http://www.minolta.com
Here are my own Minolta Manual Focus Used (daily!) X-700 Camera Systems, Lenses, Flash, Motor Drive, Remote Cord, Teleconverters, Extension Tubes, Lens Reversing Rings and Manuals. These are NOT, repeat NOT for sale at this time. Most item have caps, UV filter, case, original owner's manuals and/or other accessories, some accessories are original, all items are in good working condition - 27 or more items listed here, including products from:
http://www.minolta.com | http://www.minolta.com | Quantaray | http://www.sears.com| http://www.soligor.com | http://www.tamron.com | http://www.vivitar.com
It's easy to browse: Review items in list ^ and in detail below. See discussion below for Minolta SR/MC/MD/X-600 lens mount compatibility and interchangeability fit and function exploration and explanation!















... private, individual (I am not a camera store), so, the best way to contact me is via email: peterblaise@yahoo.com

Peter Blaise Monahon
3686 King Street #185
Alexandria, Virginia (VA) 22302 US

Phone 703-845-1556 - Fax 703-845-1894

(My business Web Pages: http://www.peterblaise.com or http://www.geocities.com/peterblaise)


Notes on Minolta-Style 35mm Manual Focus SLR and T, SR, MC, MD, and X-600 Lens Interchangeability:
(in the process of being edited and further researched - please email me at peterblaise@yahoo.com with your comments)


Q: "What lenses fit my Minolta Manual Focus 35mm Single Lens Reflex Camera?"

A: Virtually all Minolta Manual Focus-style Lenses fit and operate on virtually all Minolta Manual Focus-style 35mm Single Lens Reflex Cameras. (There are three rare exceptions, see below *.)

    Surprised?  Don't be.  Minolta, like many manufacturers, (a) designed their cameras 'right' from the start, and (b) didn't want to alienate any of their customers, so they made all their Minolta Manual Focus 35mm Single Lens Reflex cameras with the same bayonet lens mount.

    So virtually all Minolta Manual Focus-style lenses fit virtually all Minolta Manual Focus-style cameras (35mm SLR Single Lens Reflex, that is)!

Q: What's the difference between Minolta Manual Focus-style T, SR, MC, MD and X-600 lenses, then?

A: The difference between T, SR, MC, MD and X-600-style lenses is how automatically they coordinate with each different Minolta Manual Focus-style camera's automatic features and controls.

    You can operate any lens on any camera in fully manual mode.

    You focus with or without focus confirmation.

    You set the aperture with or without match-needle exposure confirmation.

    You open the aperture for a bright, clear viewfinder image during focusing and composition.

    You close the aperture to the appropriate setting during exposure.

    All Minolta Manual Focus Cameras with Auto Exposure features designed for MD-style lenses will still use those Auto Exposure features with all Minolta Manual Focus-style T, SR, MC, MD and X-600-style lenses.

T Lens = "T" adapter, a Tamron screw thread lens mounted on a Tamron screw thread receiver which is mounted in a Minolta bayonet adapter.  No other coupling exists to operate the lens's aperture (if any).  You must manually set the aperture of the lens (if any).  Minolta Auto Exposure Cameras will try to compensate by adjusting the camera's shutter timing during exposure.  Or, you can use the metered manual, meter assist/match needle mode of your camera.

SR Lens = Original Minolta Manual Focus lenses for Minolta SR-series cameras starting from the Minolta SR2 in the late 1950s.  They have no meter coupling (MC) feature.  Like the T Lenses above, you must set the lens's aperture manually before exposure.  That is, a fully open lens aperture gives you a bright, clear viewfinder image, during focusing and composition.  Then you close down the lens aperture to the appropriate f/stop during exposure.  Then you open wide the lens aperture again for the next picture.  Some Minolta SR-series cameras would reset the lens to fully open aperture after exposure, and this was the first Minolta lens use of the term 'automatic' regarding lens operation.  So, SR lenses may have a fully automatic diaphragm, semi automatic diaphragm, or function only in stop down mode.

    Note: there are perhaps 2 or 3 types of SR lenses - one with NO pin for automatic diaphragm reopening after exposure, one with a long pin
for automatic diaphragm reopening after exposure, and the final version with a short pin for automatic diaphragm reopening after exposure.  The lenses with the longer pin may physically interfere with the interior of cameras other than the original SR2 for which they were designed, so carefully check the pin length of any SR lens on non SR2 camera.

    Note also that some older SR lenses are not retrofocus designs and therefore penetrate deeply into the camera body requiring that the reflex mirror be "locked up" - MLU = Mirror Lock Up.  So, lenses like the Minolta Auto Rokkor 21mm f/3.5 and f/4 fit only cameras with MLU.  There might be other examples - please let me know!

    By the way, non 'retrofocus' means, for example, that a 21mm lens is actually 21mm from the film which is deep within the ~44mm deep camera body, versus the later design retrofocus lenses that still take in an equivalent angle of view as a 21mm lens, for example, but keep the lens mechanicals outside the camera body, away from the reflex mirror.

... for ALL Minolta 35mm Manual Focus SLR Cameras from 1958 on: generally known as the Minolta SR-series cameras - 1958 Minolta SR-2, SR-1, 1960 Minolta SR-3, 1962 Minolta SR-7, 1965 new SR-1, SR-7, 1967 Minolta SR-1s, 1970 Minolta SR-M, PLUS cameras listed below for subsequent lens mount/tab enhancements.

MC Lens = Meter Coupled lenses introduced with the SR-T-series cameras starting from the mid-1960s.  These lenses couple to a tab on the camera body and tell the camera what relative aperture you have set on the lens.  The lens stays at wide open maximum aperture for a bright, clear image in the viewfinder during your focusing and composition.  The camera then closes the lens aperture to the setting indicated by the lens aperture control ring (as set by you via exposure match needle) during exposure.  The camera then returns the lens to the maximum aperture after exposure.

    Technical Note: The MC lug is needed for a correct meter reading while the lens remains 'open' to provide a bright viewfinder during your pre-exposure focusing and framing.  That's why it was introduced in the SR-T cameras.  Of course, The MC tab function has nothing to do with the "automatic diaphragm" that was already introduced in the SR Auto Rokkor lenses above.  However, this web page is targeted at helping the reader understand how each lens will behave in it's entirety on each camera, hence the discussion of features and benefits other than strict lens to camera fit.

... for ALL Minolta 35mm Manual Focus SLR Cameras from 1958 on (as abbove) PLUS from 1966 on: generally known as the Minolta SR T-series cameras - 1966 Minolta SR T 101 (and subsequent Minolta SR T 100/100b/100x/200/201/202/303/303b/505/MCII and equivanet series cameras), 1973 Minolta SR T SUPER; and even some models without the "T": 1975 Minolta SR 101, Minolta SR 505; Minolta SR 777, PLUS early X-cameras: 1972 Minolta XK/XM/X1, 1973 Minolta X-1, 1974 Minolta XE, 1975 Minolta XE-7/XE-1/XE, 1976 Minolta XK-M/XM Motor/X1 Motor, XE-5/XEb, PLUS cameras listed below for subsequent lens mount/tab enhancements.

MD Lens = Minolta Dual (for the Dual Mode - Aperture Priority/Shutter Priority - Minolta XD-11 camera on which this pin was first used) or Minimum Diameter or Minimum Diaphragm (or something memorable like that) introduced in the mid-1970s with the Minolta XD-series cameras.  The 'MD' tab tells the camera (1) when the lens is set to allow auto closing down to the minimum aperture, and (2) what is the minimum aperture (diameter) of the lens diaphragm - either f/16, f/22 or f/32.  When using any lens that is set to NOT operate the MD tab on a Minolta Auto Exposure Camera, in Auto Exposure mode the camera will 'guess' and compensate for the ultimate stopped down aperture during actual exposure.  This even applies to MD lenses where you have not set the aperture to minimum (oops)!  Your Minolta Auto Exposure Camera will try to take the most accurate exposure given the balance between available apertures and shutter speeds possible - using whatever lens aperture setting it finds during actual exposure - and this is why ANY lens that fits ... works!.

    Note: The MD tab may contact the body of the Minolta SR-7 model V prohibiting easy use of the lens's entire aperture range.  You can either 'machine' or file the camera body, or file down the lens MD tab, or just not use the entire aperture range of the lens.  So, check for MD tab-to-camera body interference.

    Note also that using an MC lens on a XD camera in S Shutter Priority Mode, for example, means that meter read out can be 'wrong'.  However, the camera will still achieve a 'correct' exposure upon shutter release.

... for ALL Minolta 35mm Manual Focus SLR Cameras from 1958 on (as abbove) PLUS from 1966 on (as above) PLUS from 1977 on: generall known as the Minolta X-series cameras - 1977 Minolta XD/XD-7/XD-11, XG-E/XG-2, 1978 XD-s, 1979 Minolta XG-S/XG-1/XG-7/XG-9, Minolta XD-5, 1980 Minolta X-7. 1981 Minolta X-700, 1982 Minolta X-70/XG-M, 1983 Minolta X-500/X-570, 1984 Minolta X-370/X-370, 1997 Minolta X-300s/X-370n, 2000 Minolta X-370s; Minolta XG-A, Minolta XG-SE, Minolta X7A, Minolta X-9, PLUS cameras listed below for subsequent lens mount/tab enhancements.

X-600 = On the early 1980s Minolta X-600 camera, intended for Japanese-only distribution, there is a focus assist and confirmation feature.  The Minolta X-600 sensors need a clue from the lens as to the lens's maximum aperture so that the camera body can use it's appropriate range of light sensitivities from which to asses subject contrast for judging focus accuracy.  There is a tang inside the lens that identifies either (1) f/2.8 or larger maximum lens aperture, or (2) f/3.5 or smaller maximum aperture.  The lens tang operates a switch inside the body of the X-600. There is no MD Auto Exposure feature on the X-600.

... for ALL Minolta 35mm Manual Focus SLR Cameras from 1958 on (as abbove) PLUS from 1966 on (as above) PLUS from 1973 on (as above) PLUS 1983 on: 1983 Minolta X-600.

Q: Uh-Huh. Hmm ... so, simply please, if there's no difference between Minolta Manual Focus-style Lenses, then ... what is the difference between Minolta Manual Focus-style lenses?

A: Simply whether the lens will help the camera in auto mode, or whether the camera will have to 'guess' - which it will do very, very well (hence the Minolta reputation for taking great pictures).  You decide which control mode you prefer:

Manual Mode - you set Lens Aperture and Shutter Speed to match exposure calculated elsewhere, such as via a hand held meter;

Metered Manual Mode - you set Lens Aperture and Shutter Speed to match through the lens camera-indicated exposure;

Semi Automatic Mode
- you set Lens Aperture or Shutter Speed, and the camera sets Shutter Speed or Lens Aperture to match indicated exposure; or,

Fully Automatic Mode
- the camera sets Lens Aperture (if possible) and Shutter Speed to match indicated exposure.

    Not all Minolta Manual Focus-style lenses will assist all Minolta Manual Focus-style Auto Exposure Cameras to take full advantage of all the lens's or all the camera's automatic features.  However, the lens and the camera will still work in the camera's Automatic mode and in the camera's Manual mode.

    For example, when using a T or SR or MC lens on an MD-style camera, you can still use the camera's Auto Exposure setting (Auto Program, Auto Aperture or Auto Shutter Speed), and the camera will 'guess' what is the lens's aperture before you fully press the shutter button, and the camera will recalculate the actual exposure after you press the shutter button.  The camera must guess since there is no MD tab on the lens telling the camera what is the minimum aperture (f/stop) of the lens.  On Minolta Auto Exposure Cameras, using a lens with the MD tab will allow the Auto Exposure system to 'know' the minimum aperture (Minimum Diameter or f/stop) of the lens.  This 'automatic' coupling feature between the camera and the lens applies mostly to the Minolta XD-7/11 (same camera, different world markets), the XD-5, and the X-700.

    Personally, I have left my X-700 cameras in Program mode and I have never been let down.  The camera sets an appropriate Lens Aperture and Shutter Speed regardless of whether I am using a T, SR, MC or MD lens, and regardless of whether I have remembered to set the lens to it's minimum aperture.  Occasionally I set the + or - exposure compensation dial if I know there is an imbalance between bright and dark in the subject, or if I am using a particularly 'dark' (slow) lens.  For instance, the 17mm f/3.5 Vivitar MC lens collects so much light that the camera thinks the image is too bright and tries to darken it, so I often dial in +1 or +2 compensation to brighten up an image with 1/2 sky, 1/2 land.

^
Exception summary: So, after reading the fine print above, the ONLY exceptions are (1) some rare early model SR lenses have too long an aperture operating pin for safe use on cameras other than the equally rare early SR2 camera, (2) some SR wide angle lenses penetrate so deeply into the camera body that they require a camera with MLU Mirror Lock Up, and (3) MD lenses hit an escutcheon screw on the older and rare SR7 model V.  That's it!  Virtually all other Minolta Manual Focus-style Lenses fit and operate on virtually all Minolta Manual Focus-style 35mm Single Lens Reflex Cameras.  Now you can shop and purchase with confidence regarding what fits what.  Return to top of this interchangeability discussion.

Does the following table simplify things?

Camera: v
Lens: >
T-Mount Lens
SR Lens
MC Lens
Manual
Automatic
Fully Automatic
MC
MD
X-600
SR Camera
Lens Aperture: Manual
Camera Shutter: Manual
Camera Metering: Manual, not TTL Through The Lens
Lens Aperture: Manual
Camera Shutter: Manual
Camera Metering: Manual, not TTL Through The Lens
Lens Aperture: Manual
NOTE: Lens MD tab may hit screw on SR Camera body preventing use of minimum Lens aperture

Camera Shutter: Manual
Camera Metering: Manual, not TTL Through The Lens
MC Camera
MC Camera
Lens Aperture: Manual
Camera Shutter: Manual, Automatic if available on camera,
Camera Metering: Stop Down TTL Through The Lens Metering,
Lens Aperture: Manual
Shutter: Manual, Automatic Shutter selection if available on camera,
Metering: TTL Through The Lens metering
MD Camera
Lens Aperture: Manual and Automatic, full f/stop range if Lens set at Minimum Aperture
Camera Shutter: Manual, Automatic if available on camera,
Camera Metering: TTL Through The Lens metering
X-600 Camera
Camera Lens Aperture: Manual
Camera Shutter: Manual and Automatic,
Camera Metering: TTL Through The Lens metering

Or, do you prefer this 'simpler' statement:


Virtually ALL
Minolta
Manual Focus-style
35mm Single Lens Reflex
Lenses
fit and operate on
virtually ALL
Minolta
Manual Focus-style
35mm Single Lens Reflex
Cameras
.



Minolta 35mm Manual Focus Single Lens Reflex Camera Interchangeable Lens Designation Nomenclature:

    To: minoltax700club@yahoogroups.com http://groups.yahoo.com/group/minoltax700club/

    Subject: Re: MD vs. MC [Yahoo! Clubs: Minolta X 700 Club]
    Date: Sun, 08 Oct 2000
    From: Peter Blaise Monahon <peterblaise@yahoo.com>

    [edited]

    Minolta MC [Meter Coupled] and MD [Minimum Diameter or Minolta Dual-mode] are both Minolta 35mm Single Lens Reflex Camera Interchangeable Manual Focus lens styles, both styles work (more or less) on all Minolta Manual Focus 35mm SLR cameras.  MC and MD lenses need an adapter to fit a Minolta auto focus camera [and then the lens aperture is manually operated only, and the auto focus camera exposure meter works only in lens stop down taking aperture mode, and the adapter is equivalent to ~1.6x teleconverter, changing the lens focal length and maximum effective lens aperture].

    I found references to double-letter Minolta Manual Focus MC lenses from around the year 1958 on, marked ROKKOR-TC, -TD, -QD, -QE, -QF, -PE, -PF, -PG, -HF, -HG, -HH, -SG, -SI, -OK, -NL, and so on.  Apparently the first letter of the two letters is an abbreviation of a Greek(?) or Latin(?) word, and indicates the number of lens groups in the lens construction, where:

First Letter of
On-Lens
Nomenclature :
Origin (?)
= Number of
Lens Groups:
T
Tertia (Latin) 
3 lens groups
Q
Quad (Latin) 
4 lens groups
P
Penta, Pente, (Greek?, not Quinque, Latin) 
5 lens groups
H
Hex (Greek?, not Sex, Latin) 
6 lens groups
S
Septem (Latin) 
7 lens groups
O
Octa (Latin)
8 lens groups
N
Novem (Latin) 
9 lens groups

 
    Apparently there are also some 10 (Deca?), 11 (Undeca?), and 12 (dodEcA?) lens groups in some Minolta Manual Focus zoom lenses, but I haven't seen a reference to any letter code markings for them, yet.

Non-existent codes:
D Deca? 10 lens groups
U Undeca? 11 lens groups
E dodEcA? 12 lens groups
A dodEcA? 12 lens groups

    Apparently the second letter, following the order of the Alphabet, indicates the number of lens elements in the lens, where:

Second Letter of
On-Lens Nomenclature:
= Number of
Lens Elements:
C
 3 lens elements
D
 4 lens elements
E
 5 lens elements
F
 6 lens elements
G
 7 lens elements
H
 8 lens elements
I
 9 lens elements
J
10 lens elements
K
11 lens elements
L
12 lens elements

    Apparently there are also some 13 (M?), 14 (N?), 15 (O?), and 16 (P?) element Minolta Manual Focus zoom lenses, but again, I haven't seen any double-letter codes for them either, yet.  Does anyone know of exceptions?
Nonexistent codes:

M 13 lens elements
N 14 lens elements
O 15 lens elements
P 16 lens elements

    'W' was also used to indicate Wide angle lenses from 21mm to 35mm and it usually proceeded the word ROKKOR.

    'RF' was used for ReFlex (mirror) lenses, and 'RF' also proceeded the word ROKKOR.

    Oh, yes, and of course,

    'MC' and 'MD' were also two-letter markings on the lens and usually precede the word ROKKOR.

    Thus,


    ROKKOR-IC = 3 lens elements in 3 lens groups,

    NOTE: -IC is a typographical translation error in some Minolta catalogs - see -TC below

    ROKKOR-TC = 3 lens elements in 3 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-TD = 4 lens elements in 3 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-QD = 4 lens elements in 4 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-QE = 5 lens elements in 4 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-QF = 6 lens elements in 4 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-QH = 8 lens elements in 4 lens groups
    ROKKOR-PE = 5 lens elements in 5 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-PF = 6 lens elements in 5 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-PG = 7 lens elements in 5 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-PH = 8 lens elements in 5 lens groups
    ROKKOR-PI = 9 lens elements in 5 lens groups
    ROKKOR-HF = 6 lens elements in 6 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-HG = 7 lens elements in 6 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-HH = 8 lens elements in 6 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-SG = 7 lens elements in 7 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-SI = 9 lens elements in 7 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-OK = 11 lens elements in 8 lens groups,
    ROKKOR-NJ = 10 lens elements in 9 lens groups
    ROKKOR-NL = 12 lens elements in 9 lens groups.

    Whew! This nomenclature style all became passé in the mid 1970's with the introduction of the Minolta X camera series, and was pretty much entirely gone by 1977 with Minolta's introduction of MD lenses and the Minolta XD Cameras, the world's first 35mm SLR with multiple auto exposure modes.  Initially, these later US market Rokkor lenses were marked ROKKOR-X, some were also marked with the double letter codes, and some were without the double letter codes.  Eventually, all later production lenses have been marked "merely" MINOLTA.  Who knows when the last "Rokkor" lens left the Minolta assembly line?

    Why did Minolta choose Greek or Latin abbreviations?  I'm guessing ... mathematics written in ancient Greek was translated into Latin and became the mathematics of Western Europe.  KaZuO TaShiMa, the founder in the year 1928 of what was to become MiNolTa in the year 1962, wanted to be the best German camera company in Japan, so ... why not imitate even the language of German science, sort of?  I'm guessing!

    What else evolved inside Minolta lenses during the evolution of the nomenclature on the outside of the lens?  Lens coating, lens multi-coating, lens design (ray tracing), barrel construction, filter sizes (most notably a dance between 55 mm filter thread and 49 mm filter thread), internal baffling for flare reduction, number of aperture blades, shape of aperture blades, metal or rubber focus and zoom rings, different color paint used in lens label lettering, and so on.  What has Minolta to say?

Regarding Minolta lens coatings:

    According to Minolta Japan web site, in the year 1946, the company that was to become Minolta developed the first lens-coating treatment method used in Japan. Did they coat every lens? Who knows?

    According to a Minolta brochure around the year 1973, "... Minolta, for decreased flare and improved color rendition, pioneered in developing a special technique called "Apochromatic Coating" a decade and a half ago [around the year 1958?]. This exclusive process provides a double coating of fluorides plus other ingredients to yield a very high rate of light transmission as well as superior color rendition. As a result, Rokkor Lenses give rich, true color tones - better than any other lens made today we are sure you'll agree."

    This implies that at least from about the year 1973 (if not earlier) to about the year 1977 (with the introduction of Minolta MD lenses), some Minolta MC ROKKOR-xx (double-letter marked as above) Lenses were probably multicoated.

    Finally, there's more than "Minolta-brand MC" and "Minolta-brand MD" out there - there are 2 other Minolta-brand 35mm Manual Focus SLR lens types out there:

    - SR-style - the Minolta SR-2 through SR-M, from around the year 1958 through the year 1966 (when the SR-T-series came out), and that's a series of lenses even older than MC, with manual stop down for exposure, (oooh, 'SR' is yet another two-letter marking, and it's not even MC!),

and:

    - Celtic - Minolta's 'inexpensive' line, with models from 28mm to 200mm, from f/2.8 to f/5.6 - MC and MD style.

    ... and all the non-Minolta lenses from Tamron, Sigma, Vivitar, Tokina, Sears, Spiratone, Rexatar, Soligor, Sankyo Kohki, JCPenny, and many, many others, about which you are all on your own to figure out multicoating, browse to other web resources such as Robert Monahan's (no relation) enormous and enormously wonderful web site at http://mefmt.8k.com/third/ (was at http://www.smu.edu/~rmonagha/third/ which is an old reference and is now defunct) for a discussion, including a list that's about 1,600 lenses long!  The following styles fit Minolta Manual Focus 35mm SLRs:

    SR

    MC

    MD

    T(Tamron)-mount-to-Minolta-SR/MC/MD

    TX and T4/5-mount-to-Minolta-SR/MC/MD

    Tamron Adaptall-2-mount-to-Minolta-SR/MC/MD (note - these lenses can also directly fit Minolta AF cameras with a Tamron Adaptall 2 mount, thereby avoiding any teleconverter effect, though aperture operation is manual only on an AF camera)

    Other-Adapter-mount-to-Minolta-SR/MC/MD

    So, all you Minolta aficionados out there - have at it!  Is anyone still afraid of MC/MD differences?  The world is full of new and used lenses waiting for you to come out and play!  Tell us what you find! mailto:peterblaise@yahoo.com


Minolta MF lenses on AF cameras?

A frequent inquiry:

    > does anyone know if there exists an
    > adaptor to allow MC or MD lenses to be
    > used on Minolta AF camera bodies?


    Yes, Minolta made two 2x teleconverter adapters of superlative optical qualities to fit Minolta manual focus lenses onto Minolta AF cameras, one for under 300mm lenses (S) and one for over 300mm lenses (L). Look for these Minolta brand descriptions and part numbers:

Minolta 2x M/A CONVERTER-S 2583-107

... and ...


Minolta 2x M/A CONVERTER-L 2584-107

    U
se http://www.google.com/ to search for sources, ignore the responses that claim to take your order and let you know when it is back in stock - they are search engine spam. The price range is new ~US$350 or so, to used at whatever anyone thinks it's worth - NOT a popular or fast moving item.

     Like all lens adapters, they may or may not physically fit a particular lens, and like all adapters, they may or may not degrade the image forming qualities of a lens below your own standards. Be prepared to "buy it and try it". Other manufacturer's made ~1.1x to ~1.6x teleconverter adapters of varying optical qualities to fit Minolta manual focus lenses to Minolta auto focus cameras, as you were sent to on eBay to see, and Sigma made one that even auto focuses when used on the Minolta AF series cameras - the 5000/7000/9000 (but NOT on later series Minolta auto focus cameras).


    http://www.srbfilm.co.uk/ is a reliable place to purchase new adapters on demand to fit your wonderful Minolta manual focus lenses to just about anything, or to fit just about any lens to a Minolta manual focus camera, including reverse adapters and filter rings for reversed Minolta manual focus lenses.

     Note that when any lens is fitted to another camera, almost all auto features are not implemented, and all lenses become manual focus, manual stop down metering, and often have a different focal length and different maximum aperture due to needing a teleconverter to accommodate the different distances from the lens mount to the film for each camera system.

     Tamron is the only exception to this with their Adaptall 2 series of lenses which fit all Minolta 35mm SLR cameras, manual and auto focus, with adapters that have NO teleconverter effect, though they do loose their auto aperture operation on auto focus cameras and become manual stop down metering lenses. See http://www.tamron.com/lenses/prod/adaptall.asp for their modern series of Minolta-fit manual focus lenses. If you are planning on one set of lenses to use on different manufacturer's camera bodies, this is the only way to go.

    However, most people prefer the benefits of fully functional features from their investment in Minolta-fit manual focus lenses, so they eventually settle down on a matching Minolta manual focus camera body for them, especially when they realize that there is usually a teleconverter effect, and the loss of automatic features, when adapting lenses to fit between different camera body styles, and so they just "settle" on an inexpensive Minolta manual focus camera to use with their Minolta manual focus lenses, and do not try to use such lenses elsewhere.

    Tell me more about what you are after!

Click!

Love and hugs,
Peter Blaise Monahon
Minolta Vivitar Tamron Fujifilm Ilford Kodak Adobe Hewlett Packard et cetera Photographer
peterblaise@yahoo.com
http://www.peterblaisephotography.com/



Manual Focus Lenses
Cameras
Accessories
Books

17mm f/3.5

28mm f/2.8 Macro

28-70mm f/3.5-4.8 Macro

28-105mm f/2.8-3.8 Macro

35mm f/2.8

35-200mm f/3.0-4.5 Macro

38-100mm f/3.5 Macro

50mm f/2.0

58mm f/1.2

60-300mm f/4.0-5.6 Macro

85mm f/1.7

90mm f/2.5 Macro

70-210mm f/3.5 Macro

90-230mm f/4.5

135mm f/2.8

300mm f/5.6

500mm f/8 Macro

X-700

X-700 with Multifunction Back


Multi-Function Back

360PX Auto Electro Flash

Motor Drive

Extension Tube Sets

Remote Electro Shutter Release Cord

Lens Reversing Ring for Close-Up

2x and 3X Teleconverters


Minolta SLR Camera & Accessory Guide

Minolta SLR Cameras

Minolta X-300/370s & X-700/X-9 Guide

Short Course in Minolta Photography
Down to form =
Down to form =
Down to form =
Down to form =


Item Description:
see end of document * for discussion of
SR/MC/MD/X-600 lens fitting information.


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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta X-700 Camera
Minolta Multifunction Data Intervalometer Back
Minolta EH-7 Rubber Eyepiece

Minolta X-700 Camera,

A Classic 35mm SLR with TTL Through The Lens Programmed Automatic Exposure, Programmed Autoflash operation, Aperture Priority and Manual Exposure modes, using the full range of Minolta Manual Focus T-Mount/SR/MC/MD/X-600 lenses.? Exposure control: EV 1 to EV 18, +/ -2 EV Compensation in 1/2 EV steps, ASA/ISO 25/15º to 1600/33º in 1/3 Steps, (equal to ASA/ISO 6/9º to 6,400/39º in 1/2 or 1/3 steps) - Shutter: 1/1,000 to 4 seconds - Viewfinder: 0.9x magnification, 95% image - Flash: auto; sync with 'x' flash; TTL Through The Lens OTF Off The Film flash control with 'px' flash - Batteries: 2x LR44 or A-76 or SR44 or S-76 or EPX-76 or 1x CR-1/N - Self Timer,

with super bright Acute Matte Viewfinder Screen, either: the standard
P1 Horizontal Split Image Biprism for general photography, or, the
G Matt Field only - for general use, close-up and telephotography,
with screw-in body cap,
with original Minolta strap including viewfinder blind and spare battery holder,
with copy of Minolta Owner's Manual,

with Minolta EH-7 Rubber Eyepiece cup,

with Minolta Program Back with Data and Intervalometer (see below, 3rd item)

Condition: fully functional, no damage, some 'brassing', Made in Japan.

Uses ANY and ALL Minolta-style Manual Focus Lens (T, SR, MC, MD and X-600) in Manual, Aperture Priority or Program mode. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!


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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta X-700 Camera

with Minolta EH-7 Rubber Eyepiece



Minolta X-700 Camera,

A Classic 35mm SLR with Programmed Automatic Exposure, Programmed Autoflash operation, Aperture Priority and Manual Exposure modes, using the full range of Minolta Manual Focus SR/MC/MD/X-600 lenses.? Exposure control: EV 1 to EV 18, +/-2 EV Compensation in 1/2 EV steps, ASA 25 to 1600 in 1/3 Steps, (equal to ASA 6 to 64,000 in 1/2 or 1/3 steps) - Shutter: 1/1,000 to 4 seconds - Viewfinder: 0.9x magnification, 95% image - Flash: auto; sync with 'x' flash; Off The Film flash control with 'px' flash - Batteries: 2x LR44 or A-76 or SR44 or S-76 or EPX-76 or 1x CR-1/N - Self Timer,

with super bright Acute Matte Viewfinder Screen, either: the standard
P1 Horizontal Split Image Biprism for general photography, or, the
G Matt Field only - for general use, close-up and telephotography,

with screw-in body cap,
with original Minolta Strap including viewfinder blind and spare battery holder,
with copy of Minolta Owner's Manual,

with Minolta EH-7 Rubber Eyepiece cup,

Condition: fully functional, no damage, some 'brassing', Made in Japan.

Uses ANY and ALL Minolta-style Manual Focus Lens (T, SR, MC, MD and X-600) in Manual, Aperture Priority or Program mode. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta Multifunction Back for X-700

with Date/Data Imprint and Intervalometer (takes a series of pictures at programmed intervals)

"JAPAN", Y2K compatible
uses 2x 3v lithium CR1/3N or 4x 1.5v silver-oxide or alkaline S-76, EPX-76, A-76 batteries,
metal and plastic

It can imprint data on the film within the image area, and can control the camera and an attached flash.? The LCD (liquid crystal display) shows time and date and/or image sequence number and/or interval countdown.? Combined with an auto winder, it can take a series of pictures on it's timer.? With the camera on B, can hold the shutter open for a programmed length of time for long exposures.

With copy of Minolta Owner's Manual.

Condition: fully functional, no damage, some 'brassing'.

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta Motor Drive 1

for Minolta X-700 and XG-M camera,
uses 4 AA batteries

Perfectly balanced way to hold your Minolta X-700 or XG-M camera!? Has horizontal and vertical shutter buttons, each with three settings: Off, Single, and Continuous.? It has cable sockets to coordinate with an attached Minolta Auto Electro Flash to 'wait' for the flash to cycle (or flash can be set to lower power to recycle faster).? You can still use the on-camera shutter button, however, the on-camera manual winder does not wind with the Motor Drive 1 attached.? Note: Motor Drive does not rewind the film - that is still a manual task.

Condition: fully functional, no damage, some 'brassing' - yes, it's plastic, but what so I say, some 'plasticking'?

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta 360PX Auto Electro Flash

with Wide Angle Diffuser lens,
with copy of Minolta Owner's Manual,
takes 4 AA batteries,

Fully Automatic Through The Lens (TTL) Off The Film (OTF) flash control in the Minolta X-700 camera.

Works in various levels of TTL, Manual, and 3 different Automatic modes on any camera with a flash hot-shoe.

In manual mode, it has thyristor feedback to turn off the flash when light bounces back to the flash, thereby saving batteries.

It has 8 power settings from FULL to 1/16 and Winder Sync, along with Telephoto, Normal, Wide and extra-Wide settings.

The head tilts 90? and swivels 180?.

It has sockets for external power, multiple flash connections, winder control, and is PC cable compatible.

It has auto shutoff so it won't kill the batteries while in storage if you forget to shut it off.

Condition: fully functional, wide angle diffuser lens has a crack repair, some marks and scratches.

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta X Remote Cord

Electrical Contact, 19 feet long,
for Minolta X Cameras

Excellent for repeat pictures using Motor Drive or Auto Winder and Auto or Program Exposure on a tripod, but even without the auto film advance, it's nice to set up a shot, walk away from the camera (19 feet) and wait for the perfect moment.

Condition: fully functional, no damage, like new.

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http://www.vivitar.com
Vivitar MC Lens, Wide Angle,
17mm f/3.5 (to f/16)


?72mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: 70? to 103.6?,
Close focus: 4 1/2",
6 aperture blades,
Size: 3 1/4" wide by? 3" long,
Weight:
Markings: "Vivitar 17MM 1:3.5 AUTO WIDE ANGLE No.3770217 ?72MM LENS MADE IN JAPAN M/SR",
Construction: metal, glass, with rubber grips,

with Tiffen ?72mm Sky 1-A UV filter, metal, "MADE IN USA",
with front (metal, with "Vivitar" logo) and rear lens caps,
with lens case,

for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, no damage, very little wear, no marks or scratches; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

This is my favorite lens for interiors, since I can stand in a corner and get a full 90? corner image of a room.? It's also great for landscapes with close-up features since it close focuses to 4 1/2"!

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http://www.sears.com and
http://www.minolta.com
Sears MD Lens, Wide Angle,
28mm f/2.8 (to f/22)


?52mm filter ring,
Field of view: 46.4? to 75.4?,
Close focus: 4",
Macro: 1:10, 1:8, 1:5, 1:4,
6 aperture blades,
Size: 2" long by 2 1/5" wide,
Weight:
Markings: "SEARS MULTICOATED 1:2.8 f=28mm 52? No.840724883 AUTO MACRO 1:10 1:8 1:5 1:4 MD MOD. NO. 202. 736910 KOREA",
Construction: metal, glass, rubber grip,
?
with Minolta Lens Hood 28mm ?55mm thread,
with ?52mm to ?55mm adapter ring,
with ?55mm UV filter,
with front and rear lens caps,
with lens case,

for Minolta MF SR/MC/MD. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition: fully functional, like new, no wear, no marks, no scratches; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

This is a very nice, clear, clean, reasonably fast, lightweight, small lens, great for all around traveling - everything from wide angle landscapes to close focusing macro of only 4"!

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http://www.vivitar.com
Vivitar MD/X-600 Lens, Auto Focus 2.5x Zoom,
28-70mm f/3.5-4.8 (to f/22)


ø52mm filter ring,
Field of view: 46.4? to 75.4?,
Close focus: 9",
Macro,
8 aperture blades,
Size: 3 5/8" wide, 3 7/8" long,
Weight:
Construction: plastic outer body, internal all metal and glass, metal frame, mount and filter ring, all lenses are glass, takes 3 AAA batteries,

with front and rear lens caps,

for Minolta MF SR/MC/MD/X-600. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

This lens works perfectly as a manual focus lens.? NOTE: This lens was designed and built by/for Vivitar during the early days of auto focus (1980s?).? However, the electronic circuitry in this lens no longer auto focuses.? Nothing is physically broken or damaged.? It is fully optically and mechanically functional as a manual focus lens with auto exposure coupling.

Condition:? fully mechanically functional, no damage, very little wear, some marks or scratches on the outer plastic shell; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

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http://www.vivitar.com
Vivitar MD/X-600 Lens, Series 1, 3.75x Zoom,
28-105mm f/2.8-3.8 (to f/22)

?
?67mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: 37.8? to 63.4?,
Close focus: 9",
Macro,
8 aperture blades,
Size: 2 3/4" wide by 4 1/4" long,
Weight:
Construction: metal, glass, rubber grips,

with front and rear lens caps,
with lens case,

for Minolta MF SR/MC/MD/X-600. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, no damage, very little wear, some marks or scratches in the outer shell; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.? Recently cleaned, lubed and aligned - one of my favorite lenses.

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http://www.vivitar.com
Tamron MC Lens,
35mm f/2.8 (to f/22)

?
?55mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: ~37.8? to 63.4?,
Close focus: ~0.09",
68 aperture blades,
Size: ~2 1/2" wide by 2 1/4" long,
Weight:
Construction: metal, glass, rubber grips,

with front and rear Tamron Logo lens caps,
with lens case,

for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, no damage, very little wear, some marks or scratches in the outer shell; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.? Recently cleaned, lubed and aligned - one of my favorite lenses.

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http://www.vivitar.com
Vivitar MD Lens, 5.7x Zoom
35-200mm f/3-4.5 (to f/22)

?
?62mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: 13.7? to 59.3?,
Close focus: 39"
Macro 1:5x,
6 aperture blades,
Size: 2 3/4" wide by 5 3/4" long,
Construction: metal, glass, rubber grips,

with ?62mm to ?67mm step-up ring adapter,
with ?67mm UV filter,

with? front (?67mm) and rear lens caps,

for Minolta MF SR/MC/MD. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, no damage, no wear; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

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http://www.tamron.com
Tamron MC Lens, 2.6x Zoom,
38-100mm f/3.5 (to f/22) f/3.5 throughout


?67mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: ~13.7? to ~59.3?,
Close focus: 4 1/4 "
Macro 1:10-1:4,
Size: 4 7/8" long by 2 3/4" wide,
Weight:
Construction: metal, glass, rubber grips,

with ?67mm UV filter,
with Tamron logo front and rear lens caps,
with lens case,
with Tamron Adaptall for Minolta MF SR/MC,

for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, lots of marks and scratches on the outer shell, filter ring dinged and straightened, but 'tough' to screw in; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta MC Lens,
50mm f/2.0 (to f/16)

?
?55mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: 27? to 46.8?,
Close focus: 15 1/4",
5 aperture blades,
Size: ~2 1/2" wide by ~1 3/8" long,
Weight: ~5.5 oz.
Construction: metal and glass, rubber focusing ring,
Markings: "MINOLTA LENS MADE IN JAPAN MC ROKKOR-PF 1:2 f=50mm 1016217",

with Minolta 50mm Hood,
with 55mm UV filter,
with front and rear lens caps,
with lens case,
?
for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, shows signs of wear; filter ring bent and straightened; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

This is a great 'knock-about' lens for all occasions - light weight and fast enough for most available light situations, surprisingly crisp and clear images, occasional unusual pentagon flare when shooting into the sun (from the 5 aperture blades) - hard to buy this effect anywhere else
!

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta MC Lens,
58mm f/1.2 (to f/16)

?
?55mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: ~23.3? to ~40.9?,
Close focus: ~8 3/4",
8 aperture blades (good bokeh - smooth out of focus background elements),
Size: ~2 1/4" long by ~2 3/4" wide,
Weight: ~16 7/8 oz.
Construction: all metal and glass - no rubber or plastic; 7 elements in 5 groups (PG = Penta means 5 and G is the 7th letter of the alphabet, hence PG),
Markings: "MINOLTA LENS MADE IN JAPAN MC ROKKOR-PG 1:1.2 f=58mm 2558095",

with front and rear lens caps,
with lens case,
?
for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, no damage, no wear; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

This is my favorite (fast) lens for hand held available light candid portraits. The high speed f/1.2 lets me use slower, fine grain films along with one of the 80A/B/C Blue color filters to compensate for amber color indoor incandescent lights.

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http://www.sears.com
Sears MD Lens, 5x Zoom, Multicoated, Auto,
60-300mm f/4.0-5.6 (to f/22)


?62mm filter ring,
Field of view: ~4.6? to ~39.7?,
Close focus: 36",
Macro 1:2.8, 1:4.5, 1:7, 1:10, 1:14,
6-blade aperture,
Size: ~6 3/4" long by ~2 1/2" wide,
Weight: ~
Construction: metal, glass, rubber grip,
Markings: "SEARS MOD. NO 202 7368500 KOREA",

with Tiffen Step-Up ?62mm to ?67mm Adapter ring,
with front and rear lens caps,

for Minolta MF SR/MC/MD. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, no damage, no wear; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

This is my favorite lens for outdoor candid 'sniper' portraits. Using Fuji 1600 ASA film, I can hand hold this lens and get great images! It sits comfortably in my left hand while I scan the area for a subject. Zooming to 300mm allows me to stay out of a subject's immediate awareness. On a tripod, it's great for closeups of far away animals, and I've used it with the 2x and 3x teleconverters below for the equivalent of up to 900mm f/16. This lens is ~1/3 f/stop faster than the current top of the line world class Tamron 28-300mm f/3.5-6.3 $500 super zoom.

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta MC Lens, MC Rokkor-X
85mm f/1.7 (to f/22)


?55mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: ~16.1? to ~28.6?,
Close focus: ~33 1/4",
6 aperture blades,
Size: ~2 3/4" long by ~2 3/4" wide,
Weight: ~16 oz.
Construction: metal, glass, rubber grips,
Markings: "MINOLTA LENS MADE IN JAPAN MC ROKKOR-X 1:1.7 f=85mm 2617315"

with Minolta Lens Hood for 85mm, ?55mm Thread,
with ?55mm UV filter,
with front and rear lens caps,
with lens case,

for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, no damage, no wear; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

This is my favorite lens for hand held, available light, indoor (and outdoor) candid portraits. The 85mm lets me get close-up faces without being "in their face". The high speed f/1.7 lets me use slower, fine grain films along with one of the 80A/B/C Blue color filters to compensate for amber color indoor incandescent lights.

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http://www.vivitar.com
Vivitar MC Lens, 2.5x Zoom
90-230mm f/4.5 (to f/22)

?
?58mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: ~6? to ~27?,
Close focus: ~76",
8 aperture blades (good bokeh - smooth out of focus background elements)
Size: ~8 3/4" long by ~2 1/2" wide,
Weight: ~32 oz.
Construction: metal and glass, 11 elements in 7 groups
Markings: "Vivitar TELE ZOOM LENS 1:4.5 90-230mm No.378006600 AUTO LENS MADE IN JAPAN MIN",

with Built-in Adjustable Tripod Socket,
with Built-in Retractable Lens Hood,
with ?58mm UV filter,
with front and rear lens caps,
with Vivitar T-4 to Minolta SR/MC adapter,

for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, no damage, no wear - tripod mount tightening screw slightly bent but functional; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

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http://www.tamron.com
Tamron MC Lens,
135mm f/2.8 (to f/22)


?55mm Filter Ring,
Field of view: ~10.2? to ~18.2?,
Close focus: ~54 1/2"
9 aperture blades (good bokeh - smooth out of focus background elements),
Size: ~3 5/8" long by 2 3/4" wide,
Weight:
Construction: metal, glass, rubber grips,
Markings: tamron 1:2.8 f=135mm No.323382 ø55MM AUTO LENS MADE IN JAPAN USA.PAT.NO.3500736 USA.PAT.NO.3500735 MADE IN JAPAN, FOR MINOLTA SRT

with ?55mm UV filter,
with built-in retractable lens hood,
with front and rear lens caps,
with lens case,
with Tamron Adaptall for Minolta SRT,

for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition:? fully functional, lots of marks and scratches on the outer shell, filter ring dinged and straightened, still a little 'tough' to screw in; glass, aperture blades, controls, and focusing movements flawless.

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I must get one soon!

Quantaray
Quantaray T Lens, Mirror/Reflex,
300mm f/5.6 (fixed)


ø67mm front filter ring,
Field of view: ~4.6° to ~8.2°
Close focus: 86"
Size: ~2 3/4" wide by ~3 1/2" long,
Weight:
Construction: metal and glass, rubber focusing ring,
Markings: "QUANTARAY 300mm 1:5.6 MIRROR LENS No.46858 67ø MADE IN JAPAN",

with front and rear lens caps,
with T-Mount to Minolta MF,
with lens case,

Construction: metal, glass, rubber grips,

fits Minolta SR/MC/MD but does not operate camera's MC/MD sensors. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Note: Use shutter speeds to adjust exposure, and/or neutral density filters and/or polarizer filters if subject brightness is out of range

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta Close-Up Extension Tube Set SR

(9, 14, 19, 29, 38, 44, 53, 59 and 66 mm combinations)

allows magnification from 0.14 to 1.4 times life size,

Construction: all metal,

with copy of Minolta Owner's Manual,
?
for Minolta MF SR, fits MC/MD but does not operate the MC/MD tabs. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition: like new, fully functional.

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http://www.vivitar.com
Vivitar Close-Up Extension Tube Set MD

12mm, 20mm, 36mm,

all metal,

with front and rear caps,
?
for Minolta MF SR/MC/MD. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition: like new, fully functional.

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta Reversing Ring II ?55mm 8326-200

allows you to turn the lens around for ultimate close focusing image quality at magnifications greater than life size (1:1 image-to-subject reproduction ratio)
can be used in combination with extension tubes and bellows,
for up to 10.3x magnification over life size,

with Minolta Instruction Sheet,

Construction: solid metal

Condition: one like new, other shows normal use, both perfectly functional.

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ALBINAR
Albinar 2x Teleconverter MD

metal, glass, rubber grips,
"LENS MADE IN JAPAN",

with front and rear caps,
?
with case,

for Minolta MF SR/MC/MD. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition: like new, fully functional.

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http://www.soligor.com
Soligor 2x Teleconverter MC

metal, glass, rubber grips,
"LENS MADE IN JAPAN",

with front and rear caps,

with Soligor Case,
?
for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate the MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition: like new, fully functional.

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Star-D
Star-D 3x Teleconverter MD

metal, glass, rubber grips,
"LENS MADE IN JAPAN",

with front and rear caps,
?
for Minolta MF SR/MC/MD. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition: like new, fully functional.

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http://www.vivitar.com
Vivitar 3x Teleconverter MC 3x-5

Construction: metal and glass,
"LENS MADE IN JAPAN",

with front and rear caps,

for Minolta MF SR/MC, fits MD but does not operate MD tab. See discussion at end for MC/MD lens compatibility explanation!

Condition: 2 available, one like new, the other one has bent but accurately re-straightened MC pin, both are fully functional.

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http://www.minolta.com
Minolta SLR Camera & Accessory Guide

1983 Minolta
168 Pages, Color and Black and White pictures, charts

Explains cameras, lenses, exposure, film, filters, flash, plus specific instructions on photographing portraits, children, architecture, sports, landscapes, seascapes, nature and close-up, and more.

Cameras: XG-A, XG-1, X-700, X-570,

Fixed Lenses, Macro, Micro, Bellows, VFC, Shift CA, Varisoft and Mirror: 7.5mm, 12mm, 12.5mm, 16mm, 20mm, 24mm, 25mm, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 85mm, 100mm, 135mm, 200mm, 250mm, 300mm, 400mm, 600mm, 800m, 1,600mm, maximum of f/1.2 to f/11 (to minimum of f/16, f/22 or f/32)

Zoom Lenses: 24-35mm, 24-50mm, 28-85mm, 35-70mm, 35-105mm, 50-135mm, 70-210mm, 75-150mm, 75-200mm, 100-200mm, 100-300mm, 100-500mm

Flashes - 20, 360px, 132px, plus Color Meter II, Autometer III, Spotmeter II, Flash Meter, Filters, Extension Tubes, and Techniques

Condition: Pages and illustrations excellent, gum binding has been opened so book lays flat to read, photocopy or scan.

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HPBooks
How To Select And Use Minolta SLR Cameras

1982, Carl Simpson HPBooks
208 Pages, Color and Black and White pictures, charts

Explains Exposure, camera, lenses, film, controls and features, viewing and focusing, exposure metering and control, close-up and macro photography, light, filters, flash, auto winders, motor drives, data backs, and more.

Cameras: X-700, XG-M, XG-1, XG-A, XD-11, XD-5 (and 110 Zoom/SLR Mark II) all lenses and accessories, flashes and system accessories, close-up & macro, bellows and extension tubes.

Index.

Condition: Pages and illustrations excellent, gum binding has been opened so book lays flat to read, photocopy or scan.

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Hove Foto Books
Complete Minolta User's Guide
X-300s. X-370n and X-700 (X-9)


1990 Herbert Kaspar Hove Foto Books
159 Pages, Color and Black and White Pictures and Charts

Explains camera, lens, exposure, shutter, aperture, program, film, and more.

Covers the Cameras listed above, plus all Minolta lenses, flashes and system accessories, close-up & macro, bellows and extension tubes.

Condition: Pages and illustrations and binding are excellent.

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Curtain & London
A Short Course in Minolta Photography
A Guide To Great Pictures


1982 Barbara London, Curtin & London
148 Pages, Color and Black and White Pictures and Charts

One subject per page, simple without being simplistic - the camera, the lens, film and exposure, color, special techniques, lighting, how to see like a camera, and more.

Cameras: X-700, XD-series, XG-series, XK-series, SR-T-series,
Lenses (Minolta 7.5mm to 1,600mm), and Filters, Flash (Minolta 20 to 320x) Close-Up (tubes and diopters), Macro, Micro, Accessories, Exposure Meters, Cokin Creative Filters.

Glossary, Bibliography, Index.

Condition: Pages and illustrations and binding are excellent.

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