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M50 : NEW LOOK SAME PROTECTION 

 

An order was passed for non-deployable Marines at Marine Corps Base Hawaii to be issued the new M50 Joint Service General Purpose gas masks by Dec 5. Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical has been exchanging older gas masks for the newer model as supply limits to make the deadline.

Testing of the M50 at the base gas chamber started Dec. 2, under Sgt. William W. Patnode, Headquarters Battalion Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear chief.

Patnode instructs his class by giving observers a realistic combat-orientated view on CBRN situations.

“My standpoint on training to use the new gas mask is that Marines need to be prepared for real life situations,” Patnode said. “ I want them to remember how to react to scenarios, not remember that they fell asleep during another class or important exercise.”

First, Patnode describes the signs, symptoms, treatments and reactions over time from different CBRN agents on the human body and the protective gear issued.

The mission oriented protective posture suit is utilized in the training and taught to be worn correctly at level 4, the highest level that requires all gear to be used.

Afterwards the feature of new mask are summarized and its benefits. These include: a larger field of vision, improved protection from radiological hazards, new drinking tube design, ambidextrous canisters, light weight construction, self-sealing valve for filter exchange in a contaminated environment, improved speech capabilities and breathing resistance reduction.

More advantages of the M50 are being tested and Marines are addressing concerns, such as corrosion in the voice emitter interface, with their own remedies.           

“Dial electric grease is good to keep handy to fight corrosion,” Patnode said.

Once inside the gas chamber, Patnode has the Marines test the seal with various active movements, practice manipulating the filters on their buddies’ mask , and eventually break the seal and recover the mask to its full capabilities. On the first run there were no complications.

“I think the new mask is much easier to clear,” said Cpl. Meagan Larocca, blotters clerk, Military Police Department. “The old mask always seemed to get in a little gas.”

Instruction will endure for awaiting Marines and the improved advantages of the M50 will continue to be discovered. Patnode urges Marines in possession of the M50 now to practice with the filters on their own to break them in to be prepared for actual exercises.

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MCB HAWAII-Using a blowtorch, Sgt. William W. Patnode, Headquarters Battalion, Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear chief, activates o-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile gas, more commonly known as CS gas, during a Field Protective Mask Confidence Exercise using the newly issued M50 Joint Service General Purpose gas masks at the base gas chamber Dec. 2., Sgt. Mark Fayloga, 12/2/2009 5:31 AM
MCB HAWAII-Using a blowtorch, Sgt. William W. Patnode, Headquarters Battalion, Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear chief, activates o-Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile gas, more commonly known as CS gas, during a Field Protective Mask Confidence Exercise using the newly issued M50 Joint Service General Purpose gas masks at the base gas chamber Dec. 2., Sgt. Mark Fayloga, 12/2/2009 5:26 AM
MCB HAWAII-Lt. Col. Aaron B. Holland, director, Facilities Department, listens to the instructions of Sgt. William W. Patnode, Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear chief, Headquarters Battalion, near the end of training during a Field Protective Mask Confidence Exercise at the base gas chamber Dec. 2. The required annual training helps Marines gain confidence in thier ability to use the protective mask. The chamber Dec. 2 was the first time many of the Marines trained with the new M50 Joint Service General Purpose gas mask., Sgt. Mark Fayloga, 12/2/2009 5:14 AM
MCB HAWAII-Maj. Cedric C. Bevis, officer-in-charge, Communications and Information Systems Directorate, is assisted by Maj. Dennis J. Kaskovich, deputy provost marshal, Provost Marshal’s Office, as a new part of the Field Protective Mask Confidence Exercise at the base gas chamber Dec. 2. Marines using the M50 Joint Service General Purpose mask now have to remove a partner’s canister in the chamber as part of the training. The M50 has a canister on both sides and automatically seals when one is removed, allowing Marines to change out old canisters while in a contaminated environment., Sgt. Mark Fayloga, 12/2/2009 5:06 AM
MCB HAWAII-Marines from Headquarters Battalion practice placing and removing canisters during a Field Protective Mask Confidence Exercise using the newly issued M50 Joint Service General Purpose gas masks at the base gas chamber Dec. 2., Sgt. Mark Fayloga, 12/2/2009 4:07 AM
MCB HAWAII-Sgt. William W. Patnode, Headquarters Battalion, Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear chief, teaches Marines about the various equipment used in CBRN and what each marker means during a Field Protective Mask Confidence Exercise using the newly issued M50 Joint Service General Purpose gas masks at the base gas chamber Dec. 2., Marine Corps Sgt. Mark Fayloga, 12/2/2009 3:41 AM
MCB HAWAII-Sgt. William W. Patnode, Headquarters Battalion, Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear chief, explains the various methods for counteracting chemical agents to Marines during a Field Protective Mask Confidence Exercise using the newly issued M50 Joint Service General Purpose gas masks at the base gas chamber Dec. 2., Sgt. Mark Fayloga, 12/2/2009 3:11 AM