
1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 cxd4 4.Nxd4 Nf6 5.Nc3 d6 6.Bg5 e6 7.Qd2 h6 8.Bxf6 gxf6 9.O-O-O a6 10.f4 Bd7 11.Kb1 Be7 12.Be2 Nxd4 13.Qxd4 Qa5 14.Rhf1 h5 15.Rf3 Qc5 16.Qd2 Bc6 17.Re3 Qa5 18.Bf3 O-O-O 19.Qd3 Rd7 20.h4 Kb8 21.a3 Bd8 22.Ka2 Qc5 23.Re2 a5 24.a4 Bb6 25.b3 Rc8 26.Qc4 Qxc4 27.bxc4 Rh8 28.Kb3 Rdd8 29.Rd3 Bg1 30.Red2 Kc7 31.Ne2 Bf2 32.Rd1 Bc5 33.Ng3 Rdg8 34.Ne2 Rh7 35.f5 e5 36.Nc3 Bd4 37.Rxd4 exd4 38.Rxd4 Rhg7 39.Ne2 Rxg2 40.Bxg2 Rxg2 41.Nf4 Rg3+ 42.Kb2 Rg4 43.Nxh5 Rxh4 44.Nxf6 Kb6 45.Rxd6 Kc5 46.e5 Rd4 47.Rxd4 Kxd4 48.Ng4 Bxa4 49.e6 fxe6 50.f6 Be8 51.Kb3 e5 52.c3+ Ke4 53.Nh6 Kf4 54.f7 Bxf7 55.Nxf7 e4 56.Nd8 e3

DIAGRAM
White: K/b3; N/d8; P/c3,c4.
Black: K/f4; P/a5,b7,e3.

57.Kc2 Kg3
0-1

In the diagram, how many ways can the Black king move from f4 to f2 in 2 moves?

White must play 57.Ne6+ immediately, so the knight can move on to d4 (57...Kf3 58.Nd4+ Kf2). From there, the knight can be sacrificed for the Black pawn whenever the pawn moves from e3 to e2. Then, the game will be a draw.

Instead, White played 57.Kc2 ??, thinking to play the knight back next move, and so after 57...Kf3 58.Nf7 e2 59.Ne5+ Kf2 60.Nd3+ to give up the knight for the pawn when it promotes on e1.

But there came a rude surprise: 57...Kg3 !! There are 2 routes that the king can take from f4 to f2 in 2 moves. Going via f3 gives the knight a check, and so enough time to retreat and catch the pawn. But, going via g3 gives the knight no checks, so it can't get back in time! The pawn will promote safely.

After this loss, the match was tied 3-3. Bronstein never fully recovered. The match was drawn, Champion Botvinnik kept his title, and Bronstein never again challenged for the title.

Game 2

This game was played by two grandmasters in a tournament to determine who would challenge for the World Championship:

Tigran Petrosian - David Bronstein
Candidates Tournament, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 1956
1.c4 Nf6 2.Nc3 g6 3.g3 Bg7 4.Bg2 O-O 5.Nf3 c5 6.O-O Nc6 7.d4 d6 8.dxc5 dxc5 9.Be3 Nd7 10.Qc1 Nd4 11.Rd1 e5 12.Bh6 Qa5 13.Bxg7 Kxg7 14.Kh1 Rb8 15.Nd2 a6 16.e3 Ne6 17.a4 h5 18.h4 f5 19.Nd5 Kh7 20.b3 Rf7 21.Nf3 Qd8 22.Qc3 Qh8 23.e4 fxe4 24.Nd2 Qg7 25.Nxe4 Kh8 26.Rd2 Rf8 27.a5 Nd4 28.b4 cxb4 29.Qxb4 Nf5 30.Rad1 Nd4 31.Re1 Nc6 32.Qa3 Nd4 33.Rb2 Nc6 34.Reb1 Nd4 35.Qd6 Nf5

DIAGRAM
White: K/h1; Q/d6; R/b1,b2; N/d5,e4; B/g2; P/a5,c4,f2,g3,h4.
Black: K/h8; Q/g7; R/b8,f8; N/d7,f5; B/c8; P/a6,b7,e5,g6,h5.

36.Ng5 Nxd6
0-1

A knight moving backwards is the hardest type of move to visualize on the chessboard.

Tigran Petrosian later became World Champion 1963-9.

Game 3

I. Von Popiel - Georg Marco

DIAGRAM
White: K/h1; Q/d3; R/d1; N/f5; B/b1; P/a2,e4,g2,h2.
Black: K/h8; Q/e5; R/d7; B/b7,d4; P/a6,b5,g7,h6.

1-0

White has 3 pieces attacking B/d4: N/f5; Q/d3; and R/d1. Black has only 2 pieces defending it: R/d7; and Q/e5. Furthermore, Black has no way of defending it an additional time. So, if Black does not move the bishop, then it will be lost (3 attackers > 2 defenders). But if Black moves the bishop, then the R/d7 behind it on the d-file will be captured for free by the Q/d3. So, thinking that he was losing a piece, Black resigned. But this was a blunder! Instead, Black should have played 1...Bg1 !! The threat is 2...Qxh2#. By taking time to prevent the checkmate, White will lose either the Q/d3 or the R/d1 to the R/d7. So, instead of losing, Black should have won!

Georg Marco was one of the world's leading commentators on chess games.

Game 4

Sztern - Lundquist
Australia, 1983

DIAGRAM
White: K/b1; Q/e3; R/c1; N/e5; B/d3; P/b2,d6,f4,h3,h5.
Black: K/g8; Q/b6; R/a3,e8; N/d4; P/b7,c5,g5,g7,h7.

28...Qxb2+
0-1

In the diagram position, Black offered White a draw. White, as was White's right, asked to see Black's move before giving an answer. So, Black played a queen sacrifice. White was so surprised by the move, which forces checkmate (29.Kxb2 Rb3+ 30.Ka2 Ra8+ 31.Ba6 Rxa6#), that White resigned! But White completely forgot that White had been offered a draw, which White could have accepted, instead of resigning!!

Game 5

The shortest master game ever played:

Z. Djordjevic - M. Kovacevic
Bela Crkva, 1984
1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 c6 3. e3 Qa5+
0-1

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 5, 2005.11.01

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How Children Develop Life Skills with Chess

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

In a learning environment, chess can be used to develop a wide range of life skills for the child’s personal growth and ability to interact socially.

Competition
A child will gain self-esteem and confidence from winning; and take defeat and learn from losing

Concentration
In thinking about a move in the chess game, a child can learn patience, to concentrate on a task, and that success comes from your own effort.

Cooperation
Community starts here. The child can help another child from the same school, and together they will then represent their school at a team competition. Additional opportunities exist when the children form two-player teams for an exercise game with the chess pieces called double chess (bughouse); successful play requires the cooperation of the player’s partner.

Fair play
The starting point is the same for all, and the process (the rules) is the same for all.

A child first learns equality: children mix with children of different gender, ethnicity, and age. They discover that all people are equal in opportunity. All participants face the exact same starting position in a chess game. The only advantage, that one player moves first, is eliminated when the players alternate colours in successive games. Any additional advantage comes from how people with equal opportunities apply themselves to the task.

A child learns to play by the rules, that the same rules apply to everyone, and that they are not changed just for one person. Cheating on the rules is not permitted. A child may also be taught that an exception may be made once, to forgive another person’s mistake. This can happen when another player is learning the game and makes a big mistake; the child may permit the other player to change the move, but with the warning and understanding that this will not be permitted a second time.

Hard work
Study plus practice will lead to achieving a goal. Teachers can assign exercises or books from the recommended reading list. The greater the effort by the student, the more they will see the results when they play the game.

Knowledge sharing
In a learning environment, children will share their knowledge by mentoring. For example, a teacher can explain a new rule to the most advanced players in the class. The students will then turn around and explain it to all of the others! Children also play weaker players, to help them improve.

Maturity
Children learn consideration for others, and social behaviour, in the learning environment. Chess provides an opportunity for kids to communicate with each other. This can be particularly important for children with problems of autism or shyness. The moves of the game are one form of communication between the children. The setting for the game, such as choosing colours, is another.

Responsibility
Your actions bring consequences. In chess, a move made by a child brings a response by the other player. The touch-move rule states that when a player touches a piece, that is the piece which the player must move. This is important, because the child learns that actions cannot be changed or taken back. The child learns to live with the consequences of the action, which in chess is the other player’s response. From this, a child may also learn self-control - think before you act.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 4, 2005.10.15

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How Children Develop Sports Skills with Chess

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

Chess can help you with your (team) sports.

Visualization
Compare arrangement of pieces on the chessboard to the arrangement of the players on the field of play. Helps the player to keep track mentally of where teammates and opponents are located.

Thinking ahead
Soccer and chess parent Gary Gladstone described how his son Simon, my chess student, had his soccer game messed up because his non-chess playing teammates had not caught up to him yet. When a teammate has the soccer ball, and is on the offence, a good play is to pass it to Simon, so that he can take the ball and move it up the empty field of play towards the opponents' goal. But once the pass is made, the opposing team will close in on him, to prevent him from moving into the open space in front of him. So, a better play is to pass the ball from the teammate into the open space ahead of Simon! From his chess playing, Simon learned to think ahead, both when considering his own actions, and his opponents' actions. Taking all of this into account, when Simon saw a teammate with the ball, he would take off for the open field up ahead, expecting the ball to be there when he arrived. But his non-chess playing teammates were passing the ball behind him, where he used to be located!

Opponent's response
A player learns that the opponents will respond to whatever action the player makes. So, the child learns that there are consequences for each action.

Analysis
List, then assess, the strengths and weaknesses of both the player's team's situation and the opposing team's situation. Use observation, with reference to standards learned from books or other players. Use imagination to develop possible actions (alternatives).

Evaluation
Assess the value of an action, taking into account possible responses by the opposing team.

Judgement
Compare alternative actions and determine which is best.

Strategy
On the chessboard, the player guides the chess pieces; on the sports team, the coach guides the players. Form a plan for an action for all players on a team, in a coordinated effort: the game plan. Set the goal, then break the plan down into achievable steps to reach the final goal. Each player has a role.

Teamwork
In chess, the child can help another child from the same school, and together they will then represent their school at a team competition. Team spirit evolves.

Children form two-player teams for an exercise game with the chess pieces called double chess (bughouse); successful play requires the cooperation of the player's partner. Children learn signals for communication; to coordinate with a teammate; and to plan with a teammate.

Hiding your emotions during a contest
Chess provides an opportunity to learn to hide your emotions from your opponent. For example, if your face shows that you are excited at having found an opportunity to win, then you will place your opponent on guard. Your opponent may not have seen this opportunity, but will now be alerted to search for it.

Break from physical activity
You can take a break from physical sports (athletics) by playing a non-physical sport such as chess. Pass the time between games or while training.

Quotes on Chess and Sports

Rowing

"Q. What are some things people might not know about Marnie McBean?

A. My first trophy was a chess trophy. I used to play in a lot of chess tournaments; I was a little Bobby Fischer. I was ranked in Canada for under-16 in the top 25 one year."

"One of the jobs I have in the boat is dealing with strategy and tactics. It's my responsibility to talk to Kathleen Heddle, my partner, to inform her of what is going on around us. I have to anticipate not only our weaknesses but also our strengths, as well as the weaknesses and strengths of our opposition. I have to anticipate the moves of the opposition around us. I think that my gift for that has come from my background in chess. Chess led me to develop a strategist's mind by teaching me how to think tactically, and how to think about options, selections and different possibilities. I think that my background in chess has made me one of the best racers and one of the best bowsmen in the world."

- Marnie McBean, 3-time Olympic Golld Medal Rower.
["McBean at 35: Still strokin'", interview by Randy Starkman, Toronto Star, Sunday 2003.11.09, p. E2. Quote reprinted in En Passant 142, 1997.02, p.33.]

Boxing

"I always felt chess was very good for boxers. They've got to think ahead about their moves; they can't just be reactive."

- Adrian Teodorescu, Atlas Boxing CClub, Toronto, former Canadian national coach, and Lennox Lewis' boxing trainer in his amateur years.
['Lennox Lewis: Final Round - Leaving as lord of the ring' by Kevin Ward, Toronto Star, Saturday, 2004.02.07, p.C3.]

"Q. When did you learn to play chess?

A. During high school, and actually my [amateur boxing trainer] Adrian Teodorescu helped me develop it.

Q. What is it about chess that appeals to you?

A. There's strategy involved, there's thinking. You have different opportunities to use [pieces] that all work differently and you have to decide which [pieces] you want to work for your best advantage."

- Lennox Lewis, chess expert; Olymppic Gold Medal in boxing for Canada 1988; World Heavyweight Boxing Champion 1992-4, 1997-2001, 2001-4.
['The king of the world', interview by Randy Starkman, Toronto Star, Tuesday, 2002.11.12, p.C3.]

Baseball

"[In both baseball and chess, you are] always looking ahead [and cannot] afford to underestimate your opponent."

- Ron Guidry, major league baseballl pitcher, New York Yankees 1975-88; 4-time All-Star (1978-9, 1982-3); winner 5 Gold Glove awards 1982-6; winner Cy Young award for best pitcher 1978; winner two World Series Championships 1977-8.
[cover story, 'Ron Guidry: A fierce competitor on the field and the board' by Bruce Pandolfini, Chess Life, 1983.09, p.6.]

"[When playing chess, Ron Guidry] puts up a poker face and cleverly disguises his intentions."

- Bruce Pandolfini, chess author. [cover story, 'Ron Guidry: A fierce competitor on the field and the board' by Bruce Pandolfini, Chess Life, 1983.09, p.6.]

Basketball

In 1935, the Ontario men's basketball champions from Long Branch (Toronto) played chess once per week! ['Basketball Champions Developing into Chess Fiends', Toronto Star, 1935.11.19.]

"... the [chess] competition was very steep and very exciting."

- Elvin Hayes, basketball player; 11968 US College Player of the Year; 16 years (1968-84) in National Basketball Association (NBA); 12-time NBA All-Star; among top four all-time in NBA for games and minutes played, points scored, and rebounds; won NBA Championship 1977-78; member Basketball Hall of Fame, NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team.
['Celebrities and Chess' by Irwin Fisk, Chess Life, 1992.01, p.88]

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 3, 2005.10.01

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How Children Develop Logic Skills with Chess

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

Critical thinking skills can be developed from chess in the field of logic, with applications to reading, writing, research, and learning.

The development of these skills is due to the forced alternation of moves by the two players of the game. To have any success in a chess game, a child must learn to reason as follows:

"If I do this (move 1), then my opponent will do that (move 2)"; and

"If I do this (move choice 1), then it will be a better result for me than if I do that (move choice 2)".

Analysis
List, then assess, the strengths and weaknesses of both the player's position and the opponent's position. Use observation, with reference to standards learned from books or other players. Use imagination to develop possible actions (alternatives).

Evaluation
Assess the value of an action, taking into account possible responses by the opponent.

Judgement
Compare alternative actions and determine which is best.

Planning
Form a plan for an action. Set the goal, then break the plan down into achievable steps to reach the final goal.

Quote on Chess and Critical Thinking

"Chess really taught me how to think critically and to consider all possible alternatives to my decisions."

- Ahmed El-Sohemy, Researcher, Univversity of Toronto.
['Going Places - Ahmed El-Sohemy - Finding genes that fit', Toronto Star, Thursday 2004.01.01, p.B2.]

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 2, 2005.09.15

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How Children Develop Math Skills with Chess

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

Children develop math skills with chess because of a common requirement of chess and math: visualization. This usually occurs in Grade 2 (at age 7).

Chess develops visualization abilities as follows:

Chess board

The chess board is laid out in a checkered pattern of a large square comprised of 64 smaller squares arranged 8x8. Children can be taught their way around the board through its various patterns (ranks, files, diagonals, colouring of squares).

Moves of the chess pieces

The child first learns the movements of the chess pieces which travel in straight lines: pawn, rook, bishop, and queen. But then the child is introduced to a movement that is quite different from the others: the L-shaped jump of the knight. The movement is not only different from the child's previous chess experience, but is also likely an entirely new experience for the child. The child must learn to visualize the movement.

Moving chess pieces around on the chess board

Moving a chess piece from a starting square to an ending square forces the child to visualize the patterns and movements.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 7, No. 1, 2005.09.01

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Summer Chess Reading - 4 book reviews

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

Here's four books with connections to Canadian Chess. Three are available from the Toronto Public Library's circulating collection; the other you can get via their Inter-Library Loan (ILL) service.

1. Kicking Tomorrow by Daniel Richler, Canadian Edition, McClelland & Stewart, 1991

Unless you're interested in a story of a young man's coming of age, with explicit descriptions of sex, drugs, rock and roll, etc., then I can spare you the reading of the 376 pages of the Canadian edition of this book. Leaving aside the description of the stripper in the chess bishop outfit, appended below are the chess passages I could find in my skimming of the novel which relate to Toronto street blitz player Josef Smolij. According to Richler, his character, also called Joe Smolij, was a tribute to the real Josef Smolij. Unfortunately, the character was cut out of the American edition.

Josef Smolij

(From my Canadian Chess website: http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html#SMOLIJ)

- Played Canadian Championship 1959

- Played speed chess every night, all nighht, in Toronto at the chess tables on Gould Street, corner Yonge Street, from about 1977 through 1985 for $0.50/game (later $1/game)

- Famous opening: Smash-Crash Gambit (Grecco Counter-Gambit/Latvian Gambit); adopted by IM David Levy in his loss against Chess 4.7, match, Toronto, 1978 after Smolij and Levy played blitz chess the night before

- Famous claims: World's fastest chess plaayer; 50,000 chess games played

- Famous quotes: "I'm poor in the pocketboook but rich in the mind."; "Kill as you go!"; "Show no mercy!"

If anyone remembers the 'Sports Illustrated' article or 'Guinness Book of Records' book which mention Smolij, I would like to hear about it. These have been mentioned elsewhere, e.g., in the Toronto Star, but I haven't been able to verify them. You can contact me at bw998 -at- freenet.carleton.ca.

Kicking Tomorrow passages with Joe Smolij (set in Montreal):

Chapter 4, p.54-55:

"He buys a can of beer and stops in Dominion Square to play chess with old Joe Smolij, the rubby with the brambled beard and the SMASH CRASH GAMBIT sweatshirt, as blackened with street-grime and oil as the undercarriage of a diesel truck, who keeps up a running commentary above the din of traffic throughout games he never loses. 'Make a moof make a moof,' Joe says, stamping a pawn onto his corrugated checkerboard and punching the stop-clock. 'Time is money. Money is freedom. Oh oh oh no no - never expose your king, boy without a brain. Some patriot, some colonial, ha! You looss, but don't feel bad. Nobody think fast in this heat.'

'Wow.' Robbie stares at his paralyzed pieces, barely out of the gate, his beer can still cool between his thighs. Fool's mate. Joe's lungs are obviously custom-finished to process carbon monoxide to his brain. 'Fuck.'

Joe looks hard at Robbie, scratches a sunburnt potato of a nose. 'I don't make no boozy moofs. I don't get angry so quick.'

Robbie's taken aback by the answer. He's not angry with Joe. He he was enjoying himself. He forks out his dollar, smiling to prove it, says goodbye and strides on, ..."

Chapter 9, p.134:

"Finally Rosie found him in Dominion Square, arguing noisily over a game of chess with Joe Smolij, and took him home for a hot bath - even old Joe, who smelled like a bowl of mouldy polewka, had flared his thistly nostrils when Robbie first put his dollar down."

Chapter 20, p.345:

"And here was old Joe Smolij. Robbie brushed a pillow of snow off the challenger's seat. The chess pieces were spangled with frost.

'Moof, moof,' Joe told Robbie. 'Time is money. Money is freedom. Freedom's for the birds. This I tell Spassky when I beat him.' He offered him some Canadian sherry. Robbie accepted.

'You beat Spassky? So how come you're here, Joe? You could be rich.'

Joe looked at him. Such crazy people downtown. 'I got in Quebec, boy without a brain. Boy without money. You want to talk or moof?'

Chapter 20, p.358:

(From a dream sequence)

"Here's Joe Smolij, naked but for his sprawling, brambled beard, his hands flopping in his wrinkled lap like old moths in a jar, the way they always did while he waited for you to move. Robbie goes nose to nose with him and looks into his face. Joe's eyes are white, like a baked trout's. There a tattoo on his left wrist, little numbers in blue ink: QP5-KP6xR=CHECK."

2. In quest of the North West Passage by Leslie Neatby, Longmans, Green and Company, Toronto, 1958

Leslie Neatby was Professor and Head of the Classics Department at Acadia University in Nova Scotia. He was also the Canadian Correspondence Chess Champion in 1936. I came across his name because this book was listed as a reference for one of the on-line Canadian Biography search results for 'chess': Peter Warren Dease (1788-1863). Dease was a Hudson's Bay Company officer (chief trader) and Arctic explorer of British and Mohawk ancestry. While in charge of HBC's British Columbia district (1831-5), he encouraged games such as chess at his command post at Fort St. James. Dease Strait is named after him, in the area of his mapping of the north-west passage across the Arctic Ocean. Neatby's book has a few pages on his explorations.

3. Money in the Bank by P.G. Wodehouse, 1946

(You'll need an ILL request to obtain this book)

"All the characters in this book are imaginary and have no relation whatsoever to any living person." is the standard statement included at the front of this book. Don't believe it. The main character, George, sixth Viscount Uffenham (Lord Uffenham) is based on 1925 and 1927 British Columbia Chess Champion Max Enke! According to B.C. chess historian Stephen Wright, Wodehouse used both Enke's large physical size and his mannerisms in creating his character. They met when both were held in France by the Germans during World War Two.

The story is an excellent romantic comedy. Lord Uffenham has hidden his fortune, in the form of jewels, on his estate, but can't remember where. Some crooks find out about the situation and think this is like having money in the bank...

A funny quote:

"She found its occupant seated at the table, playing chess with himself. From the contented expression on his face, he appeared to be winning." (p. 29)

4. Something Fishy by P.G. Wodehouse, 1957

A sequel to the first Uffenham story, and another excellent romantic comedy. The story is about a tontine to see who gets married last: the fathers each put money into the pot, but weren't allowed to tell their children. Now only two are left unmarried. But there's something fishy about the whole thing...

The 1992 Vintage edition has a cover illustration by Mark Entwisle showing Lord Uffenham.

Some quotes:

Bill Hollister on Mortimer Bayliss: "He used to come and play chess with my father, and curse me for peering over his shoulder." (p.52)

Mortimer Bayliss to Bill Hollister: "You used to breathe down the back of my neck when I came to play chess with your father." (p.58)

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 23, 2005.08.15

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How to Lobby for a Canadian Chess Stamp

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

If you would like to see a Canadian stamp on the theme of chess, here's how to go about lobbying for it. Write to the post office at the following address:

Chairperson of the Stamp Advisory Committee
Canada Post Corporation
2701 Riverside Drive, Suite N1070
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0B1

It's up to you if you want to suggest a stamp in memory of Abe Yanofsky, or just a stamp on the general theme of chess. You will, however, need to justify your suggestion. The committee's requirements are listed on Canada Post's web site, under Personal - Collecting - Stamp Selection Policy:

http://www.canadapost.ca/personal/collecting/default-e.asp?stamp=stamppolicy

Here are three points for you to make to the Committee:

1. Other Countries with Chess Stamps

82 countries issued 423 chess stamps from 1947-89.

Reference:

Chess and Stamps web site by Colin Rose
http://www.tri.org.au/chess/

2. History of Chess in Canada

Chess players have been in Canada at least as far back as the 17th century, when Alexandre de Chaumont, aide-de-camp of de Tracy (Lt.-Gen. of the armies of the King of France in America), and one of the best chess players in France in 1665, spent two years in the French colony (now Quebec). Organized chess in Canada goes back to at least 1787, when Richard Bulkeley, a high-ranking civil servant, was president of a 'chess, pencil, and brush club' in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Reference:

Canadian Chess history web site by David Cohen:
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html#HISTORY

3. Popularity of Chess in Canada

The last survey taken on the popularity of chess in Canada showed that over 10% of the population plays at least one game of chess per year. This ranks chess behind only swimming as the most popular recreational/sporting activity in Canada. (Other sports, such as hockey, are more watched, but are less participated in.) Chess has become even more popular recently, as more schools adopt chess either in their curriculum, or as a lunch-time or after-school activity.

References:

Chess Federation of Canada
http://www.chess.ca

Chess'n Math Association
http://www.chess-math.org

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Appendix 1

Countries with Chess Stamps

Country (Years during which issued)(number issued)

Afghanistan (1989)(7)
Albania (1983)(1)
Argentina (1978)(1)
Austria (1985)(1)
Barbados (1984)(4)
Benin (1988)(1)
Brazil (1980)(1)
British Virgins (1984-8)(7)
Bulgaria (1947.09.29-1983)(9)
Cameroun (1974)(1)
Central Africa (1983-8)(9)
Chad (1982-5)(15)
Comores (1979-88)(4)
Congo (1983)(3)
Cuba (1951-88)(43)
Czechoslovakia (1967-85)(3)
Dahomey (1974)(2)
Djibouti (1980-6)(11)
Dominican Republic (1967-73)(3)
Ecuador (1975)(1)
Egypt (1965)(1)
Egyptian occupation of Palestine (1965)(1)
El Salvador (1974-7)(3)
Faroe Islands (1983-6)(6)
Finland (1952)(1)
France (1966-74)(2)
Germany (E) (1960-9)(6)
Germany (W Berlin) (1972)(4)
Germany (W) (1972)(4)
Gibraltar (1982)(1)
Great Britain (1976-89)(2)
Grenada (1985)(1)
Guinea (1984-7)(2)
Guinea-Bissau (1979-88)(17)
Guyana (1984)(3)
Hungary (1950-79)(13)
Iceland (1972)(1)
Indonesia (1973)(1)
Iran (1972)(1)
Israel (1964-78)(6)
Italy (1981)(1)
Kampuchea (1986)(8)
Kenya (1984)(5)
Korea (N) (1980-88)(5)
Laos (1984-8)(15)
Lebanon (1973-80)(7)
Libya (1976-82)(8)
Luxembourg (1981)(1)
Madagascar (1984)(6)
Malawi (1988)(4)
Mali (1973-86)(20)
Malta (1980)(3)
Mauritania (1984)(1)
Mexico (1978)(2)
Monaco (1967)(1)
Mongolia (1981-6)(15)
Morocco (1989)(1)
Mozambique (1987)(1)
Netherlands (1973-8)(2)
Netherlands Antilles (1962)(3)
Nicaragua (1963-83)(19)
Niger (1973-4)(3)
Philippines (1962-78)(4)
Poland (1956-74)(4)
Rumania (1966-84)(14)
Russia (1948-85)(18)
San Marino (1965)(1)
Surinam (1976-87)(11)
Sweden (1985)(1)
Switzerland (1968)(1)
Syria (1974)(2)
Taiwan (1984)(1)
Tanzania (1986)(2)
Trinidad (1984)(4)
Tunisia (1972)(1)
Tuvalu (1986)(1)
United Arab Emirates (1985-6)(5)
Upper Volta (1984)(1)
Uruguay (1979)(1)
Vietnam (1983)(8)
Yemen (Royalist) (1967)(1)
Yugoslavia (1950-86)(8)

Compiled by David Cohen from the following source:
Chess and Stamps web site by Colin Rose
http://www.tri.org.au/chess/catalogue.html

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Appendix 2

Articles on Chess and Stamps

1. 'Chess through Stamps' by Dragoslav Djukanovic and Branko Lazarevic, Chess Informant 20, 1976.

2. 'Chess on Stamps' by Bob Long, Chess Life & Review, March 1974, p.192-8.

3. 'World Stamps Celebrate Chess', Chess Life, June 1982, cover, p.11.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 21, 2005.07.15

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First Canadian Chess Club

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

I recently made a trip to the National Archives in Ottawa, and turned up the following interesting items, regarding Bernard Freedman and the evolution of the Chess Federation of Canada (CFC):

From 1872-1932, the Canadian Chess Association (CCA) had only one real responsibility: to organize the Canadian Championship. Bernard Freedman wanted the association to do much more, to be a promoter of chess in Canada. In 1932, he re-organized the CCA as the Canadian Chess Federation (CCF), later the CFC. In Stanley Wilson's 1958 essay “Chess in Canada”, he reports how Freedman accomplished this at the 1932 Annual Meeting: “Freedman held the delegates in the conference room until all promised to cooperate and make the Federation the hub of organized chess in Canada, with far more power than it had ever assumed.”

At the CFC's 1955 Annual Meeting, a motion by Baillargeon/Bergevin established a Permanent Trust Fund of the CFC, known as the Chess Foundation of Canada. Its charter is still in effect today, including the provision for a 5 person Board of Trustees. The first Chairman was Bernard Freedman; Phil Haley was among the initial group of the other four proposed trustees. So, this year is the 50th anniversary of the Foundation. I hope that today's CFC Governors will continue to move the CFC forward, by assuming greater responsibility in the areas of publicity and fundraising for chess in Canada.

While I conducted this research in person, there are also many Archives documents available on-line. One of these is the Dictionary of Canadian Biography:

http://www.biographi.ca/EN/index.html

If you type in 'chess' as your search term, 11 biographies will be displayed, including those of two prominent Canadian chess players, first CFC President John Cherriman, and 1874 Canadian Champion William Hicks. Most of the others were avid chess players, although chess was just one of their many hobbies. One of the more interesting characters was Kahkewaquonaby, better known as Peter Edmund Jones (1843-1909). He lived both off the reservation and on it; he was probably the first native to earn his medical doctor degree at a Canadian university (1866).

The biography of Richard Bulkeley, a high-ranking Nova Scotia public official, reveals the earliest reference that I can locate for organized chess in Canada. From about 1787, he was 'president of a chess, pencil, and brush club in Halifax'. This predates the previously known early chess clubs - Quebec City (1840s), Kingston (1840s) and Montreal (1844) by over 50 years! Ironically, Nova Scotia is the only Canadian province to never host a national championship.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 20, 2005.07.01

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Canadian Chess Timeline: History of Chess in Canada

Compiled, written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

300 B.C.-1600 A.D.
Chess is a game played on a board by two players. It originated in India over 2,300 years ago. The chessboard represents the battlefield, and the pieces represents the components of the Indian army (infantry, cavalry, elephantry, chariots). Alexander the Great of Macedonia invaded India. He was a proponent of merging the cultures of Greece and India. So, for example, his Greek officers took Indian wives. I follow the theory of Yuri Averbakh, who proposed that chess was an outcome of the merging of the race (board) games of India and the logic games of Greece. We can see this in the way the pawn races up the board to the last rank, and in the logic of the moves of the pieces.

Many variants of chess were developed as it spread in different directions. Chess flourished in the Middle East around 800 A.D., and moved with its players through Northern Africa into Europe. Regional variations of the game again developed, with a settling down of the rules largely achieved by 1600.

1000
Scandinavian countries had their own board games with pieces, and these were not necessarily derived from chess. Around 1,000 A.D. they arrived in Canada, at L'Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland. Although no chess boards or pieces were excavated at the site, the National Historic Site's display contains a replica of a Scandinavian 'chess' piece from a period several hundred years later. The Viking crews passed several winters at the site, repairing their ships. It is possible that they brought their games with them, or manufactured them on the spot, so chess in some form may have been played there in Canada for the first time.

17th century
As explorers, armies and emigrants from England and France arrived in North America, they brought their games with them, and these included chess. According to the 1947 Canadian Chess Championship tournament book edited by Léopold Christin, Alexandre de Chaumont, aide-de-camp of de Tracy (Lt.-Gen. of the armies of the King of France in America), was one of the best chess players in France in 1665, and suggests that he would not have spent his two years in the French colony (now Quebec) without playing chess.

18th century
According to Christin, archival correspondence of Louis-Guillaume Verrier, Solicitor-General of Quebec, documents his chess playing with the Intendant of Quebec, Hocquart, 1728-58. This is the earliest documented playing of chess in Canada.

1759
There is a chess set in the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa which was donated by Fred Hale. According to him, this was the set his ancestor, General Sir John Hale, “and General Wolfe played with on their way over to the taking of Quebec.”

1787
Richard Bulkeley president of a 'chess, pencil, and brush club' in Halifax, Nova Scotia. This is the earliest reference to organized chess in Canada.

19th century
Chess played in taverns in Quebec.

Chess played in houses of families in Quebec and Ontario.

In the 1800s, life in Canada was based on a rural, farming economy, so it was slow in the winter-time. It was common practice after dinner in a comfortable home to retire to the drawing room, where the men played games, including chess. A historical display at the home of William Lyon Mackenzie in Toronto contains a chess set.

Another popular past-time was composing and solving chess problems.

There was also a growth in correspondence chess, between individuals and between chess clubs in different cities.

1840s
First chess clubs founded in Quebec City (approx. 1840), Kingston (by 1841), Montreal (1844), and Toronto (by 1846).

Canadian chess games published in newspapers.

1841
First correspondence chess game in Canada, between Quebec City and Kingston chess clubs.

1872
Organized chess played over the board among players in different cities began with the formation of the Canadian Chess Association (CCA) at Hamilton, Ontario, on 1872.09.24. University of Toronto Professor John Cherriman was elected the first CCA President. The CCA's original purpose was to hold a tournament, the championship of its association and of Canada. The first tournament attracted 16 players from Ontario and Quebec, but was never completed, as the competitors were distracted by the business of the accompanying agricultural fair. Succeeding events were held almost annually up to the turn of the century. The championship was usually held in the main centres of chess activity: Toronto, Monteal, Ottawa, Quebec City.

First Canadian chess book, a collection of chess problems, published: '100 Gems of Chess', edited by Thomas D.S. Moore, published by the Western Advertiser, London, Ontario.

1873
First Canadian Correspondence Chess Tournament, organized by CCA and its President, John Cherriman, won by Henry Robertson.
First completed Canadian Chess Championship organized by CCA, held at Toronto, Ontario.
First recorded blindfold exhibition, by Albert Ensor, May 19.

1874
Second Canadian Correspondence Chess Tournament organized by CCA and its President, John Cherriman, won by A. Hood (6/6 in preliminary round) and John Henderson.
First Canadian Chess Championship to be held at Montreal, Quebec.

1875
First Canadian Chess Championship to be held at Ottawa, Ontario.

1877
First Canadian Chess Championship to be held at Quebec, Quebec.

1878
First round-robin Canadian Correspondence Chess Tournament held, won by John Henderson.

1879
Ontario Chess Association was founded, at Guelph on Dec. 12.

1880
First Ontario Chess Championship held, won by W.M. Stark.

1881
George Casey, Member of Parliament for West Elgin, competed in the Canadian Championship.

1884
Future World Chess Championship contestant Johannes Zukertort gave simultaneous exhibitions and 12 board blindfold simultaneous exhibitions in Toronto, Ottawa, and Montreal, January-February.
John Henderson competes in his 9th Canadian Chess Championship (1872-84).

1885
Frank Marshall moves to Canada around this time, where he learns to play chess, before becoming U.S. Chess Champion (1909-36).

1888
The CCA's first trophy was permanently awarded to Nicholas MacLeod. His family donated the second trophy.
James Narraway's first of five Canadian Chess Championship first place finishes.

1889
Nicholas MacLeod played in the New York tournament, held to select a challenger to World Chess Champion Wilhelm Steinitz; sets record for most losses in one tournament, 31.
James Narraway wins correspondence game against famous problem composer Sam Loyd, on Board 1 in Canada - USA match.

1892
Former Canadian Chess Champion Nicholas MacLeod defeated future World Chess Champion Emanuel Lasker, in a simultaneous exhibition given by the latter at Quebec City.

1893
World Chess Champion Wilhelm Steinitz played 16 in a simultaneous exhibition at the Montreal Chess Club, Montreal, Quebec, Nov. 13.

1894
The last eight games of the World Chess Championship, between Wilhelm Steinitz (Champion) and Emanuel Lasker (Challenger) are held at Montreal, Quebec.

1895
William Pollock represents Canada at the prestigious chess tournament held at Hastings, England.
Winnipeg Y Chess Club founded.

1897
CCA's championship moved north, when it was hosted by the chess club in Orillia, Ontario. In the years leading up to the first World War, the association died out and was then revived.

1899
Magnus Smith wins first of three consecutive Canadian Chess Championships.

1901
First Canadian chess magazine, Checkmate, published by J.H. Graham, 1901-4, at Prescott, Ontario.

1904
The CCA's third trophy, the Drewery Cup, was donated in 1904, when the Canadian Chess Championship moved west for the first time, to Winnipeg, Manitoba (where the trophy survives).

1907
Canadian Chess Champion Magnus Smith defeats World Chess Champion Emanuel Lasker in a simultaneous exhibition given by the latter at Winnipeg in June.

1910
John Morrison's first of six Canadian Chess Championship first place finishes.

1912
Future World Chess Champion Jose Capablanca visits Winnipeg, Manitoba.

1915
First British Columbia Chess Championship held, won by Steven Smith.

1918
The Canadian Chess Magazine, originally B.C. Chess Magazine News, published, edited by John Ewing in North Vancouver, British Columbia (1918-1920.01).
Montreal Chess League founded “as an association of chess clubs in Montreal, which overlooked city and inter-club championships for many years,” according to Montreal chess historian Hugh Brodie.

1919
Winnipeg Jewish Chess Club founded.

1921
Canadian Correspondence Chess Association (CCCA) founded.
CHECK! was established as a column in the Winnipeg Free Press newspaper.

1922
Frank Marshall sets world record for most opponents in a simultaneous exhibition, playing 156 in Montreal in January. Canadian-born chess player Andrew Bonar Law becomes Prime Minister of United Kingdom.
Malcolm Sim starts chess column at Toronto Telegram (1922-56).
Robert Short competes in his 6th Canadian Chess Championship (1887-1922).

1923
Future World Chess Champion Alexander Alekhine gives simultaneous exhibitions (1923-24).

1924
Stephen F. Smith represents Canada at the Olympic Games Tournament (World Amateur Championship), Paris, France.

1926
Le Pion, published by Antoine Lamothe every two weeks, 1924.08-1926.08.

1927
Canadian Chess Review, published in Winnipeg by Clarence M. Scott, 1927.09, .10, .12, 1928.01.
CHECK!, the world's longest running correspondence chess magazine, first published as CCCA Bulletin #1-4 in Canadian Chess Review 1927.09.

1928
CHECK! continued when the CCCA started publishing CCCA Bulletin with issue #5, 1928.01.

1929
Maurice Fox finishes in 5th place in a major chess tournament at Bradley Beach, New Jersey, USA.

1931
James Narraway competes in his 13th Canadian Chess Championship (1888-1931).

1932
CCA re-organized by Bernard Freedman as Canadian Chess Federation (CCF).
Maurice Fox wins record 4th consecutive Canadian Chess Championship.

1933
First Canadian Correspondence Chess Championship restricted to Canadians held by CCCA, won by Harold Jordan.

1934 Canada joins Fédération Internationale des Échecs (FIDE). Bernard Freedman serves as Canada's representative to FIDE until 1957.
Canadian Chessner, published quarterly by Dudley LeDain in Montreal, 1934.10-1937.04. LeDain also edited the Canadian Supplement of Chess.

1936
Canadian Senior Boys Chess Championship held, won by D. Abraham Yanofsky.
D. Abraham Yanofsky Canadian Major Chess Champion.
Bernard Freedman sponsors visit by young American master Arthur Dake to Toronto to give simultaneous exhibition against local club members; Freedman will go on to sponsor top Canadian juniors including D. Abraham Yanofsky, Frank Anderson.

1938
John Morrison competes in his 13th Canadian Chess Championship (1908-38).

1939
Canada represented at the Chess Olympiad team competition for the first time, thanks to funding by Bernard Freedman.
Canada wins first Board medal at Chess Olympiads, as D. Abraham Yanofsky wins Gold on Board 2.
Anabelle Lougheed first Canadian to compete for the Women's World Chess Championship, in the tournament at Buenos Aires, Argentina.

1940s
Penrose family, including future British Chess Champion Jonathan Penrose, lives in London, Ontario during World War II.
Two Knights Defence, Canadian Variation: 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. Ng5 d5 5. exd5 Na5 6. Bb5+ c6 7. dxc6 bxc6 8. Be2 h6 9. Nf3 e4 10. Ne5 Bd6 11. f4 Bc5 12. c3 Qb6 was named by Chess Review after C. Frank Goodman of Toronto.
Fred Wren gives talks on chess on CBC Radio.

1941
Frank Yerhoff Jr. wins third consecutive Canadian Correspondence Chess Championship and permanent possession of the Corbould Cup.

1942
D. Abraham Yanofsky U.S. Open Chess Champion.

1943
New Brunswick hosts first national championship, as Canadian Chess Championship held at Dalhousie.

1945
CCF renamed Chess Federation of Canada (CFC).
Frank Yerhoff Jr. wins both Canadian Chess Championship and Canadian Correspondence Chess Championship.
Saskatchewan hosts first national championship, as Canadian Chess Championship held at Saskatoon.

1946
Harry Yanofsky wins U.S. Inter-collegiate Chess Championship.

1947
Revival or introduction of provincial open championships in Ontario, Quebec.
Canadian Chess Chat, founded by Daniel MacAdam, published 1947-88. Originally Maritime Chess News Bulletin. Was official organ of CFC for a time. Combined Canadian chess coverage (more at the beginning of the run) with international coverage (more at the end of the run). Montgomery Major, editor of Chess Life 1946-57, stated before 1960 that “much of the solidity of Canadian chess is due to the unifying force of this readable and informative magazine.”

1948
Canada represented for first time at World Chess Federation (FIDE)'s competition cycle for the World Chess Championship, by D. Abraham Yanofsky at the Interzonal held at Saltsjobaden, Sweden.
Frank Anderson finishes in first place at U.S. Junior Chess Championship.

1949
Maurice Fox sets record by winning Canadian Chess Championship for 8th time.
Dudley LeDain becomes chess columnist for Montreal Gazette (1949-1978).
Former World Chess Champion Machgielis (Max) Euwe gives simultaneous exhibitions.

1950s
Sicilian Defence, Bourdonnais or Kalashnikov Variation: 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 e5 pioneered by Ivan Suk-Theodorovitch.

1950
D. Abraham Yanofsky receives International Master (IM) title from FIDE, to become Canada's first titled player.
Ross Siemms finishes in first place at U.S. Junior Chess Championship.
One of the most dedicated Canadian match participants at the regular cross-border matches on Canada Day / Independence Day weekends, between Canada and the U.S.A., has to have been Gug Hogben, who, at age 62, made a 58 mile trip - each way - by bicycle from Bronte, Ontario to score a point for Canada at Niagara Falls, Ontario.

1951
Canada represented by Lionel Joyner at 1st World Junior Chess Championship.
Malcolm Sim receives Canada's first International Arbiter (IA) title from FIDE.
British Columbia hosts first national championship, as Canadian Chess Championship held at Vancouver.

1953
D. Abraham Yanofsky British Chess Champion.

1954
Frank Anderson registers a Grandmaster Norm at the Chess Olympiad.
Frank Anderson becomes first Canadian-born International Master.
Ross Siemms wins U.S. Junior Open Chess Championship.
First publication of CFC's annual list of players' ratings.

1955
John Prentice starts 15 years as CFC President, helping fund Canada's teams at the Chess Olympiads, as well as the publication of Canadian Chess Chat.
Chess Foundation of Canada founded as a Permanent Trust Fund of the Chess Federation of Canada; Bernard Freedman, first Chairperson.
Maurice Fox competes in his record 17th Canadian Chess Championship (1924-55).

1956
First Canadian Open Chess Championship held Montreal, Quebec, won by visiting USA Grandmasters Larry M. Evans and William Lombardy. Tournament similar to original Canadian Championship, but open to all (Canadians and visitors). Tournament run every two years, Swiss system of pairings adopted. Event normally held in conjunction with CFC's Annual Meeting.
First publication of CFC's Handbook.

1957
First Canadian Junior Chess Championship held, to select representatives to World Junior Championship.
4th World Junior Championship organized by Bernard Freedman held in Toronto, Ontario, won by William Lombardy of USA.
John Prentice starts 30 years as Canada's representative to FIDE.

1958
Frank Anderson would have qualified for the International Grandmaster title if illness (an attack of influenza) had not prevented him from playing in the last round of the Chess Olympiad (the result of the game did not matter).

1959
D. Abraham Yanofsky wins the Canadian Chess Championship with a perfect score, for the second time.
Ignas Zalys declared winner of 1952-53 U.S. Golden Knights Postal Tournament.

1960s
The Canadian style in chess, which “involves non-committal preservation of options, often connected with a slow development of the pieces,” according to Lawrence Day, was developed in the 1960s by Duncan Suttles and influenced a generation of Canadian chess players.

1960
First Universities Team Chess Championship was held, won by Queen's University.

1962
Laszlo (Leslie) Witt wins the Canadian Open Chess Championship with a perfect score.

1964
D. Abraham Yanofsky becomes Canada's first International Grandmaster (GM), and the first GM to be raised in the British Commonwealth.
John Cleeve helps CHECK! editor Russ Isaac become the first person to be paid for chess in Canada.
Future World Chess Champion Bobby Fischer gave simultaneous exhibitions in Montreal.

1965
D. Abraham Yanofsky ties record by winning Canadian Chess Championship for the 8th time.
Canadian team, University of Toronto, wins Pan-American Intercollegiate Team Chess Championship for the first time.
Duncan Suttles finishes in first place in Group 'B' at World Junior Championship.
John Cleeve begins 25 years as President of CCCA.

1967
Fedor Bohatirchuk first Canadian to receive a title from International Correspondence Chess Federation (ICCF), Correspondence International Master (IMC), becoming Canada's first double international master (over-the-board and correspondence).
Important grandmaster tournament held at Winnipeg.
'100 Years of Chess in Canada', by D. Abraham Yanofsky, published as Canadian Centennial project.

1968
CHECK! given its new name with issue #344, 1968.10.

1969
Pan-American Intercollegiate Team Chess Championships held in Canada for first time, at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec.
Lawrence Day wins U.S. Junior Open Chess Championship.
Vladimir Dobrich becomes first Canadian full-time professional chess organizer.
Dataline PDP-10 (MacHack 7) plays in Labour Day Open, Toronto, one of the first times that a computer competes in a chess tournament against humans.
Duncan Suttles competes in his 4th Canadian Chess Championship (1961-69).

1970s
The word 'cheapo', meaning a swindle, entered the English language from Canadian chess slang. It originated at the University of Toronto's Hart House Chess Club in the early 1970s.

1970
Canadian Under 20 (Junior) Chess Championship revived by Vladimir Dobrich as an annual competition to select Canada's representative to the World Junior Championship.
John Cleeve becomes Canada's first Correspondence International Arbiter (IAC).
Chess Canada 1970-75, founded, edited and published by Vladimir Dobrich; contained detailed coverage and analysis by Lawrence Day and others of master level Canadian games.
Monty Newborn organizes first ACM U.S. (later North American) Computer Chess Championship.
At the Interzonal, Palma de Majorca, Spain, Duncan Suttles introduces the Robatsch Defence, Suttles Variation: 1. e4 g6 2. d4 Bg7 3. Nf3 d6 4. Nc3 c6.
Newfoundland hosts first national championship, the Canadian Open Championship at St. John's.

1971
World Chess Championship Candidates Matches Quarter-final between Robert Fischer and Mark Taimanov held at Vancouver, British Columbia.
World Chess Champion Boris Spassky wins Canadian Open Chess Championship.
Canada wins Bronze medal at World Students' Team Chess Championship.
Peter Biyiasas wins U.S. Junior Open Chess Championship.

1972 American Bobby Fischer wins World Chess Championship, sparking a huge interest in chess in North America.
Quebec Open sets world record for most players in a weekend open chess tournament, 746 players.
Mark S. Dutton will become Canada's most prolific tournament organizer and director (1972-2004)
D. Abraham Yanofsky becomes Officer of the Order of Canada.

1973
Under Kalev Pugi's direction, CFC opens Business Office; publishes magazine Bulletin (distributed to CFC members; combines coverage of international chess with local, regional and national Canadian chess news and games); and hires first Business Manager and magazine Editor, Les Bunning.
First regular publication of Canadian chess ratings, every two months in Bulletin.
Duncan Suttles Top Rated Canadian Chess Player at Year-End.
Smilja Vujosevic first Top Rated Female Canadian Chess Player at Year-End.
Canadian Open Championship becomes annual event.

1974
First Pan-American Individual Chess Championship held at Winnipeg.
First Canadian Computer Chess Championship held, won by Ribbit from University of Waterloo, programmed by Ron Hansen, Jim Parry, and Russell Crook.
Ribbit wins ACM U.S. Computer Chess Championship.
IM Lawrence Day defeated himself at the Chess Olympiad, held at Nice, France. A mixup in the colours resulted in his victory on the board being scored as a defeat in the results tables.
Largest attendance at a Canadian Open Chess Championship, 648 players.

1975
First Canadian High School Chess Championship held, won by Alexander Quance.
First Canadian Women's Chess Championship held, won by Smilja Vujosevic; as with juniors prior to the Canadian Junior Championship, representatives were previously selected by becoming the top scorer at the Canadian Open Chess Championship.
Paul Keres wins the last tournament of his career at Vancouver, British Columbia.
Sandor (Alex) Siklos wins 8th World Correspondence Chess Championship semi-final and becomes first Canadian to participate in the finals of the World Correspondence Chess Championship (8th ICCF World Chess Championship 1975-8).
Alberta hosts first national championships, as Canadian Open and Closed Chess Championships held at Calgary, and Canadian High School Chess Championship held at Edmonton.

1976
CFC incorporates as a registered charity; provincial chess associations are recognized as affiliates.
Canada 1st place team in Group 'B' at Chess Women's Olympiad.
Canada wins first Board medals at Chess Women's Olympiads, as Nava Shterenberg wins Gold on Board 2, and Smilja Vujosevic wins Bronze on Board 1.
Phil Haley pioneers use of (controlled pairing) Swiss system of tournament pairings in Canada and at FIDE Olympiads.
Cyril Large organized annual school chess tournaments on Vancouver Island, which had grown to involve 6,625 players from 162 schools.
Lawrence Day begins chess column in Toronto Star (1976-).

1977
2nd World Computer Chess Championship held at Toronto, Ontario, August 8-12, won by an American program, Chess 4.6.
Canada wins Group 'B' Gold medal at World Students' Team Chess Championship.
Smilja Vujosevic receives Canada's first Woman International Master (WIM) title from FIDE.
Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee Medal for contributions in the field of chess awarded to Bernard Freedman, Philip Haley, Daniel MacAdam, John Prentice, Kalev Pugi.
Former World Chess Champion Mikhail Botvinnik gives simultaneous exhibitions.

1978
Canada's highest finish at the Chess Olympiads, held at Buenos Aires, Argentina, with a tie for 7th place.
Branimir Brebrich sets world record for most opponents played consecutively, playing 575 games at Edmonton, January 27-28.
Peter Biyiasas wins World Open Chess Championship.
Peter Biyiasas competes in his 4th Canadian Chess Championship (1969-78).
Larry Bevand begins chess column for Montreal Gazette (1978-2001).
IM David Levy plays Chess 4.7 in Toronto in August, winning his bet that no computer would beat him in a chess match within 10 years; the computer scores the first drawn and won games (played under tournament conditions) against an IM.
Josef Smolij famous street blitz player at the chess corner, downtown Toronto.

1979
First Canadian Under 16 (Cadet) Chess Championship held.
Prestigious international grandmaster competition held at Montreal, Quebec, won by Anatoly Karpov and Mikhail Tal; game Jan Timman - Anatoly Karpov chosen as the Best Game in the second half of the year by Chess Informant, with 4 others in the Top 10 Games of the first half of the year.
Roman Pelts becomes Canada's first professional chess teacher; sets up chess studio in Montreal, the first Canadian chess school.

1980
Canada finishes first place in Group 'B' at World Youth Team Chess Championship.
Lawrence Day wins World Open Chess Championship.

1981
Igor Ivanov wins Canadian Open and Closed Chess Championships in same year.
Igor Ivanov wins World Open Championship.
Roman Pelts receives Canada's first FIDE Master (FM) title from FIDE.
Jonathan Berry begins chess column for Globe & Mail (1981-).

1982
Introduction of Grand Prix circuit of open chess tournaments in Eastern Ontario.
Duncan Suttles receives Canada's first Correspondence Grandmaster (GMC) title from ICCF, becoming Canada's first double Grandmaster (over-the-board and correspondence).
The Great Chess Movie produced.
Jonathan Berry wins North American Correspondence Chess Championship.

1983
Kevin Spraggett World Open Chess Champion.

1984
Kevin Spraggett wins first of seven Canadian Chess Championships.
Les Bunning Trophy, the fourth trophy to be donated for the Canadian Championship, on permanent display at CFC office.
First tournament in Canada where a Grandmaster Norm could be achieved, Grand Manan, New Brunswick.
Kevin Spraggett New York Open Chess Champion.
John Wright wins North American Correspondence Chess Championship.
Future FIDE World Chess Champion Viswanathan Anand of India defeats Canada at Chess Olympiad; mentions that he was treated as a child at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario.

1985
Chess'n Math Association (CMA) founded by Larry Bevand, leading to an increase in the popularity of chess at school, and the enabling chess teachers to earn a living.
First Canadian Main Frame Computer Chess Championship held, won by Excalibur Electronics.
Canada represented for the first time at the Candidates Tournament stage of the World Chess Championship competition cycle, by Kevin Spraggett at Montpelier, France, the farthest a Canadian had ever advanced.
Kevin Spraggett becomes first Canadian-born Grandmaster.
Daniel MacAdam dies after reaching age 100.
Kevin Spraggett Commonwealth Chess Champion.
Igor Ivanov ties for first place in both Canadian Open and Canadian Closed Chess Championships at Edmonton, Alberta, while playing his games simultaneously.

1986
The record for appearances in the Canadian Chess Championship in consecutive decades, and the record for longest time between first and last appearance in the Canadian Chess Championship, are both held by GM D. Abraham Yanofsky. Yanofsky, playing in his 14th Canadian Chess Championship, appeared in the event in each of six consecutive decades from the 1930s through the 1980s, during the 49 years between his first appearance in 1937 and his last in 1986.
Leo Williams sets Canadian record for simultaneous blindfold exhibition, playing 27 opponents.
Michel Gagne made the Guinness Book of Records with the first ever record for chess play against a computer: 70 hours non-stop, April 25-28, scoring +8 =1 -3 against a High Fidelity Excellence 4.0.
Jeff Sarwer ties for first with Josh Waitzkin at the U.S. National Elementary, Primary Section, Individual Championship.
Jeff Sarwer wins World Under-10 Chess Championship, Puerto Rico.
Julia Sarwer Top Female at World Under-10 Chess Championship, Puerto Rico.
Lia Bogdan receives Canada's first Woman FIDE Master (WFM) title from FIDE.
Canadian-born Joel Lautier wins World Under-14 Chess Championship.
Roman Pelts' Comprehensive Chess Course published, becomes world's best-selling chess instruction book.
Sun Phoenix, programmed by Jonathan Schaeffer of the University of Waterloo, tied for first place in the World Computer Chess Championship.
Alan Tomalty begins 'Komputer Korner' column in En Passant magazine (1986-2000).

1987
Vinod (Vinny) Puri wins Canadian Junior (Under 20) Chess Championship for 3rd year in a row.

1988
World Chess Championship Candidates Matches, 1/8 finals, held at Saint John, New Brunswick.
Kevin Spraggett wins his World Chess Championship Candidates Matches, 1/8 final, the farthest a Canadian has ever advanced in the World Chess Championship cycle of competitions.
World Blitz Chess Championship, for five-minute games, held at Saint John, New Brunswick, won by former World Chess Champion Mikhail Tal, ahead of former World Chess Champion Anatoly Karpov and World Chess Champion Gary Kasparov.
Canadian-born Joel Lautier wins World Junior Chess Championship.

1989
6th World Computer Chess Championship held at Edmonton, Alberta May 28-31.
Murray Campbell member of programming team for Deep Thought, winner of World Computer Chess Championship.
First Scholastic Championships held for each of grades 1-12.
World Chess Championship Candidates Matches Quarter-final between Artur Yusupov and Canada's Kevin Spraggett held at Quebec, Quebec.

1991
Zvonko Vranesic competes in his 8th Canadian Chess Championship, appearing in each of four consecutive decades (1961-91).

1992
Denis Pineault wins North American Correspondence Chess Championship.

1993
Doug Burgess most active tournament competitor for 7th year in a row.
Deen Hergott wins record 5th consecutive Eastern Ontario Grand Prix circuit.

1994
First Canadian Active Chess Championship for Game/30 was held, won by Michael Schleifer.
Stephen Glinert youngest Canadian to achieve Candidate Master rating, age 9.
First of six annual international open tournaments, held at North Bay, Ontario.
Leon Piasetski competes in his 8th Canadian Chess Championship, appearing in each of four consecutive decades (1969-94).

1995
Nava Starr Top Rated Female Canadian Chess Player at Year-End for a record 20th year in a row.
First Canadian Championships for age groups Under 10, Under 12, Under 14, Under 18.
Sebastian Predescu finishes in 2nd place at the U.S. National Scholastic, Grade 2 Chess Championship, defeating future Grandmaster and U.S. Chess Champion Hikaru Nakamura.

1996
Murray Campbell member of programming team for Deep Blue, which defeated World Chess Champion Gary Kasparov in a game, the first time this was accomplished against a reigning World Chess Champion.

1997
Igor Ivanov wins U.S. Grand Prix circuit for 9th time.
Murray Campbell member of programming team for Deep Blue, which defeated World Chess Champion Gary Kasparov in a match, the first time this was accomplished against a reigning World Chess Champion.

1998
Lawrence Day represents Canada for a record 13th time at the Chess Olympiads.
World Chess Champion Gary Kasparov gives simultaneous exhibition, Toronto.

1999
First Canadian Electronic Mail Chess Championship held by CCCA, won by Michael McArthur.
First Canadian Girls Chess Championships organized by CMA held in Toronto.
Michael Edelstein, David MacLeod, Claude Pare, Denis Pineault, Alexander Ugge, Kurt Widmann, John Wright first Canadians to receive Correspondence Senior International Master (SIMC) title from ICCF.
First Canadian chess electronic newsletter, Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News and Views, founded, edited and published by Bob Armstrong.
World Chess Champion Gary Kasparov took on the world in a game played over the internet.
Prince Edward Island hosts first national championship, as Canadian Scholastic Chess Championship held at Charlottetown. Nova Scotia only province to never host a national chess championship (1872-).
Denis Allan competes in his 5th Canadian Chess Championship, appearing in each of four consecutive decades (1963-99).

2000
Kevin Spraggett wins Canadian Open Chess Championship for a record 8th time.
Deen Hergott wins Eastern Ontario Grand Prix circuit for record 9th time.
Canadian Chess Hall of Fame created by David Cohen. 14 initial inductees, 29 inductees by 2005 (one per year from 2002).
Canadian Chess Championships for youths in Under-10, 12, 14, 16, 18 age groups split into separate competitions: open and girls only.
Lefong Hua wins Canadian Grade 12 Chess Championship, the 8th time he won his grade (1989-2000).

2001
Nava Starr wins Canadian Women's Chess Championship for a record 8th time.
First combined Canadian Correspondence Chess Championship by regular and electronic mail, won by Serge Dubuc and Artur Mrugala.

2002
Hugh Brodie plays in Canadian Open Chess Championship for 30th time, including 29 in a row.
David Cohen finishes in 3rd place in the Internet Slow Time Control World Chess Championship.

2003
Canadian Chess Player of the Year award created by David Cohen.
Pascal Charbonneau ties for second place at Pan-American Chess Championship, Canada's best result.

2004
Largest Canadian Chess Championship in terms of attendance (69) and prize fund ($21,000), held at Toronto, Ontario.
First Canadian Chess Championship with female participants (4).
Longest time between appearances in a Canadian Championship: FM John MacPhail, 32 years from 1972-2004.
Kevin Spraggett competes in his 13th Canadian Chess Championship, appearing in each of four consecutive decades (1975-2004).
Lawrence Day competes in his 12th Canadian Chess Championship, appearing in each of five consecutive decades (1969-2004).
Nava Starr represents Canada for a record 11th time at the Chess Women's Olympiads.
First Canadian Senior Chess Championship organized by David Cohen held in Toronto, Ontario as an active event.
Kevin Spraggett Top Rated Canadian Chess Player at Year-End for a record 22nd time.
Introduction of correspondence chess play by web server.
Canadian short documentary film 'Chess CHECK!' shown on CablePulse television channel.

2005
Canadian short film 'Battle Chess' shown on Bravo! television channel.
Canadian documentary feature film 'Game Over: Kasparov and the Machine' released in theatres and on DVD.
12-year old Shiyam Thavandiran youngest winner of Canadian Junior (Under 20) Championship.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books

'Chess: The History of a Game', by Richard Eales, 1985.

'Chess Tournament Crosstables', Volume I 1851-1900, 2nd edition (1969); Volume II 1901-1910 (1971); Volume III 1911-1920 (1972); Volume IV 1921-1930 (1974), by Jeremy Gaige.

Article on 'Chess' by Lawrence Day, 'The Canadian Encyclopedia', 1985.

Canadian Chess Books

'100 Gems of Chess', edited by Thomas D.S. Moore, published by the Western Advertiser, London, Ontario, 1872.

'CFC Handbook', by Chess Federation of Canada, various editions since 1956.

'100 Years of Chess in Canada', by D. Abraham Yanofsky, 1967.

Canadian Chess Magazines

Checkmate, published by J.H. Graham, 1901-04.

The Canadian Chess Magazine, published, edited by John Ewing in North Vancouver, British Columbia (1918-1920.01). Originally B.C. Chess Magazine News - F. MacLachlan; Games - R.G. Stark; Problems - Malcolm Sim.

CHECK! 1927- (was established as a column in the Winnipeg Free Press newspaper 1921-7; then appeared as CCCA Bulletin #1-4 in Canadian Chess Review magazine 1927.09-1928.01; then CCCA started publishing CCCA Bulletin with #5 1928; then it was renamed CHECK! with #344 1968.10).

Le Pion, published by Antoine Lamothe every two weeks, 1924.08-1926.08.

Canadian Chess Review, published in Winnipeg by Clarence M. Scott (1927.09,.10,.12,1928.01). Contained the first 4 issues of 'CCCA Bulletin'.

Canadian Chessner, published quarterly by Dudley LeDain in Montreal, 1934.10-1937.04.

Chess (Canadian Supplement), edited by Dudley LeDain.

Canadian Chess Chat, founded by Daniel MacAdam. Originally Maritime Chess News Bulletin; renamed 1950. Edited by Daniel MacAdam 1947-56; D. Abraham Yanofsky 1956-9; Nathan Divinsky 1959-74 (except for 1965-6, 1972-3), helped by Elod Macskasy; Frank Szarka 1979-87; Michael Sharpe 1988.

Chess Canada April 1970 (Vol. 1 No. 1) – August 1975 (Vol. 6 No. 7/8). Founded by Vladimir Dobrich, who was also editor April 1970 – May 1974 (Vol. 1 No. 1 – Vol. 5 No. 5) and publisher June 1974 – June 1975 (Vol. 5 No. 6 – Vol. 6 No. 5/6). Taken over by Canadian Chess Chat in 1975 (Vol. 6 No. 7/8 published by Frank Szarka).

Chess Canada Echecs Titles: Bulletin (1-34) / Chess Canada Echecs (35-61, 184-) / En Passant Chess Magazine (62-183). Edited by Les Bunning 1973-5 (1-12), Jonathan Berry 1975-83 (13-61), Stephen Ball 1983-9 (62-98), Gordon Taylor 1989-92 (99-112), Hal Bond 1992-5 (113-130), Brad Thomson 1995-7 (131-144), Tom O'Donnell 1997-8 (145-150), Troy Vail 1998 (151), Knut Neven 1998-2003 (152-182), Hans Jung (183-192).

Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News and Views. Edited by Bob Armstrong, 1999-, distributed electronically through the internet, originally Scarborough Chess Club Chess Talk, the newsletter of the Scarborough Chess Club; later Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess Talk.

Canadian Chess Web Sites

Chess Federation of Canada
http://www.chess.ca

Canadian Chess by David Cohen
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html

REFERENCES

Bulkeley, Richard (1771-1800) Volume IV,
Dictionary of Canadian Biography - http://www.biographi.ca/EN/index.html

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Thanks for their help with my researches to the following: my fellow Canadian chess historians and writers, including Jonathan Berry, Hugh Brodie, Nathan Divinsky, Marc Hébert, J. Ken MacDonald, Erik Malmsten, Andrew McMillan, and Stephen Wright; many members of the Canadian chess community who contributed to filling the gaps in my research; Dr. Cameron Pulsifer, Historian, Canadian War Museum; and chess historians, including John Hilbert and György Négyesi, chess writers and members of the international chess community.

---

Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 15, 2005.04.15; No. 16, 2005.05.01; No. 17, 2005.05.15; No. 18, 2005.06.01; No. 19, 2005.06.15

***


Chess Solved!

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

News reports out today claim that the game of chess has been solved. Researchers had described three possible theories as to how a game of chess might be concluded, should a solution ever be found. First, White could win every game by force, using the advantage of the first move to seize the initiative and attack first. Second, every game would end in a draw, as the White and Black forces were equally balanced. Third, Black could win every game, as the onus on White of having to move first would place White into zugzwang, where the compulsion to move would weaken White's position and give an advantage to Black.

The second theory proved to be correct. Using the power of distributed computing, a network of thousands of home personal computers, which would otherwise have remained idle, slaved away for years to reach this conclusion.

Initial reaction from top level grandmasters is highly critical - they fear a loss of their livelihood. Chess teachers are more upbeat, emphasizing the educational benefits of instructing children in the game at an early stage in their development. Noted Canadian chess historian David Cohen was quoted as saying "It's incredible! But if you believed all this, then you're an April fool."

---

Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 14, 2005.04.01

***


Computer Chess and Canada

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

The first person to beat a computer program at chess was Alick Glennie, a graduate student, who defeated Alan Turing's program in the first ever chess game between human and computer program, back in 1952. Programming computers to play chess attracted the interest of computer scientists. The problem was one of artificial intelligence. Could a machine be programmed to perform an intellectual activity as well as humans?

Initial difficulties were in the area of an important problem in computer science in the 1960s: search algorithms. As a chess game progresses, the number of possible positions that can arise quickly reaches astronomical proportions. A computer could not look at each chess position (to evaluate its worth). So, algorithms had to be developed to prune the tree of possible moves and replies, to concentrate upon the sensible moves. But what is sensible to the human eye and experience took decades to program into computers.

One of Phil Haley's most memorable games was a win from a 1969 open tournament against a computer. This was one of the first times that a computer was entered in a competition against human opponents.

Phil Haley - Dataline PDP-10 (MacHack 7)
Labour Day Open, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1969

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. g3 d5 3. Bg2 c5 4. d3 Nc6 5. Bf4 Bf5 6. O-O Qb6 7. Nc3 Qxb2 8. Qd2 d4 9. Ne4 Nxe4 10. dxe4 Bxe4 11. Rfb1 Qc3 12. Qxc3 dxc3 13. Rxb7 Nb4 14. Rb8+ Rxb8 15. Bxb8 Nxc2 16. Rc1 Nd4 17. Nxd4 Bxg2 18. Nb5 Bh3 19. Bxa7 Bd7 20. Nc7+ Kd8 21. Nd5 c4 22. Nxc3 e5 23. Ne4 Bb5 24. Rb1 Bc6 25. Nc3 Bd7 26. a4 Bf5 27. e4 Bc8 28. a5 Ba6 29. Rb6 Kc8 30. Nd5 f6 31. Rc6+ Kd7 32. Rxa6 Kc8 33. Rb6 Kd7 34. Rb8 Kc6 35. Be3 c3 36. Nxc3 Kc7 37. Re8 Kd7 38. a6 Kxe8 39. a7 Kd7 40. a8(Q) Ke7 41. Qb7+ Kd6 42. Nd5 f5 43. Qc7+ Ke6 44. Qc8+ Kf7 45. Qxf5+ Ke8 46. Qe6+ Kd8 47. Bb6# 1-0

To encourage the effort of computer scientists, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) organized U.S. Computer Chess Championships at its annual conventions. The organizer of the first event in 1970, Monty Newborn, became a Computer Science Professor at McGill University in Montreal. His program (originally with George Arnold), Ostrich, was a regular competitor at the U.S., North American, and World Computer Championships. A win in the following last round game would have given Ostrich a tie for first place in the 1st World Computer Championship. Unfortunately, the program missed the winning move, 35. Rxh6+, as finding it required a search depth of 19-ply (1 ply = one side's move), which was beyond its capabilities. It also missed another winning move, 39. Bf5, which required an 11-ply search. Later in his career, Newborn applied the results obtained from research on search algorithms in the field of computer chess to the field of internet searching.

Ostrich - Kaissa
1st World Computer Championship, Stockholm, 1974

1. Nf3 e6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Bg5 d5 4. e3 Be7 5. Nc3 Bb4 6. Bxf6 Bxc3+ 7. bxc3 Qxf6 8. Bd3 c5 9. O-O O-O 10. Qd2 Nc6 11. dxc5 Qe7 12. c4 dxc4 13. Bxc4 Qxc5 14. Qd3 Rd8 15. Qe4 b5 16. Bd3 f5 17. Qh4 e5 18. e4 f4 19. Rfe1 Bb7 20. Ng5 h6 21. Ne6 Qb6 22. Nxd8 Rxd8 23. a4 b4 24. Bc4+ Kh8 25. Rad1 Nd4 26. Rc1 Bc6 27. c3 bxc3 28. Rxc3 Bxa4 29. Qe7 Nc6 30. Qf7 Qc5 31. Rd3 Nd4 32. Bd5 Bb5 33. Rh3 Ne2+ 34. Kh1 Qxf2 35. Rd1 Qb6 36. Rb1 Rc8 37. Be6 Rd8 38. Qg6 Qb7 39. Qf5 Qc7 40. Rh4 Nd4 41. Qh3 Nxe6 42. Qxe6 Bd3 43. Rg1 Bc4 44. Qf5 Be2 45. Ra1 a5 46. Qg6 a4 47. Re1 Bc4 48. Ra1 a3 49. Rb1 Qd6 50. Qxd6 Rxd6 51. Rh3 a2 52. Rc1 Rd4 53. Rhc3 Rxe4 54. Ra1 Rd4 55. Rxc4 Rxc4 56. g3 f3 57. h3 Rc2 58. Rd1 Rd2 59. Rc1 e4 60. g4 e3 61. Kg1 e2 62. Kf2 Rd1 63. Rc8+ Kh7 64. Kxf3 e1(Q) 65. Rc2 Rd3+ 66. Kf4 g5+ 67. Kf5 Rf3# 0-1

The next Canadian success was Ribbit (later TreeFrog), a computer chess program written at the University of Waterloo by Ron Hansen, Jim Parry, and Russell Crook. Becoming 1974 Canadian Computer Champion and 1974 U.S. Computer Champion, it tied for 2nd place at the 1974 World Computer Championship. With the ACM event renamed the North American Computer Championship in 1975, the program finished in 2nd place. Here is the final round game which won Ribbit the 1974 U.S. Computer Championship with a perfect score.

Ribbit - Chess 4.0
U.S. Computer Championship, San Diego, California, USA, 1974

1. e4 c5 2. c3 d5 3. exd5 Qxd5 4. d4 cxd4 5. cxd4 Nc6 6. Nf3 Bg4 7. Nc3 Qd6 8. d5 Nb4 9. Bb5+ Bd7 10. Bxd7+ Kxd7 11. Be3 Qa6 12. Ne5+ Ke8 13. a3 Qd6 14. Qa4+ Nc6 15. dxc6 bxc6 16. Nxc6 e5 17. Nxa7+ Qd7 18. Qxd7+ Kxd7 19. Rd1+ Ke6 20. O-O Nf6 21. b4 Be7 22. h3 h5 23. Rfe1 h4 24. Rd3 e4 25. Bd4 Rhe8 26. Bxf6 Bxf6 27. Rxe4+ Kf5 28. Rxe8 Rxe8 29. g4+ hxg3 30. fxg3 Re1+ 31. Kf2 Rc1 32. g4+ Kg6 33. Ne4 Be5 34. b5 Rc2+ 35. Kf3 Rh2 36. Nf2 Bf6 37. Rd6 Kh7 38. Rd5 Bb2 39. Kg3 Rxf2 40. Kxf2 Bxa3 41. b6 Bc1 42. b7 Bf4 43. Nc6 Bc7 44. Rd7 Bf4 45. Rxf7 Bd6 46. b8(Q) Bxb8 47. Nxb8 Kg6 48. Rf5 Kh6 49. Nd7 g6 50. Rf6 Kg5 51. Kg3 Kh6 52. Ne5 Kg7 53. g5 Kg8 54. Nxg6 Kh7 55. h4 Kg8 56. h5 Kg7 57. h6+ Kh7 58. Ne5 Kh8 59. g6 Kg8 60. Kg4 Kh8 61. Rf8# 1-0

The 2nd World Computer Chess Championship was held in Toronto in August 1977, and was won by an American program, Chess 4.6. The event attracted the electrical engineer and author of "The Theory and Prospects of Application of Asynchronized Synchronous Machines" (based on his doctoral thesis), former World Chess Champion Mikhail Botvinnik. While in Toronto, he gave a simultaneous exhibition, scoring +12 =7 –1, including a draw with Bryon Nickoloff.

Three other Canadian computer chess programs were regular competitors at these championship events. Chute was developed by Michael Valenti and International Master Zvonko Vranesic, Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto. It started as Valenti's M.A.Sc. thesis project, under Dr. Vranesic's supervision, with Valenti as programmer and with chess input provided by Vranesic. L'Excentrique defeated the defending Champion, Chess 4.9, at the 1980 World Computer Championship. AWIT, written by Anthony (Tony) Marsland, Professor, Computing Science, University of Alberta, finished in 2nd place at the 1983 World Computer Championship.

In 1968, Scottish Champion David Levy made a bet that no computer program would beat him in a match within a decade. Over time, the bet grew in size to nearly $10,000, as new parties joined in. In April 1977, IM Levy beat Chess 4.6 1-0 in a two game match. At the end of 1977, Levy beat KAISSA 1-0 in a two game match at McGill University. In August 1978, Levy beat MACHACK/CHEOPS 1-0 in a two game match at Cambridge, MA, USA. To settle the bet, Levy played a six game match against Chess 4.7 at the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto from 1978.08.26-09.04. Round 1, with the computer as Black, saw the first draw achieved by a computer program against an IM under tournament conditions (40 moves in 2 hours, followed by 20 moves per hour). Levy recovered to win Rounds 2 and 3. Needing only a draw to win the bet, Levy took a chance with some risky play in Round 4. Here is the first win achieved by a computer program against an IM under tournament conditions.

Chess 4.7 - David Levy
Levy Challenge Match (4), Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1978

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 f5 3. exf5 e4 4. Ne5 Nf6 5. Ng4 d5 6. Nxf6+ Qxf6 7. Qh5+ Qf7 8. Qxf7+ Kxf7 9. Nc3 c6 10. d3 exd3 11. Bxd3 Nd7 12. Bf4 Nc5 13. g4 Nxd3+ 14. cxd3 Bc5 15. O-O h5 16. Na4 Bd4 17. Be3 Be5 18. d4 Bd6 19. h3 b6 20. Rfe1 Bd7 21. Nc3 hxg4 22. hxg4 Rh4 23. f3 Rah8 24. Kf1 Bg3 25. Re2 Bc8 26. Kg2 Bd6 27. Bg1 Rh3 28. Rae1 Rg3+ 29. Kf2 Rhh3 30. Re3 Ba6 31. Ne2 Bxe2 32. R1xe2 c5 33. f4 Rxe3 34. Rxe3 Rh4 35. Kg3 Rh1 36. Bf2 Rd1 37. Ra3 cxd4 38. Rxa7+ Kf8 39. Rd7 Rd3+ 40. Kg2 Bc5 41. Rxd5 Rd2 42. b4 Bxb4 43. Rd8+ Kf7 44. Rd7+ Kf8 45. Rxd4 Rb2 46. Kf3 Bc5 47. Rd8+ Ke7 48. Bh4+ Kf7 49. g5 g6 50. Rd7+ Kf8 51. fxg6 Rxa2 52. f5 Ra3+ 53. Kg4 Ra4+ 54. Kh5 Rd4 55. Rc7 Be7 56. f6 1-0

Levy again recovered, to win Round 5, the match 3.5-1.5, and the bet.

By the mid-1980s, Jonathan Schaeffer was writing his Master's thesis at University of Waterloo on programming computers to do long range-planning in chess. His program, Sun Phoenix, tied for first place in the 1986 World Computer Championship.

BCP - Sun Phoenix
5th World Computer Championship, Cologne, 1986

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. e5 c5 4. c3 Qb6 5. Nf3 Bd7 6. Bd3 cxd4 7. Nxd4 Nc6 8. Nxc6 Bxc6 9. O-O O-O-O 10. Nd2 f6 11. Qg4 Re8 12. Re1 Nh6 13. Qh3 Bc5 14. Qg3 Ng4 15. Qxg4 Bxf2+ 16. Kf1 Bxe1 17. Kxe1 fxe5 18. Qxg7 Qe3+ 19. Be2 Rhg8 20. Qf7 Bb5 21. Qf2 Qxe2+ 22. Qxe2 Bxe2 23. Kxe2 Rxg2+ 24. Ke3 Rxh2 25. a4 Rf8 26. a5 h5 27. Ra4 Rh1 28. Ra1 h4 29. Rb1 Re1+ 30. Kd3 h3 31. Nf1 Rfxf1 0-1

The 6th World Computer Chess Championship was held in Edmonton in 1989, and was won by Deep Thought. One of its programmers was Murray Campbell, a former top junior from Alberta. His first success was as a member of the team that programmed Hitech, the 1985 North American Computer Chess Champion.

Naturally, as stronger players took an interest in the field, the programs' abilities to evaluate the chess worth of a position improved. However, up to this time, the main improvements in chess programs came from refining the software's ability to search positions. Instead, Schaeffer had two ideas to improve the hardware upon which his program could run. First, to operate several computers in parallel. Second, to create a processing chip (the heart of all computers) dedicated to chess. The chip would have the software encoded onto its hardware, thus enabling it to process the instructions faster.

Several years later, IBM surpassed his second idea: they built an entire machine, called Deep Blue, that was dedicated solely to chess. The hardware could do nothing but search and evaluate chess positions. However, it did so faster than any machine in history: hundreds of millions of chess positions were examined per second. With such speed to command, its programmers abandoned the old approaches. Their new method was called brute force; simply, every possible position was searched by the specialized hardware. There was no attempt at refining the search algorithm; all possibilities would be examined and nothing would be missed. One of Deep Blue's programmers was Campbell, who was responsible for the function that evaluated each chess position.

Deep Blue beat Garry Kasparov in a game, but lost their 1996 match. Nevertheless, this was the first time that a computer chess program had won an individual game against a World Champion.

Deep Blue - Garry Kasparov
ACM Chess Challenge (1), Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, 1996

1. e4 c5 2. c3 d5 3. exd5 Qxd5 4. d4 Nf6 5. Nf3 Bg4 6. Be2 e6 7. h3 Bh5 8. O-O Nc6 9. Be3 cxd4 10. cxd4 Bb4 11. a3 Ba5 12. Nc3 Qd6 13. Nb5 Qe7 14. Ne5 Bxe2 15. Qxe2 O-O 16. Rac1 Rac8 17. Bg5 Bb6 18. Bxf6 gxf6 19. Nc4 Rfd8 20. Nxb6 axb6 21. Rfd1 f5 22. Qe3 Qf6 23. d5 Rxd5 24. Rxd5 exd5 25. b3 Kh8 26. Qxb6 Rg8 27. Qc5 d4 28. Nd6 f4 29. Nxb7 Ne5 30. Qd5 f3 31. g3 Nd3 32. Rc7 Re8 33. Nd6 Re1+ 34. Kh2 Nxf2 35. Nxf7+ Kg7 36. Ng5+ Kh6 37. Rxh7+ 1-0

The documentary film 'Game Over: Kasparov and the Machine' tells the story of the IBM computer Deep Blue's victory over World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov in their 1997 match. This brings us to the debate which is presented in the film. Are computers capable of recognizing a situation which calls for long-range planning? If yes, can they then choose to ignore the short-term considerations, and proceed with the first step of a longer-range plan? This situation occurred in Game 2 of the match, when the computer played its 37th move. Kasparov was clearly upset, considering it inconceivable that the machine could proceed this way. The film presents his suspicions that a human intervened to force the move selection. The other side is also presented, in an interview with Grandmaster Joel Benjamin, the chess player who taught the computer to recognize these situations and play them this way. Benjamin stated that this was the first game in which a computer showed that it could play Grandmaster level chess.

An interesting point is what happens when a human uses the computer's recommended moves to play a game, e.g., on the internet or in correspondence chess. In theory, the human's results should match those of the computer. However, in practice, the human's results tend to be an average of the two (I believe this was described by Jonathan Berry and Knut Neven in En Passant magazine). When the human is the weaker of the two, then the computer will improve the human's results. The supposition is that when the human is the stronger of the two, then the human will improve the computer's results. This was the situation at the time of the 1997 match, hence, Kasparov's suspicion that a strong human player had intervened to improve the computer's move selection.

Developments since the match have shown that Schaeffer's and Benjamin's goals of teaching a computer to include long-range planning in its move selection program were successful. Today, you can buy desk-top software for less than $100 that will easily find the move which so upset Kasparov. Versions of these desk-top programs which run on faster hardware have drawn matches with World Champions Kasparov and Kramnik. They are not pure brute force programs. A simple composed problem, where White must mate in two moves, can stump these programs. The programs still use highly refined search algorithms, thus, they overlook the unnatural moves favoured by problem composers. Nevertheless, after 50 years of computer programming, humans have reached their ultimate goal for their creations: programs capable of matching the highest level of human intellect in the field of chess.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 13, 2005.03.15

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History of the Canadian Chess Web Site

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

This article explains the origin of my 'Canadian Chess' web site (which is linked from the web site of The Chess Federation of Canada (CFC) - http://www.chess.ca):

http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html

Biographies

In 1999, I started my second term as a CFC Governor, having served previously from 1982-7. The CFC was in financial difficulties. A great deal of time and money went to paying for the CFC's international program: paying the expenses of our representatives at FIDE events, such as the Olympiad and the various World Championships. I thought that these pressures could be relieved by obtaining sponsors. I gave some thought to how to obtain a sponsor for our chess events, especially our national championships. My idea was that if we could publicize chess in Canada, then we could attract a sponsor. The theory that I evolved was that if we gathered our history together in one place, then we could present it to the public in general, and to potential sponsors in particular. I thought that we would have better chances with a potential sponsor if we showed that we were an experienced organization (created 1872, organized 77 national championships). So, history, leading to publicity, leading to sponsorship.

Unfortunately, there was a complete lack of effort in this area on the part of the CFC. Certainly this was due in part to their limited staff resources. But it was also due to a failure on the part of CFC staff to recognize the importance of how these simple tasks could help raise awareness of (and, ultimately, money for) chess in Canada. To this day, you still cannot visit the CFC web site and find a listing of our reigning Champions, let alone obtain their photos and some biographical data on the players and their achievements.

This was an obvious gap in my intended efforts to present chess as an attraction to sponsors. We were lacking in media stars, yet we had no shortage of talented players. So, how could I correct this by presenting them to the media? Even simpler, if a reporter, chess or otherwise, wanted a quick biography of a Canadian chess player, there was none available. So, this was my first task: compile a list of important Canadian chess players, along with their most important accomplishments.

After my initial compilation, my web site expanded in three directions: more historical background; direct publicity; and covering for more of the CFC's failures.

Expansion of Historical Background

To complement each player's biographical data, I decided to include the player's best or most memorable game. Many of the players contributed by selecting their own best game. In fact, they were more helpful here than with their biographical data, which was either forgotten or not important to them. Here's the game that gave me this idea: Abe Yanofsky's most famous game, and perhaps the most famous game played by a Canadian.

D. Abraham Yanofsky – Alberto I. Dulanto
Olympiad, Canada – Peru, Board 1, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Preliminaries Round 7, 1939.08.30

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 dxe4 5. Nxe4 Nbd7 6. Nf3 Be7 7. Nxf6+ Nxf6 8. Bd3 c5 9. dxc5 Qa5+ 10. c3 Qxc5 11. O-O O-O 12. Re1 Rd8 13. Ne5 b6 14. Bxf6 Bxf6 15. Bxh7+ Kf8 16. Qh5 Bxe5 17. Rxe5 Qc7 18. Be4 Bb7 19. Bxb7 Qxb7 20. Qh8+ Ke7 21. Qxg7 Rg8 22. Rxe6+ Kxe6 23. Re1+ Kd6 24. Qf6+ Kc5 25. Re5+ Kc4 26. b3+ Kd3 27. Qd6+ Kc2 28. Re2+ 1-0

I continued to expand the web site with player photos; topics, such as important events that took place in Canada; listings of Canadian chess books and other publications; and polls for feedback from (and involvement of) readers.

Publicity

To obtain direct publicity for us, I thought that chess in Canada could learn from (and be like) other sports. So, I created the Canadian Chess Hall of Fame; the Canadian Chess Player of the Year; and the Canadian Chess Player Top Ranked at Year-end.

CFC Failures

Continued lack of effort by the CFC forced me to compile lists that I thought they should have on their own web site: Canadian Champions; FIDE titles awarded to Canadians; a schedule of major Canadian chess events (to notify journalists well in advance); biographies, accomplishments and photos of members of the CFC Board of Governors; and a list of CFC Certified Tournament Directors.

Future Direction

There's much work still to do: search for more historical information, such as the first references to chess in Canada; search for more biographical information; complete the lists of our Champions; obtain photos which can be published; and find missing cross-tables and games. If you can help, please e-mail me at bw998 -at- freenet.carleton.ca.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 12, 2005.03.01

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 190, 2005.02, p.7

***


Canadian Chess Movies

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

I recently visited the offices of the National Film Board at 150 John St., Toronto, to attend a free screening of an environmental film, 'Being Caribou'. While there, I discovered the NFB Mediatheque. This is a free service where you can watch - any time they are open, and in your own personal chair/viewing screen - any of hundreds of NFB films. Hours are Monday, Tuesday 1-7; Wednesday 10-7; Thursday - Saturday 10-10; and Sunday 12-5. The view screens are even set up for singles, couples and families. Movies are played digitally, so you can pause, fast forward, rewind, etc.

I used the search feature to type in the word 'chess'. Two films popped up for possible viewing: 'A Mind of Your Own' and 'Game Over: Kasparov and the Machine'.

A Mind of Your Own

'A Mind of Your Own', 1999, 38 minutes, produced by the NFB, directed by Gail Sweeney, follows 4 kids who have learning disabilities. The first, Henry Skinner, has trouble reading at the same level as his classmates. He drops out of the regular class, and works hard at his weakness. Meanwhile, he develops other skills in areas where he does not have any learning disabilities, like math and chess. When playing chess, he forms two plans of action; and he thinks four moves ahead. He says that he knew he was good when he finally beat his father. Henry, like the other kids in the film, gains confidence from his success. He knows that he is not stupid, just learning disabled. Moving back into the regular classroom, the kids are looking for acceptance. They are helped in this effort because they can show the other kids that they are good at something. (If you just want to see the one chess scene, skip to the 5 minute mark; however, you'd be cheating yourself out of seeing a very good film.)

Game Over: Kasparov and the Machine

'Game Over: Kasparov and the Machine', 2003, 85 minutes, directed by Vikram Jayanti, co-produced by National Film Board of Canada and British Broadcasting Corporation, distributed by Alliance Atlantis. The film features two Canadians: Montreal doctor and FIDE Master Marc Ghannoum; and Murray Campbell. Ghannoum does the conspiratorial voice over. Campbell is a former top junior; his loss to Kevin Spraggett in the 1974 Canadian Junior Championship was the latter's first appearance in the Informant collection of each year's best chess games. Campbell was a member of the programming team for IBM's Deep Blue computer, which defeated World Chess Champion Garry Kasparov in a game (1996) and in a match 3.5/6 (1997), the first time these feats have ever been accomplished against a reigning World Chess Champion. The film is a chronicle of this match.

The film presents a debate as to whether or not IBM cheated by using a human operator to intervene. In practice, it has been estimated that a correspondence player using help from a much stronger computer will raise his rating to the average rating of the two. If this holds true for the case where the player is stronger, then a human overseeing the computer's moves could intervene and force it to play a better move.

To tell the story artistically, the film draws a parallel with the 'automaton' Turk. Unknown to its challengers, Turk was actually operated by a human hiding inside the machine. Excerpts are also presented from the 1927 film 'The Chess Player', where a similar story unfolds. Finally, this film concludes with Murray Campbell showing us the remains of Deep Blue at the IBM facility in upstate New York. As the camera pulls back, we see Campbell standing beside the big box - exactly the right size to fit inside it.

To tell the actual story, interviews are conducted with Kasparov and members of his team; and with members of the Deep Blue team. In particular, we meet Grandmaster Joel Benjamin, who contributed his chess knowledge to the project. Benjamin's job was to force the computer to make a plan in blocked positions (holding a small advantage but with no clear attacking line of play), where they had typically played planlessly. He did his job well, resulting in a huge blow-up after game two. Kasparov accused the IBM team of having a computer operator intervene to make a critical move in a blocked position. Benjamin responded with pride in the computer's play, and referring to the move 37. Be4, claimed that this was the first game in which a computer showed that it could play Grandmaster level chess.

The film recaps Kasparov's career, then follows Kasparov to the scene of the events, six years afterwards. The match unfolds through walk-abouts in 2003; flashbacks to 1997; and interviews with the participants. Kasparov demanded printouts; Benjamin countered that you would not ask a human opponent to reveal all the variations he had considered. Afterwards, Kasparov is adrift, unable to obtain a rematch, losing his World Championship title, losing even to his old nemesis Karpov. Kasparov provides some insights. He knew before the match that his biggest trouble would be that he had no information about his opponent, as IBM would not release any of its private games. Afterwards, Kasparov says that the public trusted corporations back then, but now corporations must be responsible.

I'm happy the film was made. It is fascinating for chess players, as we watch the behind-the-scenes action of our favourite game. Non-chess players can watch it also, as it is an interesting documentary on three types of minds: human, computer - and corporate.

The film will be released by Alliance Atlantis in theatres March 4.

Kevin Spraggett - Murray Campbell
Canadian Junior Championship, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 6, 1974

1. g3 Nf6 2. c4 d5 3. cxd5 Nxd5 4. Bg2 g6 5. Nc3 Nb6 6. Nf3 Bg7 7. d3 O-O 8. Be3 Nc6 9. Qc1 Bg4 10. h3 Bxf3 11. Bxf3 Rb8 12. Bxc6 bxc6 13. Bh6 Bxh6 14. Qxh6 Nd5 15. Qd2 Nxc3 16. Qxc3 Qd5 17. f3 Rb6 18. b3 Rfb8 19. Rc1 a5 20. Qc4 Qd6 21. Kf2 Ra8 22. h4 Raa6 23. h5 Qb4 24. hxg6 hxg6 25. Rh8+ Kxh8 26. Qxf7 Qd4+ 27. Kg2 Rb5 28. Qxg6 Qg7 29. Qe8+ Qg8 30. Rh1+ Kg7 31. Qxe7+ Kg6 32. Rh4 1-0

Deep Blue computer - Garry Kasparov
IBM Man-Machine, New York, NY, USA, Round 2, 1997.05.04

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 d6 8. c3 O-O 9. h3 h6 10. d4 Re8 11. Nbd2 Bf8 12. Nf1 Bd7 13. Ng3 Na5 14. Bc2 c5 15. b3 Nc6 16. d5 Ne7 17. Be3 Ng6 18. Qd2 Nh7 19. a4 Nh4 20. Nxh4 Qxh4 21. Qe2 Qd8 22. b4 Qc7 23. Rec1 c4 24. Ra3 Rec8 25. Rca1 Qd8 26. f4 Nf6 27. fxe5 dxe5 28. Qf1 Ne8 29. Qf2 Nd6 30. Bb6 Qe8 31. R3a2 Be7 32. Bc5 Bf8 33. Nf5 Bxf5 34. exf5 f6 35. Bxd6 Bxd6 36. axb5 axb5 37. Be4 Rxa2 38. Qxa2 Qd7 39. Qa7 Rc7 40. Qb6 Rb7 41. Ra8+ Kf7 42. Qa6 Qc7 43. Qc6 Qb6+ 44. Kf1 Rb8 45. Ra6 1-0

Battle Chess

'Battle Chess', 2004, 7 minutes, written, directed and produced by John Dunstan, was funded by an award from Bravo!Fact - a foundation to assist Canadian film talent. The short was shown on Bravo!Fact Presents on Bravo!, Rogers Channel 40 in Toronto, on Wed., Feb. 9 at 7:30pm. We see two well-dressed chess players across the chessboard from each other. We hear Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, first movement, during the entire film. As the music goes quiet, the chess players make their moves. They stare defiantly at each other. As the music grows louder, the players stand up - and start taking pokes at each other! The fist-fighting reflects the moves on the board. If one player loses a piece, then in the fight he will be hit hard. The music quietens, the game resumes on the board. A capture, the music grows louder, the players stand up and the real life battle resumes. This is a wonderful, if violent, fantasy, else Canadian chess expert and former World Heavyweight Boxing Champion Lennox Lewis might also win the World Chess Championship! Fortunately for us tournament players, chess is a good substitute for real life war, and if there is fist-fighting, then it is only in the minds of the chess players.

Thanks to Susan Dunstan for notice of 'Battle Chess'; and Christian Parlee of Alliance Atlantis for details on the release of 'Game Over: Kasparov and the Machine'.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 11, 2005.02.15

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 190, 2005.02, p.38-9

***


2004 Canadian Correspondence Player of the Year - Gary Ruben

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

I conducted the 2nd Canadian Chess Player of the Year poll of Canadian chess journalists. In 2003, there wasn't much interest from the Canadian Correspondence Chess Association (CCCA) in participating. However, in 2004, I was the Guest Editor of their magazine, "CHECK!", and insisted that they cast a vote!

To determine their nominees, I thought they should have a 2004 Canadian Correspondence Player of the Year. I polled their Executive, and they responded enthusiastically (100% participation) by voting as follows:

Gary Ruben - 4; Alexander Ugge - 2.

I cast "CHECK!"'s 1st and 2nd place votes accordingly.

Gary scored his first Correspondence IM (IMC) Norm, also a Correspondence Senior IM (SIMC) Norm, over 10 games by e-mail in the Champions League, on Board 1 for 'The Gambiteers Guild', finishing second in the section. He then scored his final IM Norm in the 4th North America/Pacific Zone Championship. So, Gary should receive his IMC title at the next International Correspondence Chess Federation (ICCF) Congress in 2005. Additionally, he scored a solid +2 (6/10) on Board 4 for Canada's team in the 15th Correspondence Chess Olympiad Preliminaries.

Here are excerpts from a recent e-mail from Gary, where he explained his IMC Norms, and expressed his hopes for achieving a SIMC title (the title between IMC and GMC), while mainly desiring to avoid losses:

"I got my final IMC Norm in NAPZ Ch 4. The 14 games in the event started under the old rules but I already had a 10 game SIMC Norm to go with it for a total of 24 games. I played it postal... I'll try to make the SIMC Norm in the Jordan Memorial which is 14 games. So far 6 draws no losses...

My play has been consistent the past few years and several events have been close to the IMC Norm. As an example, in both CCCA 80 and the Olympiad games I just finished I missed the Norm by only half a point. In the Pan Am Teams I expect I'll probably meet or exceed the IMC Norm again even though I don't need another Norm. In the Pan Am teams I have only 2 of the 14 games still in play and haven't yet lost a game...

Many of the players from the 1970's and 80's are still CCCA members and recall when I did the membership secretary and tournament directing jobs. In 2001, I received the Correspondence International Arbiter (IAC) title from the ICCF, which probably more closely defines my contribution over the years than does my playing abilities."

Yuliy Sheynberg - Gary Ruben
4th North America/Pacific Zone Championship, International Correspondence Chess Federation, 2002.06.26

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. Nxd4 Bb4 6. Nxc6 bxc6 7. Bd3 d5 8. e5 Ng4 9. O-O O-O 10. Bf4 f6 11. exf6 Qxf6 12. Bg3 Bd6 13. Be2 Ne5 14. a3 Ng6 15. Qd2 Nf4 16. Rfe1 Rb8 17. Na4 Kh8 18. b4 Nxg2 19. Kxg2 Bxg3 20. fxg3 Qf2+ 21. Kh1 Bh3 22. Rg1 Rbe8 23. Nc3 d4 0-1

Thanks to Gary Ruben for info and game selection.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 10, 2005.02.01

Adapted from CHECK! #551, 2004.12

***


William (Bill) Oaker's Theoretical Novelties

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

Here's a look back at the younger days of 2004 Toronto Senior Active Champion William (Bill) Oaker, winner of the 1949 Toronto Junior Championship!

In the first game, Bill "noveltates" in the Alekhine's Defence - Four Pawns Attack with 13...exd5; book had been 13...Ne5. Originally published in Chess Review 1947.09.

B. Preston - William (Bill) Oaker
Junior League, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 1947

1. e4 Nf6 2. e5 Nd5 3. c4 Nb6 4. d4 d6 5. f4 dxe5 6. fxe5 Nc6 7. Be3 Bf5 8. Nc3 e6 9. Nf3 Qd7 10. Be2 O-O-O 11. O-O f6 12. exf6 gxf6 13. d5 exd5 14. Bxb6 axb6 15. cxd5 Ne7 16. Nh4 Rg8 17. Nxf5 Nxf5 18. Qd3 Ne3 19. Rf2 Qh3 20. g3 Rxg3+ 21. hxg3 Qxg3+ 22. Kh1 Qxf2 0-1

In the second game, Bill responds to a novelty in the Ruy Lopez (Open: Keres Variation) - Adam Variation (12... Nb4) with an innovation of his own. Originally published in Chess Review 1952.11.

US Junior Championship, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, 1952
William (Bill) Oaker - Don Burdick

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Nxe4 6. d4 b5 7. Bb3 d5 8. dxe5 Be6 9. Qe2 Nc5 10. Rd1 Be7 11. Bxd5 Bxd5 12. Nc3 Nb4 13. Ne1 c6 14. a3 Nxc2 15. Nxc2 Nb3 16. Rb1 Nxc1 17. Rbxc1 Bc5 18. Nxd5 cxd5 19. Qf3 Qb6 20. b4 Be7 21. Ne3 Qa7 22. Nxd5 Bd8 23. Nc7+ 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 9, 2005.01.15

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2005 Canadian Chess Hall of Fame Inductee - John Henderson

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

John Henderson (1836-96)

John Henderson
2nd Prize, Tournament No. Two
'100 Gems of Chess' 1872

Problem: White to play and mate in 3. Solution given below.

W: K/b1; Q/f4; R/a8; B/b4,e4; N/d3,e5; P/c2,c4,e3,e6,h3.
B: K/a4; Q/g7; N/d8; P/a7,h5.

8 of Henderson's problems appeared in the first Canadian chess book, '100 Gems of Chess', edited by Thomas D.S. Moore, London, Ontario 1872. Thanks to Nathan Divinsky for loaning his photocopies made from the original at Lasa's library at Kornik Castle. Thanks also to CHECK! columnist J. Ken MacDonald for the game selection.

Correspondence, Canada, 1873
John Henderson - W. Braithwaite

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. b4 Bxb4 5. c3 Ba5 6. d4 exd4 7. O-O Bxc3 8. Nxc3 dxc3 9. Qb3 Qf6 10. e5 Qg6 11. Qxc3 Nge7 12. Ng5 Nd8 13. f4 b5 14. Bd3 Qb6+ 15. Kh1 h6 16. Ne4 Nd5 17. Qe1 Qd4 18. Qg3 Ne6 19. f5 Ng5 20. Nxg5 hxg5 21. Bxg5 Bb7 22. Rae1 a6 23. Re4 Qc5 24. Bh4 Rg8 25. e6 f6 26. Qg6+ Kd8 27. Bxf6+ Nxf6 28. e7+ Qxe7 29. Rxe7 Kxe7 30. Re1+ Kf8 31. Kg1 c5 32. Qg3 Rh8 33. Qd6+ Kg8 34. Qxc5 Rh5 35. Re7 Rg5 36. g3 Rc8 37. Qe3 Rh5 38. Rxg7+ Kxg7 39. Qe7+ Kg8 40. Qxf6 Rh7 41. g4 Rf8 42. Qe5 Bf3 43. g5 Rh5 44. g6 1-0

[Event "Tournament No. Two: #3"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1872.??.??"]
[Round "43"]
[White "?"]
[Black "?"]
[Result "1-0"]
[Annotator "Henderson, John"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "R2n4/p5q1/4P3/4N2p/kBP1BQ2/3NP2P/2P5/1K6 w - - 0 1"]
[PlyCount "3"]
[Source "'100 Gems of Chess', ed. Thomas Moore, Western Advertiser, London, Ontario, 1872"]

{Dedicated to T.P. Bull.}
1. Ng6 h4 2. Qf6 {2nd prize} 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 8, 2005.01.01

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2004 Year-End Canadian Chess Rankings

Written and copyright 2005 by David Cohen

Grandmaster Kevin Spraggett, originally from Montreal, Quebec, is the top ranked Canadian chess player at year-end of 2004, for the 3rd time in a row (2002-4) and for a record 22nd time since 1980.

Natalia Khoudgarian, of Toronto, Ontario, is the top ranked Canadian female chess player at year-end of 2004, for the 9th time in a row (1996-2004).

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 8, 2005.01.01

***


2004 Canadian Chess Player of the Year - Mark Bluvshtein

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

Mark Bluvshtein, 16, of Toronto, Ontario, was voted 2004 Canadian Chess Player of the Year by Canadian chess journalists. Bluvshtein, a Toronto high school student, earned his Grandmaster title from the World Chess Federation (FIDE) in 2004. He finished in 3rd place in the 2004 Canadian Chess Championship, and will represent Canada at the next Pan-American Chess Championship, a qualifying event for the World Chess Championship. Among his accomplishments during 2004, he won the Grade 10 Canadian Scholastic Championship in May.

Voting method:

1st place vote - 5 points
2nd place vote - 3 points
3rd place vote - 1 point

Voting results (9 of 12 invited journalists voted):

Mark Bluvshtein : 40 (8/9 first place votes)
Pascal Charbonneau : 9
Zhe Quan : 7
Eric Lawson : 5
Gary Ruben : 5 (1 first place vote)
Dimitri Tyomkin : 4
Kevin Spraggett : 3
Alexander Ugge : 3

Highlights of Canadian chess player accomplishments in 2004:

Pascal Charbonneau (Outremont, QC) - the 2003 Canadian Chess Player of the Year successfully defended his Canadian title

Zhe Quan (Richmond Hill, ON) - won Canadian Junior (Under 20) Championship; 12th place finish at World Junior Championship (Nov. 18-Dec. 1, India)

Eric Lawson (St. Rose Laval, QC) - tied for first at 2004 Canadian Championship

Gary Ruben (Pickering, ON) - qualified for the Correspondence International Master title

Dimitri Tyomkin - won Canadian Open Championship

Kevin Spraggett - tied 7th place in Canadian Championship, after an excellent year on the European circuit

Alexander Ugge (Keswick, ON) - earned a qualifying Norm towards the Correspondence Grandmaster title

Mark Bluvshtein

References:

Canadian Chess Player of the Year
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/Champions.html#PLAYER

Mark Bluvshtein biography
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html#BLUVSHTEIN

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 7, 2004.12.15

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 190, 2005.02, p.8

***


History of the Toronto Chess Exhibition as a Fundraiser for Charity

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

Part 1 - Publicity

During 2002-3, I was President of the Greater Toronto Chess League (GTCL). Throughout my years on the Board of Governors of the Chess Federation of Canada, with which the League is affiliated (through the intermediary Ontario Chess Association), I had been thinking of ways to publicize chess in Canada. I reasoned backwards. The most publicity that we could receive would be in the general interest, mass media: newspapers and, especially, television. This attention would come about from the media's interest in covering a large event. A large event would be of interest to a sponsor interested in reaching the wider audience that the mass media would provide. The sponsor's money would help to fund the large event; and the sponsor's media connections would help to ensure the event's coverage. So, I concluded that a sponsor was necessary.

To attract a sponsor, it was first necessary to prove that I could attract media attention. My reasoning was about to become circular! Which comes first, the sponsor or the media coverage? Fortunately, there was an escape route that enabled me to continue reasoning backwards. By running a specialized event, rather than a large event, I could attract the media's attention. Fortunately, kids provide these opportunities in abundance!

Our Ontario Scholastic Championships proved to be my first successful media placement. Shortly before the tournament began, I e-mailed a large number of media outlets about the event. This was a disaster - no reporters showed up. It turns out that I made two mistakes. First, I should have given the media a longer lead time: at least two weeks' notice. Second, it is important to develop contacts. These are best maintained by telephone. E-mails are just not as attention grabbing for the professionals who work in the media.

I recovered from these mistakes by working hard on the post-event follow-up. E-mails reporting the results of the event, especially those mentioning the winners' home towns, resulted in successful contacts with local media. Reporters created front page stories, with colour photos, in local newspapers. One ethnic television show did a feature on a player. The lesson was that large events are not necessary to achieve media coverage of chess. Specialized events can be reported locally.

So the stage is set for the future. We have proven media coverage. In Toronto, we've even seen the results of our efforts. I attracted Sid Belzberg into sponsoring the 2004 Canadian Championship. The organizers did a fabulous job of developing media contacts for the event. The result was media coverage for chess in general, and for the event in particular, in both newspapers and television.

Part 2 - Sick Kids Hospital

How then did the Hospital Fundraiser originate? A fundraiser for charity can be viewed as a specialized event. Take photos. Get the charity for which you are raising money to help publicize your event, both in advance, and afterwards. The resulting publicity can only help you attract sponsors and future media attention, which will open up possibilities for future chess events.

I actually had a different goal in mind when I created our Hospital Fundraiser. The effort by the chess community to seek sponsorship was an effort aimed at taking money from the larger community and channelling it into the chess community. I thought that this effort would be more successful if it was a two way exchange. Let the larger community see the chess community. Furthermore, let them see us in a positive light! Let's get the chess community to donate money to the larger community.

This is not an easy task. We have a hard enough time convincing our own chess players to donate money to support our chess causes, such as our National Olympiad Team. So, as an inducement to donate, give the donor something for the money. A simultaneous chess exhibition is good for this. Donate money, play the master. The true donation would be the difference in value between what the donor was paying, and what the donor would ordinarily pay to play the master.

Unfortunately, I knew this would prove to be a hard sell. Simultaneous exhibitions are declining in popularity. Grandmasters are more numerous these days. Access to play them is easy, via the internet. So, the price they command for an exhibition has been declining. I concluded that the chance to donate money to the charity would have to be part of the lure of the event.

With these factors in mind, I chose as my charity the Sick Kids Hospital. They are a world-famous Toronto hospital devoted entirely to the treatment of children. I reasoned that they were a charity that no one would criticize, and that everyone could get behind. Furthermore, with the increasing popularity of chess with kids, I thought that, through the kids, there would be a good link between chess and the hospital. As we shall see, I was right on this point!

Next came the financial planning. The charity receives the proceeds of the event: the fees charged to the participants, less the expenses. Expenses include the room rental; the cost of arranging chess facilities, such as tables, chairs, chess boards, and chess sets; and the price of the chess master.

To maximize the revenues, I would charge the largest fee possible. I thought $100 would be good. Who would chess players pay that much money to play? Only a Grandmaster of World Champion strength. Fortunately one came easily to mind: Viswanathan Anand. As a youngster, one of the first games he played that attracted the attention of the world was his contest with Canada at the 1984 Olympiad.

Viswanathan Anand - Deen Hergott
Olympiad, India - Canada, Thessaloniki, Greece, Round 4.4, 1984

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 e5 5. Nb5 Nf6 6. N1c3 d6 7. Bg5 a6 8. Na3 b5 9. Nd5 Qa5+ 10. Bd2 Qd8 11. Nxf6+ Qxf6 12. c4 Qg6 13. f3 Be7 14. cxb5 Nd4 15. Be3 O-O 16. Bxd4 exd4 17. Qd2 d5 18. Bd3 Bg5 19. Qe2 dxe4 20. Bxe4 Bf5 21. O-O Be3+ 22. Kh1 Bxe4 23. fxe4 Qxe4 24. Rad1 axb5 25. Nxb5 Rxa2 26. Nxd4 Qe5 27. Nf5 Bf4 28. Qg4 g5 29. Rde1 h5 30. Nh6+ Kg7 31. Qxh5 Qxb2 32. Nf5+ Kg8 33. Qg4 Qd2 34. Rd1 Qb4 35. Rd4 Qb8 36. h3 Kh7 37. Rdxf4 gxf4 38. Qg7# 1-0

Afterwards, Anand told the Canadians that as a child he had visited Toronto to receive treatment at the Sick Kids Hospital! I decided to offer Anand the chance to give something back to the Hospital. I offered to pay his expenses to come to Toronto, if he would donate his time for the exhibition. This would reduce my costs for the event. But after I mentioned donating his time, I heard no more from him.

I decided that I had been aiming too high initially. It was more practical to build up to Anand, to put myself in a position where I would be better able to repeat my offer, or to be able to pay for both his expenses and his time. It was back to getting local. I needed local cooperation: a local master to donate his time for the exhibition; and free publicity to get the word out to local players.

I posted on the Canadian internet chess site 'ChessTalk' that I was looking for a master to donate his time. Only one responded, Kevork Hacat. Kevork was a National Master, a first-year university student who had been Ontario High School Champion three years in a row (1998-2000). We arranged a date when he was free from his studies, in May 2003.

My next task was to arrange for a site and for chess facilities. Fortunately, I obtained both at once. Vladimir Dobrich offered his Bayview Games Club, along with the necessary chess facilities it contained. I wanted to obtain a free site, but was not able to do so for my first exhibition. However, in recognition that the event was for charity, Vlad did drop his regular rate from $5/person to $3/person. I was just glad that I didn't have to commit to paying a flat fee.

The next step was to gain formal approval from the charity for the fundraising event. Their web site contained an approval request form, along with their regulations. These steps are necessary to control the use of the charity's name and charitable registration number. The approval process also contains a helpful event budget planner. I settled on a price that a player would normally pay to play a master, $10. After deducting expenses of $3/player for the site and facilities rental, proceeds of $7/player would be turned over to the charity.

Receipts for tax purposes would only be available for participants in the amount greater than that of the value of the chess exhibition. Since I was obtaining the master's time for free, I was able to charge only what a player would pay anyway to play a master. Thus, tax receipts would not be available.

To help with the publicity, I convinced Larry Bevand of Chess'n Math Association (CMA) to donate a $25 gift certificate from its Chess Shop. This was to be awarded to the first junior to beat the master. If no one could win, then the first to draw would receive it. If no one drew, then the last to finish would receive it. CMA also allowed me to publicize the event for free on their ChessTalk and Kids ChessTalk web sites. Advance notice also went out in the regular free local electronic newsletter for club players, the Scarboro Community Toronto Chess News & Views (SCTCN&V) edited by Bob Armstrong. The only money I spent (my donation, in addition to my time) was on publicity, when I printed up some flyers. I distributed some to the chess club at the site; some to a chess school; and, noting that Kevork was of Armenian descent, mailed one flyer to the local Armenian school. Finally, International Master Lawrence Day publicized the event in his weekly chess column in the major local newspaper, the Toronto Star.

On the day of the event, we attracted nine players. So, at $7/player, we raised $63. This was a modest beginning, but I was happy - the event was underway! I planned for it to be an annual event. My goal was to increase each year awareness (both in the chess community and in the larger community); attendance; and the amount of money raised.

Kevork Hacat - Salvador Valenzuela
Hacat simultaneous exhibition 9 boards, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2003.05.19

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. f4 e6 7. Qf3 Be7 8. g4 Qb6 9. Nb3 Nc6 10. Be3 Qc7 11. g5 Nd7 12. O-O-O b5 13. Qf2 b4 14. Na4 Rb8 15. h4 Na5 16. h5 Nxb3+ 17. axb3 Bb7 18. Bd3 Qa5 19. Nb6 Nc5 20. Bxc5 dxc5 21. Nc4 Qc7 22. Rhg1 Rd8 23. f5 e5 24. f6 gxf6 25. gxf6 Bf8 26. Qf5 Bh6+ 27. Kb1 Bf4 28. Qg4 Bc8 29. Qg7 Rf8 30. Qxh7 Be6 31. Rg8 Kd7 32. Rxf8 Rxf8 33. Qg7 Qb8 34. Be2+ Kc7 35. Qg1 Qa7 36. Bg4 Rg8 37. Bxe6 Rxg1 38. Rxg1 Qb8 39. Rg7 Qd8 40. Rxf7+ Kb8 41. Bd5 Qh8 42. Nb6 1-0

Kevork scored +6 =1 -2 over the course of an afternoon. We had a great mixture of participants, who had heard about the event from the different sources. One player even played during his break between rounds of a concurrent chess tournament at the same site! While Kevork was a great person to work with, he turned out to have one fault - he was too slow! His results I didn't care about, but the event had to move along. Players, especially children, become impatient if they have to wait a long time for the master to come around to their board. I decided that I needed someone more experienced at moving quickly. I set my sights on obtaining a stronger player for 2004. Fortunately, he arrived in Canada in the person of Zhe Quan.

Part 3 - Evolution

Zhe Quan took our city - and country - by storm. He immediately beat all of the Toronto masters, and achieved a 2400 rating. Within a year of his arrival, he captured the Canadian Junior Championship and earned the FIDE Master title. Zhe's father, Carl, mentioned that Zhe wanted to donate his time to help less fortunate children. I made some suggestions for teaching local kids. But the event that I was able to bring to fruition was my second fundraiser exhibition. Without any trouble, I convinced Zhe to agree to donate his time.

For the second fundraiser, I obtained a free site, donated by the GTCL. They were able to do this because they had rented the site anyway for a concurrent chess tournament. The tournament director, Barry Thorvardson, also arranged for us the free use of chess boards and sets from his home chess club, Brampton Chess Club. The GTCL happily publicized the event on their web site. I also got free publicity again on the ChessTalk web sites, and through SCTCN&V. However, I lost my inducement of a prize. The move away from Bayview Games Club also meant moving away from the Chess Shop's retail outlet. So, CMA did not donate a prize. I put out a call on ChessTalk for donations, and players came through with chess books and chess magazines (including some autographed by IM Day).

Carl and Zhe enthusiastically rounded up a dozen of their regular students (all Chinese) to play him. Although I was busy taking care of the exhibition, I wanted a crack at Zhe, and joined in. So, at $10/player, we raised $130. Both our attendance and our amount raised had increased. But a real disappointment for me was that no one besides Zhe's own students wanted to play him. Perhaps this was due to the concurrent chess tournament. But I knew this was not the case. As in 2003, some of the participants were also playing in the tournament. So, despite the chance to play a very strong player, excellent publicity and an easily accessible site, all of the players were local to the master. On the bright side, the money was all raised by children! A junior gave the exhibition. Juniors paid the entry fee that went to the charity.

W: Kg1; Qg5; Rd1,f1; Be5; Pa4,b3,c4,f2,g2,h2.
B: Kc8; Qd3; Rd8,h7; Bd6; Pa7,b7,c7,e6,f7.

[Event "Quan simultaneous exhibition 12 boards"]
[Site "Toronto, CAN"]
[Date "2004.05.09"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Anonymous"]
[Black "Quan, Zhe"]
[Result "0-1"]
[BlackTitle "FM"]
[Annotator "Cohen,David"]
[SetUp "1"]
[FEN "2kr4/ppp2p1r/3bp3/4B1Q1/P1P5/1P1q4/5PPP/3R1RK1 b - - 0 1"]

1... Bxe5 2. Qxe5 (2. Rxd3 Bxh2+ 3. Kh1 Bf4+ 4. Kg1 Bxg5) 2... Qxd1 (3. Rxd1 Rxd1+ 4. Qe1 Rxe1#) 0-1

Zhe scored +13 =0 -0. I gave out the magazines at random during the event, and the book to the last player to finish. Also during the event, a player from the tournament came up to me and volunteered to donate his time for the next exhibition! Again, the volunteer was a junior. Shiyam Thavandiran, whose family was from Sri Lanka, was already the Canadian Grade 5 Champion. We arranged for him to give the third exhibition during the best time for him, the fall of 2004. In the interim, he won the Ontario High School Championship, won the Canadian Grade 6 Championship, achieved a National Master rating, played in the Canadian Championship, and was named CITY-TV's Athlete of the Week.

The fundraiser was picking up steam. It was no longer an annual event, but one that we could run whenever the opportunity arose. Again, we publicized the event for free through the ChessTalk and GTCL web sites, and by SCTCN&V. Again, we obtained a free site with chess facilities. Shiyam was a regular helper at the Thunder Chess Club, owned and run by chess teacher Michael McArthur. Michael enthusiastically helped out by suspending his club's regular teaching activities for the day; donating his club's site and chess facilities; arranging for ads in the local Tamil newspaper; collecting additional donations from interested well-wishers; and donating a chess clock to anyone who could beat Shiyam.

Shiyam's efforts attracted 20 players. Each paid $10, thereby raising $200. An additional $160 was donated by well-wishers, for a total of $360 raised. So, Shiyam met his own goal of setting the new record for attendance and money raised. I was happy because we had increased these figures at each successive event.

Shiyam Thavandiran - David Cohen
Thavandiran simultaneous exhibition 18 boards, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 1, 2004.11.14

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Bg5 e6 7. f4 Be7 8. Nxc6 bxc6 9. Bd3 Qc7 10. Qf3 Bb7 11. O-O-O Rb8 12. e5 dxe5 13. fxe5 Nd5 14. Bxe7 Qxe7 15. Ne4 O-O 16. c4 Rfc8 17. Nd6 Rc7 18. cxd5 Qg5+ 19. Kb1 Qxe5 20. dxc6 Bxc6 21. Qe2 Qa5 22. Nc4 Qb4 23. a3 Qe7 24. Rc1 Bd5 25. Ka1 Bxc4 26. Rxc4 Rcb7 27. Rc2 g6 28. Be4 Rb5 29. Rhc1 Kg7 30. Qc4 Rb3 31. Ka2 R3b6 32. Qd4+ e5 33. Qc5 Qh4 34. Qxe5+ f6 35. Qe7+ Kh6 36. g3 Qg5 37. Rb1 Qb5 38. Qc7 Qb3+ 39. Ka1 Qe3 40. Qf4+ Qxf4 41. gxf4 f5 42. Bf3 Ra6 43. Rc6 Ra4 44. Be2 Rxf4 45. Rc2 a5 46. Rf1 Rh4 47. Rf2 Kg7 48. Rc4 Rh3 49. Ra4 Ra8 50. Bf3 Ra7 51. b4 Rh4 52. Rxa5 Rxa5 53. bxa5 Ra4 54. Kb2 Rxa5 55. Kb3 Kf6 56. Kb4 Ra7 57. a4 Ke5 58. Kb5 Kd6 59. a5 Kc7 60. Rc2+ Kb8 61. a6 Re7 62. Kb6 Re6+ 63. Bc6 Re7 64. Rd2 1-0

Shiyam scored +37 =0 -0!! He played 18 boards simultaneously, with two replacements arriving after some players had departed. In an amazing display over 2.5 hours, Shiyam not only won all 20 games, but he beat all 17 of the players who opted for a second game!

As with the previous exhibition, I was the only outsider to tackle the master. All of the others were regular Tamil students at the Club. I was mystified by the non-attendance of outsiders. There were no competing chess events. Admittedly, the site was not as accessible or as well-known as the previous sites. But the method of getting there was simple enough, and the chance to play rising star Shiyam was a fabulous opportunity for the price. So, once again, it was the local effort that produced a success. And again, kids raised money for kids. Shiyam and the students he played were all juniors.

Where will we go in the future? No sooner had I announced this event than I had another junior volunteering! Jonathan Tayar, the Canadian Under-16 Champion, volunteered to donate his time for the next simultaneous exhibition. In my effort to keep the event local, we agreed to hold it in the Jewish community. I suspect that if I am ever to attract Anand to Toronto for an exhibition, it will be by working with the local Indian community. In the long run, Toronto is a large city (geographically), and it's made up of many ethnic communities. So, I don't know if it's possible to attract a large number of people to one event, whether it's a charity fundraiser or an open tournament. In Toronto, local may be the way to go, both for participation, as well as for publicity and sponsorship.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 6, 2004.12.01

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 190, 2005.02, p.15-17

Scholastic Chess by Steve Goldberg, Chesscafe.com, 2004.12.08
http://www.chesscafe.com/scholastic/scholastic.htm

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3rd Toronto Hospital For Sick Children Foundation Fundraiser 2004

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen
Benefit Organizer

National Master Shiyam Thavandiran, the reigning Canadian Grade 6 & Ontario High School Champion, volunteered his time to take on 20 players (including 19 kids) in a simultaneous chess exhibition at the Thunder Chess Club in Toronto, on Sunday, November 14. Michael McArthur donated the use of the Club's facilities and chess equipment. The effort was all in aid of The Hospital for Sick Children Foundation, Canadian registered charity # 10808 4419 RR0001 (http://www.sickkids.on.ca/foundation/). Each player paid a $10 entry fee, and this all went to the Foundation. In addition to the $200 raised from the players, well-wishers donated an additional $160, for a total of $360! Shiyam was able to achieve his goal of setting new records for our fundraiser for attendance (Kevork Hacat 2003 - 9; Zhe Quan 2004 - 13) and money raised (2003 - $63; 2004 - $130).

At the board, Shiyam won all 20 games. Not only that, but 17 of the players opted to play Shiyam a second time, and Shiyam won all of those as well! The whole effort took a mere 2.5 hours. This was hardly surprising when you consider some of Shiyam's previous accomplishments: winning the 2002 Canadian Boys Under 10 Championship (4th at the World Youth Championships), and 2003 Canadian Grade 5 Championship.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 5, 2004.11.15

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 190, 2005.02, p.37

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1st Canadian Senior (50+) Championship

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen
Tournament Organizer

IM Lawrence Day scored a perfect 5/5, winning $ 250, to top IM Jevgenyij Boguszlavszkij (visiting from Hungary) and the rest of the 16 player field Nov. 13 at the Bayview Games Club in Toronto. Day represented Canada at the 1967 World Junior Championship, and at the Olympiad a Canadian record 13 times. The Toronto Star's chess columnist since 1976, he is a member of the Canadian Chess Hall of Fame. IM Boguszlavszkij finished 2nd with 4 pts., and won $45 plus a free entry to the 1st Ontario Senior Championship, Feb. 2005 at Tartu College, which Martin Jaeger is organizing.

The following all had 3 pts.:

Top 'A' - John Chidley-Hill, Peter Hollo, Istvan Kiss, Chris Takov;
Top 'B' - Gerald (Gerry) Gross, Nikita (Nick) Zimninski.

A good time was had by all. Noteworthy was the participation of another former top junior, William (Bill) Oaker - the 1949 Toronto Junior Champion!

TD: Vlad Dobrich; Organizer: David Cohen.

IM Jevgenyij Boguszlavszkij - IM Lawrence Day
1st Canadian Senior (50+) Championship, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 3, 2004.11.13

1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 d6 3. Nc3 Nbd7 4. Nf3 h6 5. Bh4 g5 6. Bg3 Nh5 7. e3 Bg7 8. Bd3 c5 9. Ne2 Qb6 10. Rb1 g4 11. Nd2 cxd4 12. exd4 Nxg3 13. hxg3 d5 14. c3 e5 15. Bf5 h5 16. Nb3 Qf6 17. Qc2 e4 18. Bxd7+ Bxd7 19. Nf4 Qg5 20. Nc5 Bc6 21. b4 b5 22. a4 Ke7 23. Qe2 Rab8 24. a5 h4 25. Kd2 Rh6 26. Qe3 Rbh8 27. gxh4 Rxh4 28. Rxh4 Rxh4 29. g3 Rh2 30. Kc2 Bh6 31. Ncd3 Kd6 32. Ne5 Qf5 33. Kb3 Be8 34. Ned3 f6 35. Nc5 Bxf4 36. gxf4 Rh3 37. Qc1 Rf3 38. Rb2 Qxf4 39. Qh1 Rh3 40. Qf1 Qf3 41. Rd2 Qxc3+ 0-1

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 5, 2004.11.15

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 190, 2005.02, p.38

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Lions of the Kalahari

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

We're all familiar with a portrayal of chess gone wrong in the popular media, whenever we see (e.g., in a film) a chessboard set up incorrectly: a dark square is on the players' right-hand sides. There was a 50% chance to get it right, but they invariably get it wrong. And all the producer had to do was look it up in an encyclopedia; or ask a chess federation; or just ask any old player of any reasonable strength or experience.

I've noticed another incorrect use of chess creeping into popular culture: the use of the word 'stalemate'. Someone tries to draw an analogy between the situation in a game of chess and a situation in real life. This is good - it shows how popular chess has become, since the drawer of the analogy assumes that we all know something about chess, enough to have a common reference point.

Unfortunately, in the popular press the chess term 'stalemate' has come to be used to describe a temporary standoff between two parties. The term 'stalemate' is not a proper use of the chess analogy. In chess, a stalemate describes a position in which only one party cannot move. In the real world situations, neither party can move. In chess, the game is over, and there is a result (a draw, where neither party wins). In the real world situations, the game is not over, and there is no result yet.

What are the possibilities for the real world situations? Here are three of them, using the proper chess term to make the analogy.

1. Stalemate

In chess, the game is over and the result is a draw. One side can no longer move; the other can move, but cannot achieve a victory.

In the real world, a battle between two parties has ended. It's difficult to find an example of this. Perhaps the German invasion of Russia (and the attack on England) during World War II. Russia (and England) could not move; Germany could move, yet could not achieve victory. Even in these cases, 'stalemate' describes only the battles themselves. The full situation is more properly described as a 'balanced position' (standoff), since the war continued after these battles were over - see the next possibility.

2. Balanced position

In chess, the game continues without a result yet. The parties have reached a position where their chances are equal. To attempt to win by making a move is also to risk losing. Waiting moves may ensue.

In the real world, this is the common standoff described in the popular press (incorrectly labelled 'stalemate').

3. Zugzwang

In chess, the game continues. Whoever moves must lose.

Let's examine a situation in the IMAX film Lions of the Kalahari, which depicts animal life in the African desert. The king of the lions rules next to the water hole. He has two mates. Everybody is happy, until the arrival of a new female lion. The lion is interested in her. His current mates wish he were not. They decide to attack her and drive her away. The lion protects her by imposing himself between his mates and the newcomer. His mates retaliate by positioning themselves between the newcomer and the water hole. So, they settle down all in a row: the water hole, the two mates, the lion, and the newcomer.

In the film, this situation is described as a 'stalemate'. As we can see, this is not correct. The game continues. Furthermore, it is not a balanced position, as no maneuvering is possible. If the mates move towards the newcomer, then they will get driven off by the lion. If the lion moves towards the newcomer, then the mates will harass him. If the newcomer moves to get water, then the mates will attack her. Thus, whoever moves first must lose, and we can correctly describe the situation as 'zugzwang'.

P.S. Sorry, you'll have to watch the film to see how it turned out!

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 5, 2004.11.15

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Chess Trivia

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

The two players in the 2004 World Chess Championship match, Vladimir Kramnik and Peter Leko, both received their FIDE Master (FM) title in the same year, 1991.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 4, 2004.11.01

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Chess Street

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

During my summer vacation, I was perusing the street name index for Vancouver, British Columbia, where I was visiting. Imagine my surprise when I came across 'Chess Street'! I grabbed my camera and rushed out to view the site. I hoped to find some chess tables. Alas, it turned out to be one lonely block in a light industrial area, running between a city park and the railroad tracks. Nevertheless, I posed for a picture (I've cropped it so that just the street sign is visible). Next, I headed for the public library, where the helpful staff located a book for me on the origin of local street names. Another disappointment: it was named after some local merchants, the Chess Brothers. Ah well, at least we have our first 'Chess Street'. Maybe some day we'll have one in every city, and these will be attributable to our beloved game!

Chess Street

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 3, 2004.10.15

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Chess King Ali – A Chess Movie Review

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

Chess King Ali is a 25 minute documentary film made in 2002 in the Netherlands, directed by Meral Uslu. Thanks to sponsorship of the Dutch and many others, it was shown in Toronto, Sunday, May 2 at the Canadian International Documentary Festival, known as "Hot Docs" (http://www.hotdocs.ca). Here is the description from the program guide: "Originally from Iran, now living in the Netherlands, Ali is a twelve-year-old chess wiz who dreams of becoming world champion. He has the talent to represent Holland in international tournaments but as a refugee he is unable to leave the country."

The film chronicles the daily life of Ali Bitalzadeh, winner of the Dutch Under 12 Championships in regular and rapid play. His younger sister, a girl's champion for her age group, is also shown. Ali takes part in classroom training offered to the best Dutch youth players. His problem is that he can't accept invitations to compete abroad, particularly the European Youth Championships. Ali's father's refugee status has been revoked, and they are awaiting a decision on their appeal; if it fails, they may have to return to Iran. Meanwhile, Ali is not permitted to hold a Dutch passport. As Ali - used to making quick decisions in complicated positions at rapid chess - keenly observes: the government takes forever to make up it's mind, and then it often makes the wrong decision. Ali wisely notes that he is the same as other kids, so why shouldn't he be allowed to compete, just like the other kids?

In his daily life, Ali plays and enjoys other games with the children. Yet he does not join in any chess games with his classmates - they are not at his level. Is it arrogance? Probably not - I think he just would not find it any fun. He has lots of fun at the training sessions with his peers.

So why does Ali play chess? First, he set a goal of beating his father, but he achieved this long ago. Second, to pass the time. His parents are both medical doctors, but as refugees, they cannot practice. So, the family needs to occupy themselves while waiting for the government to rule on their case. Third, it helps him to escape. He does not need to think about his dangerous escape from Iran, nor about his grandparents whom he left behind.

Since the film was made, Ali's story has turned out well. He represented the Netherlands abroad at the 2003 European and World Boys Under 14 Championships, achieving a FIDE rating of 2229.

Ali Bitalzadeh - Mart Jurcik
European Boys Under 14 Championship, Budva, Yugoslavia, Round 4, 2003.09.16

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. f3 Nc6 8. Qd2 Bd7 9. O-O-O Rc8 10. g4 Ne5 11. Kb1 Nc4 12. Bxc4 Rxc4 13. h4 h5 14. g5 Nh7 15. Nd5 O-O 16. b3 Rc8 17. c4 Bc6 18. Nc3 Qa5 19. Nd5 Qd8 20. f4 e6 21. Nc3 Qa5 22. Nxc6 bxc6 23. Na4 Qa6 24. Qxd6 Rb8 25. Kc2 Rfc8 26. Bd4 Bxd4 27. Rxd4 Qa5 28. Qc5 Qa6 29. Rhd1 Nf8 30. Rd6 Qb7 31. Nc3 Qc7 32. Ne2 Rb6 33. Nd4 Ra6 34. a4 Rb6 35. a5 Ra6 36. b4 Kh7 37. Nf3 Qb7 38. Ne5 Kg8 39. Rd8 Rxd8 40. Rxd8 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 2, 2004.10.01

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77th Canadian Chess Championship 2004

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen
FIDE International Arbiter and Assistant Tournament Director

IM Pascal Charbonneau, 21, and FM Eric Lawson, 20, tied for first place in the 77th Canadian Chess Championship, which took place August 20-29 in Toronto. 69 players from across Canada competed for $21,000 in prizes. The tournament was organized by the Ontario Chess Association, and sponsored by Sid & Alicia Belzberg.

A couple of notes on the organization of the event. I had the original idea for involving Mr. Belzberg in the Closed Championship. I invited him to sponsor the Championship, and suggested that he play in it himself (CFC rules allow for the organizer to choose one player). He agreed, and the process was initiated. I dropped out as organizer, and OCA President Barry Thorvardson stepped in with his organization to do a fabulous job. His son Craig did all of the web site work. Erik Malmsten was a super-volunteer. IA Mark S. Dutton was hired as tournament director. He, in turn, hired me as his assistant. We were both thrilled to be involved in the one event neither of us had yet directed in our careers: our Canadian Championship.

The event was supposed to be called the Belzberg Technologies Invitational. Unfortuantely, FIDE had problems with its World Championship, regarding the issuing of visas to Libya for the entourage of Jewish players. As a result, the firm will not sponsor any event involving FIDE. However, Mr. Belzberg remained committed to the sponsorship of Canadian chess. Sid and his wife Alicia personally sponsored the event. It was renamed the Belzberg Invitational.

As the Championship is also a FIDE Zonal Championship (Zone 2.2 is Canada by itself), Eric Lawson obtained the IM title for his first place finish in the tournament. Christian Stevens obtained the FM title, as he was the highest scorer amongst untitled players. Mark Bluvshtein obtained his GM title in this event. He needed to raise his rating to 2500. This does not need to be published, and may even be achieved at any time during a tournament. This will prove to be the case here. He started the Championship rated just under 2500, and then performed well over the first 6 rounds.

There were three playoffs on Monday, August 30. They were originally intended to be held according to the regulations in the CFC Handbook.

For first place, and the right to advance to the World Championship, as well as for a place on the Olympiad National Team, Charbonneau, Lawson, and the organizer agreed to change the format to a 2 game play-off (at Game/30 with 10 second increments). Charbonneau won 2-0. Lawson will advance to the Pan-American Championship.

For third place, and the right to advance to the Pan-American Championship, Mark Bluvshtein, Tomas Krnan, Dmitri Tyomkin, Igor Zugic, and the organizer agreed to change the format to a double-round robin at Game/15 with 5 second increments. Tomas Krnan nicked Zugic for a draw. This left Zugic 0.5 points behind Bluvshtein in their last round encounter. They drew, enabling Bluvshtein to win 3rd place. Tyomkin had a bad day and was not a factor, topping only Krnan. Although all of the games were broadcast live on the internet, the DGT boards were not able to keep up with these fast games.

For the second FM title, 6 players held a single Round-Robin at Game/30 with 10 second increments. There was no format in the Handbook for this number of players. However, the CFC President had authorized the organizer before the Championship to choose the tie-break method. The organizer selected the method already in place for a 5 player case. As the starting time was announced as 1pm, Roman Jiganchine was forced to drop out; he would not have been able to complete all of his games and still catch his evening flight home. Dmitri Feoktistov got off to a poor start and dropped out after he was eliminated. Nikolay Noritsyn was also eliminated early, but completed his schedule. Going into the final game, Sebastian Predescu (thanks to Feoktistov's forfeit) was tied for first with Gregory Huber. David Filipovich was one point back, and so needed to win with Black against Huber to force a 3 player second round of playoffs. Unfortunately for David, and fortunately for the exhausted organizers and directors, David lost and Greg Huber received the FM title with 3.5/4 in the round-robin.

Some historical notes:

The first tournament in 1872 was never completed, as the players were more interested in the concurrent (Ontario) Exhibition.

2004 Championship has the largest number of players, 69, breaking the old record of 36 (2002).

2004 Championship is the first Canadian Championship to have female players - four! All qualified by the same rules as were established for the male competitors (CFC rating, FIDE rating, Provincial nomination).

A record was set for the longest time between appearances in a Canadian Championship: FM John MacPhail, 32 years from 1972 - 2004.

The record for appearances in the Championship in consecutive decades is held by GM Daniel Abraham Yanofsky, who appeared in each of six consecutive decades from 1937 - 1986. IM Lawrence Day becomes the first player to appear in the Championship in each of the most recent five consecutive decades: 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s. Only three other players can match his achievement: FM Denis Allan, IM LeonPiasetski and IM Zvonko Vranesic.

GM Yanofsky and Maurice Fox each finished first in our Championship eight times. GM Kevin Spraggett, top ranked in this Championship, has finished first seven times.

The following game, chosen by me and approved by our selection committee, won the Brilliancy Prize of $250, donated by a spectator in memory of Bryon Nickoloff.

FM Goran Milicevic - IM Mark Bluvshtein
77th Canadian Championship, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 7.5, 2004.08.26

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Bc4 Nc6 4. c3 Nf6 5. Qe2 e6 6. Bb3 Be7 7. d4 cxd4 8. cxd4 d5 9. e5 Ne4 10. O-O O-O 11. Nbd2 Nxd2 12. Bxd2 Bd7 13. Bc2 b5 14. Qd3 g6 15. Qe3 f6 16. Rac1 fxe5 17. Nxe5 Nxe5 18. dxe5 Qb6 19. Qg3 Rf7 20. Bh6 Kh8 21. Bd3 b4 22. Qh3 Kg8 23. Qg3 Bf8 24. Be3 Qa5 25. h4 Bg7 26. h5 gxh5 27. Qg5 d4 28. Bxd4 Qd5 29. Rfd1 Rc8 30. Rxc8+ Bxc8 31. Qxh5 Bb7 32. Bxh7+ Kf8 33. Bc5+ Qxc5 34. Rd8+ Ke7 35. Qg5+ 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 6, No. 1, 2004.09.15

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 188, 2004.10, p.25

***


Playing for a World Championship

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

In the fall of 2002, I entered the Internet Slow Time Control World Championship. Games were played at the rate of one hour/player, with a five second increment per move. The event was sponsored by the Internet Chess Club (ICC) and the Free Internet Chess Server (FICS). Players from anywhere in the world could enter the tournament. Thanks to FICS, which has no fees, it was free.

Each server ran one division, with the two division winners to meet in a Championship match. The top four from each server would meet in division playoffs. I immediately set to work gathering information on my opponents. On FICS, where I played, each player's 10 most recent games were preserved for all to see. I downloaded all of my prospective opponents' games, and reviewed them for choice of openings and style of play (open vs. closed, attacking vs. positional). At the same time, I engaged in disinformation - I filled my game history with blitz games where I deliberately played openings that I would never play in regular tournament games.

My first game was the Black side of the Sicilian Grand Prix Attack, against a player of roughly my strength. The position became blocked, and although I dropped a pawn, it was eventually drawn by the 50 move rule. My second game was an easy romp with White over a much lower rated player. I won a pawn, then won a piece, then simply traded off my opponent's remaining pieces.

In the third round, I was White in a Sicilian Lasker-Pelikan. After winning a pawn from my opponent's king shelter, I let down my guard and allowed my opponent a strong initiative. He then went from a completely won rook and pawn endgame to a drawn one to a lost one. I played a tactic that promoted a pawn with the help of a rook sacrifice. In the position, I had P/d6 guarded by R/c6. Instead of covering his back rank with ... Rh8, Black played ... Rh6. After d6-d7, Black could no longer cover his back rank, because of Rc8, defending the pawn's promotion square. In the pawnless final position, his rook became separated from his king, and was lost to a double attack by my queen.

In the fourth round, I was on the Black side of a Closed Sicilian. Right out of the opening, I missed winning a pawn through the chance to take advantage of an overworked defender. With P/d3 guarding P/e4 and B/c4, I could win the pawn with ... Nxe4, and after dxe4 recover the piece by capturing the loose B/c4. After I missed this chance, White gained the initiative, only to drop a piece on a mouseslip (a pawn advanced instead of re-capturing a piece).

With two rounds to go, I faced the tournament leader, FM Ryan Harper, who had a perfect score. When playing on the internet, one uses a handle (nickname). So, no one knows the identity of their opponent. But game dates and times are established by e-mail between the players (there is a one week window). My opponent's e-mails revealed his name, so I looked him up in my database. I found some of his games from a master round robin. I noticed that he enjoyed an attacking style, and favoured the Sicilian Dragon. I wanted to quiet things down, so I chose the White side of the Sicilian Closed. Sure enough, Black fianchettoed his dark-squared bishop. To my chagrin, the position got very lively, very quickly. I won a centre pawn. My opponent counter-attacked with his queen, making a double attack on my loose pieces. He recovered his pawn, but it was my P/b2 which fell - the one a queen is never supposed to take. He avoided getting his queen trapped, then my pieces chased his queen back home. I knew I held a positional advantage that was due to my lead in development and my actively placed pieces. However, each of us was content to draw: Harper, because he qualified for the playoffs; me, because I was placed in a good position to qualify. My opponent offered me a draw, and, not wishing to blunder after the early struggle had worn me down, I accepted. However, I still needed to win my last round game to guarantee my qualification to the playoffs.

David Cohen - FM Ryan Harper
2002 Internet Slow Time Control World Championship, Round 5

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. Nf3 g6 4. Bb5 Nd4 5. O-O Bg7 6. d3 e6 7. Bc4 Ne7 8. Bg5 O-O 9. Nxd4 cxd4 10. Nb5 h6 11. Bh4 d5 12. Bxe7 Qxe7 13. exd5 exd5 14. Bxd5 Qb4 15. a4 a6 16. Na3 Qxb2 17. Nc4 Qb4 18. Rb1 Qe7 1/2-1/2

My sixth and final round game was an anti-climactic 11 moves. Weakly playing the White side of a Sicilian Richter-Rauzer, my opponent forgot to play the safe Kg1-h1 prior to launching his attack with f2-f4. With the retreat of the B/g5 blocked, my ... Qb6 pinned and won N/d4 along the g1-b6 diagonal. So, I won the FICS division (=1st with FM Ryan Harper) with an undefeated 5/6 (+4 =2) and happily qualified for the playoffs.

My 2002 Internet Slow Time Control World Championship playoff - FICS division semi-final was a two game match. My first game yielded another opening blunder by an opponent: Black didn't make a hole on a7 for his B/b6, and lost it when my Q-side Ps advanced.

Knowing that I would face the Colle Opening in the second game, I chanced upon Koltanowski's classic book on this opening. Devouring it, I felt much better prepared. However, upon reflection, I realized that I could summarize all of what Kolty had said with 'get your pieces out and place them where they'll do some good.' Needing a win in the second game, my opponent dropped his queen to a skewer in a drawn ending. This set up a rematch with FM Ryan Harper for the FICS division title.

This time, I felt ready to take up the challenge of the Sicilian Dragon Yugoslav Attack. Once again, I undertook a rare event for me, the study of an opening. After my initial preparation, I recalled that I had once had some fun with a game based on Brian Hartman's article in En Passant. Recalling the name of my opponent, from my personal database I fixed the date of the game as 1987, and soon located the article (which I knew had been published just prior to my game) in En Passant 83, 1987.02, p. 43-4: 'Recipe for Georgiev Dragon'. My opponent of the day avoided the Georgiev Variation discussed by Hartman (after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. f3 Nc6 8. Qd2 O-O 9. Bc4 Bd7 10. O-O-O Rc8 11. Bb3 Ne5 12. h4 h5 13. Bg5 Rc5 14. g4 hxg4 15. f4 Nc4 16. Qe2 b5 17. f5, then Kiril Georgiev's move 17... gxf5). Searching in my database of master games, I quickly discovered that it was not played anymore. Roger Patterson's suggestion (after 18. Bxf6 Bxf6 19. exf5 Rxf5, then 20. Rhg1) had been improved upon by a line with a surprising queen sacrifice leading to an interesting mate (20. Qxg4+ Rg5 21. hxg5 Bxg4 22. gxf6 Bxd1 ? 23. Nc6 Qb6 24. Nxe7# 1-0).

In our first game, I never got my attack going, my opponent missed some good chances to win during his counter-attack, and I made the last mistake. For the second game, I wanted to know how the Yugoslav Attack should be conducted, and played the Dragon as Black! I played one of my best games ever, and certainly my best against a master. Strangely enough, the game started out as usual: I messed up the counter-attack, and proceeded to drop the exchange. But my opponent was in a hurry, and assumed that the game was easily won. My tactics caught him off-guard, as did my consolidating follow-up, which denied him the chance for an attack on my king.

FM Ryan Harper - David Cohen
2002 Internet Slow Time Control World Championship playoff, Division Final, Round 2

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 g6 6. Be3 Bg7 7. f3 O-O 8. Qd2 Nc6 9. Bc4 Bd7 10. O-O-O Rc8 11. Bb3 Ne5 12. h4 h5 13. Bg5 Rc5 14. Kb1 Qa5 15. Bxf6 Bxf6 16. Nd5 Rxd5 17. Bxd5 Qb6 18. g4 Nxf3 19. Qd3 Bxg4 20. c3 Nxd4 21. cxd4 Bxd1 22. Rxd1 Kg7 23. e5 dxe5 24. dxe5 Bxe5 25. Bb3 Qf2 26. Bc2 Qxh4 27. Rg1 Qf6 28. Rf1 Qb6 29. b3 Bf6 30. Rf4 0-1

In the third game, the tie-breaker, I played the Black side of the Dragon again. I improved upon my second game's opening moves. However, I took too much time away from my counter-attack, yet did not deal effectively with my opponent's attack. And so ended my chance for a World Chess Championship.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 21, 2004.07.15; No. 22, 2004.08.15

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Todd Southam Memorial Tournament

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen
Tournament Organizer

The Todd Southam Memorial was held in Toronto in memory of the former Canadian Junior Champion (1969-1996). The Active team Scheveningen had a team of masters, including three former Canadian junior champions, facing off against a team of top Canadian juniors, led by the current junior champion, Zhe Quan. Some notable results: FMs Quan and Krnan each scored 5.5/6 for the juniors; and there was not one draw in the first five rounds!

Organizer: David Cohen
Tournament Director: Vladimir Dobrich
Sponsors: Chess Federation of Canada, Greater Toronto Chess League

Todd Southam Memorial
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
2004.06.13
Active (Game/30) Team Scheveningen

1 2 3 4 5 6 T

Masters

1 Allan, Denis CAN FM +7 +12 -11 +10 -9 =8 3.5
2 Bailey, Doug CAN +8 -7 -12 -11 +10 =9 2.5
3 Day, Lawrence CAN IM -9 +8 +7 -12 -11 +10 3.0
4 Krupnov, Maxim RUS +10 -9 -8 +7 +12 =11 3.5
5 Miller, Evgeni CAN -11 +10 -9 +8 +7 +12 4.0
6 Puri, Vinod CAN FM -0 -11 +10 -9 +8 =7 2.5
13 Henry, Liam CAN -12 -0 -0 -0 -0 -0 0.0

TOTAL: 19

Juniors

7 Peng, David CAN -1 +2 -3 -4 -5 =6 1.5
8 Thavandiran, Shiyam CAN -2 -3 +4 -5 -6 =1 1.5
9 Krnan, Tomas CAN FM +3 +4 +5 +6 +1 =2 5.5
10 Smith, Hazel CAN WFM -4 -5 -6 -1 -2 -3 0.0
11 Quan, Zhe CAN FM +5 +6 +1 +2 +3 =4 5.5
12 Noritsyn, Nikolay CAN +13 -1 +2 +3 -4 -5 3.0

TOTAL: 17

Nikolay Noritsyn - Evgeni Miller
2004 Todd Southam Memorial Active, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 6

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. Nf3 Bg4 7. cxd5 Nxd5 8. Bb5 e6 9. O-O Be7 10. h3 Bh5 11. g4 Bg6 12. Ne5 Rc8 13. Qa4 Kf8 14. Nxd5 Qxd5 15. Be3 Nxe5 16. dxe5 Qf3 17. Rfc1 Ra8 18. Qf4 Qxh3 19. Rc7 h5 20. g5 Qg4+ 21. Qxg4 hxg4 22. Bf1 Bd8 23. Rd7 Be4 24. Bg2 Bxg2 25. Kxg2 Rh5 26. Kg3 Bxg5 27. Kxg4 Bxe3 28. Kxh5 Bf4 29. Rad1 Bxe5 30. Rxb7 a5 31. Rdd7 Kg8 32. Rxf7 Rd8 33. Kg6 Rd1 34. Rfd7 Rg1+ 35. Kh5 Bf6 36. Rb5 a4 37. Rd3 g6+ 38. Kh6 Bg7# 0-1

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 20, 2004.06.15

Chess Express No. 70, 2004.06.16

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 187, 2004.08, p.22-3

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Roman Pelts' Most Important Game

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

Roman Pelts' most important game was on Board 1 for the Gold Medal winning USSR at the 1964 Student Team Championship against William Lombardy of their political rivals, the USA. In trying to track down this game, I first consulted the chess column in the Montreal Gazette. Here, Dudley LeDain gave only a victory in another game by Lombardy. In reporting the names of the winning team members, he listed 'Pelch'. Again, in the British magazine 'Chess', Board 1 was 'Pelch'. When I visited Roman at his home, I was able to figure out what had happened. One of his awards had his name spelled in English as 'Pelc'. The accent on the letter 'c' is supposed to translate as 'ts'. However, the English spreaking press of the day mis-translated it as 'ch'.

The game was first reported in North America by Roman himself in an article he wrote for the Quebec magazine 'Echecs+'. From memory, he gave the first 12 moves. Pelts then gave a variation that showed why Lombardy had made an incorrect sacrifice. By ignoring Pelts' specific move (a different knight move was normal in the position, rather than the retreat to e1), Lombardy had overlooked that White could bring up an extra defender for P/e3. This variation then went into the databases around the world - but it's not what actually happened!

Lombardy realized his mistake, and the game continued, very much in Pelts' favour. Finally, on move 40, Pelts made a very nice combination. In the final position,White can take the Black N/g7 with impunity; if Black recaptures, the P/d6 will stroll in for a promotion. Meanwhile, the Black N/e3 can collect a free piece with check, but can never return home to catch the strolling pawn. Thanks to Adam Umiastowski, who maintains a database of Polish games, for providing the game score.

Roman Pelts - William Lombardy USSR - USA, Board 1, World Student Team Championship, Krakow, Poland, Round 10, 1964.08.01

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. O-O d6 6. c4 Nbd7 7. Qc2 e5 8. Rd1 Re8 9. Nc3 e4 10. Ne1 e3 11. Bxe3 Rxe3 12. fxe3 Ng4 {13.Qd3 Bh6 14.Nc2} 13. Qe4 Nb6 14. h3 Nf6 15. Qd3 Qe7 16. Nc2 Be6 17. b3 c6 18. e4 Nh5 19. Kh2 c5 20. e3 Qg5 21. Ne2 Rc8 22. Rf1 Nd7 23. Rf3 b5 24. Nf4 bxc4 25. bxc4 Nb6 26. Nxe6 fxe6 27. h4 Qe7 28. Bh3 Rf8 29. Rxf8+ Bxf8 30. Rf1 Ng7 31. Ne1 Qe8 32. d5 e5 33. Qb3 Be7 34. Nf3 h6 35. a4 Qxa4 36. Qxa4 Nxa4 37. Ra1 Nb2 38. Rxa7 Kf7 39. Bf1 Nd1 40. Nxe5+ dxe5 41. d6 Nxe3 42. Rxe7+ 1-0

In going through 'Chess' magazine, I came across an interesting story. The following was an adjourned position in a game from the Subsidiary Group.

White, to move: K/h3; R/c1,d2; P/c2,f4,g3,h2.
Black: K/g6; R/c3,c5; P/f7,h6.

The players discussed the position and, concluding that White could not make progress, agreed to a draw. But Black had been swindled! The sealed move allowed a simple mate in 2 moves: 44. Kh4 {sealed} {44... Rh5+ 45. Kg4 f5#} 1/2-1/2. The lost half-point cost Great Britain a tie for first-place, as they finished 0.5 points back of Romania.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 19, 2004.06.01

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2nd Toronto Hospital For Sick Children Foundation Fundraiser 2004

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen
Benefit Organizer

On 2004.05.09, Canadian Junior Champion FM Zhe Quan scored a perfect +13 in a 12 board (one replacement) simultaneous exhibition at Tartu College. The event raised $130 for The Hospital for Sick Children Foundation. Thanks to Zhe who donated his time; GTCL for donating the playing site; Brampton CC for donating the use of its chess boards and sets; and all those who gave prizes for the kids, including Lawrence Day, Fred Henderson, Corinna Wan & Seneca Hill Chess Team.

Two of the games featured queen sacrifices by Zhe.

Here's a nice combination he played:

White: Kg1; Qg5; Rd1,f1; Be5; Pa4,b3,c4,f2,g2,h2.
Black: Kc8; Qd3; Rd8,h7; Bd6; Pa7,b7,c7,e6,f7.

1... Bxe5 2. Qxe5 (2. Rxd3 Bxh2+ 3. Kh1 Bf4+ 4. Kg1 Bxg5) 2... Qxd1 {3. Rxd1 Rxd1+ 4. Qe1 Rxe1#} 0-1

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 18, 2004.05.15

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 187, 2004.08, p.39

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Canadians from Hungary

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

One of the nice things about hosting a web site on Canadian Chess history is that people will contact me out of the blue with contributions or questions. György Négyesi, a chess historian from Hungary, contacted me with an inquiry about Laszlo Witt. It occurred to me that we could exchange information, and he was kind enough to locate and send me games and information about players who had emigrated to Canada from Hungary.

http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html#FUSTER

Geza Fuster
(1910-90)

Here is a game Fuster played in the 1941 Hungarian Championship. I believe it's not available in the popular databases, but even if it is, I hope you take the time to play through it. Geza gives a lesson in tactics: a desperado on move 18; and a sacrifice to set up a skewer that ends the game.

Sandor Rog - Geza Fuster
Hungarian Championship, Budapest, Hungary, 1941

1. Nf3 Nf6 2. d4 d5 3. c4 c6 4. e3 e6 5. Nc3 Nbd7 6. Qc2 Bd6 7. Bd3 O-O 8. O-O Qe7 9. Bd2 dxc4 10. Bxc4 e5 11. Ne4 Nxe4 12. Qxe4 Nf6 13. Qh4 e4 14. Ne5 Be6 15. Bxe6 Qxe6 16. Bc3 Nd5 17. Qh3 Bxe5 18. Qxe6 Bxh2+ 19. Kxh2 fxe6 20. Kg1 Rf5 21. Rfc1 Raf8 22. Rc2 R8f6 23. Be1 Rh5 24. a3 Rfh6 25. Kf1 Rh1+ 26. Ke2 R6h2 27. g3 Rg1 28. Kd1 Rxe1+ 0-1

Joseph Ferencz
(1910-2003)

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, Joseph Ferencz was one of the top players in Montreal, regularly contesting the city championship. However, his employer offered him a choice of locations: Montreal or Toronto. He chose Toronto because the outdoor tennis season was longer!

Mr. Ferencz was still active in his 90s, playing - and winning - in the 2000 Toronto International. He was full of stories, and his mind was incredibly alert. Shortly before one of the rounds, I presented him with a printed copy of some games he played that I had found in Hugh Brodie's games database. He thanked me and tucked them into his briefcase, probably without realizing what they were. A few minutes later, as I was chatting away with another player, there was a tapping on my shoulder. I turned around and discovered that it was Mr. Ferencz. He had taken out his huge magnifying glass for reading, had looked over the pages I had presented to him, and was now proceeding to explain to me EXACTLY how he could have won the first game on the page - a game he had played 45 years earlier!!

Thanks to Andrew McMillan for locating the following game in the Montreal Gazette.

Petar Trifunovic - Joseph Ferencz
Simultaneous Exhibition by GM Trifunovic, Montreal, Quebec, 1963

1. e4 d6 2. d4 Nf6 3. Nc3 g6 4. Nf3 Bg7 5. Be2 O-O 6. O-O c6 7. Bg5 h6 8. Be3 a6 9. Qd2 Ng4 10. Bf4 g5 11. Bg3 b5 12. a3 Nf6 13. Ne1 Be6 14. f4 g4 15. f5 Bc4 16. Nd3 Nbd7 17. b3 Bxd3 18. Bxd3 Nh7 19. Ne2 c5 20. c3 Qb6 21. Bf2 Qb7 22. Be3 h5 23. Bh6 Rfd8 24. Bxg7 Kxg7 25. Ng3 h4 26. Nh5+ Kh8 27. Qh6 Rg8 28. e5 h3 29. Rf2 dxe5 30. Re1 f6 31. Be4 Qa7 32. Bxa8 Qxa8 33. dxe5 Nxe5 34. Nf4 g3 35. hxg3 Rxg3 36. Rxe5 fxe5 37. Ng6+ Kg8 38. Nxe7+ Kh8 39. Ng6+ 1/2-1/2

Laszlo (Leslie) Witt

These days you'll more likely find IM Witt playing backgammon than chess. Here's a battle, recorded in the tournament book edited by Ron F. Rodgers, from the 1962 Canadian Open Championship which Witt won by accomplishing the rare feat of a perfect score.

George Danilov - Laszlo Witt
4th Canadian Open Championship, Ottawa, Ontario, Round 1, 1962.08.26

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. Nc3 a6 4. g3 Nc6 5. Bg2 Nf6 6. O-O Bg4 7. h3 Bd7 8. d3 g6 9. Be3 Bg7 10. Qd2 h6 11. Kh2 g5 12. Ng1 e5 13. f4 exf4 14. gxf4 g4 15. Rae1 gxh3 16. Bf3 Ng4+ 17. Bxg4 Bxg4 18. Bf2 Qa5 19. Bh4 Kd7 20. Nf3 Rae8 21. Nd5 Qxd2+ 22. Nxd2 b5 23. Nf6+ Bxf6 24. Bxf6 Rhg8 25. c3 Rg6 26. Bh4 f5 27. Rg1 Reg8 28. Rg3 Rf8 29. Reg1 h5 30. Rf1 Re6 31. Re1 fxe4 32. Nxe4 Rxf4 33. Rge3 Rf8 34. Ng5 Rxe3 35. Rxe3 Re8 36. Ne4 Re6 37. Nf6+ Rxf6 38. Bxf6 b4 39. d4 bxc3 40. bxc3 cxd4 41. cxd4 Be6 42. a3 a5 43. Rd3 Bf5 44. Re3 Be6 45. Kg3 a4 46. Rd3 Bf5 47. Rd2 Na5 48. Rf2 Be6 49. Rf3 Nc4 50. Bg5 Kc6 51. Bc1 Kd5 52. Rf4 Bg4 53. Kh2 Na5 54. Bb2 Nb3 55. Kg3 Nd2 56. Kh2 Kc4 57. Bc1 Nb3 58. Bb2 d5 59. Kg3 Nd2 60. Rf7 Kd3 61. Rf4 Nc4 62. Bc1 Kc2 63. Rf1 Kb3 64. Re1 Kc3 65. Re8 Kc2 66. Bg5 Nxa3 67. Re5 Nc4 68. Rxd5 a3 69. Rd8 a2 70. Ra8 Kb1 71. d5 a1(Q) 72. Rxa1+ Kxa1 73. Bf4 Kb2 74. d6 Kc3 75. Kh4 Kd4 76. Kg3 Ke4 77. Bc1 Nxd6 78. Bd2 Kd3 79. Ba5 Ke2 80. Bb6 Kf1 81. Kh2 Ne4 82. Bd8 Nd2 83. Be7 Nf3+ 84. Kh1 h2 0-1

Elod Macskasy
(1919-90)

Thanks to György Négyesi for locating the following game from the early part of Macskasy's chess career, in Hungary. Macskasy chases Black's pieces away from the defence of their king, then takes advantage of their absence with an offer of his queen on move 24 that must be refused, else it would be mate in 3.

Elod Macskasy - Lajos Szedlacsek
VIII Hungarian Championship prev., Budapest, Hungary, 1951

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Nf3 O-O 7. O-O c6 8. e4 Nb6 9. Na3 Bg4 10. Be3 e5 11. dxe5 N8d7 12. Qc2 Nxe5 13. Nxe5 Bxe5 14. h3 Be6 15. Rad1 Qc7 16. f4 Bd6 17. f5 Bxa2 18. Ra1 Bxa3 19. bxa3 Bc4 20. Rf2 Qe5 21. Rc1 Bb5 22. Bh6 Rfd8 23. Qb3 Rd3 24. fxg6 hxg6 (24... Rxb3 25. gxf7+ Kh8 26. f8=Q+ Rxf8 27. Rxf8#) 25. Qxf7+ Kh8 26. Rf4 g5 27. Rf6 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 15-18; 2004.04.01, 2004.04.15, 2004.05.01, 2004.05.15

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New Canadian Women's Champion

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

WFM Dinara Khaziyeva, 17, of Montreal is the new Canadian Women's Chess Champion. She scored 5/6 at the 11th Canadian and FIDE Zone 2.2 Women's Chess Championship 2004 held Easter Weekend in Toronto, topping a field of 15 which included top-ranked WIM Natalia Khoudgarian, who finished second, and 8-time champion WIM Nava Starr. WFM Khaziyeva will represent Canada at the next Women's World Championship, as well as the next Olympiad.

Natalia Khoudgarian, Canada's top-rated female player for most of the past 8 years, returned to action with the following game:

Natalia Khoudgarian - Anne-Marie Charbonneau
11th Canadian and FIDE Zone 2.2 Women's Championship, Toronto, Ontario, Round 1.1, 2004.04.09

1. e4 c5 2. c3 Nf6 3. e5 Nd5 4. Nf3 e6 5. Bc4 d6 6. d4 cxd4 7. cxd4 Nc6 8. O-O Be7 9. Re1 O-O 10. a3 b6 11. Nbd2 Bb7 12. Ne4 dxe5 13. dxe5 Nb8 14. Bg5 Bxg5 15. Nfxg5 Nf4 16. Qg4 Bxe4 17. Rxe4 Nd5 18. Nxe6 fxe6 19. Qxe6+ Kh8 20. Bxd5 Na6 21. Bxa8 Nc5 22. Qd5 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 16, 2004.04.15

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Canadian Chess Trivia

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

Question:
Can you name CFC (Life) Member number 1?

Answer:
Adrian Russell. He was the tournament director of the 1957 Canadian Championship.

--

Question:
Can you name the 3rd place finisher in both the 1976 Calgary and Alberta Junior Closed Championships?

Answer:
Sid Belzberg, co-sponsor of the 2004 Canadian Championship

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Scarborough-born Joel Lautier, winner of the 1988 World Junior Championship, says he never received this, but never expected to, as he represented France:

"ATTENTION JUNIORS! A reward of $1,000 (cash) will be offered to the first Canadian to win the JUNIOR WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, starting with the coming competition (1975). This prize is guaranteed by A. Langlois, Director of the Alekhine Chess Club of Montreal."

- Bulletin 11, 1975.07-08, p.15

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A Member of Parliament once played in the Canadian Chess Championship! George Casey, MP for West Elgin, did not fare well overall, scoring only 1 win in the 10 player Round Robin, held in Ottawa in 1881. However, his only victory was an upset against the Ontario Champion Ludolph Schull, and caused the latter to finish 1 point back from the tournament's winner, Joseph Shaw.

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The Ontario Chess Association was founded in 1879! The first meeting was held in Guelph on Dec. 12. 9 players entered the first Ontario Championship, won in 1880 by Mr. W.M. Stark.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 11-12, 14-15; 2004.02.01, 2004.02.15, 2004.03.15, 2004.04.01

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 187, 2004.08, p.37

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How Lawrence Day Beat Himself

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

When I mention a chess player beating himself, I probably conjure up an image of Geri, the lonely geriatric chess player in the park, from the Academy Award winning animated short film from Pixar, "Geri's Game". Geri ran around the board making the moves of both players. But no, this is the mystery of the Canadian Team at the 1974 Nice Olympiad.

My researches into Canadian chess history started simply enough. I wished to compile a listing of our Olympiad results, including individual scores. The 1974 Olympiad was the last before Canadian International Arbiter Phil Haley introduced the Swiss pairing system at the 1976 Haifa Olympiad. Back in 1974, a system of round robins was still in use. In the preliminary, Canada placed =3rd and was relegated to the Group 'B' finals with 15 other teams. Here my (chess history) troubles began.

When I totalled up the players' scores from the database of Canadian Olympiad games on Hugh Brodie's Montreal Chess web site, I was 0.5 points short. Chess Canada 1975.07-08, p.44, provided the explanation: Canada's result against the other team from its preliminary group, Denmark, was carried over. Canada scored 0.5 points against Denmark. So, Canada scored 30.5 points against the remaining 14 teams in the Group 'B' finals, for a total of 31 points and an 8th place finish (24th overall).

But now comes the real mystery. In his Toronto Star column of 2004.01.31, IM Lawrence Day stated that Day - Asmundsson, Canada - Iceland, 1-0 is the correct colours. He expressed his frustration that databases around the world contained the game with the colours reversed, giving it as Asmundsson - Day, 1-0. I consulted the Canadian DB, and, sure enough, the DB had the wrong colours. But when I reverse the colours, then Canada should score one more point! What happened?

I investigated the players' colours. With 14 teams to play, Canada would have had 7 Whites and 7 Blacks. Checking in the DB for the colours on Board 1 in each match revealed 7 Whites and 6 Blacks in the 13 other matches. So, Canada played Black against Iceland. This meant that Canada was Black on Board 1, and alternated colours on succeeding boards.

Board 1 was a draw:

Fridrik Olafsson - Duncan Suttles
Iceland - Canada, Olympiad Finals Group B, Round 2, Nice 1974

1.d4 d6 2.e4 g6 3.Nf3 Bg7 4.h3 Nf6 5.Nc3 0-0 6.Bg5 c5 7.dxc5 Qa5 8.Bd3 Qxc5 9.0-0 Nc6 10.a3 Be6 11.Qd2 Rfc8 12.Rfe1 Qa5 13.Bh6 Ne5 14.Nxe5 Bxh6 15.Qxh6 Qxe5 1/2-1/2

The next two players in board order, Peter Biyiasas and D. Abraham Yanofsky, did not play this round.

Board 2 saw a game (published in Chess Canada 1975.07-08, p.45-7, with annotations by Kuprejanov) that was in the winner's words "extremely tense and nervous":

George Kuprejanov - Gudmundur Sigurjonsson
Canada - Iceland, Olympiad Finals Group B, Round 2, Nice 1974

1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bb5+ Nc6 4.0-0 Bg4 5.h3 Bh5 6.c3 a6 7.Bxc6+ bxc6 8.d4 cxd4 9.cxd4 e6 10.Nc3 Be7 11.Qa4 Qd7 12.Nh2 d5 13.Be3 Bd8 14.e5 Ne7 15.Qa3 0-0 16.g4 Bg6 17.Na4 a5 18.Rfc1 Rb8 19.Qc3 h5 20.b3 Rb5 21.Nc5 Qa7 22.Rf1 Bb6 23.Na4 Bc7 24.Rac1 Rb4 25.Rfd1 Bb8 26.Nf3 hxg4 27.hxg4 Qc7 28.Ng5 Ba7 29.f3 Qc8 30.Nc5 Rb5 31.a4 Rb4 32.Nd3 Rb7 33.Nf4 Qb8 34.Nxg6 Nxg6 35.Rd3 Qd8 36.f4 Rb4 37.Kg2 c5 38.Qe1 cxd4 39.Qh1 Re8 40.Bd2 Rb7 41.Qh7+ Kf8 42.Rc6 Qb8 43.Nxe6+ Rxe6 44.Rxe6 Rxb3 45.Rxg6 fxg6 46.Qh8+ Kf7 47.e6+ Kxe6 48.Qxg7 Rb2 49.Qxg6+ Kd7 50.Qf7+ Kc6 51.Qe6+ Kc5 52.Qe7+ Kc4 53.Qe2 Kc5 54.g5 Qxf4 55.Bxf4 Rxe2+ 56.Kf3 Re8 57.Rd1 Kc4 58.Rc1+ Kd3 59.Rb1 Bc5 60.Rd1+ Kc3 61.Rc1+ Kb4 62.Bd2+ Kxa4 63.Rxc5 Kb3 64.Bxa5 1-0

In the normal course of events, Canada would play Black on Board 3. But Lawrence has the original scoresheet to prove that he played White! I believe Lawrence played the wrong colour on his board. Piasetski, sitting next to him, probably alternated his colour from Lawrence's, and thus played the wrong colour as well. Technically, this was possible if the players at Boards 3 and 4 were seated apart from the top two boards. (It was also possible if Canada's players on Boards 3 and 4 switched with each other.) However the switch happened, it was the responsibility of the two team captains.

My theory on how the switch happened must be placed into the context of the tournament. First, all reports I've read suggest that the organization of the tournament was chaotic. Round bulletins (and, I understand, the subsequent book based on them) were incomplete or full of errors. Second, Canada did not have a team captain!

Here is the Board 3 game, which followed Lawrence's home preparation:

Lawrence Day - Ingvar Asmundsson
Canada - Iceland, Olympiad Finals Group B, Round 2, Nice 1974

1.e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.Ngf3 b6 5.Be2 Bb7 6.e5 Nfd7 7.0-0 Be7 8.Re1 Nc6 9.Bf1 g5 10.h3 h5 11.g4 hxg4 12.hxg4 Nf8 13.Bg2 Ng6 14.Nf1 Nf4 15.d4 Kd7 16.Bxf4 gxf4 17.Qd2 Bg5 18.c4 Na5 19.b3 Qg8 20.c5 Ba6 21.N1h2 Qg6 22.Rac1 Rac8 23.Qb4 Bd3 24.Qc3 Ba6 25.c6+ Ke7 26.b4 Rxh2 27.Kxh2 Rh8+ 28.Kg1 Nc4 29.b5 Bc8 30.Qc2 Qg7 31.Kf1 Bh4 32.Nxh4 Rxh4 33.Bf3 Rh3 34.Kg2 Rh4 35.Qe2 f6 36.exf6+ Qxf6 37.Rh1 Rxh1 38.Rxh1 Qxd4 39.Rd1 Qe5 40.Qxe5 Nxe5 41.Rh1 Ng6 42.g5 a6 43.Rh6 Nf8 44.a4 axb5 45.axb5 d4 46.Bg4 Kf7 47.Rf6+ Kg7 48.Bh5 e5 49.Rf7+ Kg8 50.Rxc7 Be6 51.Re7 Bd5+ 52.Bf3 Be6 53.Rxe6 Nxe6 54.Bd5 Kf7 55.c7 1-0

And now the real troubles started. Lawrence reported the results of the game as it was PLAYED - but the organizers must have recorded the result as it was ASSIGNED. So, Canada - supposed to be playing Black - lost the game on Board 3. Lawrence had beaten himself!

Board 4 was a draw:

Bjorgvin Viglundsson - Leon Piasetski
Iceland - Canada, Olympiad Finals Group B, Round 2, Nice 1974

1.e4 e6 2.d3 d5 3.Nd2 Nf6 4.Ngf3 Nc6 5.g3 dxe4 6.dxe4 e5 7.Bg2 Bc5 8.0-0 0-0 9.c3 a5 10.Qa4 Bd7 11.Qc2 Re8 12.h3 b5 13.Kh2 a4 14.Rb1 Ra6 15.b4 axb3 16.axb3 Qa8 17.b4 Bb6 18.Qd3 Ra1 19.c4 1/2-1/2

Because the point was split, the colour switch had no effect here.

Now we can see how Lawrence's game came to enter the databases with the colours reversed. Going by board order, the assigned colours and game results, editors - without accurate round bulletins to refer to - concluded that Lawrence must have played Black on Board 3 and lost the game. Strangely enough, the database of games from France has Canada playing Black in three of the four games! Lawrence's game is reversed, in order to match the posted result, while Piasetski's game is recorded with him also playing Black. The Canadian database maintains the 2 Whites to 2 Blacks ratio by also reversing the colours on the Board 4 game, thereby showing Piasetski as playing White.

In conclusion, Canada should have scored one more point and finished =5th in Group 'B' (21st overall). Finally, I have also answered the question: if you beat yourself, is the game scored a win or a loss? In Lawrence's case, it was scored a loss, but he had other matters to attend to - he was on his honeymoon.

--

References:

Lawrence Day, chess column in Toronto Star 2004.01.31 and personal correspondence

Chess Canada 1975.07-08, Volume 5 published by Vladimir Dobrich, edited by Robert Rubenstein

Hugh Brodie's Montreal Chess web site and Canadian games DataBase:
http://hugh.cc.mcgill.ca/

Eric Delaire's DataBase of games from France:
http://perso.wanadoo.fr/eric.delaire/Parties/Bases/Base.htm

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 14, 2004.03.15

'OlimpBase: The History of the Chess Olympiads' web site, 2005.07.13
http://www.olimpbase.org/

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CFC Annual Meeting at City Hall Council Chambers

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

No, I'm not talking about 2004 or the excellent time the CFC Governors had in 2003 in Kapuskasing. I'm talking about when the tradition started - in 1872!

The first meeting of the Canadian Chess Association (now the CFC) took place in the Council Chambers of the City Hall at Hamilton, Ontario on September 24,1872.

According to the report in the next day's Hamilton Spectator, there were 28 chess players at the first meeting of the CCA: James Taylor, Wm. D. Balfour, James M. Russell, R.H. Ramsay, S.J. Ramsay, F.T. Jones, P. St. Clair McGregor, John Henderson, John White, George Jackson, J.B. Salter, D.J. Wallace, Alex W. Roy, Robert S. Burns, W.S. Taylor (Chair of the meeting), F.C.N. Robertson, John Young, A. Wolverton, Isaac Ryall, Thomas Burns, James G. Davis, T.C. Mewburn, J. Beld, W.H. Stotesbury, W.H. Judd, W.F. Mackay, William Marshall, C.P. Mason.

A constitution was adopted, and the following officers were elected. President: Professor John B. Cherriman (Toronto, Ontario); Vice-Presidents: Professor Henry A. Howe (Montreal, Quebec), Professor James DeMille (Halifax, Nova Scotia); Dr. Allen M. King (Saint John, New Brunswick); Secretary: Dr. Isaac Ryall (Hamilton, Ontario).

16 players registered to play in a tournament. However, many found their time taken up with conducting business at the concurrent provincial Exposition, and so were too busy to complete a formal tournament. Instead, "several of the members engaged in contests, and some very fine games were played".

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 13, 2004.03.01

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2004 Canadian Chess Hall of Fame Inductee - Lynn Stringer

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

The Canadian Chess Hall of Fame was created in 2000 by David Cohen to recognize the accomplishments of members of our Canadian Chess community. Our inductee for 2004 is Lynn Stringer. She is best known for playing in the Canadian Women's Championships (1975, 1978, 1981); directing the 2002 Canadian Closed Championship; and organizing and directing the 1978 Canadian Women's Closed Championship and Canadian Cadet (Under-16) Championships (1985, 1991, 1997). In 2003, she was pleased to earn her International Arbiter title.

Here is Lynn Stringer's choice for her most memorable game, the only game her opponent lost while winning the event:

Lynn Stringer - Bob van Zweeden
Comox Valley Open, Courtenay, British Columbia, Round 2, 1982.02.06

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. Nf3 O-O 5. e4 d6 6. Bd3 Nc6 7. a3 Nd7 8. Bc2 e5 9. d5 Nd4 10. Nxd4 exd4 11. Ne2 Ne5 12. Nxd4 Nxc4 13. O-O Bd7 14. b3 Ne5 15. f4 Ng4 16. f5 Qf6 17. Bb2 Ne3 18. Qd3 Nxf1 19. Rxf1 c5 20. dxc6 bxc6 21. fxg6 Qxg6 22. Rf3 Qh6 23. Rg3 Kh8 24. Nf5 Bxf5 25. Bxg7+ Qxg7 26. Rxg7 Kxg7 27. exf5 Rad8 28. Qg3+ Kf6 29. h4 Rg8 30. Qc3+ Ke7 31. Qxc6 Rc8 32. Qe4+ Kd7 33. Bd3 Rc1+ 34. Kf2 Rgc8 35. Bb5+ Kc7 36. a4 Kb6 37. Qd4+ Kb7 38. Qd5+ Kc7 39. Qxf7+ Kb6 40. Qd5 R8c5 41. Qxd6+ Ka5 42. Qd2+ R1c3 43. g4 Kb4 44. Bc4 Re5 45. Qd6+ Rc5 46. f6 1–0

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Chess Canada Echecs, No. 185, 2004.02, p.16-17

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2003 Year-End Canadian Chess Rankings

Written and copyright 2004 by David Cohen

For a record 21st time, the number one ranked Canadian chess player at the year-end is Kevin Spraggett. 2003 is the second year in a row that GM Spraggett has held the year-end ranking as top Canadian; the 11th year out of the past 12 years; and the 21st year in the 24 years since his debut atop the year-end ranking list in 1980.

The number one ranked Canadian female chess player at the end of 2003 is Natalia Khoudgarian of Toronto, Ontario. This is the 8th year in a row that WIM Khoudgarian has held the year-end ranking as top female Canadian. Prior to her reign, WIM Nava Starr of Toronto, Ontario held the top spot at the year-end ranking of Canadian female chess players for 20 consecutive years, from 1976-95.

Top Rated Canadian at Year-end
(Year Name Rating)

2003 Kevin Spraggett 2624
2002 Kevin Spraggett 2629
2001 Alexandre Lesiège 2660
2000 Kevin Spraggett 2633
1999 Kevin Spraggett 2653
1998 Kevin Spraggett 2645
1997 Kevin Spraggett 2633
1996 Kevin Spraggett 2617
1995 Kevin Spraggett 2600
1994 Kevin Spraggett 2591
1993 Kevin Spraggett 2589
1992 Kevin Spraggett 2589
1991 Deen Hergott 2520
1990 Kevin Spraggett 2592
1989 Kevin Spraggett 2592
1988 Kevin Spraggett 2577
1987 Kevin Spraggett 2581
1986 Kevin Spraggett 2584
1985 Kevin Spraggett 2592
1984 Kevin Spraggett 2584
1983 Kevin Spraggett 2593
1982 Kevin Spraggett 2558
1981 Duncan Suttles 2550
1980 Kevin Spraggett 2503
1979 Lawrence Day 2400
1978 Peter Biyiasas 2450
1977 Duncan Suttles 2458
1976 Duncan Suttles 2458
1975 Duncan Suttles 2458
1974 Duncan Suttles 2492
1973 Duncan Suttles 2464

Top Rated Female Canadian at Year-end
(Year Name Rating)

2003 Natalia Khoudgarian 2304
2002 Natalia Khoudgarian 2304
2001 Natalia Khoudgarian 2304
2000 Natalia Khoudgarian 2304
1999 Natalia Khoudgarian 2304
1998 Natalia Khoudgarian 2304
1997 Natalia Khoudgarian 2299
1996 Natalia Khoudgarian 2251
1995 Nava Starr 2270
1994 Nava Starr 2248
1993 Nava Starr 2223
1992 Nava Starr 2223
1991 Nava Starr 2200
1990 Nava Starr 2193
1989 Nava Starr 2193
1988 Nava Shterenberg 2193
1987 Nava Shterenberg 2139
1986 Nava Shterenberg 2139
1985 Nava Shterenberg 2135
1984 Nava Shterenberg 2135
1983 Nava Shterenberg 2141
1982 Nava Shterenberg 2152
1981 Nava Shterenberg 2177
1980 Nava Shterenberg 2207
1979 Nava Shterenberg 2125
1978 Nava Shterenberg 1983
1977 Nava Shterenberg 2011
1976 Nava Shterenberg 2062
1975 Smilja Vujosevic 1683
1974 Smilja Vujosevic 1680
1973 Smilja Vujosevic 1680

Notes

Highest Canadian rating ever achieved by a Canadian: Kevin Spraggett, rated 2665 in 1999.

Highest Canadian rating ever achieved by a female Canadian: Natalia Khoudgarian, rated 2306 in 1998.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 9, 2004.01.01

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2003 Canadian Chess Player of the Year - Pascal Charbonneau

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen

Canada's chess journalists unanimously voted Pascal Charbonneau 2003 Canadian Chess Player of the Year. Charbonneau, 20, is the reigning Canadian Champion and will represent Canada at the next World Chess Championship. His tournament results in 2003 included completion of 2 of the 3 requirements for the Grandmaster title with a 5th place finish in the Montreal International tournament; and a 2nd place finish in the Pan-American Championship. His next tournament will match him with Former World Champion Anatoly Karpov, starting Dec. 13 in Lindsborg, Kansas, USA.

VOTING DETAILS

11 Canadian chess journalists were invited to vote for the 2003 Canadian Chess Player of the Year. 7 journalists responded, with 6 casting votes. Pascal Charbonneau received all 6 first place votes. Mark Bluvshtein received one second place vote. No other votes were cast.

WINNER'S BIOGRAPHY

Pascal Charbonneau

Age: 20
Occupation: studying Financial Economics at University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Sources:
http://www.ncf.carleton.ca/~bw998/canchess.html#CHARBONNEAU
Hugh Brodie
Pascal Charbonneau

Pascal Charbonneau's next tournament, starting Dec. 13, 2003:
http://www.lindsborg.org/chess_tournament.html

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 5, No. 8, 2003.12.15

Chess Canada Echecs, No. 184, 2004.02, p.7

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2003 Fedor Bohatirchuk Memorial

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen
Tournament Organizer

IM Ron Livshits won the Fedor Bohatirchuk Memorial, played Aug. 11–17 at the Bayview Games Club in Toronto as a 6-player round robin.

Prize winners:

1st place: IM Ron Livshits $400

2nd place: Yevhen Molchanov $200

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 4, No. 25, 2003.09.01

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2003 Povilas Vaitonis Memorial

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen
Tournament Organizer, Director

25 players gathered at the Bayview Games Club for a holiday Victoria Day weekend of chess in Toronto, May 17-19.

In Group 1, there was an exciting contest for first place, as Charlie Tang raced out in front by winning his first three games. He was then defeated by Christian Stevens, who knew that his only chance at first place lay in playing for the win with Black! But then in the last round, 13-year old Zhe Quan recovered from his first round loss to Charlie, and caught up to Christian by beating him in their last round match up. Thus, Charlie and Christian split the $150 prize, and each was awarded a 6 month membership by the tournament's sponsor, Bayview Games Club.

In Group 2, there was no contest: Steve Demmery scored a perfect 5-0!!!!!

Here is an interesting game from this section:

Alina Sviridovitch - Robert Sherman
Povilas Vaitonis Memorial, Section 2, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 5, 2003.05.19

1. d4 d5 2. c4 e6 3. Nc3 c5 4. cxd5 cxd4 5. Qa4+ Bd7 6. Qxd4 exd5 7. Qe5+ Be6 8. e4 Nc6 9. Bb5 d4 10. Nd5 Rc8 11. Bf4 Qa5+ 12. Bd2 Qd8 13. Bg5 Qa5+ 14. Kd1 a6 15. Bxc6+ bxc6 16. Nf6+ 1-0

In Group 3, an open Swiss put together at the last minute for those not playing in the Round Robins, an exciting competition developed for the two prizes: first overall, and under 1500. All of the top players in effect completed a round robin with each other, with Omid Nemati emerging the winner with 4/5. Needing a win with Black for a share of first, Richard Wing fell to Toronto Open co-champion Morgon Mills. Here is their game:

Morgon Mills - Richard Wing
Povilas Vaitonis Memorial, Section 3, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 5, 2003.05.19

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 exd4 4. Bc4 Nf6 5. O-O Bc5 6. e5 d5 7. exf6 dxc4 8. Re1+ Be6 9. fxg7 Rg8 10. Ng5 Qd5 11. Nc3 Qf5 12. g4 Qg6 13. Nce4 Bb6 14. Nxh7 Rxg7 15. Nhf6+ Kf8 16. h3 Ne7 17. Bg5 Ng8 18. Qf3 Nxf6 19. Bxf6 Rg8 20. Ng5 Bd7 21. h4 Bc6 22. Qa3+ {22... Bc5 23. Qxc5#} 1-0

For the Under 1500 prize, a 3-way tie resulted amongst Salvador Valenzuela, and juniors Brendan Fan and Alex Martchenko, with 3/5.

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 4, No. 19, 2003.06.01

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1st Toronto Hospital For Sick Children Foundation Fundraiser 2003

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen
Benefit Organizer

Kevork Hacat, National Master and 1998, 1999, and 2000 Ontario High School Champion, donated his time to give a simultaneous chess exhibition on 9 boards at the Bayview Games Club, Toronto, Ontario, Canada on Sunday, May 19 for the benefit of the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation. He scored +6 =1 -2. The only junior to defeat him, Daniel Abrahams, received a prize of a $25 gift certificate, donated by Chess Shop at 1685 Bayview Ave., Toronto. Christian Pierce was the other winner; Morgon Mills got the draw. The cost to play was $10; BGC reduced its usual daily membership fee from $5 to $3; so $7/player, for a total of $63, was raised for the Hospital. Thanks to Lawrence Day for helping to publicize the event in his Toronto Star chess column; and to those who played and had fun while helping out in a good cause.

Kevork Hacat - Salvador Valenzuela
Simultaneous exhibition by Kevork Hacat, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 2003.05.19

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. f4 e6 7. Qf3 Be7 8. g4 Qb6 9. Nb3 Nc6 10. Be3 Qc7 11. g5 Nd7 12. O-O-O b5 13. Qf2 b4 14. Na4 Rb8 15. h4 Na5 16. h5 Nxb3+ 17. axb3 Bb7 18. Bd3 Qa5 19. Nb6 Nc5 20. Bxc5 dxc5 21. Nc4 Qc7 22. Rhg1 Rd8 23. f5 e5 24. f6 gxf6 25. gxf6 Bf8 26. Qf5 Bh6+ 27. Kb1 Bf4 28. Qg4 Bc8 29. Qg7 Rf8 30. Qxh7 Be6 31. Rg8 Kd7 32. Rxf8 Rxf8 33. Qg7 Qb8 34. Be2+ Kc7 35. Qg1 Qa7 36. Bg4 Rg8 37. Bxe6 Rxg1 38. Rxg1 Qb8 39. Rg7 Qd8 40. Rxf7+ Kb8 41. Bd5 Qh8 42. Nb6 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 4, No. 19, 2003.06.01

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2003 John Morrison Memorial

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen
Tournament Organizer, Director

This tournament was held at the Bayview Games club on the holiday Easter weekend, April 18-20. It was structured as four 6-player round robin groups. Group 1 winner was Jura Ochkoos, Group 2 winner was Yuri Aronov. Group 3 winners were Michael Buscar, David Southam, and Shiyam Thavandiran. Group 4 winner was Steve Demmery.

Here is an interesting game:

Shiyam Thavandiran - Raja Panjwani
John Morrison Memorial, Section 3, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 2, 2003.04.18

1. e4 b6 2. d4 Bb7 3. Nc3 e6 4. Bd3 Nf6 5. Nge2 d5 6. e5 Nfd7 7. Nf4 a6 8. Nxe6 Qc8 9. Nf4 c6 10. e6 Nf6 11. Qe2 Be7 12. Bf5 Kf8 13. Bh3 g5 14. Nh5 Nxh5 15. Qxh5 fxe6 16. Bxg5 Rg8 17. Bh6+ 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 4, No. 17, 2003.05.01

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2003 Toronto Open Championship

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen
Tournament Organizer, Director

This tournament was held on the holiday Easter weekend, April 18-20, at the Bayview Games Club in Toronto.

Prize winners:

Co-Champions: Morgon Mills, Irakli Vadachkoriya

3rd place: Inigo Assaripallam, Fred Henderson, Ross Richardson

Top Under 1800: Martin Maister

Top Under 1600: Jonathan Tayar

Top Under 1500: Brendan Fan, Jonathan Hyman

Top Under 1400 + Unrated: Zak Hutsul

Here are three games:

Mike Beatty - Brendan Fan
Toronto Open Championship, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 2, 2003.04.18

1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nc3 Bb4 4. e5 Ne7 5. a3 Bxc3+ 6. bxc3 b6 7. Nf3 Ba6 8. Bxa6 Nxa6 9. Qd3 Nb8 10. O-O h6 11. a4 a5 12. Ba3 O-O 13. Nd2 Nd7 14. f4 Rc8 15. f5 exf5 16. Bxe7 Qxe7 17. Qxf5 Nb8 18. Rf3 Qe6 19. Qf4 c5 20. Raf1 cxd4 21. cxd4 Rxc2 22. Rg3 Kh8 23. Qh4 Nd7 24. Nf3 Kg8 25. Qh5 Rc6 26. Nh4 Kh7 27. Nf5 Rg8 28. Nd6 Rf8 29. Nxf7 Kg8 30. Rgf3 Qg6 31. Nxh6+ Qxh6 32. Rxf8+ Nxf8 33. Qf7+ Kh7 34. Qxf8 Rc4 35. Qf5+ Qg6 36. e6 Rxd4 37. Qh3+ Kg8 38. e7 Qe8 39. Qe6+ 1-0

Inigo Assaripallam - Martin Maister
Toronto Open Championship, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 4, 2003.04.19

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 c5 3. e3 cxd4 4. exd4 g6 5. Nc3 Bg7 6. Nf3 O-O 7. Be2 d5 8. O-O Nc6 9. Be3 h6 10. Rc1 a6 11. Re1 dxc4 12. Bxc4 b5 13. Bb3 Na5 14. Ne5 Nxb3 15. Qxb3 Be6 16. Qb4 Re8 17. h3 Nd5 18. Nxd5 Bxd5 19. b3 e6 20. Qd2 h5 21. Rc5 Bxe5 22. dxe5 Qd7 23. Bg5 Rac8 24. Bf6 Kh7 25. Rec1 Rxc5 26. Rxc5 Rc8 27. Qc3 Rc6 28. b4 Bc4 29. Qe3 Bxa2 30. Be7 Rxc5 31. Bxc5 Qd1+ 32. Kh2 Qc2 33. Bf8 g5 34. Qxg5 Qg6 35. Qe3 Bd5 36. f3 Kg8 37. Be7 Bc4 38. Bf6 Bf1 39. Qd2 Kh7 40. Kg1 Bd3 41. Qe3 Bc4 42. Qa7 Bd3 43. Qxa6 Qh6 44. Qc8 Qe3+ 45. Kh1 Qd2 46. Qh8+ Kg6 47. Qg7+ Kf5 48. Qh7+ 1-0

Inigo Assaripallam - Morgon Mills
Toronto Open Championship, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 5, 2003.04.20

1. d4 c6 2. c4 d5 3. cxd5 cxd5 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. Nc3 Nc6 6. e3 Bg4 7. Be2 e6 8. h3 Bh5 9. Qb3 Rb8 10. Qa4 Nd7 11. O-O Nb6 12. Qb5 Be7 13. Na4 Nxa4 14. Qxa4 O-O 15. Bd2 a6 16. a3 Ra8 17. b4 b5 18. Qb3 Qd6 19. Rfc1 Rac8 20. Rc5 Qd7 21. Rc3 Bxf3 22. Bxf3 Bd6 23. Rac1 Ne7 24. e4 Rc4 25. Rxc4 dxc4 26. Qe3 Bb8 27. Bc3 Ba7 28. Qd2 Rd8 29. Rd1 Qd6 30. Qg5 h6 31. Qg4 Ng6 32. d5 Ne5 33. Qg3 Nxf3+ 34. Qxf3 e5 35. Qf5 Re8 36. Kh1 g6 37. Qf3 Kg7 38. Qg3 f6 39. h4 h5 40. Qf3 Qd7 41. Kh2 Bb8 42. g3 Bd6 43. Qe3 Qc7 44. Kg2 Rh8 45. Rf1 a5 46. f4 axb4 47. axb4 Ra8 48. f5 Ra2+ 49. Kh1 Qd7 50. Bd2 Bf8 51. g4 Qa7 52. Qf3 Rxd2 53. fxg6 Qe7 54. g5 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 4, No. 17, 2003.05.01

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2003 Canadian Chess Challenge - Ontario Championship

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen

356 kids played in the Canadian Chess Challenge - Ontario Championship held April 13 in Toronto, out of 6,500 kids who played in 23 preliminary Regional Challenges.

One student from each of Grades 1-12 advances to the Canadian Chess Challenge - National Finals in Montreal, May 18-19.

Here are the champions:

Grade 12 - Evgeni Miller
Grade 11 - Haoyuan Wang
Grade 10 - Michael Buscar
Grade 9 - Tomas Krnan
Grade 8 - Geordie Derraugh
Grade 7 - Raja Panjwani
Grade 6 - Nikolay Noritsyn
Grade 5 - Shiyam Thavandiran
Grade 4 - Lloyd Mai
Grade 3 - Michael Kleinman
Grade 2 - Simon Gladstone
Grade 1 - Alex Chan
Kindergarden - Christopher Knox

2nd place:

Grade 12 - Josef Lentini
Grade 11 - Zhooran Li
Grade 10 - Ryan Laming
Grade 9 - Jonathan Tayar
Grade 8 - Konstantin Khayutin
Grade 7 - Irakli Vadachkoriya
Grade 6 - Justin McDonald
Grade 5 - Alina Sviridovitch
Grade 4 - Alex Norris-Roozman
Grade 3 - Arthur Calugar
Grade 2 - Nikita Gusev
Grade 1 - Elliot Kaufman
Kindergarden - Anoop Manjunath

3rd place:

Grade 12 - Wojtek Fulmyk
Grade 11 - Amir Banihashemi
Grade 10 - Ronald Leblanc
Grade 9 - Robert Hawley
Grade 8 - Jonathan Yu
Grade 7 - Timothy Tam
Grade 6 - Kevin Chung
Grade 5 - Zak Hutsul
Grade 4 - Prasanna Suresh
Grade 3 - Yuanling Yuan
Grade 2 - Kyle Belaiche
Grade 1 - Nathan Farrant-Diaz
Kindergarden - Jonathan Lai

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 4, No. 16, 2003.04.15

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Interview to promote 2003 Toronto Open Chess Championship

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen

Note: this article was written in the form of an interview conducted by Bob Armstrong, Editor, Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views.

Q. How many players are you expecting?

A. We had 40 players at the Toronto Class Championships at the Bayview Games Club. Everyone I talked to enjoyed themselves, so I'm hoping many of those players will return.

Q. What is capacity?

A. The Club seated all 40 players comfortably. They can easily add tables to hold 60 players, similar to the way Mark Dutton had it arranged for the Dutton Chess Club.

Q. What is break-even?

A. Break-even is 30 players, calculated as follows. The tournament is sanctioned by the Greater Toronto Chess League, so it follows the practice of returning 70% of entry fees to the players as prizes. From each $60 entry fee $42 goes to prizes, $18 goes to expenses. Deduct $2 for the CFC rating fee and $1 for the GTCL Scholarship Fund. That leaves $15/player for the rent, which is $150/day x 3 days = $450. So, $450/$15 per player is 30 players.

Q. Why is there no junior discount?

A. This tournament conflicts with another event which is directly aimed at juniors: the Ontario Championship for the Canadian Youth Chess Championships. I decided not to have a junior discount, in order to not compete with them for players. Despite this, many juniors would rather play in my event! Apparently, mine offers stronger competition. Also, most juniors are not interested in winning free entry to a tournament in Kapuskasing.

Q. Do you think players will come through and make this a successful event?

A. I'm worried. How many players will actually turn out is difficult to predict, especially since there's no late fee! On the plus side, this event is advertised in the current issue of En Passant magazine. On the minus side, players are competing for free on the internet. Their only reason to come out to play is to validate their rating. But that's a big headache, compared to the convenience of playing at home.

There is danger ahead for CFC rated play. Many people who were signed up by Dutton, and who played in his events, will soon have their CFC memberships expiring. So, this tournament is their last chance to play without having to shell out $40 for another membership. On the other hand, Vlad Dobrich might offer unrated events at his Bayview Games Club. That way, people can still come out to play, not worry about losing rating points, and it will be cheaper than before.

Q. What's with the backgammon at the Bayview Games Club?

A. There won't be any more conflicts between backgammon and chess at the Bayview Games Club. What happened at the Class Championships was a one time thing. I booked the rooms before the Club was established. The backgammon players pay the rent for the Club; chess is a free rider, which can exist only while the backgammon players come out. So, Vlad had to establish a regular backgammon schedule for his main customers. First time out, the two happened to conflict. In the future, we can plan the chess around the backgammon events.

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Appendix 1

Toronto Open Championship Tournament

Dates: April 18-20, 2003

(during Passover/Good Friday weekend)

Site: Bayview Games Club, 2nd Floor, 1681 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario

Format:

Limited to 60 players.

CFC rated.

1 Open Section run on the Swiss system. 6 rounds.

2 games Friday, 2 games Saturday, 2 games Sunday.

Time Control: Game/180.

Times: Fri.,Sat.,Sun. - 10:00am, 4:30pm

Tournament Director: David Cohen, CFC National Tournament Director

Entry fee:$60. May be paid in advance to CMA, c/o Chess Shop, 1685 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4G 3C1. If using credit card, add 2% surcharge (not considered part of the entry fee).

Prizes (Based on 60 players; minimum 70% entry fees):

1st, 2nd, 3rd (open to all players): $1,000, $250, $170

Class prize: $200 in each of Under 2200, Under 2000, Under 1800, Under 1600, Under 1400. Peak rating used to determine a player's class. Unrated and provisional rated players are not eligible for class prizes, and compete for a separate prize: $100. When a player is eligible for more than one prize, then the prizes are combined and divided equally among all players affected.

All players must register from 9:00am-9:30am.

Registration includes showing a CFC Membership card with expiry date 2003.04.20 or later (or joining CFC or renewing CFC Membership). Players not registered by 9:30am will not receive a Swiss pairing for Round 1.

Cash only, largest bill accepted: $20.

Byes: zero points. Please tell the Tournament Director before the end of a round, if you cannot play in the next round. If you forfeit a game, it will be rated and you will be removed from the tournament.

$1/player will be donated to the Greater Toronto Chess League Scholarship Fund

Tournament is sanctioned by the Greater Toronto Chess League

Organizer: David Cohen

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Appendix 2

John Morrison Memorial FIDE–rated Round Robin Tournament

April 18 - 20, 2003

Site: Bayview Games Club, 1681 Bayview Ave., Toronto

FIDE rated Round Robin, sections of 6 players, 5 games

Games FRI 10,16:30 / SAT 10,16:30 / SUN 10

Time control: Game/180

Entry fee: $60 (free for Igor Divljan, Zhe Quan)

FREE for FMs, IMs, GMs who register in advance!

Entry is limited to FIDE rated players. We need 4 FIDE rated players per section. Most of the non-FIDE rated players have already been invited (Shiyam Thavandiran, Charlie Tang, Alina Sviridovitch; need one more).

First prize: if only 1 section $150; if 2 sections $200 prize in each section; if 3 sections $220 prize in each section; plus free entry to organizer's next event; less $60 from the total prize fund for each titled player that enters.

Send your entry to CMA, c/o Chess Shop, 1685 Bayview, Toronto and specify "FIDE rated".

Organizer and Tournament Director: David Cohen

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 4, No. 15, 2003.04.01

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2003 Toronto Class Championships

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen
Tournament Organizer, Director; President, Greater Toronto Chess League

The organization of the 2003 Toronto Class Championships, held March 7-9 at the Bayview Games Club, started off slowly. Since there were no late fees, the only incentive to sign up early was the limited number of spaces available at the former Dutton Chess Club. When only a few entries trickled in, including only one junior (despite the tournament's being held during the school break), I decided to cut the junior fee in half. This turned out to be a good move, resulting in than half of the 41 participants being juniors.

It was a pleasure to be sharing the site with one of Canada's premier tournament organizers, Vlad Dobrich, at his new Bayview Games Club. I could have done without the backgammon tournament which coincided with one of the rounds, but this was an unavoidable conflict that will not be repeated.

With everyone grouped by rating, six to a section, competition was fierce. The time control of Game/180 allowed everyone to play their best chess, and many struggles lasted the full 6 hours! Overall, all of the feedback I received on the tournament was positive. I won't do any more regular round robins because of the problem of players wanting byes. However, I am happy to retain the RR format for future FIDE rated events which I am planning.

The players in the two FIDE rated sections were arranged randomly, so that the ratings and the juniors were all evenly distributed. 11 FIDE rated players were joined by a recent immigrant to Canada from Israel, NM Michael Barron. Two juniors fought there way through to clear first in each section. In Group 1, Igor Divljan scored 3.5. In Group 2, newcomer to Canada - here only 1 week from China & USA, where he spent the past 5 years - 13 year old Zhe Quan scored 4.5 points. He always seemed to be in trouble in his games, defending well, even in time trouble. His reward was a performance rating of well over 2500! Igor and Zhe each received a prize of $100 plus free entry to my next FIDE RR.

Other section winners were: NM Charlie Tang (4.5); Fred Henderson and Walter Chan (3.5); Inigo Assaripallan (5) - perfect score!; Robert Kubik (5) - his 4 wins plus a one point bye placed him ahead of Jonathan Tayar, who had 4 points plus a 1/2 point bye; and Alfonso Cheng (3.5). Winners received or shared the $80 first prize, except in the last section with only 4 juniors, where first prize was $40.

Thanks to Lisette Lu for her support; Jaco Uwland for volunteering at this non-profit event run by the Greater Toronto Chess League; David Filipovich for suggesting the Master sections be FIDE rated; and to everyone who played and made this an enjoyable event.

Here is an interesting game, entitled, with reference to 16... Rac8, 'The Wrong Rook':

David Filipovich - Marius Zubac
Toronto Class Championship, Section 1, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Round 1, 2003.03.07

1. Nf3 f5 2. g3 Nf6 3. Bg2 d5 4. O-O e6 5. d4 Bd6 6. c4 c6 7. b3 Qe7 8. Bb2 b6 9. Nbd2 O-O 10. Ne5 Bb7 11. Ndf3 a5 12. a3 Na6 13. e3 Rfd8 14. Qe2 Ne4 15. cxd5 exd5 16. Rfc1 Rac8 17. Nxc6 Rxc6 18. Rxc6 Bxc6 19.Qxa6 Bb7 20. Qxb6 Rc8 21. Rc1 Re8 22. Ne5 Bxa3 23. Rc7 Qb4 24. Qxb4 axb4 25. Rxb7 Bxb2 26. Rxb4 Nc3 27. Nd3 Ba3 28. Rb7 g5 29. b4 Ra8 30. Rc7 Ne4 31. Rd7 Ra4 32. Rxd5 Bxb4 33. Bxe4 fxe4 34. Rxg5+ Kf7 35. Nxb4 1-0

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Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 4, No. 14, 2003.03.15

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Report on Greater Toronto Chess League Meeting

Written and copyright 2003 by David Cohen
President, Greater Toronto Chess League; Meeting Chair, Secretary

Meeting held 2002.12.09 at 20:00 at Dutton Chess Club, 1681 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Over 50 people attended the meeting, coming from as far away as Burlington, Brampton, Oshawa and Montreal.

GTCL Executive in attendance:

David Cohen (President); Cesar Posylek (Vice-President); Bryan Lamb (Treasurer); Mark Dutton (Communications Director); David Gebhardt (Club Coordinator)

GTCL Board members in attendance:

Maurice Smith (CFC Executive); Bob Armstrong (Scarboro CC); Kerry Liles (Burlington CC); Jim Ferrier (Brampton CC); Anthony (Tony) Cheron (Peel CC); Slava Sviridovitch (Alekhin Chess School); Larry Bevand (Chess'n Math Association); Peter Boross-Harmer (Toronto High Schools).

Former GTCL Board members in attendance:

Wilf Ferner, Martin Jaeger

Agenda

A. Matters arising from Executive items

(numbering follows Executive agenda item numbers)

1. Bank account

Bryan Lamb is issuing checks on old account under his signature alone.

2. & 4. Constitution

Moved Cohen/Smith that the GTCL Constitution dated 2001.04 be approved as the GTCL Constitution with the following amendment: after Article II add "GTCL is a non-profit organization."; and that notice be given that the 2003 Annual General Meeting will ratify this action.

Motion passed with the necessary 2/3 majority. 7 votes 'yes', none opposed; 9 were in attendance at the time of the vote.

5. Web site

Bryan Lamb to update. It should be linked from the CFC web site. It should contain links to all of the clubs and their contact people. When this is accomplished, we can ask Lawrence Day to mention the initial link in his column. We can also ask the Toronto Star to link to it from their web site.

6. Bids for 2003 events

No bids have been received.

Toronto Closed: Martin Jaeger volunteered to direct half of the tournament for a small honorarium, if a free site can be obtained. Larry Bevand agreed to offer the CMA site for weekday evenings when it would otherwise not be in use for 11 rounds (12 player Round Robin) for $500 (a discount off his regular price of $75/evening).

7. 2002 Ontario High School Championship

Chris Field's request for re-imbursement of his $130 loss was approved. Cheque issued by Bryan Lamb, held by David Cohen until Mr. Field's return.

9. Scoresheets

Mark Dutton's request for re-imbursement of $150 for 1000 duplicate scoresheets was approved. Cheque issued by Bryan Lamb and given to Mr. Dutton.

10. Scholarship Fund

Around $700. Bryan Lamb had asked for a refund of the $300 he donated. Mr. Lamb persuaded to withdraw his request and to work out a format with Larry Bevand for the disbursement of the money. Peter Boross-Harmer suggested a FIDE rated Round Robin for juniors.

12. Secretary

We are still looking for a Secretary for the Executive. I will be stepping down from the Presidency and from the Board no later than the 2003 AGM. So, we are looking for new people to come forward to volunteer to help promote organized chess in Toronto.

15. GTCL team competition

David Gebhardt had asked for re-imbursement of his expenses for 2001-2. He indicated orally that he had been paid for these from the fees for the 2002-3 competition.

16. Fundraiser

I announced that the Sick Kids Hospital Foundation had approved the GTCL to run a fundraiser for them. The problem is to locate a master who would volunteer his or her time for a simultaneous exhibition, so that the entry fees collected would go to the hospital.

18. GM Joel Lautier

I announced that Grandmaster Joel Lautier, born in Scarborough, is interested to visit Toronto to give a chess lecture or exhibition. His fee is $1,100 plus expenses. We are looking for a sponsor. David Gebhardt is trying to obtain the Scarborough Civic Centre as a site for the 2003 Ontario Open. I suggested to him to try to arrange a visit in conjunction with this event.

19. Todd Southam Memorial

I announced that the Southam family is open to the naming of a junior open tournament in memory of their son Todd. We are looking for a suitable format, sponsor, and organizer.

21. Olympiad

I announced that the Belzbergs are interested in bringing the Olympiad to Canada, probably in 2008, not necessarily to Toronto.

22. Chess Corner

The Chess Corner on Gould Street corner of Yonge Street will be torn down for unavoidable reasons. Martin Jaeger has been actively seeking a replacement, and has tentatively arranged to have it relocated to Nathan Phillips Square at the corner of Bay and Queen Streets. With his own contribution and others that he has sought and obtained, Mr. Jaeger has raised $1,000 for the site. He will attempt to obtain additional money from the CFC, possibly from the former Building Fund money now held by the Chess Foundation of Canada.

B. New business

1. AGM

Moved Cohen/Boross-Harmer to hold the AGM in January 2003. Discussion: I asked Larry Bevand if we could use the CMA site in January 2003 on an evening when it is otherwise not being used at no charge, and he agreed. Maurice Smith pointed out that the GTCL fiscal year ends March 31, and the AGM should be held after this date. Yes: 4; No: 5. Motion defeated.

2. 1st Toronto Senior Active Championship

Wilf Ferner submitted the following report:

1st Toronto Senior (50+) Active Championship

November 17, 2002

Fourteen seniors braved Toronto's early snowstorm to participate in this inaugural event. The event was held in the beautiful Upper Canada room provided for the tournament compliments of Bradgate Arms senior home/hotel.

Vojin Vujosevic took top honours with a perfect score of 5/5, one point ahead of Chris Takov with 4; Barry Thorvardson and Thomas Carleton shared the U2000 class prize with 3. In the U1900 group, Smilja Vujosevic won with 3; while Ted Termeer and Bryan Wood split the U1500 class prize with 2.

Organizer: Wilf Ferner
Tournament Director: Martin Jaeger

3. Discussion of future of Toronto clubs and tournaments

From 8:30pm-10:30pm, David Cohen chaired an open discussion on the problems of organized chess in Toronto. The impending closing of the Dutton Chess Club on the CMA site spurred the huge attendance at the meeting and the interest shown by the participants.

Summary:

Ideas were discussed regarding possible causes for the closing of the club; and possible uses for the facilities. Many volunteered to help run a possible future club or future Toronto chess tournaments; they will need training.

The GTCL will formally ask the CFC to return the money from the Building Fund to Toronto by turning it over to the GTCL.

A full report will also be available from Bob Armstrong's Scarboro CC Chess News and Views e-zine.

Details:

David Cohen thanked Mark Dutton for his efforts over the past 3.5 years promoting organized chess in Toronto by running the Dutton Chess Club, and Mr. Dutton received a round of applause from all in attendance.

Highlights of comments made at the meeting:

Mark Dutton: Club membership recently declined rapidly from 200 members to 60 members. Similarly, tournament attendance has recently rapidly declined, and is now at half capacity. Players are not renewing their CFC memberships. Meanwhile, the club is squeezed financially because of escalating rent. Possible cause: juniors and seniors play; others have moved to playing on the internet.

Martin Jaeger: Hold 4 tournament/year for internet players to gauge their progress in public. (e.g., Toronto Open Ch, Toronto Class Ch, Victoria Day, Labour Day). Organize on volunteer basis. With the increase in quality of 'En Passant' magazine, people will find this reason enough to join the CFC. Bryan Lamb offered to investigate whether or not the Macedonian Hall would be available for a few additional large events on holidays (besides Labour Day).

Fred Henderson: Problem is not solely the internet. I like the club and it's social aspects.

David Gebhardt: Decline of the chess club is universal. Need more people active in organizing. Need people to get players they know to come out to a club for the first time. David Cohen suggested we take advantage of Toronto's multi-cultural make-up by reaching out to ethnic communities from countires where chess is more popular (e.g., Russia, European nations).

Bob Armstrong: City owned sites are best used once per month. Difficult to make arrangements for more frequent meetings.

DCC member: 70% of entry fees returned as prizes is too much, Dutton can keep more.

A show of hands was taken, and the resulting conclusion was that non-masters will play for trophies or small prizes; they don't need a large prize. Martin Jaeger disagreed, suggesting that large class prizes were necessary.

Anthony Cheron: Introduced the idea that the chess club of the 21st century is a combination of the club we know and the internet: a Local Area Network (LAN)! You would enter a room of computers and everyone would play chess at their computer terminal. David Cohen suggested we could test this out with a club night at a local internet store or cafe (many have appeared recently in Toronto).

Maurice Smith: There was always one organizer at a time, and each in turn burned out. Better if each club (with a different organizer) pitches in.

Bryan Lamb: I see the club as the young player's introduction to the game he or she already enjoys - in an environment that is friendly. Wants club tradition to continue, so this environemnt will exist for juniors to continue playing.

Peter Boross-Harmer: Use the money from the former Building Fund to kick start a club. Run it on a non-profit basis, i.e., generate enough funds to replenish the initial amount.

The meeting was polled on its desire to return the money from the former Building Fund to Toronto. The meeting was unanimously in favour of this. Disagreement ensued on how much to return (full amount; full amount less founders' contributions; or special project only, e.g., chess corner).

Moved Cohen/Boross-Harmer that the Greater Toronto Chess League ask the Chess Federation of Canada to return to Toronto the money from the former Building Fund (now held by the Chess Foundation of Canada) by turning it over to the GTCL. The GTCL Executive will work out the exact wording of the request to the CFC. Martin Jaeger was opposed. Kerry Liles said that there should be a definite use for the money. Motion passed 8-2 (Smith, Liles opposed).

Larry Bevand: Wants a chess club in Toronto, on the CMA site. Toronto players should do it themselves, without help from the CFC. CMA has been in Toronto for almost a decade. CMA is willing to partner with people (like Dutton) who know what they are doing and who will do a good job.

The meeting was polled, and most DCC members indicated that they were former SCC members, and would return there after DCC closed. SCC has the capacity for just under 100 members at the site it rents from the city.

There was some discussion of the possible use for the CMA site where DCC operated. Mr. Bevand offered it for use at $650/month or $150/day on weekends or $75/evening on weekdays. Martin Jaeger indicated that he paid $13/night for bridge, and Kerry Liles indicated that this format was used at the Burlington CC. Mark Dutton stated that chess players had not been willing to pay a visitor fee to get into his club.

Mr. Jaeger suggested that a free site be obtained. Jaco Uwland suggested that the renter (sponsor) needs an interest. David Cohen pointed out the problem with approaching potential sponsors was that chess players - over the course of many years - had consistently behaved poorly.

Dan Catona: Players should take a "pay cut" for the next year to play a little rather than not at all. People care, now that they know DCC will be gone. By slowly building back up, try to revive to where we were a year ago.

Matt Blakely: Underswell of support does exist. Buy memberships and play for trophies.

Fred Henderson suggested a scaled back setup at the CMA site.

Bob Armstrong: Suggested 2 committees: one for a new Toronto Chess Club, using the former Building Fund money; one for training and organizing volunteers to run tournaments

Maurice Smith: DCC was a success for over 3 years. But what action can we take now?

Mark Dutton: Chess cannot be marketed to the masses, but we need more players and more participation. People are coming from all over the Greater Toronto Area to attend the DCC.

David Gebhardt suggested different formats be tried, e.g., Pro-Am, about 6 tournaments per year. We should get ideas from others with similar problems, e.g., Kitchener-Waterloo, BCF.

Wilf Ferner: A workshop should be held for prospective organizers.

A list of volunteers was recorded. Mr. Boross-Harmer suggested that he and David Lawless would work towards creating a club and running weekend tournaments.

The meeting concluded with informal talks.

Concrete proposals are welcomed and should be sent to the GTCL Executive members, who can then contact those who volunteered.

---

Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, Volume 4, No. 8, 2002.12.15

***


Most of these articles were originally published in Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views, the newsletter of the Scarborough Chess Club (http://www.ScarboroughChessClub.ca), Bob Armstrong, Editor (back issues - http://scarboroughchess.webhop.net).

Thanks to all those who have published my work, especially:
Bob Armstrong, Scarborough Community of Toronto Chess News & Views; Hans Jung, Chess Canada Echecs; Canadian Correspondence Chess Association; Mark Crowther, The Week in Chess; Steve Goldberg, Scholastic Chess, Chesscafe.com; Wojciech Bartelski, Olimpbase; and Stephen Wright, British Columbia Chess Federation E-mail Bulletin.


Last update: 2009.06.17. 1