BBC iPlayer use, in beautiful graphics

Want to get a visual version of BBC iPlayer use? Try this

From CXO, an online magazine for chief execs and other "chief" things, comes this rather wonderful graphic. Small version here, but click it for the large one.

There's also an interview with John Linwood, the BBC's chief technology officer, by CXO.


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  • xiaosi xiaosi

    1 Dec 2009, 12:26AM

    I'm sure I'm being baited but I just can't help myself: those 'beautiful' pink discs are actually way misleading.

    Take a look at 'how the iplayer is being used' section. Does the disc representing 7% look around a tenth the size of the one representing 85%?

    No?

    area = pi * radius squared

    Ignore the squaring and you are off by a clear order of magnitude in this case.

    Google Charts can show you how it should look - as if you even care.

    I guess the arty kids were too busy doodling in the back of their maths books to pay attention.

    *pushes his NHS specs up, puts his graphical calculator away and waddles off*

  • Ashley5 Ashley5

    2 Dec 2009, 10:45PM

    Take a look at 'how the iplayer is being used' section. Does the disc representing 7% look around a tenth the size of the one representing 85%?

    No?

    area = pi * radius squared

    Ignore the squaring and you are off by a clear order of magnitude in this case.

    hey xiasi i couldn't help but notice the mistake you have made about the circle sizes. you are correct in saying that the area of a circle is pi x radius squared but in this case they have just changed the radius. as you can see the 7% circle looks as though it would fit just over 10 times across the 85% circle.

  • xiaosi xiaosi

    3 Dec 2009, 11:43AM

    @Ashley5

    Yeah, I'd noticed they'd done exactly that -- and it's misleading. The classic How To Lie With Statistics (chapter 6) by Darrell Huff tells you all about the dangers of representing values with 2D images.

    The point is that the eye will naturally judge the relative sizes of the values by the area of the circles and not their radius. When the differences are biggish, e.g. comparing 85% to 7% then we are looking at a difference between:

    7 / 85 = 8.2%
    and
    7^2 / 85^2 = 0.7%
    i.e, a difference of over 10 times.

    *puts the slide rule away and buggers off*

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