Wind in the Bush: The most informative, comprehensive, and up-to-date pages on Australian wind power and wind farms.
These pages are independent of any company, lobby group, or government.


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Wind farm photo pages...

Canunda/Lake Bonney
Hallett
Mount Millar
Snowtown
Starfish Hill
Victoria
Wattle Point

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Contact: email daveclarkecb@yahoo.com

Contents of this page...

Introduction | Installed wind power in SA | Capacities of conventional power stations | Growth of the SA wind industry | South Australian wind farms | SA wind farms by region | Visiting SA wind-farms | News | Power interconnectors | Index |

Graphs

Operational SA wind farms | Monthly wind farm generation in SA | Wind energy contribution to SA power | Generation duration curve for SA wind power | Wind output at high demand periods

Tables

Installed capacities of SA wind farms | Capacities of conventional power stations | SA wind farms by region | Colour coding for wind farm status | Other proposed wind farms | Power interconnectors |

Map

Hallett wind farms


Created as a separate page 2004/02/28, modified 2009/10/20
Information about wind farms that I have missed, additional interesting information,
or corrections for anything that I have got wrong, would be greatly appreciated.
About these pages
Contact: email daveclarkecb@yahoo.com

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Introduction

 
Updated 2009/06/22
This page discusses matters that relate to wind-generated electricity, especially as it is developing in South Australia.

In 2008 South Australia had, according to the SA Electricity Supply Industry Planning Council (ESIPC) annual report, "one of the three highest penetrations of wind generation with respect to installed capacity world wide", it also has huge potential for further wind farm development.

Before 2003 there was only one large wind turbine in South Australia: a 150kW unit at Coober Pedy. As of June 2009 there was 740 MW of operational wind farm capacity in South Australia: Starfish Hill, Wattle Point, Cathedral Rocks, Mount Millar, Lake Bonney Stage 1, Canunda, Hallett Stage 1, Lake Bonney Stage 2 and Snowtown. A further 126MW is under construction: Hallett Stage 2 and Clements Gap. Actual wind generation figures, from ESIPC, are graphed below.

Very limited government support

However, wind farm development in Australia and South Australia is slower than it could be; this is mainly due to very limited support from the respective governments, favouring the fossil fuel industry over sustainable energy. The limit to the growth of the wind industry in South Australia is the lack of high capacity electricity transmission lines where they are needed. The SA Government built a transmission line for the Olympic Dam uranium mine, but is unwilling to build or upgrade a single line for the further development of sustainable electricity. Wind farms are not being built on the west coast of Eyre Peninsula because there are no suitable power transmission lines. No more wind farms can be built in southern Yorke and Eyre Peninsulas because power transmission line capacity is fully used. Further development in the South East is unlikely without increased power transmission line capacity.

The Essential Services Commission of South Australia (ESCOSA) has placed conditions on new wind farms that are good for the power transmission operators but expensive and difficult for wind farm operators to fulfil. The Rann SA government is not as supportive of sustainable energy as is claims to be, rather it is opportunistic. For example, Victoria and NSW both have publicly available wind resource maps, but there is no public wind resource map of SA. SA is well suited to wind farms and the Rann government is attempting to take credit for development that is being stimulated by interstate mandatory renewable energy targets.

The NSW and Victorian governments have legislated large mandatory renewable energy targets. These will make electricity retailers buy significant percentages of renewable energy. For NSW to fulfil its commitment to renewable energy it will have to buy wind generated electricity from SA - SA has a better wind resource than NSW (see Wind Power Potential in Oz. The SA government will deviously try to take credit for the upsurge due to the new demand from NSW.

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Installed capacities of existing SA wind farms

Installed wind power in South Australia
by wind farm, August 2009
NameDate completedMW
Brown Hill Range June 200894.5
Canunda March 200546.0
Cathedral Rocks Sept. 2005?66.0
Lake Bonney Stage 1 March 200580.5
Lake Bonney Stage 2 April 2008?159.0
Mount Millar Dec. 200570.0
Snowtown Sept. 200898.7
Starfish Hill Sept. 200334.5
Wattle Point May 200590.8
Total740

Operational SA wind farms, Megawatts
Wind Power in SA
As of June 2009
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Wind farm generation data

The graph below shows installed wind farm capacity (the blue diamond shapes and stepped connecting line) and actual electricity generation (the vertical bars). It can be calculated that the average capacity factor for the displayed data is 27%.
Monthly wind farm generation in SA
Wind farm generation
Based on data from 2008 SA ESIPC annual report


Wind energy contribution to total SA power generation
Wind farm generation
Figure from 2008 SA ESIPC annual report
Note that while wind energy is still a small part of total SA electricity it is by far the fastest growing component. Much more could be achieved if sustainable energy was to receive serious government support.


Normalised generation duration curve for wind in SA
Wind farm generation
Based on a graph in the 2008 SA ESIPC annual report
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This graph shows the percentage of the time when total wind farm output in SA excedes a given percentage of installed capacity. For example, it shows that 10% of the time the wind farms are producing about 55% of installed capacity and 60% of the time they are producing about 18% of installed capacity.


Histogram of Normalised Wind Output for High Demand Periods
High demand period generation
Figure from 2008 SA ESIPC annual report
The X and Y axes are the same as on the previous graph. This graph shows that 50% of the time during periods of high electricity demand South Australia's wind farms have produced at about 20% of their installed capacity. Unlike solar, wind energy availability is lower than average at times of peak demand.





Capacities of conventional power stations, for comparison

RegionNameOperatorCapacity (MW)
Adelaide Dry CreekInternational Power156
Osborne (Co-gen)ATCO & Origin Energy 180
Pelican PointInternational Power480
Quarantine StationOrigin Energy95
Torrens Island ATXU (Singapore Power)480
Torrens Island BTXU (Singapore Power)800
NorthernAngastonCummins 40
HallettAGL180
MintaroInternational Power90
Northern (Port Augusta)NRG Flinders520
Playford (Port Augusta)NRG Flinders210
SoutheastLadbroke GroveOrigin Energy 80
SnuggeryInternational Power78
Eyre Peninsula Port LincolnInternational Power25
Total of all above 3414
 
All of these power stations are fossil-fuelled; most use natural gas, the Port Augusta stations burn coal.

The journal Windpower Monthly (July 2003) stated that the average electricity load in SA is 1500MW. Minimum overnight demand is about 1000MW (pers. com. Lewis W. Owens, then Chairman of Essential Services Commission of SA).
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Growth of the SA wind industry

 
SA government sustainable energy initiatives in perspective
ProjectMW
Government Adelaide Airport PV 0.11
Goyder Pavilion PV1.00
Wilpena PV 0.10
Commercial Wind farms (as of June 2009)741.00
Potential further on-shore wind developments 24 000
Potential off-shore wind developments24 000?
If the SA government was serious about maximising SA's sustainable power it could spend taxpayer's money much more productively than on tiny 'showcase' projects, for example by upgrading power transmission lines.
In 2003 the only large wind turbine in South Australia was a 0.15 MW unit at Coober Pedy. In early 2004 there was 34 MW of installed wind power and in September 2006 there was 388 MW.

In 2004 there was more than 2000 MW of proposed new wind farm development in South Australia, but it could not go ahead under Howard government policies.

Over the past decade worldwide wind energy generation capacity has been increasing by 25% per year while wind energy prices have been falling by 4% per year.

The Australian Wind Energy Association (AusWEA) produced a map in May 2004 showing that of all federal electorates in Australia Grey had by far the greatest capacity of proposed wind farms. The adjacent electorate Wakefield was second. The map showed that there were 1250MW proposed in Grey and 440MW in the adjacent Wakefield. Roughly speaking, Grey includes 90% of SA, and everything north and west of Port Pirie (all of the proposed wind farms are south of Port Augusta); Wakefield included Yorke Peninsula and points east to the border.

Since then there has been an electoral redistribution. The new, larger Grey now includes all of Yorke Peninsula. Most, if not all, of the 440MW of proposed wind farms of the old Wakefield would now be in Grey, increasing the Grey total to around 1690MW.

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The future of wind power in SA

Climate change is happening and must be minimised; Australia and the world must move away from fossil fuels. I don't think that any reasonable and informed person can doubt this any more. Unfortunately the Rudd Australian government is not giving climate change the high priority that it needs.

Turbine stumps and old tree
The lower two sections have been erected for these Brown Hill Range turbines. Two more tower sections to go, followed by the turbine itself.
2007/12/12
Wind, at the present, is the only economically competitive form of sustainable energy ready to take a significant part of the load. Using biological waste and methane from land-fill to generate electricity is feasible and is being done, but its capacity is limited. It is looking like solar thermal and 'hot dry rock' geothermal is close to being competitive, but these are not ready yet and will take many years to 'scale-up' to the point where they are major sources of energy. Wave-power, photovoltaics, harnessing algae to produce fuels, and other alternatives seem further away. A decade or two could change that picture.

Certainly wind power is not 'the answer' to climate change. Only a naive person would believe that there is a single answer, and only a naive person would object to wind power because it is not 'the answer'. It is a part of 'the answer'. Other parts are energy conservation, technological innovation, development of other forms of sustainable energy, and education. (I have listed some suggestions in What should be done.)

So, what is the future of wind power in SA?

If the logic in the few sentences above is correct, then wind power must be developed to the maximum reasonable degree and as quickly as possible. Wind farms could be built along most of the west-facing coasts of South Australia. That is, from near Ceduna to Coffin Bay on Eyre Peninsula, along much of the west coast of Yorke Peninsula and from around Meningie to Port MacDonald in the South East. Wind turbines could be built along many of the major rounded north-south ridges of the Mount Lofty Ranges and the Southern Flinders Ranges.

I would hope and expect that national parks and conservation parks would be kept free of wind farm developments.

Will we get sick of the sight of wind turbines? Quite possibly. The alternatives, it seems to me, are either to throw caution (and sanity) to the wind and continue with fossil fuels, or to totally change our life-styles and enormously cut down on the amount of energy that we use, in our personal lives and in industry. I cannot imagine our society being ready or willing to do that.






 
Wind turbine at Starfish Hill, Fleurieu Peninsula
Wind turbine at Starfish Hill, Fleurieu Peninsula

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South Australian wind farms

The June 2008 Annual Planning Report of the Electricity Supply Industry Planning Council showed that wind powproduced 10% of South Australia's electricity.

Wind farms in SA
(Locality in brackets)

Barn Hill (Red Hill)
Bluff Range (Hallett)
Brown Hill Range (Hallett)
Canunda (Millicent)
Carmodys Hill (Gulnare/Jamestown)
Cathedral Rocks (Port Lincoln)
Clements Gap (Crystal Brook)
Collaby Hill (CB/Port Pirie)
Coober Pedy (far north)
Green Point (south east SA)
Hallett Hill
Hallett wind farms
Lake Bonney wind farms (Millicent)
Lake Bonney Stage 1 (Millicent)
Lake Bonney Stage 2 (Millicent)
Lake Bonney Stage 3 (Millicent)
Mount Millar (Cowell/Cleve)
Mt Bryan (Hallett)
Myponga-Sellicks Hill (Fleurieu)
North Brown Hill (Hallett)
Port Augusta/Lincoln Gap
Robertstown (Clare)
Snowtown/Barunga (Clare)
Starfish Hill (Fleurieu Pen.)
Stony Gap (Clare)
Troubridge Point (Yorke Pen.)
Vincent North (Yorke Pen.)
Waterloo (Clare)
Wattle Point (Edithburgh)
Willogoleche Hill (Hallett)
Woakwine Range (Millicent)
Worlds End (Burra)
Wind farms by region
Other proposed SA wind farms


Note: Latitudes and Longitudes are given below in decimal degrees. They are given to two decimal places because this defines the location to ±1km; a wind farm is a large thing and typically covers a number of kilometres.

Note that the wind farms listed here as proposed or approved will not necessarily ever be built. You can't be sure that anything is going to be built until it starts happening.

 
Updated 2009/08/30

Wind farms by region

As of June 2009
RegionWind farmMW Status
Eyre Peninsula
136MW
Cathedral Rocks 66Operating
Mount Millar 70Operating
Fleurieu Pen.
68.1MW
Myponga/Sellicks Hill 33.6?Approved
Starfish Hill 34.5Operating
Hallett
(Burra, Jamestown area)
361.2MW
Brown Hill Range 94.5Operating
Hallett Hill 71.4Operating
Mt Bryan 63.0Approved
North Brown Hill 132.3Approved
Mid North
(other than Hallett)
798MW?
Barn Hill 130?Proposed
Carmodys Hill 175?Proposed
Clements Gap 56.7Under construction
Robertstown 100?Proposed
Snowtown/Barunga 99Stage 1 operating
Stony Gap 120?Proposed
Waterloo 117Under construction
South East
334.5MW
Canunda (Millicent)
46Operating
Lake Bonney Stage 1 80.5Operating
Lake Bonney Stage 2 159Operating
Lake Bonney Stage 3 49Operating
Yorke Peninsula
91MW
Wattle Point 91Operating
Colour coding for wind farm
status, below
Proposed
Approved
Under construction
Operating





 
Updated 2009/06/22

Barn Hill wind farm (Red Hill, Mundoora)

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWConstruction date LatLong
Approved622.1 to 3130 to 186Not yet announced S 33.57°E 138.16°

Barn Hill is a prominent hill about 8km SW of Red Hill, about 6km east of Mundoora and 160km NNW of Adelaide. It is conspicuous from the plains around Port Broughton, and is named The Bluff on some maps.

Stanwell Corporation, sold their interest in Barn Hill to Transfield Services Infrastructure in December 2007 and on 2009/06/18 AGL Energy Limited announced that it had acquired the rights to Barn Hill wind farm.

Transfield held public meetings at Redhill and Mundoora to discuss development of the wind farm in June 2008; they submitted a Development Application to the Port Pirie and Wakefield councils in September 2008 and this was approved in late January 2009.

The Barn Hill wind farm, if it is built rather than simply being sold from one potential developer to another, will fill the space along the Barunga Range between Clements Gap and Snowtown wind farms. (That is, from the Hope Gap Road in the south to the Torrs Gap Road in the north.)

Further information on Barn Hill wind farm
Estimated average wind speed8.3m/sec.

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Canunda wind farm

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWCompletedLat Long
Operating23246Opened March 2005S 37.61° E 140.29°

 
Canunda/Lake Bonney wind turbines
Wind turbines of Canunda/Lake Bonney
A 46MW $92.5M wind farm on Woakwine ridge near Tantanoola owned by Canunda Power P.L., a wholly owned subsidiary of UK-based International Power P.L. For an interactive map and/or directions to Canunda go to ExplorOz.

Canunda Power did not respond to my inquiry regarding the annual electricity output and capacity factor of this wind farm.

The first two turbines were switched on in early November 2004 and my information (as of April 2005) is that this wind farm is now fully operational. The wind farm consists of 23 turbines each of 2MW. AGL has signed a deal to purchase all the power generated at this wind farm.

This wind farm was formerly called Lake Bonney Central wind farm.

Also see Canunda photos and notes on visiting Canunda.

Further information on Canunda wind farm
Wind generatorsVestas 2MW
Rotation rateBetween 9 and 19rpm, depending on wind speed
Tower height67m
Blade length40m
Total height to blade tip107m
Distribution power line33kV double-circuit, 16km long
SubstationSnuggery





 
Updated 2009/06/05

Carmodys Hill wind farm

Sometimes called Gulnare wind farm

The site is east of Georgetown and runs along 18km of ridge-line south from Bundaleer Forest to Mount Misery. It is about 170km north of Adelaide.

Summary data for Carmodys Hill wind farm
Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW Construction dateLatLong
Approval applied forup to 702.5up to 175 2010?S 33.37°E 138.48°

Pacific Hydro held meetings at Georgetown, Gulnare and Gladstone in late July 2008 for community information sessions. Pacific Hydro have submitted a Planning Application for construction of the farm to the Northern Areas Council (?Oct. 2008) and have a web page at "https://www.pacifichydro.com.au/Default.aspx?tabid=250".

A 'referral' giving more information on the proposal can be downloaded from the EPBC (Federal Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts: Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act) site. (Search under Referrals and public notices.)

I would like to thank Terry Teoh of Pacific Hydro for much of the above information.

Additional data for Carmodys Hill wind farm
Project costAus$350 million
Greenhouse abatementEstimated at 540 000 tonnes per year
Electricity generationUp to 613GWh p.a.

News

From ABC On-line news, 2009/04/06
Pacific Hydro is waiting on planning approval from the Northern Areas Council, and the council is waiting on more information about the lighting on the wind farm from Pacific Hydro. Pacific Hydro spokesman, Andrew Richards, said that they are "hopeful of being able to pursue it [the wind farm project] fairly quickly some time next year" (2010).
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Cathedral Rocks wind farm

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWCompleted LatLong
Operating33266September 2005?S 34.80 E 135.56

Cathedral Rocks wind farm is south of Port Lincoln in southern Eyre Peninsula. Port Lincoln is 250km west of Adelaide as the crow flies, but considerably more by road. It is jointly owned by some combination of Roaring 40s, Hydro Tasmania and EHN (Oceania) Pty. Ltd.,

Further data on Cathedral Rocks wind farm
Tower height60m
Rotor diameter80m
Total area covered29 square kilometres
Annual production225GWh
Capacity factor39%
The annual production and capacity factor figures above are from Roaring 40s.

 
Cathedral Rocks
Cathedral Rocks wind farm
Appreciation to John White Photos
I tried to visit this wind farm in February, 2006. I was disappointed to be informed that the public does not have access to within even a good viewing distance. I was able to see it only by using binoculars from the top of Winters Hill at Pt. Lincoln. Better views would probably be available from Whaler's Way, on the southern tip of Eyre Peninsula.

Not all of the turbines were running on 4th and 5th February 2006 in spite of there seeming to be ample wind.

Josh Bradshaw of Roaring 40s informed me that the annual electricity production is approximately 225GWh on 2007/09/19. This equates to an average generation rate of 25.7MW and a capacity factor of around 39%, which is exceptionally good I believe.

News 2009/02/03

There was a fire in one of the Cathedral Rocks turbines. ABC On-line news reported that the fire was seen from a nearby boat at 1am (third Feb.) Damages have been estimated at $6 million. It seems the fire did not spread to nearby scrub.
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Updated 2009/08/16

Clements Gap wind farm

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW Completion dueLatLong
Under construction272.156.7First quarter of 2010 S 33.50°E 138.11°

 
Clements Gap
The range on which the Clements Gap turbines are to be built.
Clements Gap itself is in the hollow beyond the near hill
2007/10/07
First towers
The first three half-towers are up.
2009/03/23
Tower & blades
18 half-towers up and many blades on-site
2009/04/10
Clements Gap is about 15km south of Crystal Brook and 180km north of Adelaide.

Construction is nearing completion on this wind farm, as of 2009/08/16, all towers were in place and appeared complete, 25 were running.

For an interactive map and/or directions to Clements Gap go to ExplorOz.

While the turbines were imported, the towers were manufactured in Adelaide.

Further information on Clements Gap wind farm...
The project
Owner/operatorPacific Hydro
Estimated costAus$135 million
Electricity generationEstimated 170GWh/annum
Capacity factorEstimated 32-38%
Output GWh/yrEstimated 170
Greenhouse gas savingEstimated 170 000t/yr
Total cargo to be transported to site8 000 tonnes

The turbines
Wind generatorsSuzlon S88-2.1MW
Hub height80m
Swept area of each turbine0.6ha
Total steel in towers4 400 tonnes

Air seems insubstantial, but this can be misleading. It is interesting to note that at full production ten million tonnes of air will pass through the 27 turbines of Clements Gap wind farm each hour.

Estimated payback time for the "embodied energy" of the whole wind farm is approximately five months.

Most of the information for this section came from Pacific Hydro and Suzlon; in particular Terry Teoh of the former and Megan Wheatley of the latter.

Turbines
Completed turbines at Clements Gap – not yet all operating – 2009/07/24

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Updated 2009/06/13




 

2008/05/03

Collaby Hill
Collaby Hill, looking south
Collaby Hill
Collaby Hill, looking north

Collaby Hill wind farm

Collaby Hill is near Port Pirie and Crystal Brook and is about 210km north of Adelaide by road.

It is part of a long ridge that gradually gains in altitude toward the north and is generally accepted as being the southern-most part of the Flinders Ranges, which continue another 350km to the north. The Mount Lofty Ranges – geologically the same formation – extend from a little to the south of Collaby Hill 270km to the south at Cape Jervis.

StatusConstruction
date
LatLong
ProposedUndecidedApprox. S 33.23°E 138.20°


Wind Farm Developments erected a 50m mast with anemometers and stated that they confirmed the project as viable.

The Northern Argus (May 20th 2009) published an article stating that the original wind monitoring tower had been removed and that Origin Energy had applied to Pirie and Northern Areas Councils for permission to erect four new monitoring towers in the Collaby Hill/Hughs Gap area.

Additional data on Collaby Hill wind farm
Original proposerWind Farm Developments
Latest company involvedOrigin Energy


The above information came from a variety of sources including Wind Farm Developments. It seems that Wind Farm Developments are no longer involved with this project.
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Coober Pedy wind turbine

Coober Pedy turbine
Coober Pedy wind turbine
Photo credit: Greg Farkas
Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW CommissionedLatLong
Operating10.150.15Around 1990 S 29.03°E 134.76°


This was the first wind turbine of more than a few kilowatts capacity to be built in South Australia.

Coober Pedy is a remote town about 750km NNW of Adelaide. Its power supply is by expensive-to-run local diesel powered generators, so even though the area does not have a good wind resource this turbine was thought to be worth building.




Green Point wind farm

There seems to have been little or no work on this project for several years (as of June 2009).

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW Construction dateLatLong
Approved18354 UndecidedS 38.05°E 140.85°

Wind Prospect have planning approval from the District Council of Grant for this wind farm on the coast of south-eastern South Australia between Port Macdonnell and Victorian border.

There seems little other information available. Wind Prospect's page on Green Point is at http://www.windprospect.com.au/sites/green_point.html.

In late February 2009 54 Suzlon turbines became available to AGL (for use at Hallett). It seems that these were from a third party who had cancelled an order with Suzlon. Green Point seems to be the only Australian wind farm in the pipeline with 54 turbines planned. Of course this may be no more than coincidence, the cancelled order might not even have been Australian.






 
Updated 2009/10/20

Hallett wind farms

The individual Hallett wind farms...
NameHallett No.MWStatus (Oct. 2009)
Brown Hill Range1 94.5Operating
Hallett Hill 271.4Nearing completion
Mt Bryan 363.0Proposed
North Brown Hill 4132.3Under construction
Bluff Range ??52.5Unknown
Willogoleche Hill ??54.6Unknown

As of October 2009 the biggest wind farm in Australia is Lake Bonney (SA) at 240MW, second is Waubra (Vic) at 192MW, and third is Woolnorth (Tas) at 140MW. Brown Hill wind farm is operational, Hallett Hill is nearing completion, North Brown Hill is under construction and Mt Bryan looks certain to be built. The four of these Hallett wind farms combined will have a capacity of 361MW.

At 2009/10/20 the AGL net site was stating that "There are two other wind farms under development at Hallett" (in addition to Hallett Hill, North Brown Hill and presumably Brown Hill Range), but gave no more information about the identity of these projects. (It seems likely that they would be Mt Bryan and Willogoleche Hill wind farms.)

Wind turbines on Brown Hill Range
Wind turbines on Brown Hill Range at sunrise. Booborowie Valley on the left.
Brown Hill Range is one of the Hallett wind farms.


The Hallett wind farms are a group of six, five of which were originally proposed by Wind Prospect; all are in the area around Hallett and Mt Bryan, north of Burra. The sixth, North Brown Hill wind farm, was added later. They are all around 170km north of Adelaide. The originally proposed five developments aimed to have an output capacity of about 320MW produced by 160 two-megawatt turbines.

Map of the Hallett wind farm locations (and proposed locations)
Acknowledgment, AGL, April 2009
Hallett map





Bluff Range wind farm

(One of the Hallett group)

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWConstruction date LatLong
Proposed25?2.1?52.5?Undecided S 33.37°E 138.80°

About 10km West of Hallett and 5km SE of the Hallett natural gas-fired power station. The grape-vine informs me that this wind farm is unlikely to be built because it will be in the wind shadow of Brown Hill Range wind farm.

On 2008/03/15 the AGL site contained the following...
"AGL is also evaluating development of The Bluff wind farm comprising about 45 MW and located adjacent to Hallett power station."
Note that there is doubt about the exact size of this proposed wind farm.
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Brown Hill Range wind farm

(One of the Hallett group, Hallett #1)

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW CommissionedLatLong
Operating452.194.5 June 13th 2008S 33.36°E 138.71°

The first Hallett turbine
The first Hallett turbine; from Bundaleer forest
This wind farm is about 15km East of Hallett (map) and consists of 45 turbines each of 2.1MW, it was officially commissioned on June 13th 2008, although was largely operational several months earlier. I believe that it is owned by a superannuation company and its power is being bought by AGL.

A company named Wind Prospect first proposed the farm and did initial work on assessing the wind resource and planning a possible layout.

The turbines are Suzlon S88 2.1MW machines and the farm was constructed by Suzlon. The Suzlon parent company is based in Pune, India.

For an interactive map and/or directions to Brown Hill Range go to ExplorOz.

Bendan Ryan (of Suzlon) informed me that they used Brett Lane and Associates of Melbourne for bird and bat monitoring. Lane et al apparently wrote the wind industry's 'best practice' recommendations for bird and bat monitoring.

I must express my thanks to Peter Reed and Brendan Ryan of Suzlon for their help in keeping me informed and showing me around this wind farm.




Also see Brown Hill Range wind farm photos, notes on visiting. More information on the wind farm is given on the Suzlon site. A 623kB pdf file is available at "http://www.suzlon.com/images/common/AGL Hallett Wind Farm project profile.pdf".




Hallett Hill wind farm

(One of the Hallett group, Hallett #2)

Hallett Hill wind farm
The lower half of some of the turbines towers in place – 2009/02/13

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW Due to be
completed
LatLongCost
Operating 342.171.4Late 2009S 33.55°E 138.86° $166m

 
Hallett Hill depot
Working on the works depot for Hallett Hill wind farm
2008/08/25
Hallett Hill turbines
Several turbines completed
Photogaphed from Clare, 40km away
2009/04/01
As of early April 2009 many of the towers are at least partly built and several turbines are complete (photos). I am able to observe some of this from my place at Clare, about 40km away. Only parts of the wind farm are visible to me, other parts are hidden behind nearer hills.

I believe the tube sections are being manufactured in Adelaide.

A copy of AGL's location map is above; for an interactive map and/or directions to Hallett Hill go to ExplorOz.

Hallett Hill wind farm is about 15km South of Hallett and a very few kilometres west of the township of Mount Bryan.

ABC on-line news, 2008/08/29, reported that:

"Energy company AGL has sold its wind farm near Burra in the mid-north of South Australia in a deal it says is worth $59 million. Energy Infrastructure Trust will own the Hallett Hill wind farm and fund the rest of the project's construction. But AGL will operate and maintain the wind farm and buy all the electricity produced."

The wind farm is being constructed by Suzlon using Suzlon S88v3 turbines.

Further data on Hallett Hill wind farm
Hub height80m
Max. blade tip height124m
Swept area of each turbine0.6ha
No. truck journies during construction1240
High tension cable for rock-anchor footings130km
Rock trenching for 33kV reticualtion17km
Concrete used3400m3
Steel for towers5800t
Underground cable17km
Overhead cable10km
Total weight of material transported to site10 350t
Thanks to Suzlon for this information
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Mt Bryan wind farm

(One of the Hallett group, Hallett #3)

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWConstruction date LatLong
Approved302.163Late 2009? S 33.43°E 138.96°

This wind farm is owned by AGL.

Mount Bryan wind farm is to be built near Mount Bryan (the hill), about 5km East of Hallett, and about 12km NNE of Mount Bryan township (map).

There is some concern over a remnant stand of Eucalyptus trees (Eucalyptus globulus bicostata) in this area as of April 2008. It seems that this particular stand of trees could be up to 4000 years old. Sandra Kanck (South Australian Democrat MLC) said that the stand of trees is only 20m from one of the proposed turbines. While this stand of E. bicostata is the only one known in South Australia, I believe the species is common in the Otway Ranges in Victoria. It should be quite possible, even easy, for the wind farm to be built around this stand of trees with negligible damage. The developer would be stupid to do otherwise.

On 2009/02/04 I was informed by Tim Knill of AGL that the development plan for this wind farm is with the local council awaiting approval and that AGL hopes to receive approval by the end of March. Conditional upon approval, AGL hopes to begin construction by the end of 2009.






North Brown Hill wind farm

(One of the Hallett group, Hallett #4)

This wind farm is to be constructed about 23km from Hallett (map) and immediately north of the Brown Hill Range wind farm (Hallett #1). Wind Prospect has quite a detailed Net page about the project and you may find information on the project on AGL's site. On 2009/10/20 AGL's site stated "AGL Hallett 4 Wind Farm is currently in construction and due for completion in 2011".

EcoGeneration, 2009/10/12 ran a news article stating that AGL had sold Hallett #4 to the Energy Infrastructure Investments consortium.

North Brown Hill will be the second biggest wind farm in SA (after Lake Bonney, 240MW) and fourth biggest in Australia (Waubra is second at 192MW, Woolnorth third at 140MW).


Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWCompletion due LatLong
Approved and committed632.1132.3Sometime in 2011 S 33.19°E 138.75°

Further data on North Brown Hill
Project costAus$341m
Turbine typeSuzlon S88 V3 2.1MW
Long term average wind speed8.5M/sec.
The information on this table was from AGL's Net site.





Willogoleche Hill wind farm

(One of the Hallett group)

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWConstruction date LatLong
Proposed262.1?54.6?Undecided S 33.41°E 138.84°

About 5km West of Hallett. No company has committed to building this wind farm, but my information is that it is likely to be built.
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Lake Bonney wind farms

In the Southeast of South Australia near Millicent, this wind farm follows a line of stabilised sand dunes parallel to the coast, in a NW-SE direction.

The owner was Babcock and Brown Wind Partners, more recently N.P. Power and Infagen Energy. Combined capacity of the first two stages is 239.5MW and when the third stage is completed the total will be 278.5MW.

Lake Bonney Stage 1 wind farm | Lake Bonney Stage 2 wind farm | Lake Bonney Stage 3 wind farm






Lake Bonney Stage 1 wind farm

This farm is located on the Woakwine Range about 2km from the eastern shore of Lake Bonney, near Millicent. For an interactive map and/or directions to Lake Bonney wind farm go to ExplorOz.

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWCompleted LatLong
Operating461.7580.5March 2005S 37.71° E 140.38°


Canunda/Lake Bonney wind turbines
Wind turbines of Canunda/Lake Bonney


Lake Bonney photos, notes on visiting.

More data on Lake Bonney Stage 1
The project
Capacity factor30.3% net
The resource
Average wind speedMore than 7m/sec. at hub height
The turbines
Turbine typeVestas V66, 1.75MW
Diameter of rotor66m
Blade lengthApprox. 32m
Blade materialFibreglass
Tower height67m
Tower materialSteel
Much of the data in this table came from Miles George of Infigen Energy.





 
Updated 2009/08/29

Lake Bonney Stage 2 wind farm

Owned by Infigen Energy, who have a Net page on the farm.

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWCompleted LatLong
Operating533159September 2008 S 37.81°E 140.41°

This wind farm commenced full commercial operation in September 2008.

More data on Lake Bonney Stage 2
The Project
CostApprox. Aus$400 million
Capacity factorExpected 34%
The resource
Average wind speedMore than 7m/sec. at hub height
The turbines
Turbine typeVestas V90 3MW
Tower height, to hub78m
Tower materialSteel
Rotor diameter90m
Blade lengthApprox. 44m
Blade materialFibreglass
Much of the data in this table came from Miles George of Infigen Energy.
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Updated 2009/08/02

Lake Bonney Stage 3 wind farm

This stage is, like the other two, close to Lake Bonney and is owned by Infagen Energy (who have taken over the business of the old Babcock and Brown Wind Partners).

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWCompleted LatLong
Under construction13349December 2009 S ?°E ?°


ABC on-line news (2008/08/29) reported that "Babcock and Brown [Ingigen Energy] has this week lodged a development application to build a further 13 turbines, eight of which would cross the Wattle Range boundary into the neighbouring local government area" to the Lake Bonney wind farm. (The neighbouring council is Grant, which includes Mount Gambier and Port MacDonnell.)

As of 2009/08/01 the wind farm was under construction. The turbines are Vestas V90 models, 3MW each. The expected capacity factor for this wind farm is 34%.






 
Updated 2009/09/16

Myponga/Sellicks Hill wind farm

Trust Power proposed this wind farm to be built south of Sellicks beach and north of Myponga, near Mount Terrible and Mount Jeffcott, on the Fleurieu Peninsula. Trust Power's Net site seems not to have been updated for a long time.

Summary data
Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWConstruction date LatLong
Approved162.1?33.6?Early 2010 S 35.38°E 138.44°

Shortly after it being reported that construction would start in early 2010 the South Australian Government announced that it has refused to vary major development approval of a wind farm (Trust Power wanted to build taller towers, 110m high). Subsequently Trust Power stated they would drop the project. This all happened in late August, early September 2009.






Mount Millar wind farm

Owned by Transfield Infrastructure Find since December 2007; they have an informative page on it at
http://www.tsinfrastructurefund.com/ infrastructure_assets/mt_millar_wind_farm.htm
An interesting article can also be found on the Eyre Peninsula Tribune site.

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWCompleted LatLong
Operating35270December 2005S 33.63° E 136.68°

One of the Mount Millar wind turbines
One of the Mount Millar wind turbines near Cowell and Cleve, South Australia; at sunset
Mount Millar is a 70MW wind farm in the Cowell-Cleve area of Eyre Peninsula, about 220km NW of Adelaide, as the crow flies. For an interactive map and/or directions to Mount Millar go to ExplorOz.

It is owned by Transfield Services Infrastructure Fund.

This wind farm was previously called Yabmana. It is built along seven kilometres of hill-top roughly between Cowell and Cleve. (It is sign-posted from the Cowell-Cleve road.)

The Eyre Peninsula Tribune, on 14th March 2006, stated that construction of this wind farm started in late 2004 and was completed in December 2005. Power started being generated on February 28th 2006.

This is an interesting and scenic wind farm to visit. Most of the turbines are quite close to a public road along a ridge top with good views over Spencer Gulf.
One of the Mount Millar wind turbines
Some of the Mount Millar wind turbines; late afternoon

You can see more photos of Mount Millar wind farm.

More data on Mount Millar wind farm
Project costAust$130 million
Footings
Footing typeMass
Mass footing rely on their weight to hold the turbine in place,
rather than the alternative of bolting them to the bedrock.
Footing diameter20m
Material in footings40 tonnes of steel and 800t of concrete.
Turbines
Turbine typeEnercon E70
GearingNo gearbox, direct drive, see below
Tower height, to hub85m
Total height to blade tip120m

I wrote to Transfield seeking more information, specifically the annual production and capacity factor of this wind farm, on 13th April 2008, but had received no reply by 2008/04/24.

The Mount Millar wind farm is different to other SA wind farms in that the turbines do not have gear boxes; this, presumably, is why the nacelle of these turbines has a larger diameter than most. A quote from the manufacturer, Enercon...
"The annular generator is of primary importance in the gearless system design of ENERCON wind turbines. Combined with the rotor hub it provides an almost frictionless flow of energy, while the gentle running of fewer moving components guarantees minimal material wear. Unlike conventional asynchronous generators, the ENERCON annular generator is subjected to minimal mechanical wear, which makes it ideal for particularly heavy demands and a long service life.

The ENERCON annular generator is a low-speed synchronous generator with no direct grid coupling. The output voltage and frequency vary with the speed and are converted for output to the grid by a DC link and inverter. This achieves a high degree of speed variability."

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Updated 2009/09/05

Port Augusta wind farm

Also called Lincoln Gap wind farm

Summary data
Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWConstruction date LatLong
Proposed??177Undecided S 32.62°E 137.57°

As of September 2009 this project seems to be in the hands of Infigen Energy who mention it in a pdf file, 'Australian development pipeline'. This file gives the project status as "Initial DA [development application?] received".





 
Updated 2009/06/21

Robertstown wind farm

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW Completion dueLatLong
Proposed35 to 40?3?100 to 120?Undecided Approx. 33.99°139.10°

Robertstown is 50km ESE of Clare, 21km north of Eudunda, and 110km NNE of Adelaide. The viability of this wind farm is under investigation by Tasmania-based Roaring 40s, who have a page on the project. It was earlier reported that this and Stony Gap wind farm were to be extensions of Waterloo wind farm, but in fact Roaring 40s are treating all three as separate projects. I was informed by Chris Chad of Roaring 40s that this wind farm is likely to be similar in installed capacity, or a little smaller, than Waterloo.
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Snowtown wind farm

Also called Barunga wind farm

Stage 1 summary data
Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW First power
to grid
CompletedLatLong
Operating47 2.199March 2008Early September 2008 S 33.73°E 138.11°


Stage 2 summary data
Status# TurbinesConstruction starting
Approvedup to 83Unknown - see below


First turbine at Snowtown
The first turbine of the Snowtown wind farm
2007/12/28
Additional data on Snowtown wind farm
Owner Trust Power Ltd.
OperatorSuzlon
Project costAust$220 million
Expected output350GWh/yr
Greenhouse gas savings345 000t/yr
Turbine typeSuzlon S88-2.1MW
Tower height (to hub)80m
Height to blade tip124m
Rotational speed15 to 17.6RPM
Rotor diameter88m
Speed at blade tip69 to 81m/sec. or 249 to 292km/hr

This farm is west of Snowtown and about 150km north of Adelaide. For an interactive map and/or directions to Snowtown go to ExplorOz.
Turbine and fog
Fog streaming between turbines at Snowtown wind farm
2008/05/05

While TrustPower own this wind farm, the Indian based company Suzlon built it and will operate and maintain the turbines.

The contract calls for a minimum availability of 97%; that is, as I understand it, total turbine/hours of downtime must be no more than 3% of the total turbine/hours in a year.

The wind farm started feeding power into the grid in December 2007 and was officially opened on 2nd November 2008.

Trust Power stated that construction had been delayed because of tough licensing rules brought in by the SA government (which claims to be very pro-renewable energy).

Some of my photos of Snowtown wind farm are on another page.

Further stages

I emailed TrustPower (2008/07/30) requesting information on any proposed expansion of the Snowtown wind farm and received a reply from Clayton Delmarter. He said that they received approval for 130 turbines back in 2004, and I quote him...
"So we can still install 83 turbines under the original approval - we are looking at various layout options, but essentially if you assume the same turbine type (nothing confirmed at this stage) there is around 174MW of capacity left to build out.

We don't know at this stage if we will build this in one hit or have another couple of stages, depends how the numbers stack up - so at this stage we haven't settled on the final turbine type or the construction start date for any expansion but we are working on it!"

A company named Wind Prospect originally planned up to 105 wind turbines each of 2MW.

For email to Wind Prospect, try: admin@windprospect.com.au, for Trust Power try clayton.delmarter@trustpower.co.nz or rodney.ahern@trustpower.co.nz.
 
This section written 2009/08/06

Capacity factor

It was reported (Timaru Herald – Timaru, Canterbury, New Zealand) in early August 2009 that Snowtown wind farm produced 79GWh of electricity in the first quarter (of 2009?) and that this was 13% less than the long-term expectation. From these figures one can calculate that the achieved capacity factor must have been 36.5% and the long-term expectation 41%. Both figures are very good and, if true, indicate that the wind farm must be in an exceptionally good site.


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Starfish Hill wind farm

Owned by Transfield Infrastructure Fund since December 2007; they have an informative site on it at "http://www.tsinfrastructurefund.com/infrastructure_assets/ starfish_hill_wind_farm.htm".

Starfish Hill turbines
Some of the Starfish Hill turbines viewed from Cape Jervis

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWCommissioned LatLong
Operating231.534.5September 2003S 35.57° E 138.16°


Wind turbines at Starfish Hill, Fleurieu Peninsula
Wind turbines silhouetted against the sea at Starfish Hill, Fleurieu Peninsula
This was the first wind farm in South Australia.

It is located across two hills south of Rapid Bay, Starfish and Salt Creek, with 8 turbines on Starfish Hill and 15 on Salt Creek Hill. For an interactive map and/or directions to Starfish Hill go to ExplorOz.

Further data on Starfish Hill wind farm
Project costAust$65 million
Annual productionApprox. 100GWh
Height to turbine hub68m
Height to blade tip100m
Rotor diameter64m

An interesting feature of this wind farm is that the tips of the turbine blades can be rotated independently of the remainder of the blade. This can be used to stop the turbines when needed.

I wrote to Transfield seeking more information, specifically the annual production and capacity factor of this wind farm, on 13th April 2008, but received no reply.

Also on this Net site: Starfish Hill photos, notes on visiting.

When I visited on 2007/03/14 two turbines on Starfish Hill were out of action; all others were operational. I noticed in late January 2009 that three turbines, again on Starfish Hill, were not working; all the others were. This wind farm seems to have serious problems.

Some of the turbines made a strange sound when rotating slowly. After a time I concluded that the turbine blades must be hollow and partly filled with water which cascaded backward and forward as the turbines rotated. When they rotated at full speed the centrifugal force must have been sufficient to keep the water at the far end of the blades and stop the cascading. I have since been informed that it is unlikely that there could be water in the blades, but have heard no other explanation for the strange sound.

Wind turbines at Starfish Hill, SA.
Wind turbines at Starfish Hill, Cape Jervis, South Australia
This was the first South Australian wind farm.





 
Updated 2009/06/21

Stony Gap wind farm

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW Completion dueLatLong
Proposed40 to 45?3?120 to 135?Undecided Approx. 33.82°138.93°

Stony Gap is about 28km east of Clare, 13km east of Farrell Flat, and 126km NNE of Adelaide.

The viability of this wind farm is under investigation by Tasmania-based Roaring 40s, who have a page on the project. It was earlier reported that this and Robertstown wind farm were to be extensions of Waterloo wind farm, but in fact Roaring 40s are treating all three as separate projects. I was informed by Chris Chad of Roaring 40s that this wind farm is likely to be a little larger than Waterloo.

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Updated 2009/06/05

Vincent North wind farm

also known as Sheoak Flat wind farm

Status# TurbinesMWTotal MWConstruction date LatLong
Proposed361.6559.4Undecided Approx. S 34.71°E 137.88°

A Pacific Hydro wind farm at Sheoak Flat between Port Julia and Port Vincent on Yorke Peninsula.

Quoting from the Yorke Peninsula Country Times, 2008/04/15, "Currently the 132kv [power transmission] line serving Yorke Peninsula is at capacity and, until the capacity constraints are resolved and the electricity transmission infrastructure upgraded, this project and others like it are likely to remain on hold." Note that this same problem has stopped the development of Wattle Point Stage 2 wind farm. The SA Government talks big on sustainable energy, but does much less.

Further information on Vincent North wind farm...
The project
Output GWh/yearGreater than 140
Greenhouse gas savingEstimated 145 000t/yr
Project costAus$100 million

The information in this table came from Pacific Hydro.




 
Updated 2009/08/11

Waterloo wind farm

Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MW Completion dueLatLong
Under construction393117? Approx. 33.98°138.92°

 
Waterloo ridge
The Waterloo turbines will be on this ridge
2008/01/17

Waterloo is 20km ENE of Auburn in the Clare Valley and 110km NNE of Adelaide.

Waterloo wind farm is proposed by Tasmania-based Roaring 40s, who have a page on the project.

The turbines are to be along the top of a well defined sharp ridge running parallel to, and four kilometres west of, Tothill Range. The point specified by latitude and longitude in the table above is in the approximate centre of the wind farm and is about 3.5km east of Waterloo. Waterloo is about 30km SE of Clare. Most of the turbines (31) will be spread along a nearly straight line running from six kilometres south of this point to three kilometres north of this point. A second, smaller, group of turbines (8) are to be in another north-south line from seven to ten kilometres north of the point.

Roaring 40s erected a wind monitoring tower in 2002 to investigate the wind potential of the site. Development plans have been approved by the Clare and Gilbert Valleys Council (and, I suppose, by the other council involved as well).

An interesting point about this wind farm is that the turbines are to be 43% bigger than the biggest previously constructed in South Australia; ie. 3MW rather than 2.1MW.

The viability of two other wind farms, Robertstown and Stony Gap, is also under investigation in the same area.

News, 2009/08/07

It was reported by TradingMarkets.com that Danish wind-turbine maker Vestas Wind Systems announced that it will supply 37 units of its V90-3.0MW turbines for this project. Note, 37 turbines, not 39.
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Wattle Point wind farm

 
Wattle Point wind farm location
Wattle Point location
Wattle Point wind farm can be seen in the lower section of this Google-Earth image
A 55-turbine wind farm at Wattle Point near Edithburgh on Yorke Peninsula. Edithburgh is 80km WSW of Adelaide as the crow flies, but about 230km by road around the northern end of St. Vincent Gulf. For an interactive map and/or directions to Wattle Point go to ExplorOz.

The wind farm started operating in the first half of 2005.

The Google-Earth image at the right shows the locations of individual turbines and a number of the access roads.

Summary data, Wattle Point wind farm
Status# TurbinesMW eachTotal MWCompletedLat Long
Operating551.6591May 2005S 35.10° E 137.72°


 
Wattle Point wind farm
Old and new windmills at Wattle Point

Additional data on Wattle Point wind farm
Type of turbineVestas V82
Total area of wind farm11.5 square kilometres
Tower height67m
Blade length40m
Height to blade tip110m
Expected life25 years
Expected annual generation312GWh
312GWh/annum was roughly 2% of South Australia's electricity at the time Wattle Point was built.

The above data were from Research Institute for Sustainable Energy, (RISE).

Wattle Point wind farm
Sunset at Wattle Point wind farm
 

Alinta sold this wind farm to a wholly-owned subsidiary of the ANZ, Energy Infrastructure Trust, in April 2007 for Aus$225m. Energy Infrastructure Trust did not respond to my inquiry regarding the annual electricity output and capacity factor of this wind farm. They may not still own it.

The District Council of Yorke Peninsula has an informative site on Wattle Point wind farm. More photos are at my Wattle Point photos. The photos were taken when I visited in 2005/04/07. I stayed while the sun set. I would recommend to anyone standing in the middle of a wind farm while the sun rose or set; it's almost a spiritual experience. The turbines are the land-bound equivalents of the old sailing ships, graceful, quiet, impressive in their power. See also Of wind turbines and sailing ships.

About two thirds of the turbines were running in the morning of the seventh, when there was a stiff breeze. By the time the photos were taken there was no breeze at ground level, although still enough to keep the turbines going at their greater altitude.




Wattle Point Stage 2 wind farm

Alternatively known as Troubridge Point wind farm

This was proposed to be a 25MW wind farm near the present Wattle Point farm. At least to October 2008 it has not been built. The hold up seems to be the lack of capacity in the transmission lines.

Following an inquiry I sent to the District Council of Yorke Peninsula I received the following by email...

Please be advised that Council have approved of a second wind farm near Wattle Point a couple of years ago, however, the development has not proceeded due to the fact that there is insufficient capacity in the transmission lines to accommodate additional power loadings.

Until such time that there is an extensive up grade to the existing transmission lines, which would cost the state government millions of dollars, the development will not occur.

I trust that this information answers you enquiry.

Regards,
ROGER S BROOKS
ACTING DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT & COMMUNITY SERVICES
District Council of Yorke Peninsula
roger.brooks@yorke.sa.gov.au
www.yorke.sa.gov.au

More recently (October 2008) I have had confirmation from another source (I will not give the name) that the reason this farm was not built was a lack of support by the State Government.

So it seems yet again that a wind farm development that could happen is not going to happen because of lack of the needed government support, in this case, state government support.






 
Updated 2009/09/05

Woakwine Range wind farm

Ecogeneration (Southern Press) published online an article on 2009/08/21 stating that "Infigen Energy has announced plans to develop a 420MW" wind farm at Woakwine. (Infigen Energy owns the nearby Lake Bonney wind farm.) This article stated that "The Woakwine Wind Farm is to be developed in three stages. Stage 1 and 2 are each expected to have a capacity of 120 MW, while Stage 3 is expected to add a further 180 MW." (Infigen have previously used 3MW turbines at Lake Bonney stages 2 and 3, so it seem likely that they will use them again.)

Summary data, Woakwine Range wind farm
Status# TurbinesMWTotal MWConstruction date Lat.Long.
Proposed140?3?420Undecided Approx. S 33.8°E 139.0°

Infigen has a pdf file on its 'Australian development pipeline' that mentions the project.

The power transmission network in the region is already strugling to handle the load from the existing wind farms; it will need substantial development before this project can be brought online.

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World's End wind farm

Status# TurbinesMWTotal MWConstruction date Lat.Long.
Proposed90?2?180Undecided S 33.83°E 139.05°

The Burra Broadcaster published a front page article on 18th August, 2004 stating that a company named Wind Developments Australia Pty. Ltd. were planning to build an 80 to 90 turbine wind farm at World's End (about 15km South of Burra); each turbine being 2MW. The newspaper also stated that construction was expected to take about eight months and the Company hoped to start construction by the end of 2004.

This seems to me one of the least likely of the Mid-North SA wind farms to be built. There is no evidence that I know of for any action at all on the project, and I have been told by someone in a position to know that the turbine sites are inappropriate for efficient operation.

Allco Financial Services listed this as one of their projects. Allco, in severe financial difficulties, called in administrators in November 2008.
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Updated 2009/10/05

Other proposed wind farms

In addition to those detailed above many others wind farms are proposed (table below), but I have been unable to find anything about when, if ever, these are likely to be constructed. Information concerning these would be appreciated, my email address is at the top of this page.

If and when any of these proposed wind farms look likely to be built I will write them up in more detail.

Until a wind farm gets at least to the point where an application for approval has been submitted to the relevant authority it may be little more than wishful thinking and is not worth covering in more detail than that below.



RegionWind FarmProposerMWStatus
Eyre Peninsula Elliston Stage 1
(Tungketta Hill)
Ausker Energies & ANZ Infrastructure Services 55Planning approved
Elliston Stage 2 As above65Planning approved
Lake Hamilton/SheringaHydro Tasmania110 Feasibility
Sheringa Beach Ausker Energies100Feasibility
UleyBabcock and Brown and National Power160Feasibility
Fleurieu Peninsula Kemmis HillOrigin Energy   
Waitpinga Waitpinga Wind Farm P.L.  
South East AllendaleAcciona Energy 47Application lodged
KongorongStanwell Corporation 30Feasibility
Mount BensonBabcock and Brown National Power130Feasibility
Lake GeorgeBabcock and Brown National Power120Feasibility
Robe WindRobe Wind. Proposed by a group of 30 farmers 600?Proposed Jan. 2009
Unknown Weymouth HillMeridian Energy and
Wind Farm Development
  
For links to developers see Wind farm businesses
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Visiting SA wind-farms


As of December 2007 I have visited, or attempted to visit, all eight South Australian wind farms that are at least partly built. Below are some notes on local accommodation, accessibility, photographing possibilities, etc. I will list them in alphabetical order. (Lake Bonney has been listed with Canunda because these two, independently owned and operated, wind farms are contiguous and it is not easy to see where one finishes and the other starts.)

Wind farms in this section
(Locality)

Brown Hill Range (Hallett)
Canunda (Millicent)
Cathedral Rocks (Port Lincoln)
Lake Bonney (Millicent)
Mount Millar (Cleve/Cowell)
Snowtown
Starfish Hill (Cape Jervis)
Wattle Point (Edithburgh)

All wind farm turbines in SA are on private land. While you can often get quite close to some turbines via public roads, there will be others that cannot be approached except by crossing private land.

In my experience most farmers are very reasonable and will not object if you walk onto a property a short distance from a boundary fence, leave gates as you find them, are considerate of livestock, and do not go near sheds or homesteads without asking permission. I suggest not driving onto private land without permission. Most land-owners would prefer you to ask permission before entering on their land at all, but it is very often difficult to know who owns what land and where he/she lives. If you meet anyone, politely explain what you are doing.

I would appreciate information that would allow me to improve this section, for example, further information on local accommodation options.


Visiting Brown Hill Range wind farm, Hallett

Brown Hill Range dawn
As of January 2008 the lower half of all towers were erected and 23 turbines were completed.

Location

On a north/south trending ridge about 15km east of Hallett.

Accommodation

Possibly a hotel at Hallett. There is a caravan and camping park as well as hotel, a motor inn, and numerous cottages in Burra, 33km south of Hallett. Mount Bryan has a hotel that provided accommodation, about 20km south of Hallett. There are hotel/motels and at least one caravan park at Jamestown, which is about 20km north-west of the wind farm site.

Accessibility

Either to Booborowie then north, or Hallett and then the Jamestown road, or Jamestown, then the Hallett road. The site is southwest of 'Old Canowie' homestead on the Jamestown-Hallett road. Only unsealed roads go close to the site. At least three unsealed public roads cross the ridge on which the wind farm is located. All of these connect with the unsealed road that goes from 'Old Canowie' to Booborowie.

Photography notes

The best views available from public roads would be from the unsealed roads that cross the ridge. To go onto the private roads one should arrange permission from Suzlon (try telephoning 0448 871 875) or one of the land owners.



Visiting Canunda and Lake Bonney, wind farms, Millicent

Millicent wind turbines Canunda and Lake Bonney Stage one are fully operational, Lake Bonney Stage two is under construction (as of mid-2007).

Location

South and west of Millicent in the South East of South Australia

Accommodation

Millicent is the closest large town. It has varied accommodation including hotel(s), motel(s), a good caravan park with cabins. Dogs are permitted in the caravan park.

Accessibility

Good, mainly unsealed, roads pass around and through the two wind farms.

Photography notes

This is one of the most photogenic of SA's wind farms. The many vantage points afforded by the several roads around the wind farms give lots of opportunities. The turbines are on a low ridge and there are views over the nearby Lake Bonney in places. If you want to cross any of the private land you will need to decide for yourself how you go about it.



Visiting Cathedral Rocks wind farm, Port Lincoln

Fully operational

Location

On the south coast of Eyre Peninsula, about 20km south of Port Lincoln

Accommodation

Port Lincoln is one of South Australia's largest provincial cities, is a tourist destination, and has plentiful and varied accommodation, including hotels, motels, home-stays, b&bs, and camping grounds.

Accessibility

You cannot get closer than 10km or so to Cathedral Rocks without crossing private land.

Photography notes

The lack of accessibility makes Cathedral Rocks the least photographable wind farm of all those in SA. The turbines can just be seen from the top of Winter's Hill, Port Lincoln, but you would need a good telephoto lens to get a mediocre photo.



Visiting Mount Millar wind farm, Cowell-Cleve

Mount Millar wind farm
Fully operational

Location

In the hills between Cowell and Cleve on northern Eyre Peninsula

Accommodation

Caravan parks at Cowell, motels at Cowell and Cleve.

Accessibility

Sealed road part way from either Cleve or Cowell, then unsealed roads. Roughly equal distances from either of these towns (25-30km).

Photography notes

There is only one road well placed for photographing; it runs most of the length of the wind farm and is very close to some of the turbines. The turbines are on the top of one of the highest ridges in the area, the land is mostly cleared but there is some scrub. There is a viewing area very close to the base of one turbine.
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Visiting Snowtown wind farm

Operating

Location

On the range of hills west of Lochiel and Snowtown about 130km north of Adelaide on the Port Augusta road

Accommodation

Motel at Lochiel. Hotel and caravan park at Snowtown.

Accessibility

Photography notes




Visiting Starfish Hill wind farm

Starfish Hill with sea mist
Some of the Starfish Hill turbines with a sea mist
 
Wind turbines at Starfish Hill, Fleurieu Peninsula
Starfish Hill turbines - these on Salt Creek Hill - silhouetted against Saint Vincent Gulf
Fully operational

Location

At the south-western end of Fleurieu Peninsula, between Cape Jervis and Second Valley

Accommodation

Caravan park at Second Valley (allows dogs), cabins at Sunset Cove Resort, holiday units at Cape Jervis.

Accessibility

Sealed road then unsealed roads from Cape Jervis and Second Valley. There is a viewing area very close to the base of one turbine. The turbines are on two ridges - the higher is Starfish Hill, the lower is Salt Creek Hill - overlooking Saint Vincent Gulf. The two hills are accessed from separate unsealed roads running off the main (sealed) Cape Jervis road.

Photography notes

There are 8 turbines on Starfish hill and 15 on Salt Creek Hill. Starfish hill provides the best photographic opportunities from near the roads. Trees can provide a useful foreground on Salt Creek Hill. The Salt Creek turbines can be silhouetted against the sea if you photograph from Starfish Hill. Sea-mists can give a useful atmosphere.



Visiting Wattle Point wind farm

Wattle Point wind turbines
Fully operational

Location

A few kilometres south-west of Edithburgh on the southern extremity of Yorke Peninsula

Accommodation

Caravan parks at Edithburgh and Coobowie. Hotel and motel at Edithburgh. Cabin/units at both Edithburgh and Coobowie.

Accessibility

Sealed road to Edithburgh, then several unsealed roads pass through the wind farm, which is on flat ground.

Photography notes

The topography is flat, but various shrubs, trees and wind-pumps can provide useful foregrounds.



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Power interconnectors

Several interconnectors (high capacity high voltage long distance power lines) have been built between SA and the eastern states over the last few years. Their purpose was mainly to import power into SA, but if the proposed generation capacity is developed then these interconnectors could be used for exportation of green power from SA to the eastern states. To July 2009 no long-distance power transmission line has been built in Australia specifically for renewable energy.

ConnectorOwner/Manager CapacityConnection Points
HeywoodElectraNet SA 500MW import
300MW export
Lower SE SA to Portland Vic.
Murray-LinktransEnergie 200MWRedcliff Vic. to Monash SA
Proposed
SA-NSW Interconnector (SNI) 1
NEMCO ??
Proposed
SA-NSW Interconnector (SNI) 2
Transgrid ?SA/NSW border to Robertstown via Monash

Connectors (extracted from Beyond Logic and elsewhere) are listed in the table above.




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The big blow of 2005/01/03 (3rd Jan. 2005)

At the date above there was a very destructive wind in the Port Pirie/Crystal Brook/Red Hill area. From the large number of trees blown down I estimated that it was similar in strength to two previous very damaging winds; one about 1980 and the other around 1999. I wondered if there would be any likelihood of such a wind damaging wind turbines.

Ken Jack of Stanwell (the proposers of Barn Hill wind farm, Red Hill - Wandearah area) kindly informed me of the wind velocities that he recorded. As some wind farm operators treat their wind velocity records as confidential, it would be unfair for me to publish the exact figure here. However, I can say that the strongest gust was well below the sort of wind that might be expected to bring down a wind turbine.






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News

This section was added August 2007.
I intend to add interesting bits of information that come my way from time to time.

2009/06/04

The SA Government stated that it planned to increase the state's renewable energy target to 33% by the year 2020. However, Greens MP Mark Parnell criticised the government for not writing the target into legislation.

2009/02/03

There was a fire in one of the Cathedral Rocks turbines. ABC On-line news reported that the fire was seen from a nearby boat at 1am (third Feb.) Damages have been estimated at $6 million. It seems the fire has not spread to nearby scrub.





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On this page...
Allendale wind farm
Barn Hill wind farm
Barunga wind farm
Big blow of 3rd Jan 05
Bluff Range wind farm
Brown Hill Range wind farm
Canunda wind farm
Capacities of conventional power stations
Carmodys Hill wind farm
Cathedral Rocks wind farm
Clements Gap wind farm
Collaby Hill wind farm
Colour coding for wind farm status-Table
Contents
Coober Pedy wind turbine
Elliston Stage 1 wind farm
Elliston Stage 2 wind farm
Future of wind power
Generation duration for SA wind-Graph
Green Point wind farm
Growth of the SA wind industry
Gulnare wind farm
Hallett #1
Hallett #2
Hallett #3
Hallett #4
Hallett Hill wind farm
Hallett_Map
Hallett wind farms
Installed wind power in SA
Installed wind power, by wind farm-Table
Introduction
Kemmis Hill wind farm
Kongorong wind farm
Lake Bonney Stage 1 wind farm
Lake Bonney Stage 2 wind farm
Lake Bonney Stage 3 wind farm
Lake Bonney wind farms
Lake George wind farm
Lake Hamilton-Sheringa wind farm
Lincoln Gap wind farm
Monthly wind farm generation in SA-Graph
Mount Benson wind farm
Mount Millar wind farm
Mt Bryan wind farm
Myponga-Sellicks Hill wind farm
News
North Brown Hill wind farm
Operational SA wind farms-Graph
Other proposed wind farms
Port Augusta wind farm
Power interconnectors
Robertstown wind farm
Sheoak Flat wind farm
Sheringa Beach wind farm
Snowtown wind farm
South Australian wind farms
Starfish Hill wind farm
Stony Gap wind farm
Top
Troubridge Point wind farm
Uley wind farm
Vincent North wind farm
Visiting Brown Hill Range wind farm
Visiting Canunda wind farm
Visiting Cathedral Rocks wind farm
Visiting Lake Bonney wind farm
Visiting Mount Millar wind farm
Visiting SA wind-farms
Visiting Snowtown wind farm
Visiting Starfish Hill wind farm
Visiting Wattle Point wind farm
Waitpinga wind farm
Waterloo wind farm
Wattle Point Stage 2 wind farm
Wattle Point wind farm
Weymouth Hill wind farm
Willogoleche Hill wind farm
Wind energy contribution to SA power
Wind farm generation
Wind farms by region
Wind output at high demand periods-Graph
Wind power in SA
Woakwine Range wind farm
Worlds End wind farm
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