Allan Octavian Hume (1829-1912), Founder Womesh Chandra Bonnerjee (1844-1906), Bombay 1885 Dadadabhai Naoroji (1825-1917), Calcutta 1886 Badruddin Tyabji (1844-1906), Madras 1887 George Yule (1829-1892), Allahabad 1888 Sir William Wedderburn (1838-1918), Bombay 1889 Sir Pherozeshah Mehta (1845-1915), Calcutta 1890 P Ananda Charlu (1843-1908), Nagpur 1891 Alfred Webb (1834-1908), Madras 1894 Surendranath Banerjea (1848-1925), 1895 Poona Rahimtulla M Sayani (1847-1902), Calcutta 1896 Ananda Mohan Bose (1847-1906), Madras 1898 Sir C Sankaran Nair (1857-1934), Amravati 1897
DKPA Caption

indian national congress


yv jeppu

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Allan Octavian Hume (1829-1912) was an administrator with a deep insight and understanding of the problems of rural India. He worked for India and helped form the Indian National Congress in 1885. He died at the age of 84, on July 31, 1912 and the people of India mourned his death as he was one of them.

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Womesh Chandra Bonnerjee (1844-1906) Womesh Chandra was born on December 29, 1844, in Calcutta in an upper middle class Brahmin family of considerable social standing. He presided over the first session of the Indian National Congress held at Bombay in 1885. In the 1886 session held at Calcutta he proposed the formation of standing committees of the Congress in each province for the better co-ordination of its work and it was on this occasion that he advocated that the Congress should confine its activities to political matters only, leaving the question of social reforms to other organisations.

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Dadadabhai Naoroji (1825-1917) Dadabhai Naoroji was born in Bombay in September 4, 1825 in a priestly Parsi family. On January 31, 1885, when the Bombay Presidency Association came into being, he was elected as one of its Vice-Presidents. At the end of the same year, he took a leading part in the founding of the Indian National Congress and became its President thrice in 1886, 1893 and 1906. Known as 'The Grand Old Man of India" Dadabhai Naoroji was a great public figure during 1845-1917.

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Badruddin Tyabji (1844-1906) Badruddin Tyabji (Tyab Ali) was born in Bombay on October 10, 1844. In 1885 he helped to found the Bombay Presidency Association and virtually ran it all by himself. Soon afterwards, the Indian National Congress held its first session in Bombay under its auspices; and Badruddin and Camruddin (his brother) were among its delegates.

He was not only, as Mahatma Gandhi wrote, "......for years, a decisive factor in the deliberations of the Congress" but one of its creators.

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George Yule (1829-1892) George Yule was persuaded by W. C. Bonnerjee to accept the invitation of the Congress to preside over the Allahabad session. He belonged to the business community. He was the chief of the well-known Andrew Yule and Co. in Calcutta. He was also Sheriff of Calcutta for sometime and President of the Indian Chamber of Commerce. Throughout his Indian career, George Yule won the respect, admiration, and regard of everybody with whom he came in contact - Indian and European, official and non-official.

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Sir William Wedderburn (1838-1918) Sir William was born in March 1838 in Edinburgh, Scotland. In 1859 William appeared for the Indian Civil Service examination. He left for India in 1860 and began official duty at Dharwar as an Assistant Collector. His concern with the problems of India brought him in touch with the Indian National Congress. After his retirement, William Wedderburn threw himself heart and soul into it. He presided over the fourth Congress held in Bombay in 1889. He came to India in 1904 to attend the 20th session of the Indian National Congress in Bombay, which was presided over by Sir Henry Cotton. He was again invited in 1910 to preside over the 25th session. He remained the Chairman of the British Committee of the Congress from July 1889 until his death.

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Sir Pherozeshah Mehta (1845-1915) Sir Pherozeshah Mehta was born in Bombay, on August 4, 1845, where he spent the greater part of his life. He was mainly responsible for the founding of an English newspaper, the Bombay Chronicle (April 1913), which became an important agency for expressing Indian public opinion. In the proceedings of the Indian National Congress (in its founding he had a distinctive hand) he held an important and commanding position. His main endeavour was to keep the extremists from dominating the Congress, and in this he was largely successful. He presided over the Congress session held in Calcutta (1890) and was twice President of the Reception Committee when the Congress sessions met in Bombay (1889 and 1904).

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P Ananda Charlu (1843-1908) Panambakkam Ananda Charlu was born of orthodox Brahmin parents in August 1843 in the village of Kadamanchi, Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh. In 1885 he was one of the seventy-two delegates to the first session of the Indian National Congress held in Bombay. From that time on he attended almost every one of its sessions and took an active part in its proceedings. The impression which he produced on the delegates resulted naturally in his being elected President of the Nagpur Session in 1891.

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Alfred Webb (1834-1908) The third non-Indian to have presided over the Indian National Congress, Alfred Webb, was an Irishman. The son of a radical Quaker printer and publicist, he brought a rare breadth of vision and moral courage to Ireland's campaigns for Home Rule and land reform.

"Politics are amongst the most ennobling, most comprehensive spheres of human activity, and none should eventually be excluded from their exercise. There is much that is sad, much that is deplorable about them. Yet they remain, and ever will remain. The most effective field upon which to work for the good of our fellows. The political atmosphere, that which we here hope to breathe, is one into which no thought of "greed or lust, or ambition" should enter. We desire the good of all. We work for all." - from the Presidential Address - Alfred Webb, I.N.C. Session, 1894, Madras.

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Surendranath Banerjea (1848-1925) Surendranath Banerjea was born on November 10, 1848 in Calcutta. The Calcutta session of the Congress in 1886 marked a distinct advance in its tone and spirit and Surendranath played a leading part in the National Congress; he became its President twice in 1895 and 1902.

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Rahimtulla M Sayani (1847-1902) Rahimtulla M. Sayani was born in Kutch on April 5, 1847. He began his public life as an elected member of the Bombay Municipal Corporation (1876), the Sheriff of Bombay in 1885 and was elected President of the Corporation in 1888. He was associated with the Indian National Congress since its inception and was one of the two Indian Muslims who attended its first session in 1885. He presided over the 12th annual session of the Congress held at Calcutta in 1896. His presidential address hailed by a contemporary journal as the "best delivered so far" was notable for the close attention it paid to the economic and financial aspects of the British rule in India.

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Ananda Mohan Bose (1847-1906) Ananda Mohan Bose was born on September 23, 1847 in Myrmensingh, Bengal. Ananda Mohan was associated with the Congress since its inauguration and was elected President of its Madras Session in 1898. He is remembered in particular for the last speech that he made on October 16, 1905 at a public meeting organised in Calcutta to protest against the partition of Bengal. Shortly after this crowning act of his career, he passed away in Calcutta on August 20, 1906 at the somewhat premature age of 59.

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Sir C Sankaran Nair (1857-1934) Sir Sankaran was born on July 11, 1857 on the Malabar Coast. He played an active part in the Indian National movement which was gathering force in those days. In 1897, when the First Provincial Conference met in Madras, he was invited to preside over it. The same year, when the Indian National Congress assembled at Amraoti, he was chosen its President. He was a patriot, who worked for the welfare of his people. He was ahead of his times in social reform and here his contribution was substantial.

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